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* Posts by TheWeddingPhotographer

91 posts • joined 11 Apr 2012

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Beware Brit cops bearing battering rams. Four nabbed over Trojan claims

TheWeddingPhotographer

Small beer in the grand scheme of things

“This operation demonstrates once again that all of UK law enforcement is working to respond effectively to cyber crime, and together we will continue to collaboratively target those who use technology to misuse other people’s devices, steal their money, or unlawfully access confidential information," said Archibald. ®

Lets say it how it is...

The UK economy lost (estimated) 6.8 billion to cyber crime over the last year.

We have cyber bulling that remains un-dealt with too.

We have terrorists organising themselves on social media.

We have the big players dodging taxes.

We have companies playing fast and loose with data, with breaches all over the place.

Hence, In the grand scheme of things, this isn't news.

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Windows Phone will snatch biz No 2 spot from Android – analyst

TheWeddingPhotographer

999

Sorry, closing down for an update

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Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned

TheWeddingPhotographer

The Equadorians look bad

its a legal cock up, making the Ecuadorians look bad. I don't see why they haven't thrown him out.

Superficially, it looks like he acted like a loose canon for a while, with no respect fro anyone, broke laws in several places, and now is playing the system. He needs to man up, and face justice

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TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: Since we're paying £7000 a day for some police officers to lurk around the embassy

Let's hope he doesn't call them a bunch of plebs when he walks out

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Who is out there waiting to spy on you or steal your data?

TheWeddingPhotographer

Live our own lives

“In the near future, when every man and woman may have 2,000 fixed IP addresses allocated to them, imagine a car manufacturer which has just released a fully cyber-connected car. Every imaginable part has a fixed address and is controlled by a free operating system,” says Amar Singh, CEO and founder of the GiveADay initiative.

“After selling 20 million cars, a major vulnerability, similar to Shellshock, is discovered in the operating system that the car manufacturer has used. This catastrophic vulnerability can cause the engine to die or switch off and bypasses all controls."

It strikes me that we need to start living our own lives again. Why does a car or your toilet need to be connected? Do we really need our phones to tell us how to live our lives?

Be free, go for a walk in the woods and leave your tech goodies at home and smell the air. Appreciate that nature is awesome, not the fact a SD card is now just a tiny bit quicker.

As individuals, It is easy to mitigate against most of the risks... Just be a human.

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BEST EVER broadband? Oh no you DIDN'T, Sky – ad watchdog

TheWeddingPhotographer

business model based on acquisition, not retention

The issue is, they just want to sign you up,and roll you along. Loyalty isn't rewarded anymore

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TheWeddingPhotographer

BT moaning about accuracy

PMSL

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Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION

TheWeddingPhotographer

Default passords

Simple - don't have one factory shipped... Require the user to set one before the device will work

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Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU

TheWeddingPhotographer

Credit card upfront

What would be more honest, and stop 99.99% of the kiddies getting caught, is to say:

"This game is free to download, but we require to verify your credit details card upfront for in-app purchases."

However, when an in-app purchase is then made, a credit card is required again at the point of purchasing.

This would let mum's and dad's know what's what in advance of installing the game, and then let them agree to each in-app purchase, (f they were foolish enough to install it).

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Our system handles £130bn and it's BUST. Want the job of fixing it? Apply to UK.gov

TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: Ok enlighten me.

Turd dodging, lack of fines for IT screw ups, must have a good bullshit filter...

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TheWeddingPhotographer

They can pay me £600 a day

It will still be a screw up... but at least it will be explained clearly

"It's a turd, I rolled it in glitter, isn't it lovely! Have a happy election, let's start again next term."

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TheWeddingPhotographer

Tied up in knots

"The job advert also said the contractor will "initially be focused on the project to re-mediate the Enhanced Transition Service Enhancements (ETSE) solution which has been out of support/security accreditation since 2013.""

Stick big hard words in there, but actually say nothing then.

"re-mediate the Enhanced Transition Service Enhancements (ETSE) solution" = Fix the bungled supposed upgrade

WTF - Enhanced and Enhancements in the same axronym! They really do need to get over themselves and start thinking about get the job done

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GOTCHA: Google caught STRIPPING SSL from BT Wi-Fi users' searches

TheWeddingPhotographer

Like opening your mail

I expect my ISP to just handle my traffic, not read it, nor report back to company whose service I am using.

