* Posts by imanidiot

666 posts • joined 19 Mar 2012

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Jeep breach: Scared? You should be, it could be you next

imanidiot
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Re: CAN Bus

@perlcat "That's reassuring. I had thought that the builders of trucks and airplanes were more sane than auto manufacturers. My faith in universal corporate stupidity has been restored! Now I can sleep at night. Wait a minute..."

As mentioned CANbus itself (or one of the many competing "industry standard" layers running on top of this like FieldBus and the like) is not secured. Security comes from the implementation. In aviation that security is actually pretty well thought out. There is the option of having uni-directional links. Ports will SEND specific data but will not accept any input data. This means interference and cross-communication between systems is minimized. Without physical access to the main programming ports (usually on the electronics deck below the cockpit, only accessible from there) you're not going to get anything done. And then even if you DO have access you probably won't get much done as security and tamper protection is actually a thing in the aviation world.

Unfortunately in the truck business the situation is not much better than in the car business. No-one in the industry has ever had to give a rats ass about security, they have never done it before so they are not going to start until forced to by the market or by the bodies piling up and the wrongful death suits flooding in.

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SpaceX's blast shock delays world's MOST POWERFUL ROCKET

imanidiot
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Re: Re-Use

The failures weren't directly due to reuse of the parts but they WERE due to the parts being reusable.

The shuttle had it's large and fragile heatshield with very brittle tiles because it needed to be reused. The SRB contruction that led to the Columbia disaster was also largely due to it needing to be disassembled and reused. There were better designs possible if the booster was throwaway hardware.

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Dough! Dominos didn't register dominos.pizza – and now it's pizz'd off

imanidiot
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Childcatcher

And what was the point of gTLDs again?

Seriously, whats the point?

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The Register's resident space boffin: All you need to know about the Pluto mission

imanidiot
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Pint

Excelent achievement. If I ever meet one of them at the bar, beers are on me -->

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imanidiot
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It would be glorious and awesome? Possibly involve lot of beer and bacon sarnies?

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Americans find fantastic new use for drones – interfering with firefighting

imanidiot
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Open drone season

Nothing a 12 gauge won't solve.

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STARS SNUFFED in massive galactic whodunit

imanidiot
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Re: The galaxies are going out, one by one...

That or Magrathea

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Intel TOCK BLOCK: 10nm Cannonlake delayed to 2017, bonus 14nm Kaby Lake to '16

imanidiot
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Re: Patterning, overlay and EUV

I wouldn't necessarily be opposed to that, but I'd then want to put it past those responsible for press contact. An article is slightly different from a full article. (I'd also have a few more things to add :-)

Even if they don't want to publish this particular stuff, might be interesting for The Reg to get in contact with ASML and see if they can have a chat with some of the IT folks about what it takes to run the IT side of the business. It's not an easy feat. Some of the hardware running is already 10 years old but still under extended warranty/support. Keep in mind however that the hardware chosen when designing one of these systems is already "proven and reliable" by the time the design starts, let alone when it hits the market. THEN it still has 7 to 10 years of warranty and support left.

Also remember that a lot of this support is done remotely, meaning there has to be a secure connection from the customer site to the support team. And we're talking about a bussiness where an hour of down time equates to hundreds of thousands of dollars in cost and where a single wrong press of a button can cause that downtime, so that connection better be VERY secure, yet available whenever it's needed.

There are hundreds of service techs running around worldwide to provide support. All with a laptop, secure connections, phones, etc that need to be kept running at any time. (Just try telling your client, yeah sorry, you're going to have another day of downtime while I get my laptop replaced...)

