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* Posts by Adam 1

624 posts • joined 7 May 2012

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DREADNOUGHTUS: The 65-TON DINO that could crumple up a T-Rex like a paper cup

Adam 1
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Re: Wow!

Still too frightened to go near the snakes and spiders in Australia though.

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Scared of brute force password attacks? Just 'GIVE UP' says Microsoft

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Re: So basically, MS says ...

>... clueless idiots running MS products are clueless?

That statement may be true *cough* TIFKAM *cough*, sorry had to clear my throat.

What was I saying? That's right, I think you missed the point. If say A! Company! Whose! Name! I! Will! Redact! So! As! Not! To! Embarrass! Them! stores your super duper unbreakable "wrong unicorn paperclip capacitor" password in clear text then it is compromised.

BTW, congratulations reg; nice click bait :)

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Good luck with Project Wing, Google. This drone moonshot is NEVER going to happen

Adam 1
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Re: Why?

> but what does Google get out of it?

I can't imagine any reason at all why Google would be interested in being paid to collect a continuous feed of low altitude high resolution images of populated areas....

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China: You, Microsoft. Office-Windows 'compatibility'. You have 20 days to explain

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>Could be talking about wine on Linux (or what the Chinese are planning for an "own" OS)

I believe that theory is credible.

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Adam 1
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>If you own both the OS and the application, it is possible to make the OS work for the application.

As a generalisation I agree, but this would hold more water if it was say windows media player being able to use hidden optimisations to improve framerates or reduce battery drain, or SQL server getting some unique filesystem priority levels not adhered to for other dbms, but we are taking about a productivity suite. If you think about its limited technical requirements, there isn't a whole lot of ways to cripple their APIs that would benefit Office without the commensurate disadvantage to other products Microsoft need to maintain a viable desktop ecosystem.

In terms of their Corel lawsuits that was quite a different story. The windows API was under active development and decisions could be made to drop or otherwise make specific calls suboptimal, and they could publicise them late in the development cycle for Corel for maximum interruptions and to give their own products an advantage. Completely unacceptable behaviour if true. But in 2014 I can easily write** an office competitor using Win API, .NET or Java and achieve a level of functionality and performance that Microsoft would prefer wasn't possible.

** actually, I couldn't, lacking the will, money, patience and expertise to undertake a project at that scale, but the point is that no magic API would ms office a measurable advantage.

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Adam 1
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I may be a bit slow, but as a developer I am struggling to think of any office feature that requires anything resembling a secret undocumented API call. The inputs are all keyboard, mouse and filesystem calls. The outputs are all canvases (screen/printer). The functionality whilst broad in reach with a feature set as long as your arm is not complex at any functional point that I can see.

It is fair enough to criticise their not so open document formats but this argument about hidden APIs doesn't seem to hold a lot of water.

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Chumps stump up $1 MEELLLION for watch that doesn't exist

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Re: Kickstarter space shot

Too late. Half of them are already there.

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If you think 3D printing is just firing blanks, just you wait

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Re: Something for the weekend?

^ what he said + on a mobile device.

And off to the patent office for me too.

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NASA to reformat Opportunity rover's memory from 125 million miles away

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Re: Dust removal

>As for wipers I suspect they didn't want to scratch the cell surfaces which is what wipers in a dry dusty environment will inevitably do.

Maybe it could just find some water then use that. Two birds and the rest.

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Too slow with that iPhone refresh, Apple: Android is GOBBLING up US mobile market

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Re: Seeing as Android is a (1) malware magnet (2) blatant iOS ripoff (3) fragmented mess…

It's a phone, dude.

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Dual boot option? I would love to see a touch enabled version of grub.

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Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies

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Re: Fail. Fail. Fail.

So your saying there's a chance.

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Oz fed police in PDF redaction SNAFU

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BUT, er Team Australia!

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Raspberry Pi B+: PHWOAR, get a load of those pins

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> dubs it "Revision 3" of the B – rather than an updated version.

I think I will wait for Revision 3.14 myself.

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Intelligence blunder: You wanna be Australia's spyboss? No problem, just walk right in

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Re: That's not how it works

For what purpose was he granted security access other than his employment contract defining his responsibilities in such a way that he is permitted?

