* Posts by jamesb2147

44 posts • joined 13 Apr 2012

Identity thieves slurp Sony Pictures staff info – as CEO sends 'don't sue me, bro' memo

jamesb2147

Hmmm... what's that smell?

If only we had a system that could detect funny looking network traffic with things like names, SSN's, email addresses, etc.... or, at least, one that could pick up on GB's of data heading to servers with IP addresses in countries that we don't do business with... Hmmm......

Yes, I'm saying an IPS/IDS would have done them some good. And to say otherwise is a suspicious claim, at least.

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Why blades need enterprise management software: Learn from Trev's hardcore lab tests

jamesb2147

Mild disagreement

Certainly everything has its place, but, believe me, blades will bring their own issues. They're just like everything else... everything is unique.

Just wait until you hit that $VENDOR bug where all your $COMPONENT reset all AT THE SAME TIME! :D

It's happened before.

I'm totally sympathetic to your plight, though, and have run into my own share of life-sucking problems. In my case, it's usually a bug in our vendor's software (Cisco/Meraki), and they won't even let us see the logs. For us, the worst crime is when the bug COMES BACK. We've twice (since summer 2012) had regressions with firmware updates MONTHS after an issue we surfaced was patched.

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Yes, Obama has got some things wrong on the internet. But so has the GOP

jamesb2147

Who said we were sane?

It's a weird mish-mash. Originally founded as a federation of independently sovereign States, our legislative, judicial, and executive processes have morphed us into a weird hybrid model where not all rights are clear. For better or worse, though, every jurisdiction (federal, state, locality, and possibly county) has a clear right to tax the ever living F*&$ out of every single individual, as long as that's what society wants.

With all that said, I don't see why this particular issue is such a huge deal. It only takes one company to track it all and run the simple multiplication tables on each transaction. They could keep a small % of each, the same way Visa does. C'est la vie. Though I certainly agree that an economic analysis is called for; if it doesn't make financial sense yet, then it just doesn't make financial sense yet.

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Trevor contemplates Consumer Netgear gear. BUT does it pass the cat hair test?

jamesb2147

My luck

Even more lately, my experience has been crappy with consumer gear, particularly routers and WAP's. Back in 2012 I was working to onboard remote employees, including setting up port forwarding on their personal routers to support SIP, and there was literally not a single one that worked the way it should, for whatever reason.

These days, I'm deploying gear and putting out Ubiquiti for both routing and wireless. The wireless still has funny moments now and again (don't ask about v6 support), but the EdgeLite routers are based on Vyatta and have been ROCK solid since install. Not the same features as a UTM appliance, but not the same bugs, either.

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GT sapphire glaziers: You signed WHAT deal with Apple?

jamesb2147

Apple's dealings with suppliers

I once read a book about Apple's early history, I wish I could remember the name. When Jobs was working on the Macintosh, they had an anecdote about how he pushed suppliers. He pushed and pushed and pushed until they had virtually no margins, then told them to be glad that they were taking part in changing the world, and he sold those suppliers on the idea that Apple would move 10's (if not 100's) of millions of Macintosh boxen, making the investment worthwhile. Of course, the closest sales estimate I can find is that of 70,000 units within 100 days. Certainly not the millions that Steve and Co. were counting on.

Further, I've read unsubstantiated reports that Tim Cook, formerly (?) COO, was also renowned for his tough dealings with suppliers.

It's not surprising that this is how Apple approached the situation. It's moderately surprising that GTAT acquiesced instead of telling them to get lost.

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jamesb2147

Actually, that's probably what lead to this situation. GTAT was the furnace maker, and not in the business of making sapphire. So Apple needed a way of keeping competitors from developing sapphire screens, and one way of doing that is to lock GTAT into a contract with Apple. Of course, GTAT could have shown them the door and said go find a builder because we don't have any experience there, but that was one of only a handful of options available to Apple.