And that's just some of the stuff I can come up with as an non-IT trained "outsider". I'm sure the IT folks there would have a few war-stories of their own (if they are allowed to disclose some of it)

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imanidiot
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Re: Patterning, overlay and EUV

Part 2 due to character limit:

Back to the mirrors. So now we have light. It's been nicely collected and concentrated by a collector mirror in the light source and now we have to project it onto a wafer. Remember that slide projector analogy for DUV tools? A DUV reticle is transparent and light is passed THROUGH the reticle to create the imagine in the light beam. Now look back at the bit about the lenses. That also applies to reticles. The solution is the same as the mirrors, you create a reticle that is basically a multi-layer mirror with the pattern etched into it and then reflect the light beam off of it. ASML has not come up with a way of doing this that requires less than (I believe, I don't know the exact number) 14 mirrors. The problem is that these mirrors are not 100% reflective. They only reflect about 79% of the light. Not a problem if you have just one mirror and plenty of light power. But you only get maybe 120 or 130 watt of EUV light from the source. That means that at the end of the line you have 120*0,79^14=4,4 watt! reaching the wafer. Not a whole lot.

Then there is the wafer positioning. On the DUV tool we could use airbearings for eliminating shaking and moving around. Air bearings in a vacuum are not possible. Running into the NDA territory again I'm just going to say this involves magnets. Lots and lots of magnets.

Then there is the challenge of building all this. The traditional method for building very clean (ultra high) vacuum systems is to build all of it out of nice sturdy non porous materials like stainless steel, make sure everything is resistant to a little heat and then bake the whole system at 120 degrees for a few days while sucking out all the contamination. This is not an option if you have a vacuum vessel the size of a luxury saloon car with lots and lots and lots of electronics crammed into it. You can bake it out before you put everything in, but not after. ASML had to define a whole new category of vacuum cleanliness for this called Ultra Clean Vacuum. Modules are built clean and kept clean because any contamination put in at assembly can no longer be removed after assembly is done. You'd think this is easy but let me just give a small example of what this entails for me, the technician.

First off I'm in an ISO grade 6 cleanroom, fully suited up. Anti-static coveralls, hood, socks, gloves and shoes and surgical mask. Before I even touch ANYTHING on the machine I have to put nitrile gloves over the anti-static ones (possibility of sweat seeping through and leaving stains). Then I clean the area around where I'm going to be working with cleanroom wipes soaked in isopropyl alcohol. Then put down a piece of ultra clean plastic (doubled up) between which I can then place/prepare my vacuum tools and parts I'll be needing. Only then is it time to open the hatch I'll be working through. Before I touch anything that will be touching something inside the vacuum chamber (like tools, my own hands or parts) I put on ANOTHER pair of nitrile gloves OVER the first pair, taking special care not to touch the palm or fingers. Once I wear those gloves I can work in the vacuum parts. If I touch anything, like support myself on the edge of the chamber, or scratch my nose, or just idly leave my hand hanging by my side and touching my coveralls I have to put on a fresh pair of those second gloves. You can imagine this gets tedious. Especially since parts come nicely packaged in plastic, but that packaging is NOT vacuum clean. So I can use 8 pairs of gloves JUST for swapping a part with 3 bolts. I've had days where 2 of us went through an entire pack of gloves (50 pairs) in a single day. Anything cleaned for vacuum can never touch anything that is not.

As this is getting quite long I'll just leave some of the engineering challenges to a single line and let you figure it out.

The multi layer mirrors are extremely accurate and flat, blown up to the size of Germany the largest bump would be a few millimetres

Holding a wafer down in air is easy, just use suction. How do you do this in a vacuum where suction doesn't work?

How do you get wafers into and out of the vacuum, positioned accurately enough that you can then expose them?

How do you make things move in a vacuum if you can't use grease (normal vacuum grease contains Fluorine, which wreaks havoc on the mirrors) and steel parts touching directly will instantly cold-weld and fuse together?

How do you keep the inside of the system clean?

How do you keep the wafer temperature stable in a vacuum? Any water leak inside the vacuum could potentially destroy millions of dollars of equipment.

Then also keep in mind that these systems are VERY complex. You can't just drop a box on your customers doorstep, hand them the manual and tell them to have at it. Even basic operation requires month of training. Basic maintenance and troubleshooting adds another few months, etc, etc. All that training has to be prepared and thought up by someone. Any problems encountered that the customer cannot solve must be escalated to a support team, who must be able to escalate to even brighter minds. Once a machine is in the field, someone needs to think about what parts are spares and can be needed in the field, then make sure they are available. Someone must write the manuals and instructions. Someone must build the control software that keeps everything running. There are hundreds of thousands of tasks involved with this type of machine that many people don't even start to contemplate.

