* Posts by LeeE

311 posts • joined 12 Apr 2012

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Russian spy aircraft are flying over Britain – and the MoD's cool with it

LeeE
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You shouldn't believe the propaganda put out by any side.

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LeeE
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Re: Are flights necessary?

"Of course overflights are pointless"

Overflights reveal changes. Although an overflight may not reveal what a change means, it identifies something that needs further analysis, most probably by less overt techniques.

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LeeE
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Re: Drone on

"using the oldest aircraft available with the lowest tech" & "If you had your brand spanking new recon beauty with all the bells and whistles"

It's a reciprocal agreement that, as the article points out, specifies the equipment that may be used, includes personnel of the overflown state on the flight and the viewing of the data acquired by both the overflown and the overflying states. An overflight wouldn't be allowed if those conditions weren't met, so although you may have better stuff you couldn't use it in this scheme.

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LeeE
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Re: Drone on

"Almost makes you wonder what the Americans use for the job"

Umm... answer's in the article... OC-135Bs

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It's time for a discussion about malvertising

LeeE
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"there's no point in wasting money on the [...] advertising industry."

As advertising can be classed as a business expense it's tax-deductable, so the effective cost to someone wanting to advertise a product is considerably less than the price they pay to the advertising agencies. This is the underlying reason that there's so much advertising.

It also means that advertising is effectively subsidised by the relevant tax-collecting government.

TBH, I can't see many governments complaining about a reduction in unbiased and investigative journalism.

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New US spy satellite in orbit

LeeE
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Location & Capabilities

"geostationary orbit around Earth [...] but where isn't known"

Other geo-sync operators will need to know where it is to ensure they don't try to park one of their birds in the same place.

"The exact capabilities of the satellite aren't known"

At that distance, we can be pretty sure that it won't be doing optical, and I'd estimate that location precision for V/UHF will be of the order of several square miles at best. I'd guess that it's intended to capture foreign power military up-link sat-comms from ground units, for traffic analysis and decryption.

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Did the Russians really hack the DNC or is this another Sony Pictures moment? You decide

LeeE
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Re: Tu use Hillary's own words...

"The result if the blame sticks is that the finger pointer gets elected."

Didn't quite work for David Cameron; I remember him blaming the EU and the previous New(tm) Labour incumbents, in roughly equal measure, to deflect blame for the Tory's inability to actually meet any of their 'promises' following their election in 2010 and look where that got him.

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She wants it. She needs it. Shall I give it to her or keep doing it by myself?

LeeE
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Pint

Re: have a pint

And another one for remembering Guy Kewney.

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The cloud ain't making it rain for Intel right now: Tech giants pause server chip sales

LeeE
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Re: Data estimates

I agree, and can't see the sense in uploading the raw data, but that was the context in which those numbers were quoted.

But why would Intel's CEO say such a thing?

Making such an unprompted and implausible claim tells us something important about the state of things at Intel.

It has the flavour of trying to be reassuring, but then why would Intel feel that they need to reassure unless they feel threatened?

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LeeE
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Data estimates

"if you look out into 2020, that average person will generate about 1.5GB a day" and "If you take a look at the average autonomous car in 2020, the estimates right now are it will throw off about 40GB a minute of data"

But these numbers are supposedly in the context of cloud(tm) processing, so...

...we're looking at ~45GB/month uploads, just for social media. For automobiles, we're looking at ~2.4TB/hour, let's say for two hours/day, for 20 days/month, which comes to ~48TB/month of uploads.

Are ISPs going to be able to provide that sort of bandwidth per user at an affordable price within four years?

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If we can't find a working SCSI cable, the company will close tomorrow

LeeE
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Pins in the cable?

Curious as to which species of SCSI is being referred to here because I can't recall ever seeing a SCSI cable with male connectors (pins). All of the various SCSI types I've worked with had the pins in the device or on the controller, with the cables carrying sockets.

