* Posts by Tannin

194 posts • joined 8 Apr 2012

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Flash flushed as Google orders almost all ads to adopt HTML5

Tannin

So, just ban all 3rd party Javascript.

Of course, this would have the side effect of scrambling a few zillion cut and paste, bandwidth-hogging, slow loading code spagetti websites built on barely-underrstood bloated rubbish library imports ...

.... so when you think about it, there is no actual downside.

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Map of Tasmania to be shorn of electrical, data links to outside world

Tannin

Re: Tasmania's world heritage wirelessness

This is no time for exploring Tassies magnificent outdoors, Winkeypop, it's all burning up at present - for much the same reasons as lie behind the dams being empty.

PS: though there is another reason for the empty dams: they ran them beyond capacity a couple of years back in order to game the carbon tax system in anticipation of a change of government.Now they are paying the price.

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Tannin

Re: Aussie slang

Maps of Tasmania are very rare these days. (Unfortunately).

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Oracle to kill off Java browser plugins with JDK 9

Tannin

Re: Isn't Ask Toolbar != Java plugin?

The link is quite simple, AC. It is called "money" and it's very unfair because somebody else has got some of it and Oracle wants all of it.

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Someone please rid me of this turbulent Windows 10 Store

Tannin

Re: What went wrong?

" I'm waiting for an XP-like skin or shell that returns identifiable structure to my desktop computing experience."

Hello? Earth calling lost astonaut? Hello? Classic Shell has been out for years, and well-known since Windows 8 was new. What are you waiting for? The boxed version on DVD?

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The last time Earth was this hot hippos lived in Britain (that’s 130,000 years ago)

Tannin

Re: @GrumpenKraut

BTW, Constitution is capitalized

No it isn't.

Capitalisation is for proper nouns and certain well-defined scientific terms. Other than when starting a sentence, "constitution" begins with a lower case "c" - except when the word forms a part of a proper noun. An example is "the Constitution of the United States". This is the formal title of a specific document and as such is capitalised if and only if you are using that exact form. When you write (for example) "the American constitution" or "let's amend the constitution", it is never capitilised.

This is the exact same rule you use to determine the capitilisation of organisational titles. The "chairman of a golf club" vs the "Chairman of the Particular Exact Golf Club", or "Dr Smith over there is a professor of physics at Oxford" vs "this is Dr Smith, Professor of Physics at Oxford University. In each case, the first is a descriprion, the second is a formal title, which is why you write them differently.

Clear? Too subtle a difference for you to get your mind around? Perhaps. You don't seem to be doing too well at subtle so far, but we live in hope.

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Telstra dominates NBN retail, but less than you might think

Tannin

Re: There's more to it than that (in my experience)

Very few, I should think. Certainly I have never heard of such a thing before. The normal case is that for the six months before and the six months after NBN rollout in your street, you are emptying the letter box with a wheelbarrow because of all the flyers from ISPs spruiking their NBN deals.

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What did we learn today? Microsoft has patented the slider bar

Tannin

Re: People still use Corel products ?

Corel have really buggered up the sulime Quattro Pro, but it's still vastly more pleasant to use than Excel.

You know what I really, really miss in computing these days? Companies who just made standout quality products as a matter of pride and habit - Borland and Word Perfect are the obvious examples.

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Mozilla: Five... Four... Three... Two... One... Thunderbirds are – gone

Tannin

Escape from Lemming Mode

Given that the Firefox developers have been operating entirely in Lemming Mode for the past few years, this must count as very good news for anyone who uses Thunderbird.

Thunderbird is clunky and full of weird usability gotchas, but it is still the benchmark email client.* Castrating the chaotic current Thunderbird UI by applying Australis-style "fixes" could only make things worse. Under new, non-suicidal management, perhaps we will see a Thunderbird renaisance. At very worst, we will see nothing much happen, which is non-ideal but at least a lot better than letting the Australis morons wreck it.

* Footnote: the fact that clunky old Thunderbird is the unquestioned benchmark email client says a very great deal about all the other email clients, and none of it good.

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British woman loses £1.6 million to romance scam love rats

Tannin

Re: Small change?

Hit the nail on the head there. There is nothing here to indicarte how much 1.6b was to her. We are all assuming it was most of what she owned, a very large slice of what she owned, or even her entire fortune, but we have no evidence to back that. It is entirely possible that she could drop 1.6b the same way that I could drop $50 on a steak and a bottle of red, and feel it just as much.

