* Posts by DerekCurrie

285 posts • joined 6 Apr 2012

Page:

TTIP: A locked room, no internet access, two hours, 300 pages and lots of typos

DerekCurrie
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Devil

C O R P O R A T O C R A C Y

If anyone thinks TTP and TTIP have anything to do with benefitting We The People, citizens of the world, you're wrong. It's all about the corporations, their disrespect for their customers, their demands for treating us all as Default Criminals and therefore punishing us for imaginary crimes. We are not to be trusted. We are to be parasitized.

Oh and to hell with our elected governments. If such lame institutions do ANYTHING that compromises the profits of our corporate overlords, they get SUED in a kangaroo court of corporate lawyers as judges.

IOW: This is where the insanity began, sad people of the future.

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Mall owner lays blame at Apple's door for dragging down sales

DerekCurrie
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Mushroom

Hysterical Hysteria

"Last month Apple reported results that were - for the tech juggernaut - slightly lacklustre, precipitating a share slide that made it the former most valuable company in the world."

No: The Apple results were not remotely 'lacklustre'.

No: Apple is not the 'former' most valuable company, as of February 3 anyway. GOOG shares fell and knocked it off the perceptual pedestal.

Yes: Amidst the hysterical hysteria of WallNut Street, Apple is wisely projecting a rare decline in year over year earnings NEXT quarter. Therefore, let's blame the state of WallNut Street's paranoia and the state of the world economy at Apple's door, sell all our AAPL and buy more guns. (o_0)

OR we could figure out that there's something a bit loony about Sandeep Mathrani, CEO at General Growth Properties.

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What if China went all GitHub on your website? Grab this coding tool

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

You Know A Government Has FAILed When It Goes Totalitarian

China's government is totalitarian.

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French say 'Non, merci' to encryption backdoors

DerekCurrie
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Facepalm

From my POV, it consistently comes down to #MyStupidGovernment

My US government does NOT understand the technology. My US government does NOT bother with the US Constitution if it's inconvenient. (See the Fourth Amendment and note the flood of violations from my US government brought to public attention).

My US government instead is hell bound determined to apply totalitarian tactics to US citizen communications, with obviously detrimental results. The terrorists <3 LOVE <3 it when their victims go berzerk and wreck their countries with totalitarianism. Goal achieved. √

"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

Thank you Ben.

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American cable giants go bananas after FCC slams broadband rollout

DerekCurrie
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Go

Lazy, Greedy, Customer Abusing, Self-Destructive ISPs

That's the summary at this time.

Rave on FCC! Thank you for representing We The People against bad biznizziz.

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Lovelace at 200: Celebrating the High Priestess to Babbage's machines

DerekCurrie
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Happy

Wonderful Stuff!

I want the book.

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What did we learn today? Microsoft has patented the slider bar

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

Blame the USPTO, which I consider abominable

Thanks to the inability of #MyStupidGovernment to act in a reliably coherent manner, the United States Patent and Trademark Office is a catastrophic mess of poor funding, ridiculously poor research of prior art and overall responsibility for its blundering. The result is lots of wasted money being fed into the pockets of opportunistic patent trolls, receivers of bogus patent approval and of course lawyers. :-P

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Brian Krebs criticises PayPal’s security as authentication flaws exposed

DerekCurrie
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WTF?

The Hackers Were Brian Krebs More Easily Than I Was Myself...

Early in December, while using a VNP client, I attempted to buy some software over the Internet while using an exit node located in another country. The location of the exit node lead my attempt to use PayPal into a black hole. It refused to work properly. I ended up buying the software via a credit card instead.

Over the course to two attempts to sort out the lock out from my account via phone reps at PayPal, I ran into incessantly hellish interrogation, including not just Brian's questions, but obscure questions with answers 'collected from the Internet' that I literally could not answer, they were so outrageously obscure. My second attempt to battle through their phone system lead me up FIVE (5) levels of tech support until I finally got a very kind and coherent fellow who, at long bloody last, knew exactly what hat happened, why it had happened, and was able to repair the situation.

