* Posts by TechnicalBen

1050 posts • joined 23 Mar 2012

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iPhones clock-blocked and crocked by setting date to Jan 1, 1970

TechnicalBen
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Re: Vandalism

Test max int, test min int?

Is that too much to ask?

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Boffins' gravitational wave detection hat trick blows open astronomy

TechnicalBen
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Re: Curious how they eliminate one potential source of error

As per above. If local physical interaction is ruled out, then gravitational is suspected.

I guess it's like looking at a pool. If you see a boat causing a wake, then that is obviously not the tide. The wind can be seen separate from the ripples from a stone. But of cause a lot of checks need to be done to make sure it's not someone diving under and playing tricks. ;)

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Just remember

Gravity is an observation.

Newtonian is the law and General Relativity is the theory.

(AFAIK)

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The field at the centre of the universe: Cambridge's outdoor pulsar pusher

TechnicalBen
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Re: S R "Which part of "former chemical weapons dump" did you not follow?"

Check out the story and wiki article on "former chemical weapons dump" come school. The question above sadly is not one many seem to understand.

ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love_Canal

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Are Indians too stupid to be trusted with free Internet?

TechnicalBen
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I'm giving you free food...

But you first must sign over your land, family and fortune. But the food is certainly free.

It's fine to offer a service. However, there are many people making fraudulent claims. For someone to first ask to check if it is really what is on offer is fine.

Better they check now, than risk failure later.

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Who would code a self-destruct feature into their own web browser? Oh, hello, Apple

TechnicalBen
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I'd just like the correct language on the Steam pages. It keeps thinking I'm in some other land (no, no VPN and no idea why it will not revert back permanently).

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BT blames 'faulty router' for mega outage. Did they try turning it off and on again?

TechnicalBen
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Joke

Re: 'Faulty Router'

The routers name was Steve. He is now getting a very big telling off.

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'Dodgy Type-C USB cable fried my laptop!'

TechnicalBen
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Re: Who ever designed..

Yes. It is called 1 cable for power, 1 cable for data.

I'll get my coat. Because truth be damned to cost cutting and "progress" labelled over marketing.

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Alphabetti spaghetti: What Wall Street isn't telling you about Google

TechnicalBen
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Black Helicopters

Every time I hear the name Alphabet...

I feel like they chose that because "Umbrella" was too obvious a give away if chosen.

Or worse, they were already using it!

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Smart toys spring dumb vulns. Again. This time: Cuddly bears, watches

TechnicalBen
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Joke

Never may that be so...

My dear internet commenter.

Your worry is dreadfully uncalled for. Why this new age of entrepreneurs making things of the internet is to bring in great markets and wealth. We would never rush anything out into the market before testing or that would be unsafe. And if we did, it would be totally the other parties fault and not ours. No, we can do nothing but sell more stuff.

Oh, and while you're reading, would you like to buy one of our new Radium Blankets? It's the latest invention and perfectly safe, we assure you!

http://www.sciencephoto.com/media/364732/view

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Google ninjas go public with security holes in Malwarebytes antivirus

TechnicalBen
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Meh. I install, scan and uninstall. Rinse and repeat when needed. I use other products for real time scanning. (It's malware, not a virus scanner)

What are the chances of something going wrong in that timeframe and not getting spotted and announced as a warning for me to wait until the next update?

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Sure, encrypt your email – while your shiny IoT toothbrush spies on you

TechnicalBen
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Joke

Re: Orwell

Pretty soon with such coverage, the spooks will be able to tell you if Orwell is spinning or not...

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BT broadband is down: Former state monopoly goes TITSUP UK-wide

TechnicalBen
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What do you mean?

Using smoke signals to get your emails?

Mine is the one with the mobile in the pocket and unlimited data...

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Little warning: Deleting the wrong files may brick your Linux PC

TechnicalBen
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Re: CrazyOldCatMan

Which is why I'll never migrate over to Linux fully. I make too many typos.

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TechnicalBen
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Joke

It's always the user at fault. There is only one user with Windows 10... Microsoft.

(What, you thought you got to decide what it was doing? ;) )

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TechnicalBen
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Re: So, exactly...

Thanks for the info. But your still making the mistake of speaking a foreign language to us Windows users/Linux newbies.

Saying "it's not a file on your HDD, it's a file with UEFI settings" is, read by a windows user as "It's not a file on your HDD, it's a file (on your HDD) with UEFI settings". Because to windows, all files reside on the HDD or RAM, and RAM is considered safe to clear (we do it when shutting down ;) ).

