Feeds

* Posts by Adam 1

598 posts • joined 7 May 2012

Page:

Ten years on, TEN PER CENT of retailers aren't obeying CAN-SPAM

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Apple being the biggest spammer ever

Be reasonable! Apart from trying to scam you out of your life savings, what has spam ever done to you? They may be bad, but there is no need to liken then to distributors of u2 songs.

3
0

Jihadi terrorists DIDN'T encrypt their comms 'cos of Snowden leaks

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Bah!

If there was a backdoor, as a US based company, could they be under a secret order from a 3 letter agency to not disclose the said backdoor?

0
0

Infosec geniuses hack a Canon PRINTER and install DOOM

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Ah, the t'internet of things ...

Iot; a solution in search of a problem.

1
0

The sound of silence: One excited atom is so quiet that the human ear cannot detect it

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Spinal Tap...

You would need an amplifier that goes up to 11; that's for sure.

0
0
Adam 1
Bronze badge

So if an excited atom vibrates and there isn't another atom to hear it, does it make a sound?

3
0

The Apple Watch and CROTCH RUBBING. How are they related?

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Pebble's nearly there

>tapping is way more discreet, I have no desire to advertise to all and sundry what I'm doing with my smartphone

Siri, listen to Rick Astley.

8
0

SanDisk's record-busting 512GB SD CARD will fit perfectly in your empty wallet

Adam 1
Bronze badge

There are a couple of options. You have SD cards with built in WiFi that can mirror to any android or ios device. You also used to be able to get external card reader + hdd with a one button "clone what's on this card to the HDD" button. I had one about 10 years ago when a 512MB CF card cost would empty your wallet with around 40GB on the HDD.

0
0

Super Cali goes ballistic, Uber Pool is bogus: Ride sharing biz is illegal in the state, says regulator

Adam 1
Bronze badge

+1 for article title of the year.

4
0

Airbus developing inkjet printer for planes

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: F'ing Hell.....

It'd be cheaper to just fly on the unicorns themselves than the number you would need to make that quantity of printer ink.

0
0

Three photons can switch an optical beam at 500 GHz

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Three photons walk into a bar. The bartender asked "three lights?"

0
0
Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: But...

They would never see the light of day again?

/here all week

3
0
Adam 1
Bronze badge

If my math is right, that is less than a second to transmit a blu ray disc. Not bad. When can we have a real NBN?

1
0

Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes

Adam 1
Bronze badge

>The laptop also included speeches by more than 100 jihadi ideologues and advice on how to avoid the attention of the authorities.

Tip 1: Don't download this speech.

1
0

James Bond's metal-toothed nemesis Richard Kiel dies at 74

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: wow

No one wants to be outed as a viewer of Adam Sandler movies.

4
0

TorrentLocker unpicked: Crypto coding shocker defeats extortionists

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: I'm conflicted

>If you already have a backup of the data then why bother ...

IF you have a recent up to date backup, fair question. Many people don't. What they probably have sitting on an iPod somewhere is one of the MP3s from their music folder. The article suggests that as little as 2MB was enough to calculate the XOR key, or in layman's terms, a single song is enough to recover all their data.

2
0
Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: I'm conflicted

Pretty sure he is in Oatmeal land actually.

3
3

Leak of '5 MEELLLION Gmail passwords' creates security flap

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Not my GMail password

>I would assume that Google does not 'know' the passwords... salted cashews and such stuff.

You're right that they won't know the passwords in their database, but they can perform a match between the hashed password and what they stored. If they couldn't then it should be self evident that they also couldn't validate your credentials when you visited their website.

7
0

Enigmail PGP plugin forgets to encrypt mail sent as blind copies

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Surprising

To notice, you would need to be running wireshark or fiddler or something. At the ui level, how would you know...

0
0
Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: ... if one wants to 'Hide BCC recipients' ...

I took it to mean that the recipients in the to and cc fields would be moved to the bcc field if you answered yes.

0
0

'Serious flaws in the Vertigan report' says broadband boffin

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: NBN for average or high end users?

>should the government be providing an NBN service that meets the average needs or high end users

Should the government be providing a health service that meets the needs of the average patient or high dependency patients? We could have an orders of magnitude cheaper healthcare system if we had the same attitude.

Should our public transport system cope with peak hour rush or average load?

Should our power grid cope with the hot summer peaks when everyone is running air conditioners and pool pumps or just average draw?

I agree in principle that there is a point where something becomes unviable, or a point of diminishing returns if you like, but the real problem with FTTN is that we are taking about a capacity date in the next decade unless you think that trends will change. That is big coin for infrastructure that will require reinvestment as soon as it finishes. If it were 20-25% of the cost of FTTP then I would certainly be torn, but it is well over half the build cost anyway. More than that, it still relies on the flaky copper from the node to the house. This means you are going to have to relay copper to the node which will need to get torn up again in relatively short time. It is only cheaper if you restrict consideration to the next decade. Longer term it is more expensive to operate, orders of magnitude more expensive to upgrade (at best you are driving around to every node and upgrading hardware there rather than at a central exchange)

0
0

Dodgy Norton update borks UNDEAD XP systems

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: 'Uninstall all Symantec / Norton products immediately... that might help'

Lol. Someone who thinks the uninstaller provided by Norton is for removing the software.

