* Posts by imanidiot

627 posts • joined 19 Mar 2012

Page:

Goodbye Vulcan: Blighty's nuclear bomber retires for the last time

imanidiot
Bronze badge
Unhappy

Allas, I won't see it fly

I've been trying, but I just can't swing a visit to a UK airshow this year. Sucks.....

1
0

Why SpaceX will sort out Sunday's snafu faster than NASA ever could

imanidiot
Bronze badge

The Orbcomm sat was a secondary cargo and thus not considered as a failure for launch reliability statistics (and yes, they are a bit pick and choose when it comes to these matters). It would have made it to orbit had NASA (the primary cargo owner) allowed a second orbit raising burn.

0
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: My prediction

sorry, not intended and I do see the difference. English is not my first language, little things like that sometimes slip by, even after a second read through.

4
1
imanidiot
Bronze badge

My prediction

The 9 Aug 2015 04:30:00 launch with the Jason 3 sat will go ahead as scheduled. I doubt SpaceX doesn't already have a very clear idea where the problem lies given the MASSIVE amount of data streamed from the rocket during accent. (The telemetry received from any previous rocket system pales in comparison, they have a finger on pretty much everything)

1
1

KRAKKOOM! SpaceX Falcon supply mission to ISS EXPLODES minutes after launch

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Did the capsule survive for a bit?

Look at 23:48 in this video https://youtu.be/ZeiBFtkrZEw (linked previously by someone else). Something cone shaped and roughly dragon capsule shaped comes falling through the initial large "explosion" cloud.

Maybe the capsule survived the initial blast on the second stage, but got destroyed in the destruction of the first stage? (Or made the plunge, didn't deploy chutes and didn't survive the hydrobraking)

0
0

BOFH: Don't go changing on Friday evenings, I don't wanna work that hard

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Its a small change!

Thats how it starts... and then comes the "well that is odd"

35
0

Tesla says Model 3 is still on schedule, despite being delayed again

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: It'll be delayed again

Yeah.... no. Thats what they are planning on. I don't see it happening. They are basically betting on more supply being created because demands rise and then prices for base materials to make those batteries dropping.

I doubt that'll happen. And even WITH that gigafactory, the batterypack isn't suddenly halved in price. It's still a very substantial lump of the total cost.

I just REALLY don't see it happening. At all.

0
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: It'll be delayed again

Downvote all you wan't. That won't make it any less true.

The biggest cost in an EV is the battery pack and we're still no closer to making large capacity packs any cheaper. Not even in mass production. MAYBE in another few extra years, but don't expect a pure EV of this size with a useful range for anything below 40.000 dollar range before say 2020.

0
3
imanidiot
Bronze badge

It'll be delayed again

because they'll never be able to make an EV with acceptable specs for that kind of money.

1
5

Kamikaze Rosetta probe to ram comet it's chased for billions of miles

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: Rosetta is cool?

The problem for philae being in the sun is that it has nowhere to dump the heat. On the lunar missions they could deploy radiator panels on the shaded side or underside that were not exposed to sunlight (and where thus in the cold) and they could deflect a lot of heat to space. On top of that lunar rigolith is a VERY reflective material and thus stays relatively cool. Philae is only a tiny little probe with a very small shadow so nowhere to dump a lot of heat. It's sitting on a black/gray lump that is catching heat from the sun very well. Philae WAS designed to sit in the sun and roast all day, but at some point there is only so much you can do to stave off heat-stroke.

1
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: Rosetta is cool?

Because Rosetta is the ORBITER and designed to stay prolonged periods in the sun. The LANDER, Philae, was not designed to handle direct continues exposure to the sun for extended periods of time.

1
0

WikiLeaks spaffs files showing NSA spied on French presidents

imanidiot
Bronze badge

What a surprise...

Or not. As said before, i'm not surprised the americans spy on ANY of the european nations. I AM however getting more and more surprised by the fact the european intelligence agencies are still SO eager to work together with the yanks.

1
1

Brace yourself, planet Earth, says Nokia CEO – our phones ARE coming back from mid-2016

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: Philips

Not a native german speaker but for me the german is a bit ambiguous. It seems to state: We will only design them and license the brand name. From my understanding of the german that doesn't imply the 2 are linked (IE they might design phones for one brand and let another manufacturer use the Nokia brand for something they didn't design).

Personally I'm still waiting for some enterprising chinese manufacturer to just license the original Nokia 3310 and just start making those again. I wan't a new one dangnamit!