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Chinese hacker jailed for shipping aerospace secrets home

LeeE
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Design data wouldn't really be of much use to a foreign power but performance & testing data would give them a very good idea of the true capabilities and limitations of these aircraft, telling them what they need to design against in their own aircraft and defence systems; they don't want to be able to copy these aircraft but to beat them.

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A journey down the UK's '3D Tongue' into its mini industrial revolution

LeeE
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There's no misunderstanding here; the article refers to products, not component parts.

But in any case, the examples that you and ST give aren't valid; my clothing does not consist of just 'shapes' cut from 'a woven rectangular sheet' (would you not describe weaving as additive? And don't forget the dyes). Until those 'shapes' are combined in an additive process they're still just 'shapes' and won't become a product (clothing, in this case) until they are combined (togas, turbans and the original design of kilt might qualify but I would guess even they require(d) the addition of some stitching along the hems to prevent the weave from unravelling). Similarly, a table leg can't be regarded as a product, unless you're a tablemaker, and furthermore, one who neither varnishes, polishes or otherwise seals their wooden products which, as a result, will then have a very short usable life.

But if we follow the logic that a subtractive phase in the manufacture of a component part qualifies the the end product as being made by subtractive methods then it follows that all products must be the result of harvesting, without which you'd have nothing to process at all, whether it be additive or subtractive (and before anybody wastes time gobbing off about harvesting being subtractive the difference is that in harvesting the product is made from what is subtracted whereas in subtraction the product is the remainder (just to use a deliberately wonky maths allusion)).

ST's response, by starting with a personal deprecation, qualifies itself as simple trolling and so is not worthy of a reply.

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LeeE
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Failed Premise

"Most products are made from a ["]subtractive["] process"

This is incorrect; most products, at least those that are 'made', as opposed to harvested, such as fruit, vegetables, meat etc, are produced via additive processes. Never seen or even heard of things like automobiles, dish washers, watches, clothes, water wheels, rocking horses, space rockets, cricket bats, [...] being made by subtractive processes. In fact, even most statues that you're likely to see in the context of 'product' will have been made from several parts, shaped in molds, and then joined together.

A quick look around my home revealed just two items that were made by subtractive processes, these being a wood rolling pin and a wood spatula. Everything else was made by additive processes or harvesting.

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Theresa or Teresa May? Twitter confuses nude model and new PM

LeeE
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New PM

Soooo... We have a new PM. Judging by past history, we'll soon be involved in a new war*

*Although this one is more like the mid-term Brown appointment, so perhaps not.

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Blighty will have a whopping 24 F-35B jets by 2023 – MoD minister

LeeE
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Re: sub-launched nuclear armed cruise missiles

"4) Accept that cruise missiles are only marginally faster and more difficult to shoot down than a V1 missile in WW2."

Not true; V1's were ~100 kts slower than current subsonic cruise missiles and couldn't employ indirect routing and very low altitude terrain-following (the V1 was only a 'cruise' missile in the sense that it 'cruised' under continuous power; it was essentially just an unguided missile that could hold a heading and used a timer to bring it down on to its target)

But in any case, new supersonic and hypersonic (and in some examples, stealthy) cruise missiles are currently being developed/tested.

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Science non-fiction: Newly spotted alien world bathes in glow of three stars

LeeE
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Re: Define: Stable

The orbital configuration of this system will be stable if the orbit of the planet is in resonance with the orbit of the two close binary stars. However, if the orbits were not in resonance then this configuration would very quickly come apart.

For this particular arrangement of stars and planet[s] there will be relatively few possible configurations where the orbits are in resonance but many possible configurations where they are not so, whilst resonant configurations, once established, are to a degree, self-aligning, it would still only need a relatively small change in the configuration to break the resonance (this is from the modelling point of view; the authors aren't suggesting that the system may actually become unstable).