That is not to say they need to delete his identity records or confiscate his cards but a process wasn't followed. In this case it appears benign but they need to look at how this happened to avoid future cases where it is not 5 days and the contract is not being renewed.

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Adam 1
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Re: Alternative story if it worked

Or ASIS reports best ever productivity figures after management unable to interrupt for a week.

Seriously though, it would be entirely appropriate to deny access under such a case and failure to reject access should be seen for the security lapse it could have been. Who else "can't access" their systems?

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Bright lights, affordable motor: Ford puts LED headlights onto Mondeo

Adam 1
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Any suggestion about what this does to the repair costs if they get busted in an accident? (Even if you don't plan on having one, it is one of the factors that goes into the spreadsheet to figure out your insurance premiums so it still matters)

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China hopes home-grown OS will oust Microsoft

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Re: New user interface ...

I have no clue what you guys are saying.

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Best shot: Coffee - how do you brew?

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Re: I'm a Nespresso fan

I love a fresh ground coffee too, but I always found myself in a bit of a dilemma*. There is frankly too much faffing about to grind, warm the machine, clean all the tampers, filters, jugs and steam wands to make it worthwhile before work. So it used to be a weekend treat for me to make it. The problem is that anything pre ground would go stale well before it was used and I wasn't as happy with the el cheapo grinder which was too course for my preference.

I ended up buying a nespresso because it gave me something quite tolerable with the convenience of instant. I won't pretend it is the best drop that I have ever had but it is better than more than a couple of "baristas" have given me over the years.

*first world problem, I know

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Microsoft: We plan to CLEAN UP this here Windows Store town

Adam 1
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Re: why

> Why on God's green Earth does someone, anyone, actually want to run _iTunes_ on a _Windows device_?

Apple must think that their customers are too stupid to get music and video onto their iThings using copy paste like the rest of the world.

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Re: Hello pot, this is kettle...

> There is one and is called "Windows Installer"

Windows installer is not the best by any stretch, but that is largely irrelevant to this discussion because we are taking about repositories not installers. An installer is not fundamentally much more than a way to check for prerequisites, stop services and to copy a few files around.

An uninstaller is just another application which in theory reverses the process*

There are some important features of an app store not covered by windows installer.

- locating an application for a given purpose.

- visibility of user ratings and popularity

- being sure of the legitimacy of the download link

- buying it.

- knowing about and receiving updates, service packs or hot fixes.

As it stands in the windows world, you get each vendor coming up with their own half baked update mechanisms. Half the time they don't work (HP/Intel), and the others are a mixture of annoying popups every few days (Java), trying to sneak other software in during a supposed update (anything Apple). There are a couple of not to bad ones (notepad++) but they are few and far between. It just doesn't make a lot of sense to compare a store with an installation mechanism.

*unless you are Symantec where it is purely cosmetic.

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Adam 1
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Re: Hello pot, this is kettle...

>It means you can go to a single place to get all your updates,

Is that like how you can upgrade from windows 8 to 8.1 by going to the store and pressing download, and how you don't need to go to windows update to download all the windows 8 patches first? Oh wait...

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Memory troubling you, Android? Surprise! Another data slurp vuln uncovered

Adam 1
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Re: I do not install anything asking for this permission

>The noble idea of app permissions is flawed by not being able to revoke them individually at install time or afterwards.

It would be a good start to be able to eliminate search results in play store by requested permissions.

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Tesla: YES – We'll build a network of free Superchargers in Oz

Adam 1
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Re: Greenies

Tassie has a small population and a struggling economy. Hydro everywhere which would be a plus. SA has a lot of wind power and is a much bigger market.

Between Sydney and Melbourne would give pretty close to half the country's population, the main downside is that Victoria has some of the dirtiest power generators around so any Tesla sold down there would be worse than a large SUV for CO2. Plus a large amount of that capacity will be sold off cheap now some smelters have closed down.

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RealVNC distances itself from factories, power plants, PCs hooked up to password-less VNC

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Re: Legality ?

>When there is no password set, VNC simply connects and shows the desktop. It is therefore available to the general public in exactly the same way that a public website is.

An unlocked car whilst foolish is not an invitation to hop in. An open front door is not an invitation to wander in and take a photo.

I suspect that the researchers are probably (in the IANAL sort of way) OK to establish a connection to these computers, but taking a screenshot is both unnecessary from their research point of view and moves well into privacy violation territory.

