* Posts by TechnicalBen

1329 posts • joined 23 Mar 2012

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Our Windows windows will be resizable, soooon, vows Microsoft

TechnicalBen
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Joke

Re: Newer is not better...

How ridiculous. I'll have you know you will all soon be throwing out your old fashion round wheels, for new snazzy square ones!

(For actual new wheels, see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omni_wheel )

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Don't let banks fool you, the blockchain really does have other uses

TechnicalBen
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Re: 4D printing

What you want is a 4.5d printing, as with a whole extra fourth dimension, you also want the other half a dimension, time.

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152k cameras in 990Gbps record-breaking dual DDoS

TechnicalBen
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Facepalm

So all it takes...

Is for someone to figure out how to turn each PVR/Smart TV etc into a DDoS vector and it's game over? Considering most of these have very little security, and quite a few manufactures "forget" to turn of development back doors/eaves dropping, it's not looking good.

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And! it! begins! Yahoo! sued! over! ultra-hack! of! 500m! accounts!

TechnicalBen
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Dar Yahoo Customer:

Click here to join our Class Lawsuit: [spam link removed by virus scanner]

(Joke icon, because I wish it was one...)

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iPhone 7's Qualcomm, Intel soap opera dumps a carrier lock-out on us

TechnicalBen
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Facepalm

Intel, under pressure? Is that a joke?

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Hacker and chums jailed over gold bullion hack, track 'n' grab scam

TechnicalBen
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Joke

So you could say...

He is in for A Penny, out for a Pound?

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Nvidia: Eight bits ought to be enough for anybody ... doing AI

TechnicalBen
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Re: Possibly also not relevant -

I assume each neuron need not only be working on it's own.

Just as a 32bit cpu can do 64bit maths, it just takes twice the time or number of cpus.

PS, and if Deepdream from Google is anything to go by, you don't even do your first pass on such fine grained data at times, it may be a single bit (active area or not) etc.

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Microsoft thinks time crystals may be viable after all

TechnicalBen
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Re: What they're trying to explain...

The proposed "Time Crystal" would be a system that never decays and never updates... which when integrated into Windows 10, would make it the last Windows ever!

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TechnicalBen
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Re: "Crystals have a rigid arrangement of atoms that break translational symmetry."

But at what dimensionality? Might seem to break symmetry from one perspective, but does it from all? That's the error in their assumptions.

As an example of where they can trip ideas up, see the failed predictions until relativity was added to the equation. Einstein showed a lot of assumed contradictions were fixed with relativity. Seems a similar problem here of assumed "breaks" in symmetry causing a contradiction in the possibility of perpetual motion/time symmetry/equivalence breaking systems.

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TechnicalBen
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Re: there's more to understanding this than just reading the article

Thanks for the wiki link. Forgive me if I am wrong, but the idea seems simple then.

A "space-time crystal" is a theoretical atomic or other particle system that returns to a previous state, thus breaking time symmetry. Time symmetry involves being able to run a system backwards and forwards and getting the same results (but in reverse and visa versa).

A "time crystal" would break this because when you set it up, it now "forever" runs like in a loop. So if you try to reverse it back to before you started the loop, you instead end up going in a loop again, but this time "backwards" in time.

It is effectively the hope of setting up a loop of dominoes that knock themselves over again and again. Or perhaps like sticking both ends of a VHS tape and taping it into a loop so it plays forever?

I would assume that to get something like a time loop, you would have to forgo any loops in space (space-time equivalence). Otherwise the entire idea is impossible.

TL:DR you can have a roundabout in a playground that returns to the start position every rotation, but over time looses energy. OR we can have a roundabout that moves through time never loosing energy, but it can never move.

These people want both and in effect, a Magic Roundabout. ;)

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Microsoft

Oh, not to worry, it is not time that they seem to be messing with, but more the energy state of a system. I am certain that if they accidentally create Ice 9 ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat's_Cradle ) then we will all be safe!

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Hololens for biz shocker: Surprisingly, it doesn't totally suck

TechnicalBen
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Re: Marketing and alternative uses ?

Can they use it with satnav too? Anything to get the marketing "types" away from us!

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TechnicalBen
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Re: My company has one

There is one solution on the focus problem, but it involves light field projection and is a LOT more money and hardware. Basically a light field camera in reverse, and NVidia are working on one such headset currently AFAIK.

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HP Ink buys Samsung's printer business for a BILLION dollars

TechnicalBen
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Re: Why I don't trust HP - reason #72

I forgot the brand of printer, but I "fixed" one for a neighbour by checking the manual... after 10,000 prints it refuses to do *anything* until it has had an engineer service it. On looking it up, this meant changing the print head... or just pressing the right combination of buttons to pretend we did, as it was around £200 for a replacement as now out of production and the new model sold for £100.

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Wait, wait – I got it this time, says FCC as it swings again at rip-off US TV cable boxes

TechnicalBen
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Re: We want it Simple.

"Conceptually one could build a combined Cable TV and Satellite set top box" We have TVs that do that here. What planet are you on where this is still only in the conceptual stage?

Mine is the one with the remote to the Sony/Panasonic/Samsung that does Satellite, Antenna broadcast and internet on demand all at the same time (no cable on those, as it is propriety, but could be piped in with the right setup and a lot of money... we did do those installs for some, one cupboard with the lot, and pipe it through the house in HD).

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TechnicalBen
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Re: ...expose customer data

No one can offer internet equivalent cable tv streaming because the infrastructure cannot handle it. There are methods of doing it over the internet, but I do not think the hardware at the phone exchanges etc is there for multicast.

For on demand, you don't hit the same kind of peak requirements as often, though even then local congestion can be enormous. Cable does not have this problem, it does not suffer congestion if more people watch (for example everyone watching the Superbowl). :)

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You should install smart meters even if they're dumb, says flack

TechnicalBen
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Re: It won;t help

Perhaps we seriously underestimated the number of muppets?

But it is a self causing problem. Fail to educate people, then fail to correct the errors left behind by this.

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You're guilty but broke, judge tells Wash.io – the 'Uber of laundry'

TechnicalBen
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Re: Where is the "Uber" of washing machines?

That's a brilliant idea, here is...

... (reads last line), you forgot the joke icon!

PS, Where is the wad of cash icon?

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GE runs off $1.4bn, hands it to two 3D printing firms

TechnicalBen
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Re: That is quite a financial impulse

Right with you up to the "superior quality". That is not always how materials work. The systems currently produce sub par quality strength, but can sometime produce higher detailed and otherwise impossible to assemble structures (lattices and internal gaps/holes).

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Better than Plastic

It will be a good few years before costs come down, if ever. When they do though, I'd love to print out a set of trainers.

In reality, it's all about supplements to existing systems. The screwdriver does not replace the hammer, and the chisel the saw. Likewise there is a market and a use with a little need/demand for 3d printing.

For everything else... there is everything else.

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Spoof an Ethernet adapter on USB, and you can sniff credentials from locked laptops

TechnicalBen
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Angel

I agree, but I'd then lock the PC in a cabinet. If these people cannot be trusted with the hardware, don't give them access.

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TechnicalBen
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Holmes

Re: So...

You've never seen Windows Autorun have you? (It was the "CD" back before the usb on all those spy shows)

Sherlock, I guess he used a letter knife instead.

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McAfee's back! Intel flogs security software biz, pockets $3.1bn

TechnicalBen
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Black Helicopters

Re: Maths?

It is not the value of McAffee they are selling.

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Nokia's 4.9G races Ericsson's almost-5G, yet the finishing line is a mirage

TechnicalBen
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Joke

The latest...

Mobile wireless platform will be called "10" with no "G" prefix, and will be updated for the life of the device, it will be our last release of W̶i̶n̶d̶o̶w̶s̶ telecommunications technology we release.

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Google scraps its Project Ara modular smartphone wheeze

TechnicalBen
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Almost.

I guess it could work... well, it is working in a different way already.

As others have posted above, Phones like the Moto Z have expendables like speakers or bigger batteries. Some phones have pens. Others have watches.

This seems to be where the true expansion and repeatability comes in. A partially fragmented device. Say a terminal in the pocket, the display on your wrist, the speakers in earbuds. Each being independent and swappable for the next big thing (assuming they scale on the blutooth being used).

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TechnicalBen
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They should have gone for Lego: http://techy-ben.deviantart.com/art/Brick-Based-Palm-Pad-399712067

(Pic is much older than that upload. I drew it around dec 2002!)

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Hewlett Packard Enterprise in talks to offload software, asking for '$8bn to $10bn'

TechnicalBen
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Re: Sounds like a good deaal to me

I assume to make it look really good, you offset some bills to next years accounts, sell all the furniture and make is look like you had some profits for people to drool over just before they realise is was a rouse.

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Sounds like a good deaal to me

Hi, I have a bridge to sell you, and some European and UK banks...

/If I was feeling kind, I'd point out that anyone can make things look like a bargain on paper before the sale completes...

Mine is the one with the memories in my pocket of people actually falling for this stuff.