IOW: My impression was that using even straight, honest, 'yes this is damned well ME!' attempts to access my own PayPal account was utterly futile until I was furious enough to want to yell into the phone for supervisor after supervisor after supervisor. If these hackers got away with merely answering four digits of both a social security number and credit card (which I too was asked at level 1 of PayPal support), some phone representative NOT following the PayPal protocols I encountered EARLIER in December was being incredibly lazy on the phone.

Conclusion: Bravo to PayPal for having beyond-sane stringent rules for resetting accounts. BOO to PayPal for obviously NOT making this the case across their entire phone rep bank. A phone rep at PayPal is, from my evidence, to blame for falling for the social engineering while ignoring PayPal protocols.

:-Derek Currie

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Be afraid, Apple and Samsung: Huawei's IoT home looks cheaper and better

DerekCurrie
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WTF?

If IoT has IdioTic security, it's dead in the water

The now famous core problem with the IoT is its horrifyingly poor security. Often IoT security isn't even an afterthought. It's never thought of at all! That's why vast botnets of IoT devices already exist, ruining the reputation of the entire market.

The only winners in the IoT competition will be those that LOCK DOWN their devices to all security attacks and exploits. I don't care what company is foisting the stuff. PROVE YOUR SECURITY! Or get the hell out of the IoT market immediately and forever.

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GOP senators push FCC to kill support for local broadband

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

The Actual GOP Died Years Ago, Murdered By The Neo-Conservatives

There is no longer any Grand Old Party. Once the scum from the Neo-Conservative hell tank, 'Project For The New American Century', took over the US White House, IOW executive branch, the GOP was dead and gone. Anyone who still clung to the old ways of reason, sanity and fairness were cast aside as RINOs, or Republican In Name Only, a term that is a crowning achievement of Newspeak propagandist lunacy.

This new, fake 'GOP' is run by Israeli, corporate and richest 1% interests. That's all they are and that's all they are good for. Welcome to their Neo-Feudal state of madness.

They want to kill opportunities to bypass the parasitic ISP corporations? Of course they do. That's want they're paid for.

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Samsung appeals to Supreme Court to bring patent law into 21st century

DerekCurrie
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Devil

What's 'Realistic' Is That Shabby Samsung Owes Far More Than $1 Billion To Apple

Comparing this history of 'smart'phones, it is blatantly clear where Samsung consistently gets its ideas, beyond the bland insecurity they inherit from Android. Samsung rips off Apple. Their crimes are constant, consistent, obvious, and continue to this day (IMHO of course).

My recommendation: Boycott all things Samsung. That's one way to MAKE Samsung pay what they REALLY owe to Apple and the technology community they've corrupted (IMHO of course).

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Behold, Backblaze’s public B2 beta blast off

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

I Dumped Backblaze, And They Me, After They LOST My Encryption Key

There is nothing 'darling' about Backblaze from my lousy experience. I'd uploaded all my computer data, encrypted with a key I held close in a separate encrypted disk image, to Backblaze in hopes that they were the great Trust-No-One backup cloud service I was looking for. Then one day, I needed to restore one file from my backup. It had gone corrupt on my system and a good copy was, supposedly, up on Backblaze.

Except my encryption key, the one and only, DIDN'T WORK when I wanted to download and decrypt the file. Backblaze offered no explanation, no apology. Instead they played the old crap company game of Blame The Victim. That was followed by an offer to refund money for the remaining time on my account under the condition that I GET LOST.

Don't trust Backblaze folks. And no, I'm not going to join into a flame war about them. This is my experience and I'm sticking to it. My duty now has ended.

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Rupert Murdoch wants Google and chums to be g-men's backdoor men

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

Privacy Wins Over 'Safety' FUD In The USA

So: To the 'safety' maniacal, go live in one of the several totalitarian states if you want 'safety' over privacy. You're treasonously attempting to subvert the US Constitution. So leave the USA and find a Big Brother state better suited to your control issues and sensitivity to FUD mongering.