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Tannin

Re: Please tell me...

Daddy.

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Tannin

Re: "Victims of this fraud must understand that they are not foolish "

Just so. Foolish is as foolish does. It was very dumb.

(I, of course, have never, ever done anything foolish in the name of love.)

Well, hardly ever.

OK, not very often.

I mean not regularly.

Not more than a few times.

Well, OK, quite a lot.

Can I go now?

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Yahoo! Mail! is! still! a! thing!, tries! blocking! Adblock! users!

Tannin

Re: imap

Re Mark 85: "As long as they don't tell me to kill my HOSTS file, no sweat. I'll generously turn off adblocker... and just keep updating the HOSTS file."

^ Good thinking that man. You might like to start with, oh, just to put something completely at random:

0.0.0.0 yahoo.com

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Horrid checkbox download bundlers drop patch-frozen Chrome

Tannin

Re: Google being "the internet" is part of the problem

"it seems that the users wanted to install RealPlayer and downloaded it from the first hit from Google."

Hmmm ...

Real Player. They wanted to install it.

Oh dear.

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NBN mulls capacity charge revamp

Tannin

Re: The only thing that needs to happen

Spot on Paul. Would you buy a bottle of milk that promised to contain "up to two litres"?

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How to build a city fit for 50℃ heatwaves

Tannin

White paint is good. But there are indeed more effective materials - and they don't use silver so far as I know. See, for example, http://colorbond.com/learn/articles/thermatech-solar-reflectance-technology

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Opera Jon's sparkling Vivaldi proves the browser isn't dead

Tannin

UI still needs important work

Love the idea, all strength to it. Sadly, there seems to have been too little progress on the UI front.

There is still no single tab close button - all versions of real Opera up to and including 12.16 have this; so does Sea Monkey, so does Pale Moon, so does Firefox (albeit only via extension since the Firefox UI wreckers went mad on Australis). For many power users this is a use/avoid level feature. (Count me amongst them.)

There is still no obvious way to get a clean page without that annoying and useless panel bar down the left-hand side of the screen - you can move it but I can't find a way to get rid of it.CORRECTION: there is a way now, but it's not obvious - you have to find a little icon in the bottom left corner. Once you do though, it apparently works fine. All that's needed to complete this improvement now is put that setting where it belongs: in settings -> panel.

I won't list more minor things as the improvements are coming along nicely and I'm confident they will be sorted soon enough.

Without a single tab close button (i.e., an option to have the control to close the current tab always in the same place where it can be used automatically and without conscious thought - nothing worse in a UI than having to search for basic controls that move around) I can't view Vivaldi as a possibility for prime time use yet, but this latest version seems good enough now to replace Chrome as the 5th-choice browser on my machine. (And yes, I do use all five.)

Very keen to see Vivaldi progress: it's got nearly all the parts in place now.

PS: get it right - that means a modern browser with a UI as good as or better than Opera 12.x - and I'd be happy to pay cash money for it. I know they are looking at other ways of funding it, nevertheless, for many of us our browser is the single most-often-used program on our computers. If it cost $100 to have a better browser, I'd pay without an instant's hesitation.

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Wikipedia cracks the five-million article barrier, in English

Tannin

Re: @Chuq But it isn't in English

"If there were two English versions of each article, 99% of each pair of articles would be identical - can you imagine trying to keep them in sync with each other?"

This is already the case for every other different language version. How many are there now, more than 100?

In any case, most of the Wikipedia articles are short and cover subjects of mind-blowing triviality. Of those 5 million pages, maybe 10% are worth keeping.

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Tannin

But it isn't in English

But it isn't in English. Most of Wikipedia (en) is written in American dialect. An actual English version is desperately needed.

(American speakers would benefit from this too by having their own Wikipedia written in their own language.)

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It's almost time for Australia's fibre fetishists to give up

Tannin

Counterpoint

I posted earlier to say that the article is nonsense - made much worse by the daft headline, but nonsense nevertheless. I have always regarded Simon as a very smart cookie and long since got into the habit of simply taking articles under his byline as holy writ. Sadly, I'll have to read more critically now - trust once broken is hard to repair.

Having said all that, there are certainly some criticisms to be made of the original NBN rollout. In the details of its hurried implementation it was wasteful, chaotic and badly managed. No question of that. Try talking to anyone in the building trade: they regard NBNco with universal contempt: the organisation is chaotic, disorganised, arrogant, and you can't ever get hold of anyone who actually knows what's going on.