I think what you mean to say is that "It's not a file on your HDD, it's a file on your motherboards non-volatile memory [that is mounted by Linux in read/write mode] with UEFI settings". Or in the case where it's not the memory of the UEFI, but the live running command cue.

It's more long winded, but wow, Linux users make as many assumptions as us Windows users. Please help us migrate over, we know you have it better over there! (For most stuff. I'm still bitter over the file system. :D )

Thanks to Adam 52 for making it clear.

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Sounds Really Clever?

Sorry. "Everything is a file" is really really annoying for people like me. It's a mouse. It's a keyboard. No, there are not 4 lights.

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TechnicalBen
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Mushroom

petur...

Until MS roll an update to change the UEFI... oh, lost your Linux? MS will consider that an upgrade.

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Microsoft sinks to new depths with underwater data centre experiment

TechnicalBen
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Re: Haven't they heard

Great. Now you've just doomed all the tech support guys to scuba lessons!

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Random ideas sought to improve cryptography

TechnicalBen
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Can you guarantee your mirrors are 100% non-bias?

As the antimatter-matter imbalance exists by some unknown method, we could still find bias. But it'll be close enough. :)

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Reliable way to check the output

You joke, and I may get sternly corrected for this...

But some mathematical analyses is possible.

Say I try to zip a text document. I then try to zip some random data generated at the same bit length.

I would need to check the text document against quite a few random strings, but the text document should show its self to be more compressible than a random string <on average>.

This is of cause not true for other things, like video, as it may be compressed in a lossy method.

Data with redundancy in it, is different from true random data, however data with little redundancy is very similar, or arguably indistinguishable from random data.

Our language has a lot of redundant data in it, so we can use that to find patterns, and match it to other exiting patters (that is, unencrypted it). Random data, by it's definition, is suppose to have no real pattern. (For example, if your rng gives out four 1s, four zeros then repeats, on every result, it's not random and giving out a possible signal. See XKCD link above! :P ).

Things like stenography can be detected when comparing to original source (if available else where) etc.

I read one paper, where random strings were used to test against scientific theories. If the random string did a better prediction, your theory would officially be "worse than an absolute guess!". :D

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Chip company FTDI accused of bricking counterfeits again

TechnicalBen
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The end user is often unaware of what a fake is or how to detect it. They may even believe the shop they buy from is providing real products. In some instances even the shops get bad supplies through supply chain problems.

So, should the user, shop or manufacturer be responsible?

Attacking the fakes, is down right an attack on the consumer. I've taken to avoiding most systems like this (game consoles, blu-ray drives etc). I've long ago avoided fakes since I was a kid, but I don't want the problems when I find out the device bricks its self through a failed DRM check. Because it will do so, with legit products, more often than the real "hackers" who can just mod/chip the device and be fine.

Most real counterfeit operations have no to zero problems with the DRM/checks. In this instance it'll be rather easy for the counterfeiters to just run a driver of one version less, and strip out the DRM checks.

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TechnicalBen
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Joke

1) Define your branded TV/Computer as only being "official non-counterfeit" if plugged into your own branded mouse/keyboard etc.

2) Fry anything it touches that is not wearing the brand, including users for breaking "T&C" and "EULA" and all your absolute control and rights!!!

3) Take in loads of new orders for components, as strangely the users own ones keep failing.

...

4) Profit?

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Most of the world still dependent on cash

TechnicalBen
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Re: More efficient to pay electronically?

That is for insurance reasons. Credit cards insure the purchase. Cash, obviously, does not.

Credit cards if done right, give around 30 days interest free advances, can be much quicker than visiting bank, counting out 100s of notes, going to shop, counting again, and getting goods. Also allows for purchase over the phone/internet and saves the trip to the bank, as which driver wants to count £/$2500 for that new tv you bought at the door! :D Let alone take it back in a van marked "I'm carrying lots of cash and TVs".

But then again, debit cards can do a lot of that. It does not need to be a credit card. Just a trusted money transfer system. Which with banks is cards, and online is paypal... no wait, did I just say paypal is trusted? ;)

Coat, as mine is the one with a big wad of "iou" notes.

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HSBC online services still offline following 'attack' on bank

TechnicalBen
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Re: We successfully defended our systems.

No offence, but if there is a raid on a physical bank, I'd expect similar. Safe, but some understandable interruption.

Just as it's somewhat impossible to stop all attempts at physical theft, it can be rather hard to stop all types of online attacks.

It's how you deal with the situation, how you try to prevent/reduce the impact and how honest you are to your customers.