Ben said it best:

"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

Some fellow thinkers:

"We The People - are the rightful masters of both Congress and the courts, not to overthrow the Constitution but to overthrow the men who pervert the Constitution." - Abraham Lincoln

"There is little value in ensuring the survival of our nation (United States of America) if our traditions do not survive with it. And there is very grave danger that an announced need for increased security will be seized upon by those anxious to expand it's meaning to the very limits of official censorship and concealment. That I do not intend to permit, to the extent that it's in my control."

- Quote from John F Kennedy on April 27, 1961

"Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it on to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children’s children what it was once like in the United States where men were free." – Ronald Reagan, March 30, 1961

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Volkswagen blames emissions cheating on 'chain of errors'

DerekCurrie
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Devil

hahaha HaHaHa! HAHAHA!!!

A new corporate low. Capitalism in rot mode. A shame that.

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Apple finally publishes El Capitan Darwin source

DerekCurrie
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Holmes

Apple has been involved with 300+ Open Source Projects Since OS X

Odd as it is for Apple to say it is "the first major computer company to make Open Source development a key part of its ongoing software strategy"...

Apple has been involved with Open Source projects for decades. Recall the MKLinux project back in the mid-1990s. When Apple bought NeXT, it brought in an operating system fundamentally based on open source software, starting with the Mach kernel. By the time of the release of Mac OS X, Apple was involved with 300+ open source projects and has expanded from there.

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Who's running dozens of top-secret unpatched databases? The Dept of Homeland Security

DerekCurrie
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Facepalm

I wish I didn't have so many reasons to call it...

#MyStupidGovernment (0_o)

Catch Up! This Is The Future!

Rather than worry about being able to hack into US citizen data, why can't you surveillance zealots figure out that being hackable means You WILL Be Hacked By The Bad Guys! You ARE being hacked by the bad guys. Over and over and over and over again.

What an incoherent mess of cognitive dissonance is my US government.

Its IQ: Diminishing daily.

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Hillary Clinton: Stop helping terrorists, Silicon Valley – weaken your encryption

DerekCurrie
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Stop

Shut up Princess Hillary

The Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution is here to stay.

"The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

We The People no longer trust the surveillance zealots of #MyStupidGovernment. If they hadn't been so foolish as to destroy our Fourth Amendment rights for years-on-end, maybe we'd have sympathy. But trust is dead and gone. Solid, real, keep your damned government nose out of my private business ENCRYPTION is here to stay forever. Thank yourselves for that fact.

The '1984' scenario is the enemy. Enact it and the terrorists WIN.

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UN privacy head slams 'worse than scary' UK surveillance bill

DerekCurrie
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Devil

Ignoring Privacy Rights: How The Enemy Wins

The '1984' scenario is the enemy kids. Hello in there.

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Tim Cook: UK crypto backdoors would lead to 'dire consequences'

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

No They Weren't...

"On Monday, Cook pointed out that data breaches were "becoming more frequent", while failing to note that Apple's own iCloud servers had been ransacked late last year."

That is a deliberate, willfully IGNORANT statement. A new trait of The Register?

For those who care, what got 'ransacked' were Apple users who fell for phishing scams and ordinary dictionary attacks on their individual accounts. That problem has been ongoing for years and is of course not confined to Apple, or Facebook, or Twitter, or the banks, etc.

Incredible FAIL Kelly Fiveash. Let's stick to the facts about computer security, not the myths, not the ignorant memes, not stupid statements spread by stupid 'analysts'.

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TPP: 'Scary' US-Pacific trade deal published – you're going to freak out when you read it

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

A Nonsense Editorial That Is A Detriment To The Register's Reputation

Thank you for at least pointing out, on page 2, one of the core abominations of this 'treaty':

"The big topic that does seem to be legitimate is that the TPP will allow corporations to sue governments through so-called investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), but that individuals will not be given an equivalent right to sue corporations."

This is plain and simply corporatocracy. It overrides US law and the law of any other signatory country. It hands over rights that only belong in the hands of voting citizens into the hands of corporations. It is obviously a play by corporations to wreck any aspect of real democracy that does not suit its needs. That specifically makes this 'treaty' an abomination.

Enough said.

Kill TPP.

