* Posts by TechnicalBen

1254 posts • joined 23 Mar 2012

Page:

Captain Piccard's planet-orbiting solar aircraft in warped drive drama

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Don't try anything new!

Upvote there on the electricity. We already have them. Electric hobby craft and drones/quadcopters.

However none of these are solar powered just yet...

... with the exception of biofuel, as that is grown via the sunshine! :D

2
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: @James 51

That may be the key. Keep the entire in flight entertainment etc running of solar and a small battery system. Could it keep weight down? Or is the petroleum equivalent just so much higher density in power storage that it negates any savings in "recharging" mid flight?

The time the craft spend taxing etc is also one to consider.

0
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Facepalm

Re: It's a start

It is not to replace a 747/787...

It is for autonomous and continuous craft. Say mapping or camera work. A small solar powered craft that can go up, fly for an unspecified length of time, and come back down. Not taking cargo/passengers, but just images/data.

5
0

Zero-day hole can pwn millions of LastPass users, all that's needed is a malicious site

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

And there I was...

Thinking "I'll not bother with a password vault, as it has a single point of failure".

I'll probably stick to a second device (no internet, thus air gapped) with an encrypted list of passwords, possibly stored on usb stick. Yes the encryption will be poor, but it will need physical access to get at anyhow. Yes I'll need to type them in every time, so risk there. But the low hanging fruit is now hacking databases, not individual computers.

7
0

It's 2016 and your passwords can still be sniffed from wireless keyboards

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: There is a reason why I use wired KB's

That and I remember family buying some cheap ones. Both the keyboard and the mouse went to sleep, often when in use, and required additional "thumps" to wake up again. Not much of a feature in my book.

2
0

Microsoft's 3D Jedi phone explored

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Wait? When was this developed/is it patented?

I hope not, because my Note 3 has this. I'm not sure if the Note 1 or 2 did. I can use the hover gesture with the pen, and the hand gestures with apps. (Swipe left/right for photo gallery etc)

0
0

Free Windows 10 upgrade: Time is running out – should you do it?

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Try a partition table manager...

Windows 8.1/10 changes the partitions on the drive. For me (upgrade from 8 to 8.1) it just messed up my tidy partition with the additional install/recovery partition (IIRC a new 500mb partition at the end of the windows install partition, which can mess up some setups). For others though, it forced their dual boot to stop working.

4
0

We're not looking for MH370 in the wrong place say investigators

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Given that they haven't found it...

An upvote for the joke. But technically the search space could cover the right place. It could just be far too large, or the right part is the last part they will search...

... wait, by definition the right place is the last place they search.

0
0

Boffins unveil 500TB/in2 disk. Yeah, it's made of chlorine. -196˚C, why?

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Joke

Re: Cool, but...

The electrons/atoms have "spin".

0
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: useful

Look to biology. It is presumably the only way to do it at that scale. If there were other ways to do it, biology would have done it that way too/instead of. ;)

At slightly larger, well you don't need atomic storage. :P

1
0

Ransomware gang: How can I extort you today?

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Trollface

What is it with...

all these Windows 10 articles?

14
0

All you need for quantum computing at room temperature is some mothballs

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Joke

Re: Errmm...

Quantum decoherance?

14
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Interesting

An easy way of thinking is to think of it covering every possible state simultaneously. Due to limits in the number of bits needed to do this, it reduces your computational reach, but increases the speed (to theoretically instant results).

So say you had around 256bits worth of qbits (32bytes?) you could theoretically break 256bit encryption in an instance. The current problem is, you still need the rest of the computer to see if those bits decode your message. Which takes normal time. Which means currently there are very few applications for quantum computing.

But once we are also uploading your code breaking program and the encoded messages into a fully functional quantum computer, then we may be able to do really quick codebreaking (or search on Google in a femtosecond!). :P

0
0

Did mock cop bot trot on fraught tot? Maybe not

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: I'm sure

Wait, why are you saying it does not have a camera? How is this security device suppose to "security" if it does not have an on board camera?

3
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Facepalm

Re: That bot looks suitably menacing

How do you propose said robot functions at it's job description without, say, some cameras?

Did you see the picture of it? (Hint, it has cameras?)

5
0

Gaming apps, mugging and bad case of bruised Pokéballs

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Pretty poor research here

"Free" but with game restrictions and drip fed rewards perfectly tuned to make kids (or grown ups) feel they *need* to buy the "boosters". Thus side loading with "infinite boosters" is a really big draw.

The difference between a f2p game, a p2w game, a coin paid arcade and a casino is very, very slim.

2
1
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: I've got a lot of fond memories of playing Pokemon Leafgreen with my son.

No harm in the play time until the game mechanic specifically involves running out into the road.

Board games tend to not encourage that. Football has a field we play on. Hopscotch with crayons? Some parents might confiscate to dissuade kids from drawing the game in the middle of the road.

Same here, the possibility of problems is so high, I'm amazed some form or safety/change to the mechanic was not made.