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Google patents robotic 'mobile delivery receptacle'

TechnicalBen
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Would a...

trained dog not be a better option?

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Retailers urged to create 'CCTV-like' symbol to inform customers of mobile tracking

TechnicalBen
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Why bother disabling Wifi, BT etc

Thanks for the downvote, whomever did it. :P

But yes, is /should/ stay turned off. Things like the Avast app can turn it back on to check for anti-theft/lock requests

Previous versions of the OS "KitKat has a feature where, when Wi-Fi is turned off, it periodically scans for networks to allow Wi-Fi-based location detection to work."

Yet more network providers may add their own apps to turn wifi on when they want updates and/or check for voip etc or whatever they decide is in vogue this week.

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TechnicalBen
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You'd have to checkup AFAIK. Depends on OS and manufacture. Is it really an airplane mode? Can Apps override it? Does the OS override so as to check for updates etc?

Have you installed the app, and is it tracking offline via GPS and/or other means (though very rare and too hard to do outside of the spooks/University experiments).

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TechnicalBen
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Black Helicopters

Re: Why bother disabling Wifi, BT etc

IIRC your wifi is never "off" on modern phones. They have the ability to wake it up and check things. Depends on manufacture and OS I suppose. Google like their data collection too, and other times it's to check for updates. But it's not unheard of.

The other thing is external tracking is not the same as internal. Some stores were spoofing local wifi/telephone masts (I forget which) to get tracking data on shoppers without the need for an app internally on the device. They just used normal triangulation and signal strength etc.

I'd not think it too impossible that Anon can track an antenna within X distance even when unpowered. If though they are doing anything more untoward, then more fool them.

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'Unikernels will send us back to the DOS era' – DTrace guru Bryan Cantrill speaks out

TechnicalBen
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I assume...

It's the low handing fruit.

The first place off attack is usually the weakest. In a split OS, you have APP->Kernal. An attack hits the app, then you hopefully, still have the Kernal as secure, or just an "arms race" ahead of the attack.

With no split, any and all attacks can hit the Kernal as well as the App. So now there is more chance of a larger "hack" at your system.

Though it may just be a moving of the walls, instead of an obliterating of them. :P

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Cunning Greek lizards seek skin-matching rocks

TechnicalBen
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Is it not?

As simple as proving they can see their own backs.

I mean, they got eyes, right? They also have very flexible necks.

I'm not saying they have not done the maths. Just that it may be clutching at straws to not go for the obvious.

For example: https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn27574-octopus-has-automatic-camouflage-thanks-to-its-light-sensing-skin/

The only way to know if it is a learned method, is to check with some captive lizards. Though even then, animals can be quick learners and improvise on the fly.

PS, yes I know they tested and found out it "cannot see". Call me sceptical. :P

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If you can't buy bootleg gear online in New York, this may be why

TechnicalBen
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Headmaster

Possibly...

Just Amazon and Paypal? How hard is it to rinse and repeat on burned accounts through Paypal if they get caught? If it's a grey enough trade, how long before customer complain, if ever?

Who gets caught? Lots of people. Many people just either don't understand the meaning or difference or risk of counterfeit goods (fake Windows DVDs) or just don't care (fake handbags).

Some will have no effect on the customer, except possibly a lower quality (fake handbag). But some could turn out to be a total scam (Fake Windows key, that just returns "not valid").

I've had the conversations, and it requires helping people to learn. Just because something is on the internet, and cheap, does not mean it's "real". But the temptation for a deal or a cheap purchase is so high.

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Airbus, Boeing aero parts maker loses $54m in cyber-stick-up

TechnicalBen
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Joke

As it was an inside job...

They'd certainly get caught linking their laptop up to a TV, banned for "playing games on work equipment" and told to get the IT department to link up and Powerpoint slideshows for them.

Then while being walked out, asked "can you did give your password back to the IT debt so they can get those business docs out of your work PC?"

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Data centers dig in as monster storm strikes America's East Coast

TechnicalBen
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Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

Most phones can work for over a week when turned off.

It's more worrying that water damage would get them in a real disaster situation.

But turning it on, then off, ever hour or so may be enough. Or a "endurance" mode and not using Facebook should be fine for receiving emergency communications.

And by "emergency" I mean the life and death type. The business call can wait...

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Squeeze the banana to log into this office Wi-Fi

TechnicalBen
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Joke

I think...

The idea is bananas.

In a few weeks the security on that might be a bit stale.

With all the multiple users it has a high risk of catching some bugs.