GTAT should have recognized the strength of their hand. There's a reason Apple is approaching you, GTAT.

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PROFESSORS! PROFESSORS! PROFESSORS!

jamesb2147

Who knew

You could sound like an arse for giving loads of money away to support education?

More seriously, how much of a problem is it that so much wealth is concentrated at Harvard because of the network opportunities and social prestige? This is sort of the epitome of conspicuous consumption for the donation field. (The true epitome of conspicuous consumption being that Microsoft arch-rival Larry Ellison, who practically owns his own Hawaiian island.)

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'Net Neut' activists: Are you just POSEURS, or do you want to Get Something Done?

jamesb2147

Calm, rational argument

"And calmly and rationally batting aside objections like "Obamacare"."

Let's do just that for a moment. Did you see The Oatmeal's comic about this? Here, have a look if you haven't already: http://theoatmeal.com/blog/net_neutrality

Go ahead, soak it in. Now, let's also take in Senator Cruz's full quote: ""Net Neutrality" is Obamacare for the Internet; the Internet should not operate at the speed of government."

As I stated in an earlier comment, 3+ million comments to the FCC and <1% oppose net neutrality. Mr. Cruz's comment can and should be used against him. It was stupid. With that said...

He has kind of a point after the semicolon. I'm willing to take that into consideration. However, I don't believe that regulating the last mile into a shared access medium is inherently incompatible with his concerns.

The Oatmeal takes pains to point this out. It doesn't make sense for a Senator to be opposed to the idea of net neutrality, only certain aspects of its implementation. I think the Senator's expressed concerns can be accommodated. What I don't think is that he and his colleagues will actually focus enough on the topic to accomplish anything worthwhile. So, for my time investment, it's much more effective to try out non-legislative solutions; it's simply more efficient. If we *must* involve Congress (which, in spite of your proclamations to the contrary, may not be the case) then this fight will be longer, slower, and vastly more expensive, and that's assuming that the legislators get everything right (which they recently proved they could not, even when having the free time to do so from being the least productive Congress in AGES, as they still haven't got patent reform right).

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jamesb2147

I have to agree with the first half here. 3+ million comments to the FCC, early indications of which suggest that <1% of them are negative in sentiment toward net neutrality, would disagree with your claims, Andrew.

That's also the reason that Mr. Cruz's comment was incredibly stupid, politically speaking. It revealed an astounding disregard for the demonstrated feelings of the US public.

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LARGE, ROUND and FEELS SO GOOD in your hand: Yes! It's a Nexus 6

jamesb2147

Pricing

Am I missing something here? There's a lot of talk about price, but it's nothing like the price of the last Nexuses (ignoring Nexus One). I also don't think comparing the $700 64GB's Nexus 6 price to Apple's $750 64GB iPhone 6 price or even $850 64GB iPhone 6+ is a fair comparison when talking about how "cheap" it is compared to the competition.

Perhaps I'm a bit lost but comparison of "flagship" Google/Apple phones would look more like this:

Nexus 5 (last year's model): $350 (if you can find it)

Nexus 6: $650

iPhone 6: $650

iPhone 6+: $750

And just to be clear a "really good phone" can be had for $400-ish in the OnePlus One. A "good enough" phone can be had for $200-ish in the Moto G. Want a different vendor's "flagship"?

Samsung Galaxy S5: $500(-ish)

If you're going to compare pricing, please be clear about what you're comparing.

Further, the Nexus line changed my expectation for my investment in a phone. I do NOT want to double the price of my phone (pushing it into laptop pricing territory) for a marginal performance increase. Further, even if I'd drunk the Apple Kool-Aid (disclosure: I too hate phablets, and until the iPhone 6, I at least thought Apple had good design sense), I'd only be looking at the entry level models. To me, all my data lives online, so I only need enough space for my apps and what I might want on a given plane ride.

