* Posts by Jim84

102 posts • joined 20 Mar 2012

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Reclothed BlackBerry Passport launched as Silver Edition

Jim84

Capacitive Keyboard

I have never used the Capacitive keyboard other than as a physical keyboard. I imagined that it would be used to move the cursor around in text like the 'trackpad' on the classics. But this never seems to work in any applications.

What really surprised me is how much I like the wider screen. Yes you can turn a galaxy/iphone sideways, but then the scrolling real estate is reduced to less than that of a passport.

But I can't see the Passport ever selling in large numbers due to it's weird size and shape. Also the rubber back is actually really good, but will initially put people off in shops.

My layman's wish is that Blackberry would produce 4 phones each year:

- Classic

- Budget classic with the same screen, but everything else cheaper parts.

- iPhone/Galaxy alike with a capacitive trackpad/nub combo home button.

- Slightly thicker version of the iPhone/Galaxy alike with a somehow decent slide out keyboard.

My other wishes are for a metal back that is somehow dimpled so that it is not slippery, but is still cool to the touch (the iPhone 6's are ridiculously slippery). Also for the classic and slide out to have two or more LED lights under each key, lighting up different characters on the key, allowing for a contextual keyboard.

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Petrol cars are dead in the water, says Tesla CTO waving numbers on the back of an envelope

Jim84

Dearman Engine will win

http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2012/10/nitrogen-cycle

The Economist has already called it, a better way of storing energy for motive power is a Dearman liquid nitrogen/liquid air engine.

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Feeding the XPoint cuckoo and finding it a place in the storage nest

Jim84

Re: Consoles

I think Nintendo's next console (the Nintendo NX) is coming out a lot sooner than 2020 given the failure of the WiiU. Although XPoint will probably be too expensive.

Can someone explain how XPoint will lead to better games?

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BlackBerry vows to make even fewer phones

Jim84

Moon on a stick wishes

Typical blogger comment here, but they should just do four phones per year. An iPhone alike, a slightly thicker version of the iPhone alike with a slide out keyboard, a classic device, and a cheap materials version of the classic device. The home button on the iPhone alikes should be raised rather than recessed and able to act as a trackpad like that on the current classic.

It is a shame that they don't seem to be able to get all Android apps working in BBOS as there are clearly benefits to making both the hardward and OS.

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FEMALE BLOOD-SUCKERS zero in on human prey by smelling our BREATH

Jim84

Re: Dettol and baby oil

Is it really beyond human ingenuity to build a device that attracts and then kills mosquitos? Do the bastards adapt to all attempts or something?

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Self/Less: Crap science, eyebrow acting, and immortality for the 1%

Jim84

The Prestige

@LeeMing - Aren't you a copy of yourself though? Have you ever been knocked out? If they could grow a copy of you, and the copy woke up and didn't see the original, it wouldn't know that it was a copy.

This will probably never be possible, but it makes for some fun thought experiments. See the Christopher Nolan's film "The Prestige" for a good example of this in fiction.

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Microsoft: This Windows 10 build has 'NO significant known issues'

Jim84

Bring back clippy

I really want a mod that skins cortana into Clippy. "Looks like you're trying to open a word document...". Some of the most annoying words in the English language.

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Gates: Renewable energy can't do the job. Gov should switch green subsidies into R&D

Jim84

Nuscale

Nuscale power have an interesting SMR rector that uses standard uranium oxide fuel rods. The big innovation is that they have designed the rector so that there are no powered pumps or moving parts, and the whole thing sits in a giant pool of water. If the plant loses power then the magnetically suspended control rods drop, and the thing winds down to a power level where it can air cool itself forever long before the water pool evaporates.

Because it is small the rectors can be factory built, avoiding cost overruns and long in field construction times.

Because it is small the complex can be built in a hole in the ground (basically a bunker) rendering it earthquake and airplane proof. And if you stuck it on a hill it would be Tsunami proof too.