All of this put together means its quite an achievement ASML has got systems running at customer sites. A system that solves all of those engineering hurdles (and then some, with more still to go) that is barely larger than a 60 ft shipping container. Keep in mind that many said that EUV was simply impossible. Time will tell if all of this works out or if it was a swing and a miss. The shrink will have to stop at some point.

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imanidiot
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Re: Patterning, overlay and EUV

Gahhh, I've started this explanation about 3 times now and my brain keeps screwing me over, talking about all those little details that are completely unimportant. I apologise in advance for any spelling or grammar errors, I'm typing this on a way too old laptop without a spellchecker and I'm kinda tired of proofreading after starting again for the third time.

So, lets try again.

Lets start by thinking about what makes lithography itself hard.

First thing is the size. Computer chip feature sizes are measured in nanometers (shortened to nm). That's 1000ths of 1000ths of a milimeter. That's hard to even comprehend. Take your own hair. Grows at leisurely pace of 0,3 mm a day. That's 3,47 nm per second! By the time you have read this sentence your hair has grown more than the distance between 2 features on an Intel processor.

Quick term explanation: The silicon bit of a computer chip is produced many at a time on/from a wafer. A slice of mono-crystaline silicon. Usually circular, 300 mm diameter and 0,775mm thick)

What we are trying to achieve is to project a pattern of lines onto a resist covered wafer. Easy squeezy you'd say, all you need is a fancy slide projector. At the very core that is sort of what an litho machine is. It shines a bundle of light through a slide (called a reticle) and then shrinks that image with some lenses and projects it onto a wafer.

The earliest version of litho machines were called steppers/repeaters. Project an image of the whole die, move the wafer a bit, expose another die, etc. All well and good, but at some point someone decided they wanted to do it faster. And faster. And faster still. At some point, stopping the wafer every time to expose an image starts to take time. So a clever guy came up with the scanner. Project a slit of light, move the reticle underneath it and then move the wafer the other way simultaneously. Now you can keep the reticle going back and forth and the wafer moving in a constant SSSSS pattern. Result, you can expose even faster. Modern DUV tools are now producing over 100 wafers per hour. That means that in under a minute a 300 mm diameter wafer is completely filled with exposed dies (something like 6x6 or 10x10 mm) and ejected again. You can imagine that getting that scan synchronised between the wafer and reticle is extremely important. With ever smaller structures the accuracy also needs to get better and better. The chucks holding the wafer move at incredible speeds. Accelerations over 100Gs and top speeds over 25 m/s. And the reticle has to keep up.

So how accurate does this alignment have to be? Well, given the feature size and the speed of the chuck the alignment has to be well below 1 nm. (and keep in mind we are talking about 2 physically completely separate items not mechanically connected in any way). So if we were to scale that up, it's like flying 2 jumbo jets at 700 km/h within 0,003 mm of each other. Again, and again and again, scan after scan.

The projection itself is also a challenge. Remember that demonstration with the laser and the fine grating of parallel lines, creating a diffraction pattern? All those lines an a reticle do the same thing. What you get is not a clean image, what you get is a diffraction. So the lens system has to eliminate all the diffraction orders expect the ones you want.

Then there is the matter of vibration. You're trying to project something very very small, very, very accurately. No matter how thick you make your foundations, vibrations are going to happen. From earth tremors, trucks moving outside or fat Mike from Accounting walking down the hall. So you have to keep those out. Usual solution for those in any industry is air bearing and voicecoils, but you can imagine that all shaking a wafer and reticle around business is going to cause a fair bit of shaking in and off itself. ALL that needs to be compensated.

Further bit of trouble is temperature. Materials shrink or expand as they cool down or heat up. Silicon is no different. But what happens if I have a wafer that is cold on one side and hotter on the other, expose a die and then let the wafer change temperature? Well, simply put the next layer you expose on top is going to end up in entirely the wrong place and you have a very expensive bit of useless silicon on your hands.