They may have taken "code monkeys" too literally.

Finally, his project was never "Finnished"... it was "Danished".

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SpaceX: launch, check. Landing? Needs work

TechnicalBen
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Re: Hey, Subs! You can have this for free:

"Any landing you walk..." um, "roll around the barge and explode from" is a success in my book.

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PDF redaction is hard, NSW Medical Council finds out - the hard way

TechnicalBen
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Depending on the quality of the scan/text could you not drop the colour bit depth to 2? Should remove anything within the black squares. If it does not, it would be obvious and could be redone.

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TechnicalBen
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Re: This happens all the time with FOI requests in the UK

OCR is sometimes possible for the recreation if your printing to a hard copy.

Or as I posted above, is copy/paste to a notepad then redacting, then back to PDF a solution? You loose some of the formatting, but retain all the content and it does a similar job to the paper and scissors.

:P

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TechnicalBen
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Facepalm

Re: Another common error...

Funny you mention cut and paste in notepad to recover redactions... it would also work for making them and proof checking.

Copy to notepad, redact, paste to new PDF (to remove any possible "tracked changes" and other malarkey software can be "automatically" helping you with).

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Ground control to Major Tim! Brit's spacewalk halted after NASA 'naut takes unexpected leak

TechnicalBen
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Joke

Proof that...

It's really filmed in a giant swimming pool!

(No, not the black helicopters icon!)

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Call of Duty terror jabber just mindless banter

TechnicalBen
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Joke

Re: See what happens when you think CSI:Cyber is a series of training films?

I prefer NCIS https://youtu.be/1Y2zo0JN2HE

;)

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TechnicalBen
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Re: paranoia

It's probably par for the course.

It's just a communications method, and it gets the programmers/publishers out of a legal loop should someone accidentally post their credit card number, home address or last nights fling in the chat.

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Chinese unleash autonomous airborne taxi

TechnicalBen
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Re: parachute

I think batteries win on this scale.

Larger scales a fuel cell would.

But petroleum wins every time. (Not sure in this case they can make the engines if it's not a helicopter design)

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Scaled up quad-copter

Did they not show a video of it flying with a passenger?

I agree it's still a concept. But a very good proof. Though as further up, some other designs are competing and arguably better in safety (parachute for total power failures).

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LogMeIn adds emergency break-in feature to LastPass

TechnicalBen
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Re: Dodgy

I agree with the above, that presumably, the correct way to do it would be with a form of public key.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSIDS_lvRv4

So both you and the trusted other need to generate keys and encrypt the passwords. You have a private master key, that decrypts by it's self. You also have a public key.

Your trusted other has their own private key. You also give them your public key. Via some clever maths, the vault can be locked with your two keys, and unlocked with their two keys. They only ever have their private and your public key, and always need those two (so MitM attacks are harder).

Though they will have complete access to your passwords/vault as the only thing preventing their keys from working everytime is the service provider checking back with you. Generally when you give someone an access to something using private/public keys it's because you want them to access it. :P

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Cache-astrophic: Why Valve's Steam store spewed players' private profiles to strangers

TechnicalBen
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Re: Refreshingly honest

In an out of character defence, they did start on the right footing. The caching system only caches non-critical customer details. Those are always put through the proper channels.

However, some pages can be cached as they don't supply full/private details. This was the grey area that got hit with the wrong switch by a third party on one day of the year.

So a mistake and a fumble, but a good catch after it all. (I hope, for the sake of the customers)

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Windows 10: What's coming in 2016?

TechnicalBen
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Re: How long?

Never. They already have the cash from marketing and data collection*.

*Not the private stuff, as I assume legally they have to not rifle through your files. But the non-private services, apps and websites they introduce will have FaceBook style data profiling.

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There's an epidemic of idiots who can't find power switches

TechnicalBen
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Headmaster

Re: Image

Obligatory: https://youtu.be/UEfP1OKKz_Q

(British plug and why!)

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Windows for Warships? Not on our new aircraft carriers, says MoD

TechnicalBen
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Re: Ah joke wallpaper ...

There was also the flash portal that loaded a full screen browser window and a working (simplistic) GUI of Mac OS.

Load that up in IE on a windows PC to see someone get rather confused.

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Lloyds Bank apologises for ClickSafe verification system snafu

TechnicalBen
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Pint

Anything under a Grahams number is small really.

Oh, and if it's not over 50% of the customer, it's "most of our customers are well served".

Finally, if you sell one product, and sold one of it, it's the "biggest seller we have". ;)

Beer, because then I don't need my coat.

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