Going beyond on-ground implementation to mid-level planning, it was just as bad. Take my case: my street has had an excellent HFC cable system in place for more than a decade. Sure it is technically inferior to genuine FTTP, but it works very well in practice, the infrastructure is still quite new and in good order, it has years of useful service life left in it, and it is plenty fast enough for almost all purposes. (My new-last-month NBN fibre connection is significantly slower, about half the speed on average, though that is more a matter of throttling to the lowish speed I'm prepared to pay for off-peak, and the backhaul network's inability to cope with the huge daily surge in Netfix movie traffic between 5 and 11. The HFC connection (through the same company) slowed too, but not as much as the NBN one.)

What person with half a brain would prioritise NBN fibre service to a locality with a good quality existing HFC service over delivery of the new service to other parts of the same city with no HFC and a lousy, unreliable ADSL system running on ancient hardware? Completely daft! (No skin off my nose, of course, I'll never need to replace the new fibre and I can have it lots faster anytime I feel like paying the (much higher!) price for a better contract.Well, I will be able to, as soon as they fix the Netfix backhaul overload problem, which we assume they will sooner or later.)

Nevertheless, the all-fibre NBN plan was, despite its many faults of on-ground implementation (e.g., doing least-needy suburbs first instead of last), unquestionably the right plan overall, and a vastly better plan than the even more wasteful, chaotic, and badly managed joke that Turnbull replaced it with. No fact in this article contradicts that. Lift your game, Simon.

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Tannin

What a load of rubbish,

To get that performance, you'd need to lay a brand new copper line and get all the details exactly right - i.e, spend more than it takes simply to lay a fibre line. FAIL.

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Microsoft now awfully pushy with Windows 10 on Win 7, 8 PCs – Reg readers hit back

Tannin

A very useful clean-up and block script

I've been using this very useful tool: https://voat.co/v/technology/comments/459263 to remove all the scumware from Windows 7 & 8 - including not just the Windows 10 stealth download stuff but also the tracking a telemetry. Seems to work perfectly. Recommended.

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Junk your IT. Now. Before it drags you under

Tannin

You've got it backwards

Computers aren't any faster because we are afraid to throw away working systems? Rubbish!

Computers aren't much faster than they were in 1995 because we keep replacing working systems! (By "we" I mean us software guys and users and admins as opposed to the hardware people.) Because we keep throwing away perfectly usable systems in order to replace them with new, supposedly improved, systems, nothing ever gets finished; nothing ever gets fine-tuned; nothing ever gets the bugs worked out before it is replaced by something bigger and "better". By "better" we mean that it may or may not bring functional improvements and useful new features, but these almost always come at a horrendous cost in code bloat, responsiveness, and system overhead. Oh, and a whole new set of bugs and expensive UI changes that cost way more in lost time and training than they ever save in productivity. By the time two-thirds of the bugs are sorted, of course, we throw the whole expensive and now fairly workable system away and start again.

Because software people have become so obsessed with replacement rather than improvement, we now see huge, very complicated support code libraries devoted purely to the task of making this replacement faster and easier. The result, all too often, is sluggish, buggy, insecure bloat. Look, for example, at something as simple as an ordinary web page: in nearly every case, this simple task is achieved at the cost of thousands of lines of load-on-demand scripting library and code framework bloat. No wonder it's slow and buggy and insecure! No wonder we feel the need to replace the damn thing so rapidly!

The only, repeat only reason we have been able to get away with this gross strategic incompetence is that the hardware wizards keep on delivering massive raw power boosts which serve as enomous subsidies to the dysfunctional and uneconomic software industry.

Well, OK, I'm exaggerating a bit. But only a bit. I'm far closer to the truth of the matter than the software salesman who wrote this PR department press release article.

(PS: Sometimes new versions of software actually are better. Mostly not, all things considered, especially not when allow for the huge free boost that your new hardware provided, but it does happen. Crikey mo, the latest versions of Photoshop are actually much nicer to use than the likes of CS2 was not so long ago .... but then that was inevitable. Adobe do like to change things and it wasn't as if anything they could do would have actually made it worse. The only way left to go was up. But it still only functions at all because of doubled and redoubled hardware.)