Now here come a few of the challenges in combining all of these things. We want to expose wafers faster. Pumping more light onto that wafer means the resist hardens faster, so I can move the chuck faster. Move the chuck faster and I get more vibrations (not to mention I still have to make sure the damn thing doesn't move relative to my chuck under all that load). More light also means more heat generated on the wafer, so now I have to cool it more. Faster exposure also means I have to get the wafer into and out of the machine faster. At 100 wafers an hour, that's a load and unload every 36 seconds.

Last thing I want to touch on is overlay. Overlay is the accuracy of alignment between the different layers of a chip. All those different layers have to connect together so every time you expose a new layer, it has to be accurately positioned relative to the previous layer(s). But to process that layer you have to remove the wafer from the machine, do a whole lot of processing to it and then feed it back in. Then the new layer has to be within a few nanometers of the old one. Time and time again. This is achieved using special alignment marks. They are exposed and etched in the first layer. Problem then is that you still have 30 or 35 or maybe even more layers worth of exposing and etching and processing to do. You can't redo those alignment marks because you can't be sure you get them in exactly the same place but you still have to keep track of a mark that keeps fading and fading and fading into oblivion. (And somehow they manage to do this)

So now lets look at EUV. All the fun we talked about previously with some added bonus hurdles.

First off is how do you get the light? EUV is a weird sort of photon. Not quite Xray, not quite UV any more. Some bright spark somewhere found out you get these photons at a nice usable 13,5 nm wavelength if you convert very pure tin into a plasma by blasting it with a lot of energy. Like a CO2 laser or a pulse of high voltage. Aside from the fact that air would make creating and maintaining this plasma difficult EUV light does not travel through air very far. If your screen where emitting EUV light right now it wouldn't even reach your eyes. So you replace the air right? With what? Not many gasses are transparent to EUV. One of the few that does that you COULD use is pure hydrogen. Good luck with that, I'll be WAY over there taking shelter if you ever try this. SO you remove all the air and do it in a vacuum. Seal the whole thing in a nice sturdy jar, pump it down and blast away... (I'll get back to why this is not easy in a minute)

But how do you get the light from that plasma onto the wafer? You have to somehow focus it. Big problem number 2, EUV light doesn't really do lenses, or mirrors for that matter. There is no known lens material that is transparent to EUV, has a usable refraction index and is economically viable for production. That leaves mirrors. The standard single surface mirror we all know doesn't cut it. It just doesn't do anything. EUV can be reflected by a so called multi surface mirror. Lots and lots of layers of alternating material. It's still not a perfect bounce though, only a part of the light gets reflected. I'll get back to this in a minute

Only, how do you shoot tin with a laser and form a plasma? What happens to the tin after that? How do you direct the light? So here comes the next challenge. Several crazy and/or smart people have gotten involved in the matter. Cymer (US) and Gigaphoton both went with the laser produced plasma method, shooting droplets of tin with a high power CO2 laser. Xtreme (Germany) went with a high voltage method.

In the end I believe Xtreme didn't quite make it and Gigaphoton is still working on it. Cymer got acquired by ASML and their source seems to be the main option right now. Having only ever been up close and personal with the Cymer system I'll focus on that one here.

So how does a LPP EUV source work? Well, take a big vacuum pot. Shoot tiny, tiny (micrometer size) droplets of tin across it with a high pressure gas and use a very accurate targeting system to blast each droplet with a CO2 laser beam as it passes. The droplet superheats, explodes, produced a tiny bit of tin plasma giving off EUV light and a lot of tin debris. Catch any un-hit droplets on the other end, let the debris condense on the walls, where it'll flow down to a collection drain where you can then pump it up again to repeat the process.

Then you stick a nice shiny multilayer mirror behind it to focus the light and bobs your uncle... right? One problem with multi-layer mirrors. They don't really like tin. Or plasma, fingerprints, carbohydrates, moisture, acetone, getting hit with EUV light (yes, really. Though only little bit), etc, etc. So you have to get this mirror really close to the tin without actually getting it into the tin. Then you have to catch ALL the tin debris flying around before it can hit any of the other mirrors you need to project that light on the wafer. How this is done unfortunately starts veering into NDA territory so I'm going to leave it here.