If my aunt sends me a letter, it is of no concern to the postal service, what my address is, or what my aunt's address is, nor the contents of the letter. They are simply expected to deliver it

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Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP

TheWeddingPhotographer

Let's "Unspin this"

"As part of a performance update to Azure Storage, an issue was discovered that resulted in reduced capacity across services utilizing Azure Storage, including Virtual Machines, Visual Studio Online, Websites, Search and other Microsoft services," Zander told the Northern Hemisphere.

"During the roll out we discovered an issue that resulted in storage blob front ends going into an infinite loop, which had gone undetected during fighting (testing).

"As part of a performance update" = the rest of the comment I am going to give you is utter bullshit

"An issue was discovered that resulted in reduced capacity across services utilizing Azure Storage" = No shit, the users discovered this faster than the tech's, It's easy to "discover an issue" when your phone-line is being burnt down about it.

"During the roll out we discovered an issue that resulted in storage blob front ends going into an infinite loop" = Data does not go into an infinite loop, the commands dealing with it can, if they are ill-conceived. i.e. : I detect a change, send me the new file thus I detect a change send me the new file

"which had gone undetected during fighting (testing)." = It wasn't tested (at all) properly

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Ofcom snatches 700MHz off digital telly, hands it to mobile data providers

TheWeddingPhotographer

Twisted and skewed

And more content will be on Sky via cable... Go figure..

It's a good job the peeps in London get a decent phone signal and cable then.. now for the rest of us with country broadband and no signal, there is Freeview.

What's more, most ariel filters that have currently been fitted and are being sold right now, reject anything over 800mhz. So essentially we will all need new filters too!

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Microsoft's Azure goes TITSUP PLANET-WIDE AGAIN in cloud FAIL

TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: And instead you reccomend

I see that, but my question was more pointy...

One day last year, we had more traffic to a site than we did over the previous month. Cloud servers let us add more servers behind a loadbalancer, autoscale etc.

If we paid to have that level of server capacity 24/7 365 we would make a loss. By adopting a hybrid approach,when it gets busy we can scale up and sell (instead of crash) and then scale back down again as traffic drops.

Back in the day when a "dedicated server" was all you could get, you had a choice - pay for lot's of redundancy, or come to a grinding halt when the when server gets too busy. At least now there is a sensible middle ground.

Not all applications are the same, and for corporate email, which is fairly steady Exchange Server on a fixed size box makes sense. It was the global "all cloud is bad" point I was challenging.

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TheWeddingPhotographer

Agree

you are right, It really doesn't make sense. It ought to be resilient in it's nature. It feels like they have spread the chocolate very thinly on the cake

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TheWeddingPhotographer

And instead you reccomend

Being devils advocate here... What else do you recommend?

For example you are setting up a reasonable size website that needs to be scalable to suit the business need, not break the bank and yet and can grow and contract resources to suit the demand?

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YOU are the threat: True confessions of real-life sysadmins

TheWeddingPhotographer

There is a conundrum here

The issue is that employers who employ System Admins often don't know best practice or worst practice. They often don't know the first thing about networking.

So what happens - the keys are handed over to the admin, and then the admin generally is the one setting (or driving the set-up of any rules / policies)

In a large team, this is usually mitigated, as said admin is working with a team of peers, and has a supervisor who knows what's what

In anything other than a large team, the admin has a huge amount of responsibility that generally is not policed. it is that sort of admin that poses the most risk

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ATTACK OF THE DRONES: ‘Nefarious’ private use rising, says top Blighty copper

TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: That's Because...

Too true...

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UK urged to stop bigging up startups, feed 'growing' firms

TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: Agree

I was thinking that..

I was also thinking that some of the most talented programmers / IT bod's in the country allready live in a commutable distance of there too

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TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: Outside london?

On explaining to a shop assistant in London that (at the time) I lived in Aylesbury, I was then asked...

"What tube stop is Aylesbury"

I then explained that Aylesbury wasn't on the tubes and was in Buckinghamshire. the response was.

"Eeeewwww... Are you frightened of the cows, I would be"

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TheWeddingPhotographer

@ noxex

I get the sentiment, but just like in the UK Olympic program, there needs to be some strategy for it. (we could all learn a lot in the way we changed our approach to sports funding in the UK)

The skill, as any gardener will tell you is that you must select the very best seeds, and ruthlessly weed out the ones which will die early. Some things are not worth supporting.

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TheWeddingPhotographer

Agree

I agree.

Reward, promote and support success

Hold the hand of those with the fizz and exuberance of a of new idea.

As for the regional thing... Do not build more things in London - it is a hot, busy, overcrowded place already. The rest of the country is so overlooked in most areas.