(PPS: Sometimes we also see really significant progress in software. That simple web page example I mentioned above - now you can recode it using nothing more than HTML5 and CSS3 and not have to change it again except to improve it here and there. Simple, practical, easy to code, concise, and lightning fast. It's a massive improvement over the awful HTML 4.x or XHTML that came before. But everybody still writes new pages every year or two using 16 Javascript includes and a complex, bloated framework, and the web gets worse. Similar arguments apply in many other areas.)

(PPPS: try running some nice old software on modern hardware. Fast? Responsive? We are talking instant!)

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Companies grow faster when they buy more IT. Yes they do

Tannin

Re: MRDA

Who?

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Laptop imports declared SECRET in Australia

Tannin

One assumes insanely expensive cost-no-object kit for the secret police security force so that they can better protect watch us. Don't talk about it, you'll be dissapeared and no-one will know.

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Surface Book: Microsoft to turn unsuccessful tab into unsuccessful laptop

Tannin

In your dreams

"Apple's hegemony as the luxury laptop ... vendor of choice."

In your dreams. Two or three well-known and long-established specialist computer hardware makers compete constantly to be the most-wanted high-end laptop brand. Hint: none of them are called "Apple" or "Microsoft".

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Australian justice minister calls the Feds to finger Twitter-spoofer

Tannin

This is news?

This is news? At last count, there were twenty five prominent members of the Parliamentary Liberal Party plus five members of the assorted NLP, CLP and Nationl Parties impersonating ministers of the crown. (Oh and a dozen parliamentary secretaries also pretending to be quasi-ministers, if they count.)

For some obscure reason, none of them have been prosecuted yet. Possibly this is because very few seem to have actually tricked anyone much into thinking they are really ministers of the crown, so it could be argued that there is no deception involved.

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Photoshop for 40 quid: Affinity Photo pushes pixels further than most

Tannin

Let me know when it works on computers.

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Almost all dot-science malicious, dot-cricket rigged, researchers find

Tannin

I'd like a magic tool to auto-block all domains outside of the traditional .com, .net,. .co.uk, .org.au, .gov.nz, and so on. Frankly, I remember seeing sites that were actually worth visiting even once on weird TLDs (and I count .biz, for example, as another "weird" one) possibly as often as twice. Ever. Wouldn't miss any of them in the slightest.

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Seagate births 8TB triplets and a 2TB mobile nipper

Tannin

Movement at last

Great to see some genuine movement at last. It seems like years since we have seen a capacity increase. Hell, it is years, and way too many of them.

None of these drives is of general interest - i.e., all three are specialised items for particular, narrowly defined uses - but we now have reasonable grounds to anticipate a long overdue lift in capacities of standard drives. Seagate's brilliant 750MB and 1TB laptop drives have given great service, but they are way too small. Put me first in the queue for a 2TB 2.5 inch hybrid as soon as they make it. (It's even tempting to look at the 2TB drive announced today, but it would seem like a terrible slug after the luxury of a hybrid.) Bigger desktop drives will be more than welcome too.

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Tannin

Not stupid, just ignorant of the way hard drive heads work: the height of the head (which is critical - if that is wrong the drive fails!) is determined by aerodynamics. The head flies just barely above the surface of the disc, never touching, held aloft by the rush of air (or helium) as the drive spins.

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Google's Chrome to gag noisy tabs until you click on them

Tannin

Not before time. But the real question is why haven't the other browsers done this long since instead of slavishly apeing the dumbed down Chrome UI and ignoring the aspects of Chrome which are actually good? (Yes, I'm looking at you Firefox. Stop staring out the window and pay attention like the other children.)

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Microsoft drops rush Internet Explorer fix for remote code exec hole

Tannin

Re: "A simple fix for this is,,,

An even simpler fix is to use a decent bloody browser in the first place. Using Internet Explorer is - no two ways about it - just plain stupid.It gets pawned time after time after time. Just don't. It's not that hard.

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Use QuickTime … and become part of the collective

Tannin

What is the point of complaining about Flash when you are still shipping Quicktime? Two shocking duds which were dreadful early on and haven't improved. When they are both gone - may that day be soon - neither one will be missed in the slightest.

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CAUGHT: Lenovo crams unremovable crapware into Windows laptops – by hiding it in the BIOS

Tannin

Re: Bit of a shame most of you can't read

Quite so, 1980s coder. Just in case you missed it (from your reply I'm unsure) my "nobody cares much outside the enterprise" remark was directed at the Think-branded desktop products, not the much-loved Thinkpad laptops.