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Humongous headsets and virtual insanity

Jim84

Pseudo Holographic TV

I have a feeling that Pseudo Holograms might be the next big thing for TV, while VR might be restricted to solo gaming. The other thing limiting VR in the near term is that you need an enthusiast level PC to run a headset with enough FPS.

On the other hand Dolby Atmos for sound looks absolutely awesome for regular TV as well as VR. Although not that many people have a full 5.1 speaker set up in their living room. The main problem is plumbing in all the power wiring for the speakers. And these cables get dusty and horrible. Perhaps if wireless power over 2m takes off (Witricity reckon they can do it) then people will just be able to stick speakers to walls and place them on stands behind the couch.

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Windows Phone is like religion – it gets people when they are down

Jim84

Bring back the E6

I wouldn't mind an updated version of this with windows phone 10 on it.

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What an eyeful: Apple's cut price 27in iMac with Retina Display

Jim84

Still has a mobile graphics card in it

I understand that they probably can't fit a full sized Nvidia 980 or AMD R9 290X card into an all in one PC. But you might be better to wait for the next refresh as AMD will by then have greatly reduced the size of their card through the use of High bandwidth Memory (HBM).

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-gpu-radeon-2015-hbm,29054.html

On the other hand if you wait 6 months you can almost always get a much better computer...

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Hyperloop tube trains, killer AI, and virtual skydiving: Yes, it's the Pioneers Festival

Jim84

Looks like 5 TED talks squashed together

Hyperloop - could actually work. But will need Billions to develop and Musk has already maxed out his credit trying to get into space.

Graphene - Is still a manufacturing breakthrough away from being practical. I hope it doesn't take 10+ years like OLED Televisions.

AI - So many predictions about this it is boring.

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Roku 3: Probably the best streaming player on the market ... for now, at least

Jim84

DLNA

OK I see that the Roku 3 New can do DLNA streaming from a local storage device/NAS by installing the "Roku Media Player App". But why not just have that functionality installed out of the box?

Also another add on that seems to be fairly obvious to me is some kind of rudimentary social network so that I can have a recommendations stream based on what my friends are watching, or what my friends share or hit the like/love/recommend button on.

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Microsoft HoloLens or Hollow Lens? El Reg stares down cyber-specs' code

Jim84

The lack of wires is cool but...

...a lack of wires has got to limit the graphical power. And as an early large function of the Hololens and other headsets seems to be gaming, surely this is an Achilles heal.

Still Witricity have been promising to make wireless power over a few feet real for some time now. It if is not vapourware then perhaps MS could use or buy their tech. Even in that case though it would be better if they figured out how to screen share the output of a desktop PC's graphics card to the Hololens. I know that current screen sharing introduces lag, but surely there must be some way around this? We're not talking Gaikai over the internet streaming of 3D, just streaming in the same room.

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Nobody should have to see their own rear, but that's what Turnbull's NBN will do to Australia

Jim84

Too much hassle

I'm going to guess that wearing a VR headset to watch the football will be too much hassle. People don't wear 3D glasses, and they are lighter and more convenient. I think large pseudo holographic TVs are the future.

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Hackable media box based on the Raspberry Pi compute module: Five Ninjas Slice

Jim84

Pirate media player - This can play NAS stored files

I think Apple TV can't play (potentially pirated) media files on your NAS drive (at least my flat hasn't been able to figure out how to do this with Apple TV). I tried to read if Roku could do this, but got lost in walls of text in review focusing on its Netflix support.

I think this is the main difference between Slice and Roku/Apple TV? Please correct/abuse me if I am wrong?

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BlackBerry gets flirty with QWERTY IP, launches $275 Leap

Jim84

Dual curve

Not to sure about the dual curve, just seems like another gimmick from Samsung in their "throw everything against the wall and see what sticks" strategy (still it worked a treat with phablets).

But a querty slider looks pretty tasty. The only thing I am worried about is that the keyboard will be horribly compromised like the keyboard on the old torches.