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Slacker vendors' one-fix-a-year effort leaves 88% of Androids vulnerable

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

No, Once A Month Is Not Good Enough. ASAP Patching Please!

ASAP patching is the only reasonable response to an onslaught of security flaws, exploits and malware. Once a month is obviously convenient for certain situations, but it's not realistic regarding actual security of anything.

Specific to Android devices, the 'FragmAndroid' fragmentation nightmare has got to go. It must end. ALL Android devices must be able to be updated immediately at the same time across all vendors. Otherwise, Android is going to do nothing but grow its already notorious reputation for security nightmares. In this day and age, the results of fragmented Android installations is entirely unacceptable. I can't imagine why anyone with techno-savvy puts up with it.

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Top VW exec blames car pollution cheatware scandal on 'a couple of software engineers'

DerekCurrie
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WTF?

So what about the rest of the diesel car industry that ALSO pull this scam?

Did those two renegade software developers at VW write the code for ALL THE OTHER diesel car companies that equally abused their customers? I don't think so. I think this situation doesn't just go to the very top of VW. I think this trick was shared among the top executives of ALL of these companies and became a matter of competition. If your scum company didn't scam the customer, they were going to lose out.

Result: A corruption eddy. You're ALL to blame.

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PHONE me if you feel DIRTY: Yanks and 'Nadians wave bye-bye to magstripe

DerekCurrie
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Stop

It's NOT the mag strip, dummy. It's the mag strip READER that's the problem.

There's a faerie tale Target told the victims of their massive customer account security breach. They said the cause of it all was that mag strip on credit and debit cards.

No it wasn't.

100% of the problem was the Windows XP Embedded mag strip readers that stupidly stored all the scanned mag strip data in-the-clear (no encryption) in RAM, ripe for the picking by malware infecting those readers. Once ALL the crap mag strip readers are dumpstered, the problem will be gone.

The Target faerie tale continues that, if only the USA would embrace NFC (RFID) credit and debit cards, security would be attained and happiness would reign throughout the kingdom.

Wrong.

There are first generation NFC cards that suck, from which any old passing granny can steal its customer data by way of a portable scanner. Oops, dear old granny bumped into you, her scanner read your card, you're screwed. That's what Target wanted everyone to use instead of mag strips. Awful idea.

Now there are second generation NFC cards the suck far less. They only output a one-time-use number for a purchase, meaning that NONE of the user data can be stolen. These are, at long bloody last, effectively 'safe' cards to use for shopping.

Taking the one-time-use number farther are services such as Apple Pay, where the user has to physically approve any NFC data dump. There is no longer the ability of naughty granny to grab even that that number. That is the best option. That's happiness.

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FBI boss: No encryption backdoor law (but give us backdoors anyway)

DerekCurrie
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Facepalm

#MyStupidGovernment At Work

What's worse?

A) 'Terrorists' being able to break into every computer in the USA because of back doors?

B) US citizens exercising their constitutional, Fourth Amendment rights to total privacy?

We've already been watching the result of crap software and operating systems allowing China, ad nauseam, to steal millions of government employee's identities, including fingerprints. We want these computer illiterates to have a back door into ANYTHING that can invade our privacy. NO!

Deal with the fact of the US Constitution, dear government of mine. Stop destroying our trust in you!!!

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XCodeGhost iOS infection toll rises from 39 to a WHOPPING 4,000 apps

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

It's China, Stupid

"The more rigorous testing regime required before an iOS app can be published has always been considered to be the reason for this difference, but in this case it seems to have fallen short."

Every Apple developer knows the two, and only two, sources for downloading Xcode. Any developer with any sense of software security knows that WAREZ versions of anything are entirely capable of being malware vectors. That is nothing new. Back in early 2009, WAREZ versions of Mac apps were implicated in a Mac botnet of hundreds of thousands (as many as 600,000) Macs.

The way it should have gone down was:

- Developers in China inform Apple that The Great Firewall Of China screws them over every day with crap for bandwidth.

- Apple should have responded by providing software servers inside China, subverting any motivation to download WAREZ versions of Xcode.

- The End.