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imanidiot
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Re: Patterning, overlay and EUV

EUV is not quite x-ray lithography (soft x-rays start at roughly 10nm wavelength. EUV is at 13,5 nm. Close but not QUITE xrays), but has a similiarly long gestational period. Problem with EUV is that until quite recently nobody had a clue how to do it in an economically viable way. Even now the boundries of what is possible need to be pushed in a LOT of areas to get things to work.

I'll try to type up that "why is it so hard" post this evening, but no promises.

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imanidiot
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Patterning, overlay and EUV

Working from inside the lithography industry I suspect the problem for Intel is that they didn't expect to need the triple or more patterning to produce chips below the 14 nm node and didn't really put in all the effort. They were fully expecting to roll out with EUV litho. Once that plan fell through they went back to full bore development on multipatterning but are struggling to reach the needed overlay accuracy and throughput while having to catch up to where they would have been going that route in the first place. From the info I'm getting ASML is very close to reaching a production-worthy throughput on its EUV tools. I suspect Intel is taking the breather to allow itself to catch up with its multi-patterning on DUV tools and allow ASML to catch up with it EUV tools.

EUV however is no trivial matter. It's all the fun engineering challenges of DUV immersion with the added joys of working in a vacuum with MUCH stricter geometry and patterning contraints.

If anyone wants I can do a "short" explanation on just what it is that makes EUV so hard to do. (I'm an engineer actually working on parts of these EUV tools at a supplier).

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The Great Barrier Relief – Inside London's heavy metal and concrete defence act

imanidiot
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Re: great series. when are you getting around to the rest of the planet?

See my posts in the previous geeks guide forum for some extra suggestions in the Netherlands: http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2015/05/30/feature_crossness_pumping_station/ (Page 2, starting with "Cathedrals of Steam")

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imanidiot
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Re: "largest flood moving flood barrier in the world"

It should probably read the "largest navigable moving flood barrier in the world". The oosterscheldekering (probably the The Eastern Scheldt barrier he is referring to) isn't navigable. It just lets water through.

The author does seem to be completely ignoring the existence of the Maeslantkering in the Nieuwe Waterweg near Rotterdam. Which is larger than the Thames barrier by some margin. And better looking IMHO.

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Q. Why did Nintendo force GitHub to take down an emulator? A. It was stuffed with ROMs

imanidiot
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Re: ironic who the victim is

Nintendo is also the company that keeps insisting trading used games is piracy, so I'm not sure we should be paying much attention to their opinion if it's not in the law (And/or they are not about to get it made into law)

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Pan Am Games: Link to our website without permission and we'll sue

imanidiot
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Coat

Re: "...mockery..."

PS2. It's also about two days to get to the further east point in Newf. And it's about two days from Toronto to the middle of Canada at Winnipeg. Let's review. If you're already two days from the extreme east, and you drive two more days then you'll reach Toronto, which is about two days from the middle of Canada. Big place.

"Space Canada is big. Really big. You just won’t believe how vastly hugely mindbogglingly big it is. I mean you may think it’s a long way down the road to the chemist’s, but that’s just peanuts to Space Canada."

I'll get going now, long way to go. Yeah, mines the one with the Electronic Thumb in the pocket and the towel in the other.

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PLUTO SPACE WHALE starts to give up its secrets

imanidiot
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Re: Call me simple

This is the part of the new definition that bothers me most. Following this reasoning, Jupiter was not a planet while it was busy hoovering up everything in its path and moving toward the sun and didn't become one until Saturn pulled it back from the brink and helped it to settle into its current orbit. While it was doing all of this, Jupiter was a "dwarf planet."

Well no, Jupiter was NOT a dwarf planet while it was doing that. Strictly speaking, as it was not in a stable orbit it wasn't even a planet.

Personally I find the original definition proposed before all the politics of the object being the dominant body in its orbit to be more appropriate. (What is the definition of clearing its direct orbital neighbourhood anyway. There are thousands of Jovian trojans in the same orbit as Jupiter. Does that constitute "in the neighbourhood"?