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Australian ISPs agree to three-strikes-plus-court-order anti-piracy plan

Jim84

The dog ate my homework

It wasn’t me:

How many times have you loaned your car to a friend, only to have him use it to rob a bunch of banks while wearing a mask that looks remarkably similar to your face -- too many times to count, probably. And then when the police come knocking at your door to ask you about some crimes, you say, "No, it was my friend wearing a mask that looks just like me." Then the cops are like "Whoa, sorry to bother you!" and they leave.

There actually needs to be something specific in the law saying that if you set up a wifi communication network, then you are fully responsible if anyone is able to use it to copy IP. Ignorance of how to secure your network, or how to prevent your children from accessing certain websites cannot be allowed as a defense unfortunately.

But then there arises a bear trap. What if a 14 year old uses his pocket money to buy a prepay mobile sim with a few GBs of data downloads and goes ahead downloading the latests pop songs. Is the parent responsible in that case??

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FOCUS! 7680 x 4320 notebook and fondleslab screens are coming

Jim84

Lightfield displays

Pseudo Holographic Displays require about 10 times 1080p resolution to work according to Seereal Technologies. Of course a telly manufacturer still has to put some king of beam steering oil filled block or whatever in front of each pixel to make a lightfield display.

Ultra D also seem to be doing some work in this area:

http://www.ultra-d.com/testimonials/

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Windows 10 heralds the MINECRAFT-isation of Microsoft

Jim84

dot com boom 2.0 is the answer

I think Microsoft's purchase of Minecraft for 2.5 Billion falls into the same category as Facebook paying 2 billion for Occulus. They are both massive overpayments in a fairly frothy market, and now analysts are struggling to come up with rational justifications for them. The real explanation is the simple one - it is probably a bubble.

There were a few winners from the first dot com boom (Amazon, eBay, Paypal, Skype). I think a few current giants are just spraying money around hoping to buy the next big thing. But I think marketplaces and social networks are natural monopolies, as the more people who use them, the more valuable they are. I am not sure that either minecraft or occulus have any network effects however?

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Hola HoloLens: Reg man gets face time with Microsoft's holographic headset

Jim84

Going dark

I wonder if the front of the glass display could be made to go dark when playing an Occulus VR type game to block out the outside world, and then switched back to clear for AR? Perhaps objects could be selectively displayed in VR mode so that when you walk within 1.5m of the coffee table or family dog they appear preventing accidents and the "Trip anxiety" that goes with VR?

Also these things will probably need some kind of ranged wireless power like what Witricity is proposing to ever be used wirelessly.

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Sony's well and truly 4Ked with skinny TVs and cheap cams

Jim84

It does look pretty good, at least in this photo:

http://sonyeu1.i.lithium.com/t5/image/serverpage/image-id/247773iABFFE95121EBE24A/image-size/original?v=mpbl-1&px=-1

Although that is without any dusty cables sticking out of the back.

I don't know why TV manufacturers don't go after the gaming market? Bring out a 5k set (4 times 1440p) with g-sync and free-sync.

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QWERTY-tastic BlackBerry Classic actually a classic

Jim84

Square the circle

Will Blackberry ever be able to square the circle and produce a phone with a decent slide out keyboard, avoiding any compromise on screen size?

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BlackBerry CEO Chen says to expect profits ... in 2016

Jim84

Square the circle

Blackberry is still caught between a rock and hard place. Their devices have smaller screens due to the space the keyboard takes up, and even Apple has thrown in the towel and given people larger screens.

They could try to get around this by making a slide out keyboard phone (e.g. the Torch). But in the past these have always been fat, and the keyboard has been rubbish compared to those on the standard candybar Blackberrys. Unless they had do some engineering alchemy and produce a slider that is under 9.5mm thick and has a decent keyboard I think they are toast in the long term too, as the market for candybar Blackberries just isn't large enough on its own.

They should have three devices - a candybar phone with keyboard, a unicorn slider, and a iPhone alike without a physical keyboard (but with that trackpad button that the new classic has for placing the caret when editing text).

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Super Cali's futuristic Tesla batt swap focus – even though car tech test is an expected bonus

Jim84

Dodgy replacement battery

Nobody will want to swap their brand new battery for a dogdy used one on its 800th charge cycle... unless they get their original back. Or Telsa throws in some "minimum range" guarantee on the swapped batteries so people basically buy the car and then rent the batteries.

Battery swapping does make a lot of sense as it solves the recharge time problem. Then you just have to get the cost and the weight of the things down. Musk's "Gigafactory" should get the cost down a bit. But he's still gambling on new better battery tech emerging to get the weight down.

3 minutes is not a problem, particularly if they automate the payment as someone else said. I think service stations are resisting this only because they want to march you past the temptation of diabetes causing sugary drinks and chocolates on the way to the counter. 3 minutes would give me time to wash and wipe the windscreen anyway.

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Pitch Black: New BlackBerry Classic is aimed at the old-school

Jim84

They need to bring back a proper version of the torch

Somehow with a decent slide out keyboard.

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The future looks bright: Prepare to be dazzled by HDR telly tech

Jim84

Occulus Rift

Could make good use of this tech without having to wait for standards to be finalized.

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Wireless Power standards are like Highlanders: There can be only ONE

Jim84

Witricity can apparently do wireless power over several meters

Which would neatly solve the problem noted by Iain that in a lot of cases outside of cars, coffeeshops, and aeroplanes we'd still be lugging around a wireless charging pad and cable.

http://witricity.com/technology/witricity-faqs/

I'm guessing that in the future a lot of lights in the middle of ceilings will get a large Wtiricity solenoid placed above them so that your laptop, mobile, and even TV don't need to be plugged in with only really power hungry appliances such as kettles being plugged into the walls.

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Renewable energy 'simply WON'T WORK': Top Google engineers

Jim84

Molten Salt Nuclear to the rescue

The Chinese are now research molten salt nuclear power plants in earnest. These things cannot melt down in the event of power loss to a plant, run at atmospheric pressure, and don't need massive expensive steel pressure vessels which take years to build properly on site. The real cost saving would be that you could build them in a factory and ship them to where needed on the back of a truck. The thorium versions (LFTRs) are even super difficult to use to make weapons.

There is a cross party group of politicians in the UK who have created the Weinberg Foundation to try and promote research into these reactors:

http://www.the-weinberg-foundation.org/

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Sailfish OS tablet is GO: Fans stuff cash into Jolla's cap in hand

Jim84

Will Nokia buy Jolla?

Jolla's interface looks way better than that Z-Launcher on the N1 (admittedly I have only seen each in pictures/videos).

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Jim84

Any chance of Sailfish running android apps like BBOS 10.3 does?

Because without apps I don't think it stands much long term chance.

Also, it is just a theory, but device makers seem to make better devices when they control the hardware and OS. The most notable example is of course Apple, but then you have to pay the Apple tax. On the Android side, Google seem to bring out features around 12 months after Apple. But that is not really red hot competition for Apple, and I don't imagine Google have loads of incentive to do more than match Apple, as forcing Apple to spend more on R&D would just force them to do the same.

I am rooting for Sailfish and BB OS as I think the future mobile computing world could do without being dominated by only 2 companies.

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Plasma-spaffing boffins plan spaceships driven by FRIKKIN' LASERS

Jim84

Re: In atmospheric rockets and jets? Seriously?

Yeah this article doesn't really make clear whether the laser is onboard the rocket, or ground based and pointed at the back of the rocket?

I think this is an interesting hybrid between a normal chemical rocket, and proposals to just use a ground based laser to heat a fairly inert mass such as helium or nitrogen.

An onboard laser would probably require an incredibly dense power source such as a molten salt thorium fission reactor or fusion reactor...