On the whole, if new (big) developments were pushed into the regions - besides the local growth the country would benefit overall, as any sustained growth would have space to thrive (in all senses of the word)

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HPC bods boogie to 68 new Top500 hits at New Orleans show

TheWeddingPhotographer

Impressive stuff

Seriously impressive work. This stuff makes things like weather forecasts actually accurate, and the crunching in big science possible. Well done

Hint. Don't install Windows on one, it will for sure come to a grinding halt in 6 months, and want to restart when it decides it want to.

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Northern Ireland website leaves front door open, spills users' data

TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: Mission accomplished!!

The short-cut.. drink more Guiness. The more I drink, the better my Irish gets

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TheWeddingPhotographer

It was the advert hacked onto the side of the site that really unravelled the lack of security...

Ar mhaith leat mé a Tarmak do thiomáint

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NOKIA - Not FINNished yet! BEHOLD the somewhat DULL MYSTERY DEVICE!

TheWeddingPhotographer

Don Jolly - Eat your heart out

And then.. There was just the ringtone...

De da da da de da da da de de da

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Ofcom tackles complaint over Premier League footie TV rights

TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: Really?

next we will be talking about immigrants in football taking all the jobs of the locals!

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TheWeddingPhotographer

Well said. The same applies to F1, which after a lifetime of watching religiously, I now no longer watch

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MYSTERY Russian satellite: ORBITAL WEAPON? Sat GOBBLER? What?

TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: Expert opinion

Artistic.. (obviously)

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TheWeddingPhotographer

Ask them

Ask them, the answer will strike at least one possibility off the list.

Of course they may need to keep a track on thier fighter planes they keep flying about with no notice to ATC or similar

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China BLOCKS Verizon's EdgeCast before internet meeting

TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: Why on earth...

"It's like letting Russia host the worlds biggest gay-pride parade..."

That would be a great day for humanity... Very unlikely though

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TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: I disagree...

You make a great point. Consumers wont give a hoot. It wil be companies like Verizon who eventually will get ground down by the pettiness, and not bother investing in the direction of China

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TheWeddingPhotographer

They will soon learn

They will soon learn that if they want foreign consumers to flip over the widget and see "Made in China", they will need to accept that things in the business / economic / social / political / human world are a 2 way street.

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So you want to introduce a BYOD plan. Where do you start?

TheWeddingPhotographer

Make it easy for users

There should be an APP for that. End of.

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Keen to get CRITICAL PAYMENT systems up QUICKLY after HACK?

TheWeddingPhotographer

Redundancy

Well if we all had 2 of everything, we would all have backups.

If we all had 4 of everything, we would have totally redundant systems ready to swing in when the poo hits the fan.

Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on your point of view) infrastructure, programming, staff and the like is generally provided to a managed budget, and risks generally factored in. There is a balance - risk Vs cost. and there is a judgement to be made. Money is an object, we cant escape that.

When a criminal ransacks say a bricks and mortar shop at 10.00pm generally the glazing firm has to clear up the mess a bit and board the place up, the shop keeper has to come in and appraise the situation and in the morning the staff need to make the place safe. Eventually, the police send the forensic people around to figure out what went on.

I guess net/ system admins are in the same boat... See a DOS attack, close the port to that IP range.. Find a rogue script - isolate it and kill it off. i.e. they are the first line of defence, and sometimes their work, naturally screws the evidence chain.

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DEATH fails to end mobile contract: Widow forced to take HUBBY's ASHES into shop

TheWeddingPhotographer

Does this not depend on what sort of account. A joint account (for example) would continue to operate. Had the account been frozen, the phone company couldn't take payments.

I agree. First port of call - phone the bank, cancel the DD. Second port of call, recorded delivery letter with a copy of death certificate.

If they want to pursue it after that, then let them TRY to enforce it, they wont get far.

This case illustrates something we see over and over again in modern life - Customer service fell out of the window in the race to the bottom.

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Snapper's decisions: Whatever happened to REAL photography?

TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: Good article

They did on the D70. Hence why one still sits in my camera bag.. The flash sync to silly numbers :-)

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TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: Digital photography isn't dead yet

Agree.. I was wondering where a mid/top line Nikon / Canon fell into tall of this. A D3s is pretty perfect for nearly all work out of a studio, and a D3x for nrarly all work in a studio.

... And as you mentioned, the Pentax 645 digital sits in the middle ground,

Yes there is a place for large and medium format, but practicality and usability also need to be flung in the mix.

In the real world, we do want cameras we can get mucky, use in the rain, snow, climb mountains with, put in a underwater housing etc. etc. Or even, just take a snap for a text message with..