That didn't happen then; At least it's happened now. Apple meanwhile has to thrash through the iOS store to find every app infected with XcodeGhost malware. It's going to take awhile. This new number of 4,000 apps is mind-boggling.

Should this incident be compared to the rat's nest of security holes and malware that are the default of all things Android? OF COURSE NOT. Try not to look so desperate to bash Apple, please.

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Bible apps are EVIL says John McAfee as he phishes legal sysadmins in real time

DerekCurrie
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Happy

Conclusion: Don't Allow BYOD Android Devices. Do Allow Non-Jailbroken iOS Devices

Stick with iOS BYODs. That's the simple message from my POV.

Reservations:

1) iOS devices have to be verified as non-jailbroken at the place of business.

2) Apple has STILL not adequately addressed Wirelurker exploits whereby stolen enterprise developer security certificates can be used to sign malware that fakes itself as another existing application, overwriting the real applications and PWNing the device when the fake app is run by the user. Just this week a new Wirelurker related exploit was made public. It abuses an AirDrop setting to send malware pretending to be a 'photo' to a victim. That malware is automatically installed upon reboot of the device. When the resulting faked app is run, the device is PWNed. Fix this Apple!

[Note: The AirDrop exploit has been 'mitigated' but not yet patched in iOS 9.]

['PWN' = 'Own' = The device is now under the control of a malware rat.]

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Obama edges toward full support for encryption – but does he understand what that means?

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

Too Late

"We assume by "voluntary cooperation," the President is willing to be told to get lost by the tech giants in November – if they have the strength to do so."

That's over. Google and Apple, and I expect other companies, have already proven their strength to 'Just Say No' when the government demands the impossible, decrypting the encrypted without the keys to do so.

Then add in the fact that anyone can access and use publicly available unbreakable encryption for their files. Unless those encrypted files have a worthless password or someone discovers the keys, they're staying encrypted.

Meanwhile, no doubt the government will continue to use and create new methods of intercepting information before its encrypted or after it's decrypted by an intended receiver.

Let's just hope the US government figures out that they are required to abide by The Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution whether they like it or not. Any evidence collected outside of the mandates of the Fourth Amendment will be judged worthless and thrown out of court, as is currently being proven daily. IOW: Follow the law or your case is sunk. No '1984' scenario is welcome here. Deal with it.

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Apple downgrades iPhone 6S with wimpy 1715mAh battery

DerekCurrie
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Gimp

Yeah, I noticed The Register is in Apple Hate Mode

In this case: Darn! iPhone 6S still has stunning battery life.

Actually, I'm writing this comment just to point out that we Apple fanatics do more than 'go bonkers' hating you back. Sometimes we just *YAWN* at you.

It's a shame that I find The Register to be a great place to pick up computer security news. But I have to dig around for it amidst a sinking load of old cobblers. Phew.

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US gov to Apple: COUGH UP iMessages or FEEL our FEDERAL FROWN

DerekCurrie
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Go

THANK YOU APPLE!

[Insert Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution HERE]

Now Apple, how about turning the OS X firewall ON by default? And how about entirely REMOVING 'Open "safe" files after downloading' from Safari? And how about swift, immediate, ASAP patching of security vulnerabilities in OS X and iOS? All of these would be equally helpful to your customers.

And to FBI director James Comey: We The People rule the USA, NOT any government. We The People run our government. The government serves the people and its wishes. The government does not run the people, despite their wishes. No '1984' scenario is welcome in my country. You've already proven, dear government, that you cannot be trusted. Therefore, deal with the consequences of your deceit.

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Ed Snowden crocked cloud, says VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger

DerekCurrie
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WTF?

This is Snowden's Fault NOT

It's ridiculous to put anything on Snowden regarding the aftermath of his revelations, isn't it! Poke fingers at the CAUSE of all this hell: #OurStupidGovernments. Wishing we could stick our heads back in the sand, wishing patriot Snowden had never taken down The Surveillance Curtain, is foolish.

Can we move along now with our response to these profound attacks on our citizen privacy?