I think fission reactor powered rockets would have the same controversy of what happens if they crash as did the proposed nuclear powered drone aircraft a few years back.

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This is why we CAN have nice things: Samsung Galaxy Alpha

Jim84

Metal/Glass phones

It is kind of irrelevant what the sides and back of the phone are made of as the first thing anyone does with their iPhone/Glaxay/HTC/Sony is buy a plastic/leather case to protect it from falls and scratches. Sods law says that if you don't you'll inevitably drop it in the first week and will have to spend the next 24 months looking at the chips and scratches.

I think Nokia had the right idea way back in the day when they were making (plastic) dumbphones, but with the key feature that you could buy another plastic case if the first one got scratched/samaged. They often came in loads of crazy colours and designs.

I don't think it is beyond Samsung to come up with a version of the galaxy alpha with a somehow removable metal rim, and perhaps a dimpled metal back that is less slippery. When these became chipped and scratched you could then just buy replacements (if it is possible to sell these for not too much).

The other benefit of this is that it cuts about 1.5mm of plastic case thickness off your device. But the real benefit would be being able to feel the premium material your phone is made out of without living in fear of perma damage.

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Vulture takes BlackBerry's Passport through customs

Jim84

Re: Missed Trick

Yeah but... then there would be no backlight which is even more essential for a phone keyboard than one on a laptop. Although maybe they could light the keyboard from the sides like a Kobo ereader? Still, I think bright lit up keys are what is needed. I'm wondering how difficult it would be to just stick 2 LEDS under each key, with a blue one lighting up only the top corner of the key where a number (usually dark) sits and this alternate keyboard is activated using the function key. There might be some real cost or technical difficulties blocking either of these proposals though?

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Jim84

Is the touch enabled keyboard good for placing the caret somewhere in a body of text?

The reviewer didn't answer this, hopefully because the new touch qwerty keyboard makes it as easy to place the caret somewhere into position in a body of text as did the old trackpad on the old Bolds.

The was removed in the Q5 and caused all sorts of grief as The Register pointed out: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/07/10/blackberry_q5_review/

When I got my Galaxy Note 2 with its large screen I imagined tapping in long posts (like this one). In reality the inability of placing the caret back in a body of text to edit it made this too painful. We've got the scrolling ability of a mouse with touchscreens, but not the pointing ability (yet).

I definitely think four rows of keys would have been the way to go. Stick the blackberry logo on the top of the device on the back (like Apple does). Then you'd get a decent width spacebar and function keys.

The next Q10/Z3 iPhone alike from blackberry could or should have a home button on the foot of the device, and it could have the functionality of the old Bold trackpads when typing with the virtual keyboard onscreen (as well as fingerprint ID etc).

Also I don't know how hard it would be in practice, but rather than edge backlighting the keyboard with white LEDS how about having a blue and white LED under each key, with the white LED lighting up the main functions of the keyboard, and the blue LEDs in the top left corner lighting up the alternate keyboard accessed by pressing the function key.

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NBN Co: Melton trial document SMELLS BAD

Jim84

Stupid on many levels

They're just going to have to build FTTP one day anyway, baring some massive totally unexpected leap in mobile data capabilities. All the National Liberal Coalition is doing is ensuring that a decent network has to be built in two phases for a much higher cost.

The government here keeps emphasizing that most households don't need download bandwidth greater than what is available on ADSL, completely ignoring network aspects like latency (that anyone playing Call of Duty is aware of).

They are also implicitally discounting any future products and services that may require more bandwidth or lower latency. 4k TV, 120 frames per second sports broadcasts, Pseudo Holographic TV, proper videoconferencing spring to mind. None of those may come to be popular, but I'd bet that the internet isn't done coming up with intensive services that we will all want to use in the near future...

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Hollywood's made an INTELLIGENT science vs religion film?!

Jim84

An intelligent movie except...