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Watch SpaceX's rocket dramatically detonate, destroying a $200m Facebook satellite

TechnicalBen
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Mushroom

"Settle down" is one things they did after that fireball covered them.

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Deep inside Nantero's non-volatile carbon nanotube RAM tech

TechnicalBen
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Re: All change

The application scales to the resources. Look at PC gaming for an example of this to the extreme.

If you need less resources, you purchase accordingly, and possibly don't get the faster memory in the first place.

Supply and demand and all that jazz...

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TechnicalBen
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Re: It sounds good

The individual bit may last 1000 years, the rest of the PC, PCB boar and IC casing is likely to dissolve away through age though!

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African Ring of Fire to show up at annular solar eclipse

TechnicalBen
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Is the picture to scale?

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Intel's makeshift Kaby Lake Cores hope to lure punters from tired PCs

TechnicalBen
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Re: 70% over 2011 i5's

I think they call the thermal paste "future proofing", however that is towards their desired replacement cycle.

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Our pacemakers are totally secure, says short-sold St Jude

TechnicalBen
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Facepalm

Re: "Muddy Waters, the Wall Street firm"

This is America. It is probably the founder real life and parent given name.

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'Second Earth' exoplanet found right under our noses – just four light years away

TechnicalBen
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Re: Stephen Baxter

This really gets me with most sci-fi. It's when they mix sciences. Oh, by all means mix science with fantasy, like in Star Wars. Just leave it unexplained!

If you want a time machine say "we invented one" or "we went in a black hole/worm hole" and stop there. Put down the pen, and go away. Never ever ever write "we invented one by using magnets and anti-venom" or "we used a tacyon cascade neural net" because it will just sound stupid to those who know the tech/science and is the same as "magic" to those who do not. So why loose both, when you can just write "the hyperdrive core" as they do in the sci-fi that concentrates on the good stuff... the story!

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TechnicalBen
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This. Correlation does not imply causation.

For example, cars are correlated to garages. So I build hundreds of garages, but no cars appeared.

Or trees are correlated to soil, so I plant a ton of it on the moon... oh, no trees.

We have to be honest and until we know a process or have a sample size that can be studied, we are guessing at empty space.

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'Neural network' spotted deep inside Samsung's Galaxy S7 silicon brain

TechnicalBen
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Re: Is it just me...

Actually this is the way to go. I assume theoretically it is simpler...

Just the inbetween is more complex. The bit where we integrate existing designs to neural network like branch prediction and/or code execution.

When we get good at it, or the price comes down, or just the use of the design scales up, we will see lots of systems that adjust automatically for the task. I suppose GPUs already do this with their pixel pipelines and programmable shader cores etc (I am no expert so may have misunderstood?).

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Beauty site lets anyone read customers' personal information

TechnicalBen
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Re: Mind-bogglingly stupid

Seems they tried to apply Amazons "gift to friend via email address" and whoosh, the point went over their heads like Chicxulub! (Google is your friend ;) )

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Ancient radioactive tree rings could rip up the history books

TechnicalBen
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Re: Them is...

Some of the trees are aged via rings alone, but have damage to the bark. Thus they could have been putting out two or more rings per year during certain changes in weather. So they could be as much as half the age estimated.

The sad thing is, most of these techniques are estimations, and when used to overrule historic records (written history), it's rather saddening.

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'Daddy, what's a Blu-ray disc?'

TechnicalBen
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Re: @TechnicalBen

Thanks DougS, I did not know the name for it. I was under the impression Samsung accused LG of that. I did not know if it was the other way around (I've not seen any marketed OLEDs from Samung except for phones, and yes, sadly my one is pentile. :( ). But for TVs I think it's mainly LG that are doing it with OLED.

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Dave 126.

Sorry Dave, I guess as said, it is the marketing. Dynamic range has little to do with contrast ratio. The "brightness" as such. Dynamic range defines the colourspace in between. Why? We can talk about bit depth forever, but the panels have physical limits. :)

CRT/LCD/OLED all have physical maximums or manufactures tolerances. The bit depth makes no difference. What is the proof? You just asked me to look at a HDR image on my non-10bit PC panel (I would guess it's 8bit). I can still see the HDR image perfectly. :D

What I don't see is a perfect gradient between the colours. I may get more banding than another person. I think you know this, but described the colour range and brightness and contrast in the same sentence. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_depth

The marketers make out that 10bit depth will make images "brighter" and "crisper", which is a lie. They just remove banding and add colour. As in the past, as now, they always have the ability to map the max brightness and darkness to anything the panel can output. For example they say "does not effect total brightness" then show example images varying only in total brightness. :/

4k as a tech does not change the max brightness (contrast ratio) in the panel. That is down to LCD backlight and OLED tech, which is separate to any resolution restrictions (currently AFAIK).