Note for the author: I hope our shared preference for non-phablets manifests itself in a course correction on the smartphone trajectory. I need something discreet, not a laptop replacement.

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Net neutrality, Verizon, open internet ... How can we solve this mess?

jamesb2147

My 2 cents

So I took the time to read that 24-page white paper (thanks for the link, author!).

There are some strengths and weaknesses. Let's cover some strengths first:

"Under the plain terms of the statute, mobile broadband Internet access cannot be CMRS.

CMRS is a mobile service that makes “available to the public” an “interconnected service”—i.e.,

a service “that is interconnected with the public switched network.”"

"public switched network" used to imply the PSTN, which is a legitimate point. The only flaw being that it doesn't explicitly *state* PSTN. Still, it's a strength for Verizon's argument against treating wireless under Title II.

"Reliance interests are especially relevant here because the avowed and express purpose of

the Commission’s prior classification orders was to induce the billions in investment that have

now occurred.6

Although the Supreme Court suggested in Fox that an agency may receive more

leeway for a policy change when its prior views on the question were equivocal, 556 U.S. at 518,

for almost two decades, the Commission has done precisely the opposite when it comes to

classifying broadband. The Commission has repeatedly and unequivocally interpreted the 1996

Act to exclude broadband from Title II."

Yeah, that one's going to hurt. The justices like doing economic analyses to decide law, and this is going to be painful for the FCC. On the other hand...

WEAKNESSES

"...(reasoning that an agency must provide “a more complete explanation” when

changing its position either on “particular factual findings . . . or . . . on its view of the governing

law,” because then “one would normally expect the agency to focus upon those earlier views of

fact, or law, . . . and explain why they are no longer controlling""

That's a weakness, believe it or not. The justices didn't close the door, but again stated that they would need a reasonable argument, which might be challenging, but is probably possible to achieve. There are a lot of really smart lawyers out there in the world!

"Unbundling would create prohibitive complexities in delivering separate services;

customers would have to pay for both types of services, which would raise consumer costs; and

all of this would drive away consumers and providers from broadband service, thereby harming

the Commission’s goal of promoting broadband deployment."

I don't think there's any other passage in the entire paper that's more fluff. This is completely a matter of interpretation. All they have to do is redefine "broadband" (say, as 25Mbps) and suddenly deployment numbers drop, and unbundling COULD lower costs for some subset of users, meaning greater deployment. This one is way too easy to wipe away.

"There still is no way to use the Internet and to

access, utilize, retrieve or process the stored information available through web sites around the

world “without also purchasing a connection to the Internet,” "

This is both untrue and also because of bundling. Unbundle it. He goes on, though...

"Indeed, given developments in the nature of broadband services offered since the time of

Brand X, the conclusion that broadband Internet access is an integrated offering is even more

true today. The typical broadband Internet access services today use telecommunications to

perform even more information service capabilities than they did when Brand X was decided.

New parental controls, for example, allow customers to identify and filter inappropriate content.

Multiple e-mail accounts allow customers to store, access, utilize and make available

information. And on-line storage services are a common part of broadband Internet access

offerings and allow customers both to store information they retrieve on-line and then to access,

utilize, and further process that information. All of these information services are “functionally

integrated” services that “transmit data only in connection with the further processing of

information” and require the use of telecommunications."

None of the examples cited are fundamentally a part of the internet connection/access, therefore are not "functionally integrated," in spite of what Verizon wants you to believe.

Give me my IP address, or even just my L2 modem via Title II, and I'll bring you competitors for your L3 business. Here's to hoping the FCC sees it the same way.

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FCC to Obama on net neutrality: We work for CONGRESS, SIR, not YOU

jamesb2147

Re: a day late and a dollar short

Well, I was going to offer that perhaps Obama would show some backbone here. That is, until I looked up his records.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_presidential_vetoes

Who wouldn't want to stick to that Washingtonian veto pattern?