... it relies on Paley's watchmaker argument that a complex object like a watch or an eye can only have been designed by an intelligent being, rather than by making untold billions of copies and picking those that keep working. This is totally counter intuitive to human innate reasoning (something complex like a campfire must have been created by intelligent other humans - danger!). But that is part of the reason why it was 200 years from the start of the renaissance before anyone figured this out.

Scientifically this movie is just as silly and mildly annoying as one where true love cures mental illness.

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Pimp my lounge and pierce my ceiling: Home theatre goes OTT

Jim84

Wires, wires, wires

I think the biggest problem with home theater is all the wires that you need to run to connect and power the speakers. Witricity are doing some interesting stuff with wirless power, but don't yet have a product on the market. Personally I wouldn't mind getting rid of all wires in my living room if possible.

http://edition.cnn.com/2014/03/14/tech/innovation/wireless-electricity/

The second problem as pointed out by the article is the absolute Zoo of content delivery systems. I think it will take something like "Apple TV with Dolby Atmos Beats fully wireless speakers" to sort this out. Or some other company like Google or Netflix could produce there own set top box and speaker package.

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Government report: average Oz user will want 15 Mbps by 2023

Jim84

Meanwhile...

My Nan's house in New Zealand already has FTTP. I don't understand how NZ can do it but Australia can't?

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Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE

Jim84

FPS > Pixels

I was in the Brisbane Sony Centre the other day picking up my SRS X9 and Sony's latest and greatest 4K TVs were out on display showing 4K content from the world cup.

Firstly more pixels does look nicer. Whether you are standing close up or further away.

But what I thought could really improve things and make the TV more like a window onto reality would be a much higher frame rate. The detail was really good on the footballers at 4K but the movement was still flickery.

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Games industry set for $5 BILLION haircut, warn beancounters

Jim84

Pseudo holographic TV and VR

One of either pseudo holographic TV or VR will probably be popular by 2019.

I think the biggest problem faced by games is that they are currently just simulating simple mechanics such as aiming, timing button clicks to onscreen action (rythm action/platformers) etc. To get out of this ghetto and towards a holodeck where you can actually talk to NPCs is going to require strong AI.

So we'll either end up there, or failing to produce better AI we'll have FPSes with ever more lifelike graphics and physics. I think this is where the Analyst's pessimism is coming from as one day diminishing returns on better graphics will set in (maybe around 2019)?

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BlackBerry claims ugly duckling Passport mobe is a swan in the offing

Jim84

No trackpad

Unlike the new classic it doesn't have a trackpad to move the cursor around in the text, meaning more awkward poking of the screen to try and get the cursor in the right place.

If they had been more ambitious they could have maybe made the spacebar into a trackpad.

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Keep monopoly or make network expensive, NBN Co warns

Jim84

Country Bumpkins can do one

Hold on. I am one of those metro apartment dwellers, but if I am reading this correctly the NBN wants to stop TPG giving ne the option of fibre because it wants to charge me more to subsidize building fibre out to country towns? Seems like a bit of a statist solution if you ask me.

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BlackBerry's Passport will be the WEIRDEST mobe of 2014

Jim84

Qwerty Slider + Moon on a stick

I know they already tried this with the torch, but ended up with the worst of both worlds. The screen was smaller than an iPhone 3.5 inch job, and the keyboard was awful. Plus the whole thing was 1.5cm thick.

Still if they could produce a thinner torch, with a bigger screen, and a keyboard rivaling those on the classic designs, they would have a very nice phone. Whether that is physically and technically possible I don't know?

Also the keyboard is a bit worse than onscreen ones by not being contextual. Could they use a white and also a UV backlight to highlight different characters on the keys? Or make changeable e-ink keys? And for a reasonable price?

I do think the Torch failed not just because of its design compromises, but because BB7 was bloody awful as a smartphone OS for downloading and using aps and surfing the net. Messaging still worked outstandingly well, but Android and iOS were good enough by then.