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Space prang of cosmic proportions blamed for giving Mars its moons

LeeE
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Re: Conjecture

This modelling shows that the hypotheses is possible but not probable and only by the sampling of Phobos and Deimos will we be able to tell whether they're captured asteroids or protoplanetary fragments.

Protoplanetary fragments, although superficially looking like asteroids, should show evidence (such as slow melting and compaction) of being part of a larger gravitational body whereas an asteroid, having never been in those gravitational conditions, would not.

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BAM! Astroboffins now have a second way of picking up black holes' collision super kicks

LeeE
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Re: "remnants of the black holes..."

Just to add some details to Flocke Kroes's explanation...

When a body is compressed to <= the Shwarzchild radius for the mass of that body it will undergo a runaway gravitational collapse and the current thinking, according to the Quantum Mechanics Standard Model, is that this collapse will continue until it reaches the size of the Planck Length, which is about 1.61 x 10-35 metres. For comparison, the radius of a Proton is about 0.86 x 10-15 metres, so the singularity at the center of a Black Hole is of the order of 1020 times smaller than a Proton.

However, whilst the size of the singularity within a BH is not dependant upon its mass - all singularities collapse to the PL, regardless of mass - there's also the 'Event Horizon', which is in proportion to the mass*; the size of the EH for a body of the same mass as the Earth is about 8.8 mm, and for Sol, about 2.95km.

Now, whilst most people are aware that the EH marks the distance from the singularity where the Escape Velocity is equal to 'c' - the Speed of Light - it also marks the distance from the singularity where Gravitational Time Dilation means that the local rate of time reaches zero, so not only is there the problem of something that's trying to 'leave' a BH being unable to go faster than 'c', it's also got to try to do something (change its state) in a local time period of zero. This would seem to mean that if the state of a body that crosses an EH is to change then it must enter a super-position of states so that, in much the same way as Schrodinger's cat is both simultaneously dead and alive, the body is both simultaneously changed and unchanged.

So forget simplistic descriptions of what BHs are doing; everything that's observable occurs outside an EH; everything, if anything, that goes on within an EH is beyond physics, as far as we currently understand it, except in the most abstract forms.

*<pureSpeculationAlert>The fact that the size of the Event Horizon appears to be dependant upon the mass of the singularity, which is beyond the EH, is interesting; if nothing can escape a BH/EH then why is there still gravity? It would seem that either gravity can pass the EH, even though it's confined by 'c', or perhaps, due to the gravitational time dilation effects, we're actually observing what is essentially a bit of 'frozen' time; the 'real' mass no longer effectively exists in our universe but the historical effects of it do. Who knows? I certainly don't, but when it comes down to it, as far as BHs are concerned, all you've really got to play with is space, time & energy, and they're all candidates to go a bit wobbly beyond an EH</>

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Looking good, Gnome: Digesting the Delhi in our belly

LeeE
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Re: Did they fix the *REASONS* why Mate was forked from 2?

"Gnome 3 made it NOT possible to cram 20 icons on the panel, along with 6 system monitor thingies, the date and time, the menu, and some extra white pace between groups of icons arranged *MY* way, not *THEIR* way."

Snap! For precisely those reasons, I ended up with TDE (Trinity Desktop Environment) on all my systems (except for the RPis, which run XFCE). I actually have eight customisable ksysguard monitor thingies on the panel on this particular workstation (CPU load, RAM, network, swap, system load, disk IO, temps & fans). Yeah, I could probably drop the swap space graph, but don't really need to; all the clicky stuff is neatly and compactly grouped together in the rest of the panel to minimise mouse travel. My choice.

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LIGO team may have found dark matter

LeeE
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Plausible/worth

As Dark Matter is pretty much defined by the fact that it only interacts with baryonic matter via gravity then it is plausible that it might be detected by LIGO. However, whilst all we know about DM so far has been gained from astronomical observations on very large scales, which means very low-frequency time-period data, LIGO might be able to add to our rather minimal definition of DM by capturing relatively high-frequency time-period data.