It could still be blamed on the highly unproductive congresscritters of late, but yeah, that's kind of my last bastion of hope. Anyone taking bets on whether that ambiguity becomes a concession after January?

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jamesb2147

I love the Reg, but who watches the watchmen?

...but it's wrong. So wrong.

"Given the precarious position of the FCC, it's likely that only Congress has the authority to devise telco regulation that might withstand a legal assault."

There's very little legal ground for the above claim. The Supreme Court did not declare that ISP's are "information services" (which would leave little to no room for the FCC to reclassify them), it declared the all courts must defer to the FCC in making these decisions. So, if the FCC changes its mind about whether ISP's are "telecommunications services" providers, they have the Supreme Court's official blessing to do so.

You're wrong, Andrew. See below for an excerpt from the NCTA v. Brand X decision backing up my claims.

"n Chevron, this Court held that ambiguities in statutes within an agency’s jurisdiction to administer are delegations of authority to the agency to fill the statutory gap in reasonable fashion. Filling these gaps, the Court explained, involves difficult policy choices that agencies are better equipped to make than courts. ... If a statute is ambiguous, and if the implementing agency’s construction is reasonable, Chevron requires a federal court to accept the agency’s construction of the statute, even if the agency’s reading differs from what the court believes is the best statutory interpretation."

Also, this appears to be a leap out of an ignorance of the topic (it is complicated, so I don't blame Andrew for being ignorant, if that's the case):

"Google built the world's largest private network to carry YouTube traffic – would it be happy with everyone using these facilities? Or would Amazon be obliged to offer free access to its cloud? Google has already said it doesn't offer voice with its fibre because of common carrier regulations, even though the cost of the voice part would be "almost nothing" to Google."

We're talking specifically about *consumer* services, not extending Title II to private internal networks. That's dumb, dude. IDK what would lead you to believe such things would happen.

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Obama HURLS FCC under train, GUTPUNCHES ISPs in net neut battle

jamesb2147

Granny Smith and Pink Lady

"My business is paying around $500/month for 20Mb service. I pay $100/month for 100Mb service at my house. The difference?"

The difference is, in part, that you're a business. Therefore, you pay for "business class" services, which basically means F%$& you, the telcos can charge what they want because you'll still pay it (this is the same reason airline tickets are more expensive last minute; business travelers often buy last minute and will pay more for the privilege... because they can pay more for the privilege). With Comcast, that means, technically, that you don't have a usage cap, and legally, that your ass is covered (allowed to run servers and buy the connection as a business without violating the ToS).

I'm not disagreeing per se, just saying that it's not a straightforward apples-to-apples comparison.

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FTC to flog Butterfly Labs' Bitcoin holdings

jamesb2147

Re: Strange goings on...

If only they actually did that, instead of lying to buyers about timelines and where their money was going.

BTW, it's illegal in the US to take money for pre-orders, then use it to fund development activities. That's what Kickstarter is for, not pre-orders.

The issue is not what the company would eventually do (though they were at least 9 months behind when they were raided and had assets seized), but the fraud in how the company was being run. That's illegal and, frankly, based on the chat logs, I'd say it should be punished. You can't treat a company like your personal bank account, because that's called embezzlement.

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How Hollywood film-makers wove proper physics into Interstellar

jamesb2147

Disagree

Hey, the first half of that film was excellent (though I've found most people found it boring).

You won't catch me defending the second half, though, nor Boyle's apparent views on women in storytelling.

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Marriott fined $600k for deliberate JAMMING of guests' Wi-Fi hotspots

jamesb2147

There be dragons here

Marriott

$500M in net profit last year on revenues of $13B.

This is the same company that's beginning a campaign of putting tip envelopes in rooms so that guests are "more aware" of the "custom of tipping housekeeping."