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Tannin

Bit of a shame most of you can't read

Bit of a shame most of you can't read. As with (almost) all of the recent Lenovo fails, it does not apply to Thinkpads, only the el-cheapo "Lenovo" branded kit.

There was one batch of cheap(ish) consumer-grade Thinkpads that had a completely different embuggerance a year or so ago, but that was the only one and it's long gone.

Lenovo bought the entire IBM PC company, remember, including the R&D people, the management, everything, and although that was quite a while ago now, the Thinkpad operation still runs much the same way that it always has. (I.e., with that same extraordinary mix of brilliant engineering and stupid bureaucratic bungles which has made us laugh and made us cry for decades.) Presumably the business-oriented Think-branded desktop line also, though nobody much outside certain enterprises would care about that too much 'coz not many people buy them, or indeed any other name-brand desktop. Why would you?

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Red-stained Opera wants someone to hug it and whisper: 'No more pain, no more tears'

Tannin

Well of course they are broke

Well of course they are broke. They treated their users with absolute comtempt and now they are suffering from the inevitable backlash.

Presto, by the way, wasn't what made Opera. It never was. Users generally couldn't care less what rendering engine a browser uses so long as it puts stuff on the screen in more-or-less the expected manner. The UI is what makes or breaks a browser. It is the broken no-better-than-Chrome UI in the third-rate browser rebadged as "Opera" today that turned Opera users off en masse, not the rendering engine underneath.

The switch of rendering engine wasn't impoirtant. Presto was far better than most critics realise or admit (and still is for that matter: 12.17 works perfectly on most sites to this day). Secondly, no-one would notice if (by some magic) you switched the rendering engine underneath the browser from Presto to Gekko to Webkit every 10 minutes, so long as the UI was the same. Rendering engines don't matter. The UI matters. Opera ASA have only themselves to blame.

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Random numbers aren't, says infosec boffin

Tannin
Coat

Re: Brainstorming ....

"You really don't want anything radioactive integrated into a VLSI chip. Each radioactive decay can corrupt a bit of data, just as well as contributing to a bit of random numbers."

So you are saying the result of your calculations, given the corrupt bits, is likely to be a bit ...er .... random?

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Opera Software asks fat lady to stay shtum for a bit, but keep humming

Tannin

Hello from Pluto

"Opera's browser is very well-regarded" - what planet are you writing from? I can't believe I just read that! FMD, 99% of punters quite correctly regard Opera's browser as a no-account fifth-rate clone of Chrome with added major flaws and nothing much anyone can think of to recommend it.

Opera's brower used to be very well-regarded - indeed many good judges regarded it as best-of-breed and even its detractors granted that it pioneered all sorts of features which the other browsers eventually copied and which are now regarded as obvious standards.But that was years ago before Opera Inc inexplicably abandoned its one great product along with its loyal users and chose instead to shoot itself in the head. Nobody knows why.

(Yes, yes, Pluto isn't really a planet anymore. That's my point, really.)

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Buy a Tesla for the good of Australia, say country's dino-burners

Tannin

If every new car sold today was electric, emissions would go up - yes, burning petrol is bad, but we'd be charging most of those new electric cars on coal, which is worse. Naturally, where there is an opportunity to go EV and charge it using renewable power instead of coal off the grid, it should be taken. The point is that these opportunities are - as the article itself makes clear - quite limited at present.

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Tannin

I don't see any major market for electric cars in Australia in the near future. Not for Mr Ordinary. Thre are particular special circumstances which will suit a significant minority, of course, but we don't have the sort of major generation facilities (nuclear, in some places run-of-river hydro) which make overnight off-peak charging sensible. Here, overnight charging = mostly coal which is madness.

Best to focus on other tasks first and revist non-fossil transport in a decade or so when the technology mix and the cost reductions have both evolved a little furter.

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Mozilla's ‘Great or Dead’ philosophy may save bloated blimp Firefox

Tannin

Re: That is (hopefully) good news

"There needs to be at least ONE browser that delivers maximum power, not minimum UI."

There is. Its name is Seamonkey. These used to be another one which was even better, but it hasn't been updated for a very long time and won't be. The company (ir)responsible now markets a pointless Chrome clone under the Opera name, though nobody knows why.

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Tannin

"Firefox will soon be almost the only browser not using the WebKit rendering engine. "

Ahem .... Seamonkey and Pale Moon say hello.