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How to marry malware to software downloads in an undetectable way (Hint: Please use HTTPS)

Adam 1
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Re: Ooohhhh! A terrible attack is available in the lab !

Whilst it can be defeated by HTTPS, that isn't really the ideal technology to transfer large files because it limits proxy servers' ability to serve those downloads. The server is also then encrypting each packet in the file with the session key which is even more overhead. Publishing the sha256 hash of the download is much more efficient. The main problem is that if you can intercept the file download it is trivial to intercept and change the page with the expected hash. That page could be delivered over https.

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Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer

Adam 1
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Apple are terrific at many aspects of industrial design. The mouse is not one of those aspects. I am sorry but how long did it take before there was a right click option; and even then it was the right click when you are not having a right click, like someone philosophically opposed to such buttons saying well if you make me put one on then fine but there is no way my mighty mouse will have any visual cue to show where that button is.

And finally, the puck mouse! Not only the worst design of anything in the history of the world but it had a cord; meaning that the poor soul who had just been driven mad trying to use it was at high risk of using it to strangle someone.

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Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows

Adam 1
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Re: Standard Windows timings

>Windows 8.x seems to improve this though, grabbing and applying updates post-install seems to be much improved

Funny thing is that my memory of installing 8.1 involved first applying about 1GB of update patches before it would let me download the upgrader itself (only available via their windows store BTW) which then proceeded to basically blow away and replace with new versions all of those files it had just demanded be installed.

Incidentally, I don't remember win 7 taking as long as OP suggests. Maybe I spent too long many years ago fighting each machine that was loaded with either 2k or 98 where upon install you had to find another machine with net access to find your network drivers before you could find your video drivers so you could get out of 640*480 mode... fun days (and at the time Linux wasn't much better; the initial install was seamless in comparison but there was always something that would take days to get working.)

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Time to ditch HTTP – govt malware injection kit thrust into spotlight

Adam 1
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Re: Possible solution?

>The Server could encrypt pages using a user-provided Public Key.

Sure could. How do you validate that the server you sent the public key to is the right one? A malicious server could substitute your public key with its own, talk to the real server, decrypt the website, then re encrypt it with your public key and you are none the wiser.

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Revealed ... GCHQ's incredible hacking tool to sweep net for vulnerabilities: Nmap

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Re: Misdirection

>nmapping the internet is a fast way of attracting attention, no matter how stealthy you might think you are.

You are right, but I highly doubt that the port scan is happening directly. They would already have a botnet which would do their dirty work.

/applies tin foil

I am sure when they managed to take over the cryptolocker C&C servers they just shut them down without pushing their own malware into hundreds of thousands of machines.

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Brits' BORKED Samsung kit held up after repair centre slips into administration

Adam 1
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Re: Pop goes Samsung's glossy image.

A fair comment. My recent experience was the opposite. Bought a new HP ultra book which refused to activate. Went through the reset my PC (that is the new lingo for reloading the original image) to no avail so I connected to their web support portal thing. They* were utterly useless and just kept advising to reset the PC to see if it fixed it. The third technician to get involved even offered to "generously" post out a recovery DVD (all I needed to do was buy an external drive).

It wasn't until the local outsourced repair company got involved that the problem was fixed (and they actually turned up when they said and returned phone calls). The difference was night and day. So I guess YMMV.

*Yes I know the web support is also an outsourced company.

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What's in your toolbox? Why the browser wars are so last decade

Adam 1
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Re: Fiddler2 is a useful tool

It is very useful, but now it is owned by teleric it is only a matter of time before it is EA-ified.

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Wetsuits, sunshine, bikini babes and a competitive streak: Epyx California Games

Adam 1
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These guys owe me a joystick after the control schemes they came up with.

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Password manager LastPass goes titsup: Users LOCKED OUT

Adam 1
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You must be new here. Hi, I am Adam 1.

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Japanese boffins invent 4.4 TREEELLION frames per second camera

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Re: We're gonna need a bigger hard drive...

>how is that kind of bandwidth possibly handled?

I imagine frame to frame compression would be amazingly effective at that frame rate.

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Adam 1
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Re: We're gonna need a bigger hard drive...

How long before this technology is used to film cats?