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imanidiot
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Re: Call me simple

It has not cleared its direct orbital neighbourhood of debris and is thus NOT a planet.

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NASA chooses ace SPACE PILOTS who'll take the USA back into manned flight

imanidiot
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The SpaceX Dragon 2 will be able to carry seven astronauts!

p.s. I wish it was still called DragonRider, that is a very cool name.

If I remember correctly it's EITHER 7 crew with no cargo OR 4 crew and 400 kg of cargo.

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Welkom in Nederland: Laid-back, chilled, and MONITORING everything

imanidiot
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Re: Not really surprised

Thinking about it, I think the one about the nail and hammer IS an imported saying. The native Dutch one would probably be: "Hoge bomen vangen veel wind" (High trees catch a lot of wind). Being used pretty much in the same way as "The nail that sticks up get hammered".

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imanidiot
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Re: Anyone with a clue...

Uhhhm, no, more than one intelligence agency around the world has admitted at one point or another that dragnet surveillance on communications is of very limited value.

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imanidiot
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Re: Not really surprised

The saying is more precisely translated as "The nail that sticks up gets hammered (down)". The Dutch are indeed a very closed people. But trust me in saying that most Dutch don't like the rules about business any more than you did. (They are indeed ridiculous) but somehow the government in the Netherlands seems even more detached from reality than in most countries.

I sincerely hope this law WON'T pass, the Dutch inteligence agencies already have plenty of options to spy on us. They don't need more. In fact, they need FAR less and FAR MORE oversight. Unfortunately there is just no-one worth voting for at the moment who will do ANYTHING about this. Every election for the past 12 years at least has been a farce with noone worth voting for. The outcome of this is we can choose pretty much left wing or FAR left wing parties. No other choices available.

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Canuck chump cuffed over helium balloon flying chair stunt

imanidiot
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I wouldn't do business with a guy like this

If I was one of his suppliers, only full payment in advance. If I was a client, only payment upon delivery. This idiot is likely to go out of business and/or life.

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imanidiot
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Re: Up!

Come on, the dog wasn't SQUIRREL!.

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Ginormous HIDDEN BLACK HOLES flood the universe – boffins

imanidiot
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We're not the ones blasting much high energy Xrays. We're only observing them.

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Han Solo to get solo prequel flick in 2018, helmed by LEGO men

imanidiot
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Re: No matter how many times....

That depends entirely on what cut of the movie you are watching.

(But the whole idea Greedo would shoot first but miss at that range is ridiculous.)

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Dawn falling late: NASA's other glitch of the week

imanidiot
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Re: Both Dawn and New Horizons?

Pretty much any spacecraft "we" have out there has, at one point or another, entered safemode. It's to be expected with all the cosmic radiation blowing through them at all time. It's why the backup system is there in the first place. Spirit, Oppertunity and Curiosity all have been running on the backup at one point or another for instance.

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Berlin pours bucket of flat beer on Patriot missile hack report

imanidiot
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Re: Very questionable..

Also unlikely as to they'd be right on a secure military facility between lots of people carrying firearms and an order to use them on intruders.

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Look! Up in the sky! Five Brit satellites on one Indian rocket!

imanidiot
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Re: The natural result of abandoning a space program

So the Indians are making the rockets as a loss leader?

And France still makes some for fun... and the Americans, Russians...... et al.

Of course rockets are profitable, if they weren't these other countries wouldn't do it.

Uhhhmmmm, no, the space programs for most countries are not all that profitable. Especially the US space program as a whole is a massive money sink. Sure money is earned on commercial launches but any launch that is not commercial (research, ISS supply, spysats, etc) is creating a loss. And not a small one either.

I suspect right now the Indian space program is pretty much running even or making a small profit on it's commercial launches. Before full investments have been recouped is going to take a while.

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imanidiot
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Re: Why are we giving aid money to a country with a space program?

See my retort to that other anonymous commentard up there

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imanidiot
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WTF?