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Google, Adobe barricade Flash against hacker hordes – we peek inside

Tannin

Re: Too complex

"A cut down version ... that could only play videos with no scripting ability would meet over 90% of user requirements."

Well yes, but I reckon you could safely say somewhere around 98-99%.

If you set aside Flash video playing and consider only the scripted stuff, on my (wild!) guess, it would account for some pitifully tiny share of the market and be dwarfed by even dead things like Silverlight.

Disclaimer: I am deliberately excluding areas of zero possible interest to the intelligent person, such as on-line games. They can have some other thing, with some suitably trendy name such as MutantSonOfFlash, based on the same lousy code as the existing Flash, and installed only by those who want it - i.e., practically no-one we care much about. Meanwhile, Flash can just play videos. Surely they could get that right. Couldn't they? Er ...

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600 MEELLION apps open to brute force account guessing

Tannin

AC wrote: "W3C, BSI, ISO ... *someone* should define a standard."

Oh, there is a standard. You just don't like it.

(For those who have forgotten, the standard is called "Do whatever the hell you like" and don't waste any valuable time on it 'coz it's not as if users mattter, let alone security, next question please". Everyone uses it - well, nearly everyone - but most people have a bit of trouble remembering the acroynm, which is DWTHLYD .... DWHYLC .... er ... can I have three guesses?)

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Microsoft to Windows 10 consumers: You'll get updates LIKE IT or NOT

Tannin

I've been thinking about upgrading my systems to Windows 10.

I'm not thinking about it anymore.

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LOGITECH - TECH = 'LOGI' ... that's non-Logitech tech, is it?

Tannin

Re: Now more people will get to feel the pain

The mice aren't too bad, but then any of several of the better mouse brands are just fine and go on doing exactly what you expect them to do for years. (Hint: stay away from the expensive ones, you really don't get anything from an expensive "luxury" mouse that you don't get from a plain basic model so long as it is of decent quality - anything made by Logitech (or for that matter Microsoft) in a basic OEM mouse is usually cheap, practical, and reliable).

It's the trackballs which drive me spare. Logitech make a line of trackballs which are head and shoulders superior to pretty much anything else from an ergonomic point of view. Once you get used to one you'll never want to use anything else. But they are absurdly expensive (which I can live with) and the damn things wear out very quickly (which is unforgivable in a product costing this much).

Compare with the Kensington Expert Mouse in the same broad price category which is built like a tank and lasts pretty much forever. Sadly, although the Kensington mechanical design and construction is first class, the ergonomics are not even in the same street as the cheaply-built, expensive Logitech product. So you grit your teeth and pay through the nose and buy yet another new one every couple of years.

In revenge, I make a point of buying non-Logitech OEM product for our mainstream products. Not that it achieves anything, but what can you do?

EDIT: I see that Kensington have redesigned the Expert Mouse and it's now a more sensible and practical shape. Time to try one out again, I think. If it's even half as well-made as the old model used to be it will be a winner.

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China's STILL holding up the full WD-HGST integration. Why?

Tannin

Who wrote this? A Western Digital employee? Or just someone cutting and pasting from a company press release? It is an absurd nonsense to pretend that reducing competition even further would lower prices. Good for China! Nice to see that someone (for whatever reason) is acting in the interests of consumers and businesses the world over instead of spinelessly caving in to oligopoly.Damn shame that none of our own governments have the balls to do their duty.

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Firefox to speed up dev cycle, go multi-process, rip and replace UI – soon

Tannin

Wrong date

I am honestly gobsmacked. If you had printed this story on April 1st I'd have thought it a poor effort, obviously far too exaggerated, a parody which would take no-one in, and a failure because an April Fools Day story is supposed to be absurd and ridiculous ... but just sensible enough to be credible.

WTF are those tools at Mozilla smoking? When you are in a hole you are supposed to stop digging, not send out for jackhammers and a bigger shovel.

Are you sure about the date?

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iiNet warns NBN circuits too expensive in the Netflix era

Tannin

Half-past nine local time, and my Iinet connection is unusably slow. As usual.

I'd up-vote several posts above but I can't be bothered waiting 60 seconds each time for the page to reload. Sorry guys.

Since their idiotic Netfix deal, Iinet has become terrible - and this is nothing to do with local DSL problems or anything like that, I'm on HFC cable here which is technically the next best thing to pure fibre and perfectly capable of delivering high speed - indeed it has done just that these many years. The day Netfix hit . BAM!, it turned to carp, carp, carp.

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