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Why is the smart home insecure? Because almost nobody cares

DerekCurrie
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Facepalm

The Dark Age Of Computing Continues Apace

Exactly: Almost nobody cares. Technology requires comprehension, which is too difficult for execuTards. Therefore, stupid reigns. And You Can't Stop Stupid.

This is CLASSIC technology project management HELL. The only way to get things done correctly, very sad to say, is to go TYPE A on everyone and become a Napoleon. That works great in the short term, as long as Napoleon knows exactly what he's talking about AND has people around him who know all the critical details he couldn't possibly keep in his single sized human brain.

Again world: Technology requires COMPREHENSION. You can't skim through it and survive. You will be metaphorically killed if you go slacker on the job. PAY the experts for their expertise and FOLLOW their expertise to that finish line called SUCCESS.

Again, for the uninitiated, The Problem Solving Protocol:

1) IDENTIFY the problem.

2) CREATE a solution.

3) ENACT the solution.

4) VERIFY the solution worked.

- AND - My own addition -

5) Keep the marketing people OUT of The Problem Solving Protocol, except as sources of marketing information and advice. NEVER allow them to be in decision positions. If you do, you're gonna have a bad time and so are your customers. Marketing-As-Management is a prime business project KILLER.

Are you reading me Samsung, Sony, Microsoft, News Corp, Comcast, Google, Oracle, Qualcomm, General Electric...?

I know Apple understands, another reason why I <3 Apple.

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Samsung smart fridge leaves Gmail logins open to attack

DerekCurrie
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Facepalm

Entirely PREDICTABLE!

We knew the IoT was a security leak infested mess over a year ago. SURPRISE! The IoT really really really is a mess of security holes.

NOT ready for prime time. Shame on you Samsung and all the other upcoming IoT security hole vendors yet to be revealed. You made the IoT dangerous. Good gawd, how predictable. (o_0)

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Spotify climbs down on new terms and conditions

DerekCurrie
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Devil

Déjà vu much?

The usual human lesson: Act like a sheep and you're dinner. Act like a wolf, and the attacking wolves will back down. (o_0)

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Apple: Samsung ripped off our phone patent! USPTO: What patent?

DerekCurrie
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Devil

The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) IS THE PROBLEM!

I'd personally like the The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) to be KILLED OFF and started again entirely from scratch. The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is INCOMPETENT, SLOW, UNDER-STAFFED and UNDER-FUNDED. They are A DETRIMENT TO THE USA and THE WORLD.

Kill The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

How is it that NOW, after all this debacle, the USPTO gets around to figuring out there's prior art regarding a patent THEY approved? To hell with this worthless agency. START AGAIN and DO IT RIGHT THIS TIME.

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ZTE Nubia Z9 Mini: The able Android smartie the company won't sell you

DerekCurrie
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Facepalm

There's nothing 'smartie' about using Android anything these days

Google has allowed Android to become a catastrophic mess of bad security. At the moment, Android users are literally guaranteed to be attacked via, now 7 (SEVEN), Stagefright attacks on their Android devices. EVERY version of Android since 2010 is affected. It is strongly suspected that there will be MORE Stagefright exploits discovered as the weeks go by. Meanwhile, Google isn't going to even pretend to offer solutions until September. That's outrageous.

Get off the Android folks. It's bad for you. That's not a challenge or an invitation to argue. It's a fact.

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'I don't recognise Amazon as a bullying workplace' says Bezos

DerekCurrie
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Unhappy

Marketing-As-Management Strikes Again

Allowing people with marketing personalities to manage anything is akin to a deathwish. What was described from the NYT article sound precisely like Marketing-As-Management. It has killed or decimated many companies. I had to live through it at Eastman Kodak. The end result is obvious. Apple went through a Marketing-As-Management period, culminating in $1 Billion worth of Mac Performa computers rotting in warehouses because no one wanted them. It brought Apple to its knees.

People with actual, natural LEADERSHIP skills are required for management. Perhaps Mr. Bezos should consider not just the hiring people who are tech savvy, but people who actually understand now to work with and manage other people. Such people are ALSO gravely in short supply, sad to say.