Re: The natural result of abandoning a space program

If your country has a space program, but can't ensure everyone has access to a toilet (really, how hard is it to dig a hole and stick a few planks over it!!) Then you really need to re-think your priorities as a nation..

You are entirely missing the point!

Yes, India has a huge poverty problem. It's spending billions each year in providing aid to these people. (A permanent solution to human waste disposal is a LOT more complicated than a hole with a few planks over it. That'll work for a week for a family of 4. Not for a year for a slum of millions)

India spends a few million (maybe a billion) a year on its space program. They used their Mars mission as a technology demonstrator. "Look at us, we can do this. Maybe send some of those launch contracts our way?". Now it's getting commercial launch contracts that are pretty much cost covering. The advantage? More high paying technology jobs that trickle down the economy. More money flowing into the country that can then be taxed so that they CAN fight poverty without massivly increasing the countrys debt. The biggest problem with poor people is that they pay no taxes. So creating more paying jobs creates more income for the government to fight the poverty.

Just the fact that they HAVE a space program doesn't mean that they DON'T spend money on poverty.

I would also point out that at the height of the US space program a large portion of the US population was also still living in poverty.

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Soyuz source replenishes international space station

imanidiot
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Re: And I've heard...

I've heard no 'nauts like to use the russian stuff. Not even the Russians.

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Let me PLUG that up there, love. It’s perfectly standaAAARGH!

imanidiot
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Re: The Flaming Fax Machine...

Thank you for these stories Shadow Systems. Highly entertaining indeed. Your mother sounds like a great lady! Gotta wonder how she managed to put up with your dad in the first place.

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imanidiot
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Joke

Re: The Rise of IT Consultants...

You know why they call it PMS right?

Cause Mad Cow Disease was already taken

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Uitsmijter

imanidiot
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Not AFAIK. The Dutch cheeses all seem to be of the harder variety that can be stored for long times without spoiling (it just matures more the longer it's on the shelf if conditions are kept right)

I also think that within the Netherlands the traditional cheese production has never really gone away within the country itself. It's just that a lot of larger corporations saw fit to start marketing the young, rubbery, tasteless Gouda across the world and somehow it seems to have gotten popular enough to define peoples definition of Gouda cheese. I think lots of hotels (even in the Netherlands) put out the almost flavourless stuff because this is what people expect now and if they ever DO put out the real stuff people might get offended by it having (ohh horror) flavour.

The same sort of problem exist for a lot of cheeses. Take french Brie for instance. Most people also think this is a pretty flavourless, white, pasty/rubbery cheese. The original is however quite tasteful and should be just a tiny bit runny when ripe. But people tend to buy the cheap stuff, not let it ripen and serve it chilled to the bone. The absolute worst way to serve it.

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imanidiot
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For DURING the drinking

I'll reiterate my suggestion from the previous thread of the Dutch Bitterbal. There is no better snack food for while you are on the booze.

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imanidiot
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I would put forward that if you find dutch cheese rubbery, tasteless, synthetic or chemical you've never had a proper Dutch cheese. (And I do mean the REAL dutch stuff and not what is typically sold in foreign supermarkets as "dutch", Edam or Gouda. (Which in fact have as much to do with the Netherlands as alpine meadows.

Also keep in mind that Gouda typically comes in a large variety of different types depending on age and flavour. The most typical being (shamelessly ripped from the Dutch Wiki article on cheese:)

Name aging/ripening time

Jonge kaas 4 weeks (Young)

Jong belegen 8 - 10 weeks (Young Matured)

Belegen 16 - 18 weeks (matured)

Extra belegen 7-8 months (extra matured)

Oude kaas 10-12 months (Old)

Overjarige kaas 12 months or more (Over-year)

Personally I like anything past extra belegen, which gives a much firmer slightly crumbly cheese with a bit more flavour to it. Over-yeared cheese is crumbly and hard with a strong salty flavour.

Young cheese is usually what is sold in the rest of the world as Gouda cheese (or sometimes even Edam, which is an entirely different kind of cheese) And yes, that is mostly flavourless and rubbery.