3
2

If we can't find a working SCSI cable, the company will close tomorrow

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Pournelle's law, well one of them anyway...

I had similar buying a new mic. Turns out it was the sound card drivers. Branded ones just so happened to crackle and pop at the point with a mic you'd suspect hardware faults. Unbranded (direct from the chip manufacture not the badge supplier) work a treat.

2
0

Windows Phone users beg Pokémon Go creators for attention

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: The hard reality

This. I wondered about making apps as a hobby (you know, like all those other hobbies we have :P ).

It's easier and cheaper for me to buy and Arduino and program it, than try to navigate the hurdles and costs of uploading for Android or iOS (yes I know there are free options for testing/home development).

1
4

Galaxy S7 Active can't swim, claims site. But it can, vendor retorts

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Got a dead Samsung Galaxy A1 here...

Some reviews mention it is water resistant...

... it may have been until my poor friend plugged it into the charger. On inspection there is some residue in the case where some of the components *used to be*.

2
0

Linus Torvalds in sweary rant about punctuation in kernel comments

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Yep.

The greater person learns and accepts others formats.

That is, if Linux is so good at his work, could he not be a bit more polite in understanding the entire world is not the same as he is?

I'm now tempted to put my comments in actual functional and exciting code now.

4
10

The Great Brain Scan Scandal: It isn’t just boffins who should be ashamed

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: I would suspect...

While I agree about the diagrams... if you think the photos are counter-productive, perhaps reflect on the diagrams.

When the DNA was imaged, and when atomic molecular machinery in the cell was imaged, we had to rethink our diagrams and understandings. At least on the intricate details we tended to skip over.

Thinks like colouring the sample come to mind very quickly for methods to improve making specific photos over "bias" photos. :P

Would it be dangerous to say that human interpretation is above record keeping of the actual data?

Is it disingenuous to prefer the actual data plus human understanding, over just having opinion?

1
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

I would suspect...

Sadly a lot of science is possibly bias this way.

For example, Radio 4 just did a show on photographs and development from the 1830s. Turns out Henry Talbot was refused when he offered to give the technology to botanists. Why? Because they feared the photos would not show the *right* information.

So any form of science (scientific group) or study, has a risk of thinking it can decide what is right and wrong, instead of allowing the data or reality to decide.

8
2

Win 10 Anniversary: 'We're beginning to check in final code' says Microsoft

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Joke

Re: 'Free' update to end.

I don't believe they have a Linux Office hidden anywhere... but they may have the "export API to" button ready on their current code. ;)

1
0

AMD promises code fix for power-hungry Radeon RX 480 GPU

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Just a small bump in the road...

Never seen a dead Nvidia card? Well for certain some brands/rebadgers/manufactures do make mistakes. One was giving instant swaps/replacements as one particular model fried it's power line after 20 months. :P

It was a 570, and they replaced it with a 660 for me. :)

3
0

Sociology student gets a First for dissertation on Kardashians

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Thumb Up

Re: Hang on a minute...

What book is that? Actual interest :)

0
0

Judge gives Zuck a US$6 million Brazilian

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Joke

Re: WhatsApp should just hand them over

I often feel that way when I ask for a clue from most companies. :(

1
0

The future is complicated - can technology make it simple?

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

My advice...

Keep your technology stupid and your users smart.

Oh, by all means add the tech and processing power to it. But use if as a tool. Make it the best tool ever, but don't try to remove the user or their ability, as this is when things go wrong.

0
0

Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware goes FULL SCREEN in final push

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Facepalm

Re: A final throw of the dice before

FUTURE purchases will be subscription. Not the "free" version. How many times does this need to be stated? MS can't suffer the legal or consumer reaction unless they are truely suicidal in taking the option to make the free version subscription based.

However, you are correct that all and any other version of Windows or any future sale could all be subscription based. You claims though are like claiming that Windows 95 files will be held to ransom, because office 365 went subscription based.

(PS, downvote all you like, I'm not defending MS, just saying they are setting up a customer base to advertise to and exploit, not one to steal from.)

4
1

Mystery black hole hides by curbing its appetite

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

I would assume no, as some scientists/mathematicians/astrophysicist etc have tried to accound for dark matter via naked black holes. Dark matter usually outstrips most assumptions, and as it seems to lie outside of galaxies, black holes don't seem to fit the bill.

That is, unless totally naked (no matter around them or gas), then we would see a faint glow around some galaxies as little jets of gas/stars/wondering rocks hit the black holes. We see none, hence it is "dark" matter, not "warmed and glowing with a snug jumper" matter. :)

http://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2016/05/26/black-holes-as-dark-matter-heres-why-the-idea-falls-apart/#3a4646246d7b

However the above article suggests some early black holes could account for some of the matter. The closer we get with each slice, the closer to knowing what is left that is truly "dark", but still existing (no, not magic, just invisible like radio waves or sub atomic particles :P ).

0
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Yes. The "one data point" problem. While they can use mass distribution and star observations to estimate how many black holes there are, I'm not sure they can for how many "unseen" black holes there are.

1
0

A trip to the Twilight Zone with a support guy called Iron Maiden

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Not sure it's your brain Dabsy

Possibly, as some tones and sounds do merge with slight hearing loss. however it may be his brain. If he heard the people perfectly, but it was the spelling/meaning/ordering that seems wrong. Otherwise known as Dyslexia. I'd not be able to repeat some of my miss reads/miss heard conversations. :P

Alistair Dabbs, are you perhaps Dyslexic? (Yes, it effects word and letter ordering in hearing as well as reading)

2
0

Florida man sues Apple for $10bn, claims iPod, iPhone was his idea

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Wow. I could have sworn TNG was early 90s. Well, I feel old now...

1
0

Meet the grin reaper: Password manager now snaps login SELFIES

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Facepalm

Re: Photos?

It could also be partially hackable... as a third party, say sitting on the desk behind the mark, send a request to login seconds before the mark tries to log in...

They get a picture of anything (though social engineering may help). They are expecting *their* photo, so click it before logging in (muscle memory out paces the though processes). They quickly realise it was not their attempt, phone/email the app makers, get put on hold, while the crim pilfers their account details etc.

I agree on the cheese though!

0
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Coat

Oh, I don't mind if they...

listen in to me singing in the shower. Just don't watch me getting undressed!

1
0

Dr Craig Wright lodges 51 blockchain patents with Blighty IP office

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Mushroom

Re: Software patents

Thank you. I could not figure out why Linux looks so rubbish in comparison to lots of other operating systems... because of patents on "being able to see the screen". Darn you all patent applicators...

0
0

Rejoice, fatties: Giving chocolate electric shocks makes it healthier

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: From comments around the internet

It already happened.

4
0

Watch as SpaceX's latest Falcon rocket burns then crashes

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Engines and SSTO

It happens when you play KSP about just as often. Some of the Luna landings also cut it very very fine.

0
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Maybe he should have licenced a SABRE engine

SABRE is also not that type of engine. That is for a spaceplane style design. :)

6
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Different approach

Possibly the calculations were off on the autopilot, as it was so low on fuel?

1
0

YouTube sharecroppers start world’s most useless trade union

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Joke

Re: I can kind of understand...

So they have worked at the same firms I have then?

0
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

I can kind of understand...

wanting to separate the issues of pay and fair treatment in other areas.

If it is a bullying problem, DRM takedown etc, if those subjects are concentrated on, and the pay is left to other conversations.

Oh, but as a job description "Internetainerpreneur” is no good for us dyslexics! :D

6
0

Should we teach our kids how to program humanity out of existence?

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: "Coding" ...

I think the BBC Microbit is in a delay limbo... but if it works anything like an Arduino/Adafuit (Atmega chip) or is in C# like they are, then it will do fantastic. :)

1
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Alice

Just do what I do, when asked "what is your surname" I say "complicated". Then suggest they just write "Ben".

Or when asked "what shall I write on the cup" could we try "coffee"? Or if asked "what is your name?" I suggest signing in BSL. That's sure to get a laugh, and they will remember for next time and not need to write anything. :D

2
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Joke

Re: d3vy

Oh, I use to get that too, handed something by the brothers, then when the parents walk in, it's MY fault!

Wait, are we talking about immature kids getting into trouble and arguing, or about children and parenting?

4
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Don't they...

Also have to train the other kids? I always got into trouble for not being a good example...

8
0
TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Holmes

Is it programming?

Yes it IS programming. Very basic.

I think the oldest example of programming is rope wrapped around a spindle/axle of an old automated cart* in Greece. It could be "programmed" where to go, by which direction the rope was wound, and so could drive onto stage, change direction, and drive back all by its self.

l guess all programming is logic operations. Then understanding sequential and parallel commands and logic trees.

*Bucket of water/sand/rocks on a long rope pulled down by gravity to drive it along: https://www.newscientist.com/blog/technology/2007/07/programmable-robot-from-60ad.html

and: https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg19526111-600-the-programmable-robot-of-ancient-greece/

4
0

Sneaky brown dwarf gives us a bright flash and astroboffins are confused

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Slowly, the almost-sun..

For now: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whipping_Star

1
0

Patent trolls, innovation and Brexit: What the FT won't tell you

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge
Facepalm

Ok, so how do I...

make a disability utility? Or aid?

Just say I imagine a product that is totally possible to make now, but no one is selling/making it? Can I risk getting sued into the ground?

Do I open source it?

How do I produce it without the risk? Or do I just risk it?

0
0

Buggy vote-counting software borks Australian election

TechnicalBen
Bronze badge

Re: Counting votes under STV can be laborious.

OCR? Add a barcode next to each name, and scan the boxed for entry/choice. We use to have these things back in school, automated checked exams.

3
0

Page:

Forums