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TheWeddingPhotographer

Re: Many good points - however

It's the combination of a lot of things that produce a great shot...

Opportunity, Creative vision, luck, location, gear, light, time of day, timing, patience and skill...

My observation over the last years is that most want to skip: Getting up at dawn for the best light, learning the skill and patience

What most tend to do nowadays is believe that Canon or Nikon provide the technology for making up for all of the above

In the main, to start of with (besides creative vision), you need great light, and if you don't have great light, you need to add it yourself. If you cant change this, you are pushing the water uphill before you started. You then need a great composition... that can mean working that extra bit harder to climb the mountain to get things right.

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EVERYTHING needs crypto says Internet Architecture Board

TheWeddingPhotographer

No it doesn't.. We only need to encrypt where it is needed. It is a overhead we don't need. More bloat, harder diagnosis..

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DAY ZERO, and COUNTING: EVIL 'UNICORN' all-Windows vuln - are YOU patched?

TheWeddingPhotographer

Run before walking competently

The issue is much more that MS seem to think that "constantly upgrading" is good. Sometimes they do this so quickly, the wheel has rotated and the basics were swept under the carpet.

I see Windows like an onion, with DOS at or near the centre of it... With layer on layer of complexity and bloat added to it. The difficulty with this, it that you kind of get stuck with the core, and I feel the developers only appear to concentrate on the newest outer layer.

I have wondered for a long time now if there needs to be a philosophical and architectural shift in the whole approach to windows.

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Shove over, 2FA: Authentication upstart pushes quirky login tech

TheWeddingPhotographer

Security for boring people then

Let me get this straight... You do something "out of your norm", and your phone says no...

Happy holidays

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Fiendish CryptoLocker ransomware survives hacktivists' takedown

TheWeddingPhotographer

The issue with these scumbags is that you cant "follow the money" that's why ultimatally the Bitcoin model, is deemed for failure.

Essentially Bitcoin circumvents the tax man, Accountancy etc. etc. Eventually, governments will have to agree to regulate this sort of venture, or close them down, as it undermines pretty much everything modern economics is built with

As for all of the spamming / scamming scumbags, Im sure Government agencies know enough to close them down. It appears, from a espionage point of view, they have pretty much embedded themselves into all aspects of the internet

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MPs back call to boycott low-taxed tat from Amazon over Xmas

TheWeddingPhotographer

If only they understood the web....

Of course this really helps the "hard working, British tax paying" companies that happen to use Amazon as a sales channel

(Not)

If the Muppet in Government concentrated on making simple, un-ambiguous tax laws, they could leave the rest of us to do whatever it is we do best... run successful businesses and generate revenue for UK PLC

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Texas teen jailed for four months over sarcastic Facebook comment

TheWeddingPhotographer

It is really sad..

Firstly that the comment was made, it was disrespectful. Society seems to have degenerated somewhat

Secondly that we feel that adding "LOL " makes everything a joke. Much better to just say what you mean and stop hiding behind the veil

Thirdly that the courts / police seem to have had a brain transplant

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CLIMATE CHANGE forces women into PROSTITUTION - US politicians

TheWeddingPhotographer

Well that is obvious

Of course it is a common fact (not) that all women in "warmer" countries are prostitutes

What a stupid debate

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Google report shows record rise in government takedown requests

TheWeddingPhotographer

It is all about convergence

Across the world, humans that live in very disparate cultures and under very different regimes find the internet to be a very good leveller - in terms of trade, humanity, access to information and reason. Meanwhile insecure authoritarian type regimes and governments (some of which are in the west) try their hardest to maintain what is increasingly becoming a fragile position

This is why the internet is such a good thing for humanity. Eventually, no mater who you are or where you are, you will be able to communicate and see how the rest of the world lives, and have some hope, that the local despot's power is eroded

In the end, the people just wont put up with it

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jQuery 2.0 kicks old Internet Explorer versions to the curb

TheWeddingPhotographer

It will be all about customers

If you are writing a website for young trendy some-things, you can make a broad assumption that they will have up-to-date browsers and OS's. However if your demographic includes, families, crinklies, people who work in an office, B2B etc.. then you virtually "NEED" to support older browsers and OS's

Example, If you run a bricks and mortar shop, would your sales manager be please that you disenfranchised 15% of your target audience in some way, say by not having a wheelchair ramp, or by having a window display aimed at 20 year olds only, when your stock covers the whole market..Your sales manager would be very annoyed. Not supporting some browsers is very much like this

As the cost to market for a e-commerce store (for example) is a minute percentage than that of a regular shop on the high street, it beggars belief that people will not invest in supporting users...

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