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CAUGHT: Lenovo crams unremovable crapware into Windows laptops – by hiding it in the BIOS

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

Not Acceptable

Lenovo is already on the skids. What a great way to hammer home the idea of ignoring them next time buying a new PC is under consideration.

Way To Go LenovO! Just dive on into that grave.

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Apple and Google are KILLING KIDS with encryption, whine lawyers

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

Enabling mass surveillance is blatantly unconstitutional.

"Children are being raped, citizens murdered, and lost souls trafficked for sex and the police can't do anything about it thanks to..."

...The TPP treaty. Right? No?

Oh, its the TOTALITARIANS back at it again, destroying The Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.

This issue actually has NOTHING AT ALL to do with companies like Apple and Google who very kindly respond to their customer's wishes and offer (somewhat) iron clad services to protect customer privacy. IOW, #MyStupidGovernment is going about this issue in the WRONG WAY. The Fourth Amendment is specific about serving warrants to INDIVIDUALS who are suspected of crime. Blanket surveillance of any US citizen communicating on US soil is blatantly ILLEGAL. But the FUD mongering surveillance totalitarians find that's far too much work. It's better to surveil ALL of us ALL THE TIME and have us 'trust' them to honor and respect out privacy. Except, they've already proven their traitorous attitude toward our constitutional right to privacy.

Therefore: BZZZT! Wrong US surveillance hounds! You've destroyed any trust we'll ever have in you. Handing blanket surveillance tools to you folks is not going to happen. So please cut the FUD foisting and get back to doing everything constitutionally, ONE suspect at a time. Leave mass surveillance via the business world out of it.

[Sorry to do the 'shout' caps, but I know of no way to do italics or bolding here at ®.]

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It's 2015, and someone can pwn Windows PCs by inserting a USB stick

DerekCurrie
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Holmes

35 CVEs patched in Adobe Flash and AIR

"Adobe has posted an update to fix 34 CVE-listed vulnerabilities in Flash Player."

Nope. 35 CVEs. I counted twice, just to be sure. Only two of them currently have descriptions up on Mitre.org. But Adobe provides a list of general problems and associated CVEs in their new Flash/AIR security bulletin:

https://helpx.adobe.com/security/products/flash-player/apsb15-19.html

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BlackBerry can't catch a break: Now it's fending off Jeep hacking claims

DerekCurrie
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Facepalm

Uconnect Uconnect Uconnect

Homework Hints:

http://www.driveuconnect.com

https://www.driveuconnect.com/software-update/

http://www.autoblog.com/2015/07/25/how-to-update-secure-vulnerable-chrysler-uconnect-video/

IOW: Uconnect is specifically what has been implicated in this latest IoT security mess.

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Apple, Google should give FBI every last drop of user information, says ex-HP CEO and wannabe US prez Carly Fiorina

DerekCurrie
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FAIL

Big Sister

This issue is NOT about companies that offer encryption. It is entirely about US citizens who chose in and of themselves to use privacy tools, such as encryption. It's all about US citizens applying their rights provided in the Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.

The end.

Pestering third parties to spy on US citizens on US soil without an actual legal warrant as specified by the US Constitution is, simply, unconstitutional. And NO, blanket FISA court warrants are NOT constitutional no matter which way you contort the subject.

Non-US citizens: They're entirely fair game. Communication of US citizens outside of the USA: That's entirely fair game.

Question: Why is the world of humans in general desperately bent on playing out the '1984' scenario? Is it out of laziness on law enforcement's part. Obviously, that's a factor. It's harder to follow the law themselves. But there's also the constant question of whether citizens or their elected government actually runs any single country. The actual answer is that the CITIZENS run everything and the government is merely a representative servant. Nonetheless, there are obviously some people, who think somewhere within the psychopathic scale, who want flip it all upside down and make the government to rule the people. That can only be done in this day and age via massive citizen surveillance, aka TOTALITARIANISM. No to that! Sorry Big Sister.

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Another death in Apple's 'Mordor' – its Foxconn Chinese assembly plant

DerekCurrie
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Unhappy

So Apple. Are you ready to Get Out Of China yet?

I've been ranting at Apple to Get Out Of China for several years. Sadly, the current methods of doing 'business' in the world require dirt cheap labor with the best possible quality of workers. That apparently means Chinese labor. *sigh*

At least Apple demonstrates caring about their contracted cheap labor. It sure would be nice, by golly, if the insistent FUD Mongerers at The Register would pick on the many other companies that also hire Foxconn. But as we know, the price of fame is FUD. Kick 'em when they're up. Kick 'em when they're down. Nothing new for Apple.

Meanwhile, the business incentive for cheap labor continues unabated.

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Microsoft vacates moral high ground for the data slurpers' cesspit

DerekCurrie
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WTF?

Yosemite: Also yuck, in its own special way

"And the quality of Apple’s platform has fallen to abysmal levels recently – Yosemite is buggy and inefficient, and forces me to work in ways I don’t want to work."

As an Apple fanatic and beta tester of OS X 10.10 Yosemite, I entirely AGREE! It's the first version of OS X I ever SKIPPED. I don't use it. The beta of 10.11 El Capitan is a bit more sane and enjoyable. I actually use it. So all is not lost.

And yes, I warned Apple about Yosemite's problem many times. Apparently, they didn't care. That really was a new low for Apple. But now they're appearing to perk up, having figured out just how much Yosemite is hated by the cognoscenti. :-P

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Pentagon email hacked, Russia already blamed

DerekCurrie
Bronze badge
FAIL

So Pentagon: Is it because you need more money?

Hell no. What you need is to catch up with the 21st century and take computer security seriously. Why, with all your military industrial complex money-out-the-ears can't you keep your computer systems secure, encrypted (See! Encryption is good!) and out of the hacking tentacles of the rest of the world? It's not because you're entirely stupid. But when it comes to computer technology, part of your organization just failed the Computer Literacy Test for the modern era. #MyStupidGovernment continues to be a mantra in the USA, certainly from me.

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General Electric: Come here, cloud, and get in my IoT belly

DerekCurrie
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Unhappy

If GE make it...

... From at least my experience with GE products... It will be a ripoff and break immediately after the warranty runs out. And if you're looking for security, start snickering now. Or so say I.

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STOP! You – away from the keyboard. There's no free speech in our China

DerekCurrie
Bronze badge
Devil

FREE SPEECH CRIMES!

And we thought '1984' was only for fascists.

Totalitarianism is a universal crime against humanity, no matter the political bent.

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Flash deserves to live, says Cisco security man

DerekCurrie
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Re: Re Silverlight

Microsoft has made it thoroughly clear that no one should be using Silverlight henceforth. Why anyone is still using it is beyond comprehension. The alternatives are here and working. Silverlight is dead tech. So bury it already.

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DerekCurrie
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Mushroom

Re: ASAP Patching Wins Again

Oh and let's kill Adobe Flash and Oracle Java over the Internet ASAP as well. They are wide open gateways to security exploitations, despite all the rhetoric to the contrary. Just end them. Superior replacements are either already here or require coding by security minded developers; Therefore, not coded by Adobe or Oracle. I think we can manage that.

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DerekCurrie
Bronze badge
Mushroom

ASAP Patching Wins Again

The bizarro alternative to ASAP patching has been the ridiculous 'Second Tuesday Of The Month' ritual that is apparently supposed to placate lazy IT 'professionals' who want a predictable day when all the security changes are going to hit them. I've had people blether until they're blue about how this is supposed to be a great idea. And yet, consistently and repeatedly it has been proven to be the dangerous alternative to the only logical choice: ASAP patching.

There is no argument. ASAP patching is the responsible requirement of the software industry. Therefore, let's at last kill off the ritual patching days, be realistic and stay that way. Otherwise, the security exploit rats could not be more grateful. They're lazy as well and love it when they can count on that one day of the month when their coffers will be filled again, nailing the unpatched masses with attacks. Keeping them on their toes like the rest of us are forced to be, zero-day by zero-day, is the last thing they want as well.

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Windows RT on life support: Microsoft vows it won't pull the plug

DerekCurrie
Bronze badge
WTF?

The Plug Is Already On The Floor

Someone believes Windows RT has any future? They're not paying attention.

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