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Assange™'s emotional plea for asylum in France rejected

imanidiot
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Re: Why is Assange still holed up in the Ecuadorean Embassy after all these years?

Getting out of the embassy is one thing. But where would he go after that? He's still in the UK with few options of getting out.

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imanidiot
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Re: France...

This. Assange just needs to stop hiding and face the allegations. There is a chance he'd get extradited to the US, but I doubt the US would want to lend any credence to his self proclaimed "status" as being anyone imporant. (also, does anyone actually care about this asswipe? The more of these articles I read the less I care about him.)

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Goodbye Vulcan: Blighty's nuclear bomber retires for the last time

imanidiot
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Unhappy

Allas, I won't see it fly

I've been trying, but I just can't swing a visit to a UK airshow this year. Sucks.....

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Why SpaceX will sort out Sunday's snafu faster than NASA ever could

imanidiot
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The Orbcomm sat was a secondary cargo and thus not considered as a failure for launch reliability statistics (and yes, they are a bit pick and choose when it comes to these matters). It would have made it to orbit had NASA (the primary cargo owner) allowed a second orbit raising burn.

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imanidiot
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Re: My prediction

sorry, not intended and I do see the difference. English is not my first language, little things like that sometimes slip by, even after a second read through.

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imanidiot
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My prediction

The 9 Aug 2015 04:30:00 launch with the Jason 3 sat will go ahead as scheduled. I doubt SpaceX doesn't already have a very clear idea where the problem lies given the MASSIVE amount of data streamed from the rocket during accent. (The telemetry received from any previous rocket system pales in comparison, they have a finger on pretty much everything)

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KRAKKOOM! SpaceX Falcon supply mission to ISS EXPLODES minutes after launch

imanidiot
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Did the capsule survive for a bit?

Look at 23:48 in this video https://youtu.be/ZeiBFtkrZEw (linked previously by someone else). Something cone shaped and roughly dragon capsule shaped comes falling through the initial large "explosion" cloud.

Maybe the capsule survived the initial blast on the second stage, but got destroyed in the destruction of the first stage? (Or made the plunge, didn't deploy chutes and didn't survive the hydrobraking)

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BOFH: Don't go changing on Friday evenings, I don't wanna work that hard

imanidiot
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Its a small change!

Thats how it starts... and then comes the "well that is odd"

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Tesla says Model 3 is still on schedule, despite being delayed again

imanidiot
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Re: It'll be delayed again

Yeah.... no. Thats what they are planning on. I don't see it happening. They are basically betting on more supply being created because demands rise and then prices for base materials to make those batteries dropping.

I doubt that'll happen. And even WITH that gigafactory, the batterypack isn't suddenly halved in price. It's still a very substantial lump of the total cost.

I just REALLY don't see it happening. At all.

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imanidiot
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Re: It'll be delayed again

Downvote all you wan't. That won't make it any less true.

The biggest cost in an EV is the battery pack and we're still no closer to making large capacity packs any cheaper. Not even in mass production. MAYBE in another few extra years, but don't expect a pure EV of this size with a useful range for anything below 40.000 dollar range before say 2020.

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imanidiot
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It'll be delayed again

because they'll never be able to make an EV with acceptable specs for that kind of money.

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Kamikaze Rosetta probe to ram comet it's chased for billions of miles

imanidiot
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Re: Rosetta is cool?

The problem for philae being in the sun is that it has nowhere to dump the heat. On the lunar missions they could deploy radiator panels on the shaded side or underside that were not exposed to sunlight (and where thus in the cold) and they could deflect a lot of heat to space. On top of that lunar rigolith is a VERY reflective material and thus stays relatively cool. Philae is only a tiny little probe with a very small shadow so nowhere to dump a lot of heat. It's sitting on a black/gray lump that is catching heat from the sun very well. Philae WAS designed to sit in the sun and roast all day, but at some point there is only so much you can do to stave off heat-stroke.

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imanidiot
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Re: Rosetta is cool?

Because Rosetta is the ORBITER and designed to stay prolonged periods in the sun. The LANDER, Philae, was not designed to handle direct continues exposure to the sun for extended periods of time.

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