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NASA said a 60ft space alien menacing Earth wouldn't harm us: Tell THAT to Nicaragua

jamesb2147

Re: 107,200

Hey, that's the Nicaraguan First Lady you're talking about! (Read: She's not just a "government press person," she's actually highly influential in politics, moreso than most First Lady's, and disturbingly out of touch with science.)

I'm guessing this was an explosive. The interesting thing is that it might not be from the civil war (Somoza) or Contra era; there's evidently a small, but new, wave of violence sweeping the country. We may see more of this in the future, and it may turn out that the political leaders or military were looking for an alternative explanation to distract from the fact that they don't know what caused this.

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Watch out! KILLER HP firmware update bricks ProLiant server mobos

jamesb2147

Re: 'Expert'? WTF?

"The best part of half a day..." means at least half of half a day. Assuming an hour work day, he means 2-ish hours. I am not impressed with your logic.

Also, at least on our HP blades at work, BL460c, I think, of G1 and G8 variety, it takes about 10-20 mins at least to get through the boot sequence. We've also had bad luck getting the firmwares updated as there are several tools and they'll sometimes take 45+ mins to figure out that they are lacking some file or other dependency ("no, you'll have to upgrade this *other* firmware first and you need a different tool for that") and you have to start all over again... In short, 2AM upgrades on HP blades are hell.

If you and yours take less than an hour, you should offer training courses and/or thank your lucky stars.

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You want an IT course? Welcome to QA Training's Week of Free

jamesb2147
WTF?

You need a bug spray icon

The two IPv6 sessions have the same link. Intended?

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Apple fanbois make it 'official', hook up with Internet of Fridges Things

jamesb2147

Door locks

And peepholes, for that matter. Seriously, I've had a smartphone since 2008 and STILL I have to carry a sharp, malformed chunk of potentially lethal (for children, natch) metal with me at all times?

I actually spent some time thinking about this once. Refrigerators are near useless to network, but a lightswitch is remarkably useful. For example, turn on the A/C/heating when lightswitch detects a paired bluetooth smartphone nearby and adjust the dimmer based on time of day or detected lighting levels.

Personally, I want an oven that dings my smartphone to let me know when it's done preheating. I tend to step away and forget while waiting for it to warm up enough to cook my frozen pizza.

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jamesb2147

Re: Everything

"Going the "my techno and nothing else" is becoming more and more a strategical mistake for Cupertino. Soon, they will realise it ..."

Because the more you say it, the more true it is.

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No sign of Half-Life 3 but how about FOURTEEN Steam Machine makers?

jamesb2147

Warning: PDF

I miss the old days... can El Reg bring back that little touch? It's nice that you still mention it, but I prefer the full effect of "Warning:" written just beforehand.

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Snowden: 'I am still working for the NSA ... to improve it'

jamesb2147

Re: many more in his possession?

Ditz. This is getting fucking annoying. Snowden's like Manning, in that he handed over the files, and now reporters are combing through them to write articles. At least, that's the last I'd heard.

If this weren't already the Register, I'd expect the Register to be skewering you and every other half-brained reporter. Truly, it's sad.

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NBN Co reports smaller-than-expected loss

jamesb2147

Or it could be indicative of a negotiating position when Telstra comes to the table. It gives them some leverage.

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The Register's NBN study: a good start, let's ramp it up

jamesb2147

Re: Yes it does deserve a response, I'll try one.

It would also enable cultural changes to occur allowing employers to accept remote workers more broadly.

Not disagreeing with you, just saying that you maybe aren't disagreeing with the quoted comment, either.

The biggest benefit I see is that companies can depend on Aussie consumers having access to a speedy connection of known reliability. "Internet of things" starts to happen. "aaS" offerings abound. I keep imagining PXE booted zero clients being offered over IPv6 as a natural progression of Chrome OS, or something. The idea is to ask, "What services become feasible, and how will that impact Australia?" I think that's a difficult question to answer. If pushed through, though, NBN makes Australia a most interesting experiment.