4
0

Boffins hunch over steaming cups of coffee to find HIDDEN SECRETS of caffeine

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: That's confusing....

>African elephants or Indian elephants

Kenyan, I believe.

0
0
Adam 1
Bronze badge

>You're new here aren't you? Or at least don't visit much.

No, it appears that the poor chap kept a backup of his passwords in a photo in his iCloud account.

3
0

Data entry REAR-END SNAFU: Weighty ballsup leads to plane take-off flap

Adam 1
Bronze badge

>At best, it would flag imbalance and cause seat reassignments shortly before departure (ie, chaos)

If only they were carrying hundreds of tonnes of some sort of liquid that could be pumped into tanks in different parts of the aircraft to rebalance the weight.

2
0

DREADNOUGHTUS: The 65-TON DINO that could crumple up a T-Rex like a paper cup

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Wow!

Still too frightened to go near the snakes and spiders in Australia though.

0
0

Scared of brute force password attacks? Just 'GIVE UP' says Microsoft

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: So basically, MS says ...

>... clueless idiots running MS products are clueless?

That statement may be true *cough* TIFKAM *cough*, sorry had to clear my throat.

What was I saying? That's right, I think you missed the point. If say A! Company! Whose! Name! I! Will! Redact! So! As! Not! To! Embarrass! Them! stores your super duper unbreakable "wrong unicorn paperclip capacitor" password in clear text then it is compromised.

BTW, congratulations reg; nice click bait :)

1
0

Good luck with Project Wing, Google. This drone moonshot is NEVER going to happen

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Why?

> but what does Google get out of it?

I can't imagine any reason at all why Google would be interested in being paid to collect a continuous feed of low altitude high resolution images of populated areas....

4
0

China: You, Microsoft. Office-Windows 'compatibility'. You have 20 days to explain

Adam 1
Bronze badge

>Could be talking about wine on Linux (or what the Chinese are planning for an "own" OS)

I believe that theory is credible.

1
0
Adam 1
Bronze badge

>If you own both the OS and the application, it is possible to make the OS work for the application.

As a generalisation I agree, but this would hold more water if it was say windows media player being able to use hidden optimisations to improve framerates or reduce battery drain, or SQL server getting some unique filesystem priority levels not adhered to for other dbms, but we are taking about a productivity suite. If you think about its limited technical requirements, there isn't a whole lot of ways to cripple their APIs that would benefit Office without the commensurate disadvantage to other products Microsoft need to maintain a viable desktop ecosystem.

In terms of their Corel lawsuits that was quite a different story. The windows API was under active development and decisions could be made to drop or otherwise make specific calls suboptimal, and they could publicise them late in the development cycle for Corel for maximum interruptions and to give their own products an advantage. Completely unacceptable behaviour if true. But in 2014 I can easily write** an office competitor using Win API, .NET or Java and achieve a level of functionality and performance that Microsoft would prefer wasn't possible.

** actually, I couldn't, lacking the will, money, patience and expertise to undertake a project at that scale, but the point is that no magic API would ms office a measurable advantage.

0
0
Adam 1
Bronze badge

I may be a bit slow, but as a developer I am struggling to think of any office feature that requires anything resembling a secret undocumented API call. The inputs are all keyboard, mouse and filesystem calls. The outputs are all canvases (screen/printer). The functionality whilst broad in reach with a feature set as long as your arm is not complex at any functional point that I can see.

It is fair enough to criticise their not so open document formats but this argument about hidden APIs doesn't seem to hold a lot of water.

6
16

Chumps stump up $1 MEELLLION for watch that doesn't exist

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Kickstarter space shot

Too late. Half of them are already there.

1
0

If you think 3D printing is just firing blanks, just you wait

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Something for the weekend?

^ what he said + on a mobile device.

And off to the patent office for me too.

6
0

NASA to reformat Opportunity rover's memory from 125 million miles away

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Dust removal

>As for wipers I suspect they didn't want to scratch the cell surfaces which is what wipers in a dry dusty environment will inevitably do.

Maybe it could just find some water then use that. Two birds and the rest.

0
0

Too slow with that iPhone refresh, Apple: Android is GOBBLING up US mobile market

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Seeing as Android is a (1) malware magnet (2) blatant iOS ripoff (3) fragmented mess…

It's a phone, dude.

3
1
Adam 1
Bronze badge

Dual boot option? I would love to see a touch enabled version of grub.

0
0

Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Fail. Fail. Fail.

So your saying there's a chance.