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Genes take a shot at rebooting after death

LeeE
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Activation or stopping of suppression?

"It looks almost like genes making a last-ditch attempt to keep things going"

I agree with SRS that, rather than the genes being activated in an attempt to combat death, they become reactivated because the processes that suppresses their activity ceases; rather than an attempt to keep things going, it is a sign that things are terminally broken.

Hmm... now what does that remind me of?

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Surveillance, interrogation and threats: Behind the Nest witch-hunt

LeeE
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Memes???

"...posting memes from Google's internal noticeboard..."

Did you mean memos?

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Supermassive black hole devours star and becomes X-ray flashlight

LeeE
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Discovery Channel Science

This article is a bit like a typical Discovery Channel science program - oversimplified, factually wrong in some respects and ultimately misleading.

"...a dormant black hole will awaken and start a feeding frenzy..."

Black Holes are neither dormant and nor can they 'awake' - this suggests a change in activity or a change of state of the BH. They are, like their name suggests, essentially a hole in space and any activity or dormancy occurs in the material around the BH, not in the BH itself.

"...if anything ventures past its event horizon..."

If anything ventures past the Event Horizon of a BH then any consequences are unobservable to us, or anyone else. Once again, the clue's in the name - events are not observable beyond the Event Horizon; we can only observe events occurring outside the EH.

Btw, the plural of 'spacecraft' is 'spacecraft'.

@AC: "Could dormant black holes be the Dark Matter we seek?"

A very small proportion could be but overall, no. BHs are formed from baryonic material and insufficient baryonic material was formed in the Big Bang to account for the total amount of Dark Matter required to explain what we observe. In addition, if all of the DM were in the form of BHs then the microlensing effects we see due to DM would have different characteristics.

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You lucky creatures! Mammals only JUUUST survived asteroid that killed dinosaurs

LeeE
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Re: it is the volcano that will kill you

Yes, although bolide impacts get more coverage, being more exciting for those who like their science to be simple and dramatic, there's some good evidence that the dinos were dying out before the Chicxulub event occurred, coinciding with the Deccan Traps flood basalt eruption, which would have globally devastating consequences just on its own. Similarly, the earlier and larger Siberian Traps flood basalt eruption is associated with the even more severe Permian-Triassic mass extinction event, which is the only known mass extinction event where the mass extinction of insects occurred.

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Microsoft cancels Remain speech after death of Labour MP

LeeE
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Debrief?

"The senior politician was to debrief the local workforce on the benefits of staying inside the EU today"

I think you really mean brief, as this was to be before the event, and its purpose would have been to inform actors and involved parties of factors pertinent to the forthcoming event; a debriefing occurs after an event, to gain information from the actors and involved parties about what actually happened during that event.

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FBI expands code theft charges against Chinese national

LeeE
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Re: "Stole"?

No need for a new word; the term 'copied' is appropriate in cases where what has been copied is protected by copyright. The relatively recent usage of 'steal' in this context is just an attempt to deceive, by employing emotion, in an attempt to make the crime (of copyright violation) seem worse than it is.

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Fiber optic cables prove eyes of glass squids are like invisibility cloaks

LeeE
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Pint

Fibre Optics - reflectin of refraction?

I was once told by one of the scientists working on Kao's team at STL that optical fibres work by refraction and not reflection; the refractive index of the fibre increases with distance from the center of the fibre with the result that light travelling down the fibre is 'bent' back towards the center of the fibre before reaching the internal walls, rather than reflecting off of the internal walls of the fibre, which would degrade the resolution of the light pulse. However, this was a pub conversation (icon) about 40 years ago so I can't absolutely confirm this, and it does seem to contradict the generally accepted mechanism.

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Boffins send encrypted quantum messages to spaaaace – and back

LeeE
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Re: @King Jack Curious question...

'Alice can't say: "I'll measure this and get a 1, and therefore send a 1 to Bob" but she can say "I measured this and got a 1, therefore Bob got a 1'

That's more or less my understanding of it too.