FWIW, you might be right about the medicine. I'm thinking it will be "revolutionized" by personalization by computers crunching massive amounts of data and scientists looking to ask the right questions of the datasets, rather than doctors. That won't require massive bandwidth to the end user.

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jamesb2147
Stop

Linky link

Shouldn't this article have one? I don't see a link to the Pozible page for the study.

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How NSA spooks spaffed my DAD'S DATA ALL OVER THE WEB

jamesb2147
Facepalm

Re: NSA have no sense of humor

One last thing.

They're still public domain materials, as works of the government or persons working for the government carrying out their official duties. Being secret doesn't change that, and especially doesn't affect copyright violations. Remember, all classified material becomes declassified after 50 years. It belongs in the public domain, and without a very substantial national interest in keeping it secret, the public has a right to it (hence it enters the 'public domain').

At least, that's my guess.

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jamesb2147
FAIL

Re: NSA have no sense of humor - Lawsuit options

At least in the US, copyright is just that; by having *copied* the image at all (even if not for publication) and not following the terms, they've violated, at least, the terms the copyright holder set forth. I believe that makes them liable for infringement, although conflicting messages on the website weaken the claim. Still, I'd be asking the EFF and/or ACLU if they were interested in using the suit somehow. I imagine it could be a useful tool in their kit, and a generous donation by the author to allow them either to represent him, or, in the extreme, to transfer ownership of the copyright.

Not sure how all that works when crossing the pond, though, and IANAL.

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US chief spook: Look, we only want to spy on 6.66 BEELLLION of you

jamesb2147
Facepalm

"...although no actual phone recordings were obtained."

Should be changed, unless you know something I don't. Should be something like, "...although the order did not approve the recording or interception of phone calls."

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NSA Prism: Why I'm boycotting US cloud tech - and you should too

jamesb2147
Pirate

Oooh, do you think I can get backups from them in case of disaster?

Better yet, by duplicating so much data, are they violating my copyright?

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Leaked docs show NSA collects data on all Verizon customers

jamesb2147
FAIL

Re: Constitution and ammendments

I was going to put up a post about how it's so great to have free speech in our society, fair use, and privacy from government, all constitutionally guarantee...

oh, yeah.

At least it's not the first time? ***Trail of tears reference*** God, I hate Andrew Jackson. D-I-C-K, DICK. Much like whoever conceived of thin-thread or w/e at the NSA.

Took long enough to leak.

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COLD FUSION is BACK with 'anomalous heat' claim

jamesb2147
Pint

Minor note: it looks like they're already set up for battery power; one photo shows the interior of the cargo containers pretty clearly with what appear to be batteries inside. It looks like far more than they need, but they could slightly modify the setup to meet much of the criticism here. I look forward to reading about the next round of observations. :)

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jamesb2147
Facepalm

Re: Turns nickel into copper, eh?

The scientists seem rather convinced, although perhaps they're being lied to and passing those lies on. They're specific in mentioning that it's a hydrogen-laden nickel dust in the chamber, with some kind of secret sauce catalyst. It's unclear if the sauce is in the "trade secret waveform" or powder chamber that had to be emptied away from the scientists (although they appear to have been present when the chamber was cut open).

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jamesb2147
Thumb Up

Re: Please pass the Fluke TrueRMS DVOM

Certainly that's entirely possible. Hopefully they have a chance to test that in future.

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jamesb2147
Stop

Re: Having not read the paper yet

They're referring to harnessing many more joules/kg than any known chemical reaction. They're not referring to energy output compared to energy input.

You should read the paper.

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Heavenly networker Pertino pockets $20m to take on Cisco Meraki

jamesb2147

Re: What exactly is it???

I had the same problem; after watching the video on the Pertino site, it sounds more like a new *business model* for VPN access than a new technology. They even mention VPN in the video.

Not sure why El Reg keeps reporting on it like it's hot stuff, though. I was curious. Now I'm bored.