Sorry if I thought your first post mentioned the brightness being effected by the UHD spec. As said, the HD sets previously could even support the 10bit depth, so not a 4k tech in the slightest. It does make more colours a standard though, but a rather pointless one when content can just be adjusted as you mentioned in photoshop. :P

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TechnicalBen
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It is an animation and your HD tv (or blue ray player) can upscale it nicely without loosing definition. It will smooth the edges a little and you loose some information in the process.

Now do that with a DVD of a nature program, compare it to a Bluray and a 4k version. Did some in store with Sony mastered safari clips, there is a nice difference. HD is a sweet spot, and 4k is nicer, but not a requirement just yet. SD is a blurry mess in comparison.

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Are we sinking into a kB/Kib-like mess?

Yes. Did you know there are subpixels?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subpixel_rendering

A full pixel reproduction of a digital image would give you 3 colours per pixel. Reg, green and blue. Sub pixel rendering allow you to adjust them to provide an image that almost gives you more pixels than you have.

Which is fine for increasing the image quality on say, a 4000 pixel width TV. But they may do the opposite, and give you a sub 4000 pixel (or sub 3480*2160) and use sub pixels into tricking you as a consumer into thinking it is a 4k tv. :(

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Dave 126.

No. Just NO!

The OLED provides better dynamic range. (Black has always been black, white has always been white, everything else is false advertising)

The OLED has better colour reproduction. (Green is green, red is red etc, everything else is false advertising)

The UHD/4K provides better resolution.

The resolution alone is a nice touch, it is an improvement as with all things. It is down to personal taste and specific content on if this is needed or wanted (for example I like it, but others wear glasses and see no benefit).

But how does it offer "greater dynamic range"? It is a TV with pre-recorded content, OLED and black is black, white is white. How can they "increase" that via the source data or by changing from 8bit to 10bit colour? They can't. ;)

BUT, the 4K does offer finer colour range. So sunsets and subtle colour gradients have no banding. But to be honest, I've only ever seen banding on PC games/webpages, never on TV content as this naturally provides dithering that even at SD is perceivable.

TL:DR, the advertisers and marketers are very good at using the wrong words to describe real changes, and you seem to have fallen for it. AFAIK they even back ported some firmware to add High Dynamic Range to HD TVs (you saw a real change, colour improvement and contrast from the OLED/backlights in LED, the marketers lied and said it was a 4k improvement only).

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TechnicalBen
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Worse...

A few (mainly OLED ones) are using 1.5 pixels when you would normally have 2. So they display 2880 real pixels and extrapolate the 4k down to that. I think they get away with it because they do have a "half" pixel. They alternate the colours green and blue every 2 pixels, but each pixel does not do the full colour range. Similar to the iPhone retina display.

A bit like how digital video has a lower colour resolution to save on bandwidth, these tvs may have a lower sub pixel resolution to save on costs.

It basically tries to use sub pixel rendering to make it look like it is a higher res panel. :/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sub-pixel_resolution

I know it's pedantic, but I prefer them to advertise the true details of the panel. Far too many just go "it's a HD TV" and later you find out they redefined "HD" to mean "Heavily Dented". ;)

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Bees bring down US stealth fighter

TechnicalBen
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I wonder if...

This has anything to do with using radar to track bees?

http://beetime.eu/inside-of-tracking-honey-bee/

Who is so stealthy now?

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SpaceX lands another rocket

TechnicalBen
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They seemed to have hit the target dead centre there. Wow.

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Boffins' blur-busting face recognition can ID you with one bad photo

TechnicalBen
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Re: The meanings of "identify"

That is literally how the law works at times.

I recently read the Steam (online PC games store) is about to ban people if they gift a game, and the person they gave to uses hacks. This is to prevent hackers from making fake accounts and gifting out stolen/cheap games to easily hack on a second account (thus avoiding a ban on the first).

The solution is like a shotgun to remove a flea. :/

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The curious case of a wearables cynic and his enduring fat bastardry

TechnicalBen
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Re: Can you change the strap?

12 months too late for me. I saw their marketing drive and I assume their target consumer group.

They could have had that as standard from day one, but did not. That choice does not bode well with me and the possibility of them providing a product or service I want, as supposed to one they know can gouge out my eyes (wallet).

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TechnicalBen
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Can you change the strap?

I almost got one of these, there are some really nice ones. All the ones I saw had permanent one time only straps and no supplies for replacements...

I kill straps. :(

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