8
0

Oz fed police in PDF redaction SNAFU

Adam 1
Bronze badge

BUT, er Team Australia!

2
0

Raspberry Pi B+: PHWOAR, get a load of those pins

Adam 1
Bronze badge

> dubs it "Revision 3" of the B – rather than an updated version.

I think I will wait for Revision 3.14 myself.

12
0

Intelligence blunder: You wanna be Australia's spyboss? No problem, just walk right in

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: That's not how it works

For what purpose was he granted security access other than his employment contract defining his responsibilities in such a way that he is permitted?

That is not to say they need to delete his identity records or confiscate his cards but a process wasn't followed. In this case it appears benign but they need to look at how this happened to avoid future cases where it is not 5 days and the contract is not being renewed.

1
0
Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Alternative story if it worked

Or ASIS reports best ever productivity figures after management unable to interrupt for a week.

Seriously though, it would be entirely appropriate to deny access under such a case and failure to reject access should be seen for the security lapse it could have been. Who else "can't access" their systems?

0
0

Bright lights, affordable motor: Ford puts LED headlights onto Mondeo

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Any suggestion about what this does to the repair costs if they get busted in an accident? (Even if you don't plan on having one, it is one of the factors that goes into the spreadsheet to figure out your insurance premiums so it still matters)

4
0

China hopes home-grown OS will oust Microsoft

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: New user interface ...

I have no clue what you guys are saying.

4
0

Best shot: Coffee - how do you brew?

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: I'm a Nespresso fan

I love a fresh ground coffee too, but I always found myself in a bit of a dilemma*. There is frankly too much faffing about to grind, warm the machine, clean all the tampers, filters, jugs and steam wands to make it worthwhile before work. So it used to be a weekend treat for me to make it. The problem is that anything pre ground would go stale well before it was used and I wasn't as happy with the el cheapo grinder which was too course for my preference.

I ended up buying a nespresso because it gave me something quite tolerable with the convenience of instant. I won't pretend it is the best drop that I have ever had but it is better than more than a couple of "baristas" have given me over the years.

*first world problem, I know

3
1

Microsoft: We plan to CLEAN UP this here Windows Store town

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: why

> Why on God's green Earth does someone, anyone, actually want to run _iTunes_ on a _Windows device_?

Apple must think that their customers are too stupid to get music and video onto their iThings using copy paste like the rest of the world.

0
0
Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Hello pot, this is kettle...

> There is one and is called "Windows Installer"

Windows installer is not the best by any stretch, but that is largely irrelevant to this discussion because we are taking about repositories not installers. An installer is not fundamentally much more than a way to check for prerequisites, stop services and to copy a few files around.

An uninstaller is just another application which in theory reverses the process*

There are some important features of an app store not covered by windows installer.

- locating an application for a given purpose.

- visibility of user ratings and popularity

- being sure of the legitimacy of the download link

- buying it.

- knowing about and receiving updates, service packs or hot fixes.

As it stands in the windows world, you get each vendor coming up with their own half baked update mechanisms. Half the time they don't work (HP/Intel), and the others are a mixture of annoying popups every few days (Java), trying to sneak other software in during a supposed update (anything Apple). There are a couple of not to bad ones (notepad++) but they are few and far between. It just doesn't make a lot of sense to compare a store with an installation mechanism.

*unless you are Symantec where it is purely cosmetic.

1
0
Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Hello pot, this is kettle...

>It means you can go to a single place to get all your updates,

Is that like how you can upgrade from windows 8 to 8.1 by going to the store and pressing download, and how you don't need to go to windows update to download all the windows 8 patches first? Oh wait...

3
0

Memory troubling you, Android? Surprise! Another data slurp vuln uncovered

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: I do not install anything asking for this permission

>The noble idea of app permissions is flawed by not being able to revoke them individually at install time or afterwards.

It would be a good start to be able to eliminate search results in play store by requested permissions.

4
0

Tesla: YES – We'll build a network of free Superchargers in Oz

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Greenies

Tassie has a small population and a struggling economy. Hydro everywhere which would be a plus. SA has a lot of wind power and is a much bigger market.

Between Sydney and Melbourne would give pretty close to half the country's population, the main downside is that Victoria has some of the dirtiest power generators around so any Tesla sold down there would be worse than a large SUV for CO2. Plus a large amount of that capacity will be sold off cheap now some smelters have closed down.

0
0

RealVNC distances itself from factories, power plants, PCs hooked up to password-less VNC

Adam 1
Bronze badge

Re: Legality ?

>When there is no password set, VNC simply connects and shows the desktop. It is therefore available to the general public in exactly the same way that a public website is.

An unlocked car whilst foolish is not an invitation to hop in. An open front door is not an invitation to wander in and take a photo.

I suspect that the researchers are probably (in the IANAL sort of way) OK to establish a connection to these computers, but taking a screenshot is both unnecessary from their research point of view and moves well into privacy violation territory.

0
0

Page: