* Posts by TechnicalBen

1184 posts • joined 23 Mar 2012

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US nuke arsenal runs on 1970s IBM 'puter waving 8-inch floppies

TechnicalBen
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Paris Hilton

Re: Some Department of Commerce weather alert systems use Fortran

Javascript and Ruby are just convenience. I learnt that just reading on the Reg. If others think they are used for their power in computer... um?

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Android might be on the way to the Raspberry Pi

TechnicalBen
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Re: Another slice of pi

"Splashtop" also does remote desktop on android and windows (possibly others too). Free app for local LAN and paid for for VPN or something over the net.

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One ad-free day: Three UK to block adverts across network in June

TechnicalBen
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Re: “The current ad model is broken"

They do make money. Everyone pays for bandwidth.

"Carriers [want to] make [ludicrously more] money from the current ad model."

FIFY. :)

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Boffins blow up water with LASERS, to watch explosions in slow-mo

TechnicalBen
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I was certain I have seen that video before. (Sees like already clicked) Yep, I watched it the first time they did the rounds. :P

This new video then seems to be sections or timeframes of the zaps to compare. :)

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TechnicalBen
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Cool stuff.

I assume this would give more data on things like improving car engine injection systems. Or dare we say... HP inject priunters!

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Microsoft bans common passwords that appear in breach lists

TechnicalBen
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Mushroom

Only one soluion...

Go two factor already. It's the only way to know for sure...

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G4S call centre staff made 'test' 999 calls to hit performance targets

TechnicalBen
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Re: Two IFs

They were "test" calls, so not "fake". They were allowed to make the calls, just not allowed to fake the stats. For example, they were allowed to make as many test calls as they wished. However test calls were not to be included in the reporting. They included them in the reporting. They faked the reports to the management.

As they are allowed to make the calls, they broke no legal rules. The stats were internal checks and performances. And as far as I know, it is not illegal to fail at work, just you may get sacked for it.

(Though that is based on my limited knowledge from what the article posts)

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Two IFs

Possible elephant in the room of if it was a "test" call they were allowed to contractually make, and they just found a loophole in the metric reporting systems.

So no legal ground for charges, but could be dismissed on other grounds (found to be using facebook at work?).

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Cock fight? Not half. Microsoft beats down Apple in Q1

TechnicalBen
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Trollface

Re: Maybe if the ipad Pro

No, adding "i" to it does.

(At a loss for which joke iCon to use, but settled for the obvious troll...)

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Apple: Another bug fix. Er, thanks, GCHQ

TechnicalBen
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Black Helicopters

I think the conspiricy is...

That Twitter recently added the camera (include camera photo, not "gallery" image) icon to their Twitter app and we still are using muscle memory from the old button placement.

Black helicopter as thats what will happen when they add the quadcopter icon in a burst of creativity.

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Toyota not shybot about whybot it will trybot the iBot

TechnicalBen
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Big Thumbs Up!

We can do amazing things when we try. Sadly money is often a limit.

Don't let it be. It's great to hear about those looking to improve and help others.

I hope the effort is put in the right place and many people benefit from this.

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LinkedIn plays down '117 million users' breach data sale

TechnicalBen
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Facepalm

Adobe Leak...

If playing the Adobe password leak crossword game is anything to go by, the leak did little harm as 99% of the passwords was "dog".

For the game, see below:

http://zed0.co.uk/crossword/

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BBC's Britflix likely dead before the ink has even dried on the news

TechnicalBen
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Re: I think a paid service would only work

No, Youview is not POD. It's just catchup/streaming/time shifting.

It may have other ideas, but it seems not much if any of the POD is there right now.

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Would we want to regenerate brains of patients who are clinically dead?

TechnicalBen
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Re: Well

Two mistakes. One that we are not the same as what we are made of. And two that we need a human brain for any of those tasks.

As it would have the same structure as a person, a reanimated brain would be a person. No excaping that.

As we only need neurons, we can use any type (fish, worm, Z list celebrity) to do our calculating. Why choose the most risky and hardest to keep functioning?

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TechnicalBen
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Trollface

That is all well and dandy...

But I have this flying car I would like you to test. Don't worry about those serious problems. I will get them fixed by analysing you... um, the car in the crash it may have.

Thanks for volunteering!

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TechnicalBen
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Re: how it feel to to be wrenched back from an even more definite terminal event.

Alister. I think your mistaken there Alister. The electrical charges are positioned by chemical connections. In fact every neuron connects to another not via electrical signals, but chemical ones. The electrical part sends the signal along the neuron to the other parts, but the end communication is a chemical one.

So both recent chemical compounds and long term neuron connections are very much non-electrical and permanent (while alive and not decaying).

So memory and similar do seemed stored. However you are correct that to be "running" or "present" it needs to be electrical in nature.

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TechnicalBen
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And we are doing this on people... why?

I assume they did this on animals first? Or in labs with stem cells? Or anything better than going head strong into using people as test subjects (alive or dead) as their first attempt...?

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White hats bake TeslaCrypt master key into universal decryptor

TechnicalBen
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So after the last Reg article...

suggested paying up? We now get a free release? Yeah, as said, don't pay the ransoms.

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Destroying ransomware business models is not your job, so just pay up

TechnicalBen
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Re: Mr. Pauli's Informed Opinion

I suppose there are instances where some data is obvious if tampered with, photos and video. But you'd have to strip it of everything except the raw images to be safe after the fact.

Oh, and I'd only attempt the physiological payment, not the economic one with these guys. Though just spending time on the effort might be enough of a waste.

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TechnicalBen
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Re: It is our job to uphold the law

Why pay the person holding your belongings to ransom?

Why trust them twice over? The first time with what they now have, the second time with what you are now giving them?

If you start paying shoplifters to take items from your store and return them... is it not a rod for your own back?

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Got $130,000 down the back of the sofa? Great. Grab an HP 3D printer

TechnicalBen
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Oh, I'm quite interested in what this might be...

"The Jet Fusion 3D 3200"

Hmmm, sounds too much like a razor. Why do HP and printer companies in general have such uninspiring naming schemes? At least the Reprap and Makerbot etc have descriptive names.

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ZFS comes to Debian, thanks to licensing workaround

TechnicalBen
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My right to choose how to liscence my own software...

includes a clause all must wear chicken costumes while using said software. ;)

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Microsoft boots fake fix-it search ads

TechnicalBen
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Re: I don't know why people are so fucking stupid

All of those points aer valid, but none of them have anything to do with blindly clicking links on the internet.

I think we need internet training like we do food training. We grow up knowing not to eat everything that can fit in out mouths, how to check it's safe, and how to check it's from a good place or is what it says it is.

Why can we not do the same with the internet instead of clicking every link? Same seems to go for those poor people getting poisoned by tabs in clubs. Really? You trust these people to make something your going to put in your mouth that you have no idea except a promise is not going to kill you?

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Useful

Wait? So you look up "DVLA" in the phone book, call David Victor Liam Alfred and when he scams you, blame the phone book?

I know scams on Google are bad. Google (and other search engines) do a lot of work to fix it. But I cannot understand people who are so trusting not to look at where they are on the internet. I know some people will buy anything from a man in a van in the street. Which is not their fault, they were scammed, but please have a little bit of thought in how and what you do. :/

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Kobayashi Maru gets real: VR and AR in meatspace today

TechnicalBen
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It can in part, as it's a static image and the eye can scan that image.

So it can improve the 2d version, just not the 3d version (unless that information is in the VR projection).

I really should use it to see what it's like, as I tend to notice those little inconsistencies (such as you say, not being able to perform saccades in an actual 3d environment, only the two 2d images provided).

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Laser-zapping scientists will save the Earth from meteorite destruction

TechnicalBen
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Re: Odds

Finally, some food for thought. I'm in no way saying we should not try. I'm saying that we need perspective on these things. There are always things outside of out capability, but possibly too low in probability to worry about.

Such as:

Globally destroying solar flare, such as the recent near miss (July 2012).

Super volcano eruption (a few candidates possible).

Local Supernova. etc.

These problems are not solved with bigger lasers. Some are not even solved by moving off this rock.

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TechnicalBen
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Mushroom

Re: Momentum

Creating a cloud of dust may be enough. If the dust has a different albedo to the rest of the roid, it could allow the sunlight to push it slightly.

However the easiest method would probably be sending a lot of white paint over to it...

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TechnicalBen
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Re: The local neighbourhood has cleared

Thanks Pascal. It's also dependant on the notion of "near".

I'd have to ask the probabilities or changes in those trajectories to know if they vary enough to become a risk. As said, if a galaxy collision results in no such few stellar collisions, then will we get any/many during our time on earth?

Example, we have 8 or so planets in our solar system to see the results from. The likes of the collisions with Jupiter etc. What are the causes, what are the precursors to these events? Are there the same causes and precursors with regards to the earth?

There may be zero car collisions in the desert. Hundreds on the freeway. But how many in my parking garage result in me being ran over or total destruction of my house?

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Alister

I think the question is, why were they near misses? If totally avoiding the problem is Sci-Fi, what can we do that is realistic to keep them down to near misses.

Besides. If we can track them, we can know where they will hit. What is the most reliable way to avoid danger then? Fire lasers and hope for the best, or evacuate the town/city in the path? One gives a current tech and reliable method of saving lives. The other hopes for the best and that we can deflect/destroy the object.

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Odds

More than that. I'd argue the period of time where NEO were a danger has passed. The local neighbourhood has cleared.

As an example of the risk, with galaxy collisions the predicted number of stellar collisions is around a dozen or two. That's very low for the amount of stars between two galaxies.

So while were not talking about planets hitting planets (unless we reclassify Pluto ;) ). We are talking about the odds while the system is currently in a rather stable state.

What are the simulations on collisions within a solar system with an age of ours? Unlike Galaxy collisions, we don't seem to have any local neighbours on a collision course. Most of our surrounding matter is orbiting in unison (around the Sun, or with our solar system around the Galaxy's core).

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Apple, AT&T, Verizon named in $7bn VoIP patent claim

TechnicalBen
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Re: Flocke

"If you have something good, make it, sell it, then sell the company to venture capitalists (VC = someone who buys an operating cash cow, then fires the developers). Let the VC deal with trolls while you sell version 2 from the new company you set up with the proceeds of the sale."

Possibly this. Make the product, keep the USP. Sell off the product side of the business (or open source it to make the trolls even more annoyed), and keep the services/support side of the business going.

Also known as... Google. :P

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TechnicalBen
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So, I'm in two minds...

I honestly am not sure what can be done anymore...

I want to patent "stick with a mobile device" (quite literally, and no it's not a Selfie Stick), but realise it is a very mundane patent. If I don't patent it though, would I get attacked by lawsuits when I make my Mobile Stick?

So using Patents to defend rights is great. Using it to attack others, is going to be down to each individual case.

However, if you have a USP that no one else can go to/copy, then perhaps lean on that instead of bits of paper trying to prove the unprovable.

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This is what a root debug backdoor in a Linux kernel looks like

TechnicalBen
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Joke

Re: How do I delete the /proc/sunxi_debug/sunxi_debug file?

I've come to a reconciliation with "everything is a file", but only if we can rename it to something else. Like "link" or "ethereal thingybob". ;)

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'I thought my daughter clicked on ransomware – it was the damn Windows 10 installer'

TechnicalBen
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Facepalm

Re: Shadow Systems...

No idea who downvoted you. Downvoting someone who requires a SRE. Wow, that's low of them. :(

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TechnicalBen
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Big Brother

It is a stealth update. I've not had it happen on my Windows machines, because I killed it all with fire (from orbit), but did have it happen on my mobile device. Though that runs Android, it's the same kind of setup.

I'm busy working, playing or surfing. I'm texting or typing. All of a sudden a box loads up in front of my focused window/app/homepage. I click the screen/type on the keyboad just as my mind registers the input. 0.5 seconds of human response time when mid flow in a task is not enough. No "are you sure" just "oh you seem to have accidentally click 'upgrade' so lets turn everything off right this second!"

I have no sympathy for MS, and have deep concern for those they have pulled the wool over the heads of. While the OS is fine, it's about as good as getting a perfectly good 3 course meal from the person you know is just waiting for you to turn your back on them...

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TechnicalBen
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Mushroom

No...

Because I've seen it happen. They spent a good amount of their time learning XP, then Vista then Windows 8.1.

They spent a LOT of time learning it. They could just manage to print and organise their photos. It "just worked" for them. They were happy.

Then the unremoveable update (they told me after the 30 days, the update removed the reinstall partition of the original OS thanks to MS new fangled method... clever planning of MS there!) to Windows 10 hit.

Photo printing and organising is so different that even I'd burn it out for a Linux swap at the drop of a hat. Poor things have decided to go back to their Vista laptop for photo editing and printing, and the Win10 machine is just for email and web now.

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TechnicalBen
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Trollface

Re: How could they force people to upgrade?

Choice of upgrading or a kick in the teeth.... see. ;)

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Ransomware grifters offer to donate proceeds of crime to charity

TechnicalBen
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Childcatcher

Re: Um, that is irrelevant

I'm reminded of one game where the pirate looks at their targets empty cargo hold and cries "Oh no, my children will go hungry tonight!" Because, that's the first thing they'd spend all the gold on. ;)

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We will end misleading broadband adverts, thunders ASA...

TechnicalBen
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Trollface

I'm offering free internet!

To anyone who pays £50 a month for a totally unrelated reason. Free internet only available to those paying the unrelated £50.

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Nvidia, Samsung pump brakes in car-crash GPU patent rip-off race

TechnicalBen
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Coat

I'm just off...

to paten the "microchip on a..." with a big long list from a dictionary.

As "car" and "mobile phone" is taken, I'll be aiming for:

Quadcopter

Hexacopter

Fish

Shoe

Ring

Bicycle

Etc.

After that I might have just enough cash to patent it all over again but with "touch screen on a..." as the prefix.

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Chap runs Windows 95 on Apple Watch

TechnicalBen
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...

Still more useful.

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SpaceX adds Mars haulage to its price list

TechnicalBen
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I assume...

That's to Mars orbit or even less, "the general direction of Mars". A lander/rover is going to be less weight than the entire package.

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One black hole, three galaxies, four BEELION solar masses – found by accident

TechnicalBen
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Re: AC Electrons and a Big Bang.

I think you have missed the "observation" definition. By "observation" we mean effected by, or communicated with. So a particle, wave or system that has an effect on us. Electrons have always effected us, we have always observed them and their effect. But recently we have seen things more directly, like electron clouds and individual particles. Before then, we were all made of atoms and particles. Electrons don't need us to observe them for them to exist. Electrons are observed, they effect things.

So I agree it does not create it, however logic can only dictate objects or things we can observer (things that can effect us). We cannot state or theorise real things that have no effect on anything. We can theorise those as fictional things, but they cannot exist in reality.

As for black holes, it may be more simple or more complex. For example, black holes are already good candidates for being themselves white holes. Just as a river both has water flow into it, and out of it.

TL:DR version in simplicity and poetry: They is one thing we all know to be a fact. Existence. The rest is just detail.

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Simple question

Simple answer: Logic.

We can state the observables, we can infer the things inferred. Everything else? Does not "exist" by definition.

Especially if the current observation is the explanation, then an alternative is not the observation and not correct.

Add to that, by definition a thing can only happen once. To be able to define it or observe it twice, it needs something to be different, IE time or position. For example, consider the game of noughts and crosses/tic tac toe. And the possible results. Consider what would happen if we had every possible combination of plays, vs one play. How do we define or know if one of our random combinations is the beginning, middle or end or a current game? When we understand that, we understand why and how the universe is bound by time and it's direction.

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Japan's Hitomi space 'scope bricked, declared lost after software bug

TechnicalBen
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Boffin

Re: Er no.

I never cease to be amazed at how things like KSP can really show the problems and simulate the real challenges that the space agencies follow.

Though the game can just re-adjust and recalculate things like COM on the fly, in real life communication limits and the lack of a "save game" feature can make small mistakes critical errors.

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Will Comcast's set-box killer murder your data caps? The truth revealed

TechnicalBen
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Re: why is it not an internet service?

I'd agree with the definition. But I'd add that, possibly, it's about time that as soon as they deliver something from off that network, they become a common carrier.

Want to own that line and charge anything you like with any rules you like? Keep it 100% your content. Wish to connect to the "internet" and sell it to your customers (down your line, cable or satellite etc), then you have to keep to the common carrier rules etc.

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TechnicalBen
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One word.

Monopoly.

It is not that Comcast do this. It's a good thing to do in certain situations. It is that it has a monopoly.

Think for a second that Comcast is not the internet or cable or TV or phone. Imagine it is a road provider or car manufacturer. Instead of only preferring their TV, now they decide who drives on the road, who pays fees and who gets to go home in the evenings. Instead of giving "free bandwidth" to their own services, they charge everyone to use the roads except their own services.

All of a sudden, all parcel delivery companies go out of business, shops have to sell themselves to Comcast because they cannot afford the transport costs.

With a monopoly a company can take control, and do whatever they like, which can be bad.

AFAIK Sky, BT etc have the cap be effected by their own services. However sometimes they offer other packages, and they know there is an option for customers to leave if they feel they are being treated unfairly.

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What a difference a year makes: ICO tele-spam fines break £2m barrier

TechnicalBen
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Re: NIce headline

A big letter with a fine arrives at a door to an empty building. Next door, strangely there are hundreds of people employed to call random numbers and ask if you want some "free" legal advice...

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'No password' database error exposes info on 93 million Mexican voters

TechnicalBen
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Coffee/keyboard

Oh I'm sure...

we could help a load of other nations spill their data at the same time?

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TechnicalBen
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Re: Meanwhile, in Italy...

I would assume insurance database. Here in the UK lots of "insurance claims" calls are made just after a legit claim is made/processed.

So someone somewhere is leaking and/or getting the data legally. The "insurance claims" calls are skirting the law by only charging ludicrous fees on possible personal court claims. So their just ambulance chasing, which is unwanted but not illegal.

Getting the data via the wrong means is though, and as these companies are not using the central database for an actual claim, but to sell you legal advice/services, then they really should get a big slap on the wrists.

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