You can have a pair of entangled particles but their state is unresolved and therefore unknown until you examine one of them, at which point you know what the state of the other particle will be when it is examined, even though it may be arbitrarily far away.

An analogy would be to have two people, separated by distance, flipping coins; neither person knows whether they'll get a head or a tail until they flip their coin but once they have they'll know how the other coin will land when the other person flips it.

It would be possible to devise a protocol to make use of this, but not to convey information directly. For example, let's say the two coin-tossers, Alice & Bob, have agreed to send an encrypted message between them and have a choice of two encryption keys, 1 & 2. Alice & Bob agree that if Alice tosses her coin and gets a 'Head' then they'll use encryption key 1 but if her coin lands as a 'Tail' they'll use encryption key 2. When Alice tosses her coin and gets a 'Head' she encrypts the message using encryption key 1, and once Bob has tossed his coin he'll know he has to use encryption key 1 to decrypt the message; they haven't needed to transmit the information about which key to use. However, the message itself, once Alice has encrypted it, would still need to be sent via classical non-instantaneous methods.

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US military tests massive GPS jamming weapon over California

LeeE
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Re: Ground Bound?

Yes, I'm pretty sure you're correct; the shape of the affected volume of air-space indicates a ground-based system.

GPS operates on several frequencies between 1.17645 - 1.57542 GHz and requires line-of-sight to receive a signal so any jamming system would need to operate in the same frequency range, give or take a few harmonics, and will also be essentially line-of -sight. As a consequence, if you move away from a ground-based transmitter/jammer, it will fall below the horizon and out of line-of-sight. This effectively raises the floor-elevation of the signal as distance from the transmitter/jammer increases, which is what the map and numbers show.

However, an even worse faux-pas, than getting the basics of the system wrong, in this article is the pathetic attempt at sensationalism by making the ridiculous claim that the FAA are grounding all civil/commercial aircraft in the region concerned, for six of the busiest hours of the day, when the tests are running...

Quote: "The US Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) is warning aircraft to stay a few hundred miles away from the Naval Air Weapons Station at China Lake"

Yes, it's clarified in the next paragraph... Quote: "The FAA has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) warning [PDF] that on June 7, GPS readouts will be unreliable or nonexistent for..."

But that's not the same as saying that aircraft shouldn't fly in the region, which is what the first quote above says.

Whilst I can forgive the journalist's ignorance regarding the nature of the system being tested, the pathetic attempt at sensationalism is simply insulting in what is supposed to be a tech/science journal; just because your readers enjoy the informal and light-hearted 'tabloid' format it doesn't mean they're stupid.

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Home Office U-turns on surveillance camera review muddle

LeeE
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Why the confusion?

A politician has answered a question that they wanted to be asked, not a question that they may or may not have actually been asked. This is normal.

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Flying filers and Game of Thrones: Jon Snow? No, latency is dead

LeeE
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I/O or compute?

"With latency mainly due to the sluggish render farm performance, the artists couldn’t work as the files were just not available fast enough for them.”

That quote seems to be saying that the bottleneck was in producing the increased number of ray-traced CGI image-frames, which is down to compute, not IO. Sure, each scene/frame to be rendered will need the scene/frame data to be loaded before rendering can start but the render time will be far greater than the IO time.

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Ultra-cool dwarf throws planetary party

LeeE
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Re: Fusion?

Hydrogen is the easiest element to fuse and so yes, all stars start by fusing Hydrogen.

Briefly, as the gas that is to become a star collapses and compresses under its own gravity it reaches a point where the Hydrogen at the center of the gravitationally collapsing gas becomes heated and compressed sufficiently for fusion to occur. The outpouring of energy from the the newly started fusion process then counteracts further collapse due to gravity but once most of the Hydrogen in the core is fused the out-pressure from fusion drops and the star resumes gravitational collapse until the Helium in the core, produced by the fusion of the Hydrogen, can start fusing. The Helium fusion, along with the renewed gravitational collapse, leads to Hydrogen fusion in a shell around the Helium core (which is when the star starts its giant phase). This process may repeat several times, depending upon the characteristics of the star, with successively heavier elements fusing in the core, surrounded by multiple fusing shells of progressively lighter elements.

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LeeE
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Fusion?

"not massive enough to sustain hydrogen fusion"

If it was not sustaining Hydrogen fusion then it wouldn't be a star; it would just be a gas giant. It does, in fact, sustain Hydrogen fusion but via Deuterium fusion, which is the second stage of the Hydrogen-1 proton-proton fusion process that powers larger stars.

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Russia poised to unleash 'Son of Satan' ICBM

LeeE
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Not solid

Interesting that they've gone for a liquid-fueled motor rather than solid, not withstanding the greater efficiency and controllability of liquid-fueled motors.

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Tabby's Star's twinkle probably the boring business of calibration

LeeE
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Re: But why would it show a consistent decline over 100 years?

I can't buy the idea that the apparent reduction in light, over time, from Tabby's Star is because "The problem with using a hundred years' of observations, the group argue, is that the source data from “Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard includes half a million glass plates shot between 1885 and 1993, using a number of different instruments and cameras."

Going even further than MartinG, I'd expect the SOP would be to only consider plates that include sufficient additional stars to allow the entire plate to be calibrated, comparing every star (and galaxy) in the plate being calibrated with every other plate/image in which any of those stars and galaxies appear.

This wouldn't eliminate the problem with variations in the sensitivity of the emulsion across each plate but as the plates would have been prepared specifically for scientific measurement purposes I'd expect the 'noise' variability across each plate to be pretty low, and certainly way below 20%, which the team seems to think is a typical noise level (is 20% noise even science?).

Fwiw, Kepler's noise floor appears to be around 80 ppm, whilst two of the measured variations in brightness from Tabby's Star, in recent times by Kepler, were by 15% & 22%.

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DARPA wants god-mode attribution platform to pin and predict crime

LeeE
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I wonder...

...if it'll exclude .gov actors from its results?

Perhaps that's why the statement says it "would generate, anonymise, and share threat data" instead of 'collate'.

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NASA, USGS publish topographical map of Mercury

LeeE
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Take a walk on the hot planet

Mercury's not as hot as Venus so 'Take a walk on a hot planet' would be more accurate.

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Intel has driven a dagger through Microsoft's mobile strategy

LeeE
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Logic & Gui

I think that the real problem here is combining both the logic and the gui in the app, not whether it runs on x86 or ARM. If the gui is split from the app logic then re-compiling the app logic to run on a different architecture or platform is relatively easy; you then just create whatever interfaces you need to control/talk to the logic in the app.

A lot, even a majority, of server software already works this way.

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First rocket finally departs Russia's Vostochny cosmodrome

LeeE
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Trees

All those trees around the complex == firewood?

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Nanoparticle boffinry could boost battery life

LeeE
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Hmm...

"The engineers found that icosahedral nanoparticles, which have 20 different sides, stored less energy than cube- or pyramid-shaped nanoparticles."

This seems sort of predictable - the Hydrogen will react with the Palladium nano-particles via the surface of the nano-particle and, for the same mass/volume, an icosahedron will have a lower surface area than a cube or pyramid shaped nano-particle.

But I guess that's why they were testing them in the first place.

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You Leica? P9 certainly is a Great Leap Forward in imaging... for Huawei

LeeE
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Re: Is there a "best" phone camera out there?

"More light means more detail can be captured. The more pixels, on a sensor that is smaller than a larger sensor with less pixels is going to struggle with noise"

It doesn't quite work that way around; the more light, in terms of quantity of light, that a lens can collect, governed by its aperture, in combination with the sensitivity and dynamic range of the sensor, dictates how much noise there will be, whereas the resolution of the lens and sensor dictates how much detail can be captured.

The size of the sensor is pretty irrelevant, in terms of noise, but given that there's a limit to the minimum size for each pixel, a larger sensor can have more pixels. However, a larger sensor needs a longer focal-length lens to get the same image proportions, and the longer the focal-length of the lens, the further away it needs to be from the sensor e.g. a 50mm lens will produce a ~46 deg image on a 35mm sensor, with the optical center of the lens being 50mm from the sensor, but you need an 80mm lens to produce the same image with a 60mm sensor and it needs to be 80mm from the sensor (sorry for using old film sizes - couldn't quickly find typical focal lengths and sensor sizes for phones). The upshot is that with increasingly thin phones, it's not possible to move the lens further away from the sensor, to allow a larger sensor & lens.

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IT freely, a true tale: One night a project saved my life

LeeE
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Re: Priorities and empowerment

Getting your workload prioritised sounds simple enough but doesn't always work.

I was once in a situation, working for a large London Borough, where I had ten different projects on my work list. When I asked the management to prioritise the ten projects, six of them were assigned priority one, three priority two and one priority three, which didn't really solve anything.

The situation wasn't helped by the fact that the effective prioritisation scheme that the management used was to pacify whichever client made the most fuss/noise; each day it would be "drop everything and work on client X/Y/Z's project". So although I could try to plan work, to make the most effective use of my time, it was pointless because any plans I made were more than likely to be overridden on a daily basis.

It finally reached the point where, on arriving at work one day, my manager told me to visit four different clients, in four different locations around the borough, and "pretend to work on their project" (and he did say "pretend" because he knew that after having to drive between the different locations and then back stuff up before doing anything I wouldn't actually have any time left to do any proper work).

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Glum, depressed ... and addicted to Facebook, Twitter? There's a link, say medical eggheads

LeeE
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Re: Get a Life!

It seems axiomatic to me that if people had something better to do, as in terms of more rewarding/satisfying, than social media then they'd be doing it, so the fact that they are resorting to social media indicates that they haven't.

In some ways, social media is a bit like religion: a crutch for those who need it.

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Dodgy software will bork America's F-35 fighters until at least 2019

LeeE
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Re: A boondoggle through and through and now ejection seats are also a problem?

The funding and the go-ahead for the F-35 project would have been on the basis that it was a necessity. However, the project's delays and lateness rather seem to indicate the opposite.

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If Jack Sprat ran an IT department

LeeE
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Sponsored content

I remember when it was just proper news articles and features 'round these parts.

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Hackers turn to angr for automated exploit discovery and patching

LeeE
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Which countries?

The article says that the Shellphish team has members in the US, France, China, Brazil, and Senegal but the flags shown in the team photo seem to indicate that they're from the US, Italy, China, Senegal, Russia, Germany and India.

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Linux fans may be in for disappointment with SQL Server 2016 port

LeeE
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Re: linicks

"Raised a few eyebrows" would've been about right.

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LeeE
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Excitement?

"Microsoft's decision to bring SQL Server 2016 to Linux caused great excitement in the open-source world this week."

I found this announcement quite, but not totally, surprising, and rather more interesting, because of some of the possible implications for the future, but exciting? No, not even mildly.

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Airbus' Mars plane precursor survives pressure test

LeeE
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Re: Bernoulli's Principle?

"Any object being pushed through the air with a positive aspect ratio will push the air it displaces down and forwards."

I assume by "positive aspect ratio" you mean positive Angle of Attack (AoA), but the problem with this explanation is that, as the AoA increases, the lift vector would reduce and the drag vector would increase, and stalls due to upper airflow separation wouldn't be an issue because, in this explanation, all lift is generated below the wing. In practice though, both the lift & drag vectors increase with higher AoAs until upper flow separation leads to a stall and loss of lift.

It's also worth considering a non-symmetrical aerofoil with positive camber; such an aerofoil can have a completely flat lower surface but will still generate lift at zero AoA.

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