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BlackBerry bottoms out: Vows to wow with new Berries

Jim84

Qwerty Slider

A qwerty slider would be nice. But the keyboard on the last one they made a few years back was horrible. Not sure if it is possible to produce a slider with a decent keyboard. That would be the best of both worlds... provided they somehow kept it to 9mm overall thickness somehow.

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Internet of Things fridges? Pfft. So how does my milk carton know when it's empty?

Jim84

The problem is remembering what is missing at the supermarket, and having to go to the supermarket

You are right that the fridge won't be able to identify a half full carton of milk.

What could be done though is to stick a touchscreen on the front of the fridge that has a grid of all the fridge items on it. When milk is running low you just tap the milk icon on the front and it is added to your shopping list. If you click order now all the items on the shopping list are ordered online and delivered via Amazon Drone or Google's self driving delivery vans within 30-60 minutes.

All that is required is a cheap bar code scanner (or camera).

Yes you could probably do this on a tablet, but then you'd have to grab that and set it up. Far easier if the fridge just has this functionality built in. You can use your smartphone or tablet to change channels on yor TV, but I don't think anyone has switched from the remote yet.

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Supermodel Lily Cole: 'I got a little bit upset by that Register article'

Jim84

The real problem

Is that this is only a newsworthy story because the recipient of the NESTA cash is fairly high profile. How many other absolutely worthless projects have had taxpayer money thrown away on them? The funding system is quite clearly broken and needs to be fixed... or binned. I'm sure there must be examples of successful government assisted startup schemes that can be aped? I've heard that Finland and Israel have successful scenes despite not containing silicon valley within there borders.

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S is for SMACKDOWN: Samsung takes Galaxy Tab slab war fruit-side

Jim84

Microsoft on the right track, but horrible execution as usual

i actually think that the end game for tablets will be a 12 or 13.3 inch model that has a 4k 'retina' OLED screen, is very light, and has an attachable keyboard that rather than relying on a kickstand on the back of the tablet (making the tablet square edged like Microsoft's Surface) has a bit of plastic or metal that pulls out backwards out of the keyboard to prevent the 'laptop' from falling over. This, along with some magnetic rotating hinges on top to hold the tablet would allow the tablet to be as thin as an iPad in the users hands.

Of course making a 4K 12 inch tablet that light and with enough processing power to run a 4K screen without draining the battery in no time is not quite possible at the moment. But Microsoft or Samsung could sort out what seems to be a very obvious design flaw in the attachable keyboard (at least to me).

Then again, Microsoft seem to be making a lot of crazy design choices such as getting rid of the start button in Windows 8, or forcing every Xbox One to be bundled with a Kinect. So perhaps I am judging with the benefit of hindsight?

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Waiting gamer slams no-show show: E3 – was that it?

Jim84

Re: Now that we all have large, HD TVs,

I totally agree with Mr Plant that 4 player co-op with randoms from online sounds pretty horrid.

But I remember the days where you could link two Xboxes and play Halo on two separate TVs. The downside was that someone had to lug the console and all its cables and controllers around to their mates house.

But... this sort of thing should be easier now that everyone has mutliple LCD tvs in their houses.

I think this could actually wind up being a good use for PS TV if Sony can get Playstation Now working lag free (a big if). You could lug the bedroom TV into the living room (not too hard if it is a thin light LED backlit model) and use PS TV with Playstation now as the second console.

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Help me Obi-Wan Kenobi! 3D HOLO-PHONE hinted in Amazon vid

Jim84

Re: I think it's a lenticular display

Yes I think it is a lenticular display too. Unless amazon have figured out some way to steer beams of light emanating from each pixel a lenticular display is the only way to prevent the image intended for the left eye from reaching the right eye.

Seereal technologies proposed putting cells filled half with oil and half with water in front of LCD pixels and moving the oil about using magnetism in the sides of the cells to control the light direction. But never developed a practical demo.

The problem with lenticular displays is that there are only so many viewing angles.

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