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Mighty 4 Terabyte whopper crashes down on the desktop

jamesb2147

Re: Maths fail?

IDK how this got missed. Quality SSD's are <$1/GB these days (note: not the newest gen, necessarily). How did the author not catch that he was writing "or a cent for a megabyte?"

It's Thanksgiving here in the US, perhaps the author is celebrating with a liquid Wild Turkey feast?

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Accidental discounts land Apple in NZ's Disputes Tribunal

jamesb2147

Re: He Was Hoping To Get $89 Worth Of Stuff For $0.83 - Really?

You'd be wrong. It's called FOB origin.

"FOB origin means the consignee is taking ownership prior to shipping and is responsible for freight payments."

--http://www.ehow.com/info_8284356_freight-delivery-terms.html

It could be "free" shipping, and the company could be the one paying for it from their accounts, and STILL be FOB origin. In which case this would be theft.

The issue is, I think Apple US is FOB destination. He could still have a case, but at that point it's not theft.

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Emotional baggage

jamesb2147
Thumb Up

Re: I love my Wenger Backpack

As long as we're on the subject of Wengers...

Bought mine in 2005. It has a CD player pocket instead of an iPod/phone pocket. The thing has held up amazingly well. Still has some cushion (in nasty situations, I have been known to use the thing as a pillow), straps are comfy, and about the only thing that's gone wrong is the lining started peeling off a couple of years ago. I guess that was the waterproofing. Oops!

Seriously though, I take this thing everywhere with me. I'm US based and it's seen Canadia, Nicaragua, the UK, Germany, and it's my primary bag on domestic trips. Biggest problem is that if I let it get too big then it doesn't fit in the overhead bins on smaller airplanes!

See if you can find it someplace with a good return policy. Are Amazon's UK return policies same/similar/better? I've turned in used electric razors before when dissatisfied.

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Raspberry Pi served with Ice Cream Sandwich

jamesb2147
Facepalm

The pack of fags

Remember, we here in the good ol' US of A have another meaning for the word fag that generally trumps any alternates...

Which makes the phrase "fag pack" an interesting choice of words for a man named "Caleb Cox."

:X

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Early verdict on Intel Ultrabook™ push: FAIL

jamesb2147
FAIL

Don't forget that a picture of an MBA used to be the photo used on Intel's homepage and all over its website generally to promote "Ultrabooks."

As a side note, I filed a complaint with the FTC over false advertising and alerted Intel support to the issue. After taking several months to respond to my allegations, they denied that it was a picture of a Macbook Air. Even though it clearly has a mockup of the proprietary and patented Apple MagSafe port in the mockup. :/

Dumbasses. Marketing FAIL.

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Apple iPad sales drop by DOUBLE DIGITS in Europe

jamesb2147
Alert

Unrelated

Can we please go back to having article titles and subtitles/subtext/w/e in standard (and classy!) black font instead of... w/e color scheme this is? It not only hurts my eyes (srsly!), it's distracting. I had a ridiculously hard time reading the article because my eyes kept drifting up to the title.

:(

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Vote now for the WORST movie EVER

jamesb2147
Paris Hilton

Sunshine?

Now I understand that it changed halfway through. Completely. To an awful, totally unrelated to the first half movie. Believe me, I understand that. But... didn't it seem like that was a producer's fault anyway?

Anyhow, I can put enough of a spirited defense of the first half that I don't think it qualifies as "worst movie ever" unless you count the horror of finding an excellent movie ruined by its own direction/production. Even then, has anyone here ever seen a film by Ewe Boll? There was one time he actually said something to the effect of, "Do you know what this movie needs? More explosions. Lots more explosions. And gun fights. And cars. And cars in gun fights with lots more explosions." ...Because that's honestly what he thinks everyone wants. Do you know how his films have been financed? MASSIVE tax breaks from the German government that basically subsidize half the cost of production.

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