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DIME for your TOP SECRET thoughts? Son of Snowden's crypto-chatter client here soon

Adam 1
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Re: Pete 2 One Tip...

>Once the sender and/or recipient are identified they can simply move to either a warranted search

I have no problems with Spook's executing warranted searches with proper oversight (like a judge). It is the wide scale untargetted fishing expeditions that grossly invade the privacy of everyone where I disagree. If we are going to start (continue?) to track everything about everyone then we put in place the key infrastructure needed by a police state. You had better make sure that the risks and substantial costs are worth it...

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CryptoLocker victims offered free key to unlock ransomed files

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Re: It was inevitable.

>Cracked, hacked, decrypted, recovered keys, i dont give a monkeys HOW it was done. But it was..

Thief 1: We managed to crack the uber secure super vault.

Thief 2: Awesome! But how? We have been trying for years without success. Even the cops and even three letter agencies haven't been able to get in! That is a game changer. Can you describe how you did it?

Thief 1: We found a spare set of keys in the wife's handbag.

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Australia's metadata debate is an utter shambles

Adam 1
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Re: Abbott is a complete and utter incompetent

explained his plan to attack the youth unemployment issue on regional centres by funding training and apprenticeship programmes as well as university scholarships and business incentives to come on board, financed by phasing out tax concessions to superannuation income over $200000.

(No, he didn't suggest this, but I surely proved you could be surprised by the end of that sentence)

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Adam 1
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Re: Meta-data

Or some dope working for a three letter agency is going to fail to understand how the internet works and therefore think you visited such a site when all you wanted was the phone number of a dentist.

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Help Australia's PM and attorney-general to define metadata

Adam 1
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Re: Brandis

I laughed out loud literally after watching that interview with David Speers. Then I remembered that this is our AG so now I am just depressed.

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Operators get the FEAR as Ofcom proposes 275% hike in mobile spectrum fees

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Re: Honestly

I didn't but that's OK because someone else did.

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It's official: You can now legally carrier-unlock your mobile in the US

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Re: Ironic

Or to be able to use the phone while overseas without the extortionate roaming charges (especially for data).

Even if they do want to root their phone, why is that a problem? The vendor can refuse a warranty claim if the problem can be shown to be caused by the rooting process. Piracy is a problem with or without this law. The piracy problem was not solved for the 18 months when it was banned so why would it be solved if the ban remained in place.

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Google's mysterious floating techno barge SOLD FOR SCRAP

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Re: I always figured the plan was:

I think that was the original thinking but they discovered they didn't need to do steps 1,2 or 3

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Pentagon hacker McKinnon can't visit sick dad for fear of extradition

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Re: re:- " Brits don't like us because we don't use the letter U in every second word..."

> Admittedly the US did turn up - late both times - but only after agreements which effectively neutered the resolve of the "Brit's", and then only to protect US economic expansion.

Hmmm. Normally it is the residents of the land of the free that I seem to encounter who don't seem to know their own history but love to point out the failures of others.

While yes, the US took a long time to realise that an isolationist position was untenable, I suspect that a certain nation behaving like dicks in the Ukraine at the moment might offer a slightly different viewpoint about the length of time taken to open up the western front. The alliance with Stalin was never more than that of a common enemy and from a British point of view it was preferable for the Nazi and communists to be killing each other than to become another Spain.

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Russia to SAP, Apple: Hand over source code to prove you're not spies

Adam 1
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If only there was an operating system that could run on commodity hardware where the source code and complete build chain were open source....

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Recording lawsuit targets Ford, GM in-car CD recorders

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>And Apple with their Itunes and Ipod with integral hard drive that has a facility to store a complete CD in a lossless format from my home collections of CD's are not included in the law suit because?

Simples! Those record companies are just waiting to be sued. Have you not seen the round corners on the typical CD? Has a CD never stopped working because you were holding it wrong? Apple have them over a barrel!

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FREE PARTY for TEN lucky Australian Reg readers

Adam 1
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Re: Limericks

>we do have some interesting town names like

Additionally there are complex abbreviation rules. You can call Wagga Wagga Wagga; but you can't call Woy Woy Woy.

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CAPTCHA challenges you to copy pointillist painter Seurat's classic

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Re: Another Tech That Should Die

I completely agree with Jake.

/WTF JUST HAPPENED

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