0
0

Post-pub nosh neckfillers: Reader suggestions invited

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Not strictly POST pub nosh

As they go well with a beer it's not strictly POST pub nosh, but I'll throw in the traditional Dutch "Bitterbal" (random google hit recipe: http://www.holland.com/global/tourism/article/bitterballen.htm . Alternative: http://dutchfood.about.com/od/starterssnacks/r/Beef-Bitterballen-Recipe.htm)

If you can get them frozen/premade, it'll be a lot easier post pub. (Just tip a box of thawed balls into a deep-fryer and wait until cooked) but nothing beats home-made. Though I've never tried to make them myself.

WARNING, once you've fried these they contain burning hot fatty ragoux on the inside. BE CAREFUL and warn people about this before you let them eat this stuff. (NASTY burns can result if someone thinks they can just gulp one down straight out of the fryer. The breading might have cooled a bit, but the interior is still HOT)

0
0

Philae warms up nicely, sends home second burst of data

imanidiot
Bronze badge

You could also explain it as philae getting intimate with a comet and then immediatly falling into a coma for 7 months...

Also, I would put forward that Rosetta is doing a bus ton of science itself. It's not there JUST for support.

3
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: Over engineered?

Not OVER engineered. Just engineered well.

Philae fulfilled her primary objectives (get to the comet, touch down, deplete batteries while gathering as much data as possible.) That is what it is engineered for. That engineering then allows her to continue operating for longer than just the primary objectives and fulfill later research as well.

Just like opportunity and curiosity are doing and spirit did. That doesn't mean they are over engineered. Every mission like this has primary objectives (we'll do this first), then secondary, tertiary, quaternary, quinary, senary, septenary, octonary, nonary objectives after that. The hardware is designed to be absolutely sure it'll fulfill the primary objectives, very likely the secondary, probably the tertiary, maybe the quaternary, perhaps the quinary, etc.

22
0

PRATCHETT chats to Oz from 31,000m above Planet Earth

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: So....

Doing a post-doc probably.

0
0

YOU ARE THE DRONE in Amazon's rumoured new parcel delivery plan

imanidiot
Bronze badge

being a long term Amazon customer doesn't automagically make someone more trustworthy. The question still remains, who is responsible if a package disappears? That question is relevant for both the customer as the delivery person. What if I drop off a parcel, but the person receiving claims to have never received it and never to have seen me? Would I be on the hook for lost parcels if I where to deliver packages? If so, better think twice before coming even close to something like this

Also, I'd claim long term Amazon customers are more likely to be cough potatoes prone to NOT going anywhere and thus NOT being the perfect person for this sort of thing.

2
2

Sun's out, guns out: Plucky Philae probot WAKES UP ... hits 'snooze'

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: Excellent work!

The biggest cost in these missions is not the hardware. It's in the launch (lots and lots of expensive hardware with tight tolerances that is likely to go BOOM if shortcuts are taken) and the support (lots of expensive data links, radio dishes, personnel, etc.).

9
0

Poison résumé attack gives ransomware a gig on the desktop

imanidiot
Bronze badge

The problem nowadays is that windows seems to default to "Hide known file extensions". Which is a pain in the arse as it makes it impossible to differentiate between files. A user might never even see a file is a screensaver and not a document.

(Or as I have to deal with, 8 different files with a known and thus hidden extension with EXACTLY the same name, generated by an automatic system, but not always in the same order. And then the file options being locked by IT so I can't undo it. Good luck finding the right files after doing a few measurements...)

0
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge

You do know the intelligence level of the average (l)user right? Finding the powerbutton before their first coffee in the morning is already pushing it.

4
0

LOHAN'S PRATCHETT mission set to soar Saturday

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: Still think the layout is flawed

Arghhh, for seems, read seams.

0
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge

Still think the layout is flawed

In the real LOHAN the servoes will be much more exposed, with only a thin bit of nylon separating them from the cold (and possibly some seems to let cold air blow in). In the PRATCHETT payload the servos and batteries are mounted inside a nice insulated box, so will stay warmer because of that.

Ofcourse I hope I'm wrong, and in any case it'll provide valuable data.

1
0

Confusion reigns as Bundestag malware clean-up staggers on

imanidiot
Bronze badge

This is what I was thinking. It's not like something like this would be completely unheard of anyway.

5
0

POO-bomber space station 'nauts swap orbiter for rural Kazakhstan

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Welcome back

to earth, with the rest of us losers.

1
0

Virgin Galactic will get into space 'within 18 months to two years'

imanidiot
Bronze badge

I'll Believe it

When I see it

2
0

Taming the Thames – The place that plugged London's Great Stink

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: The cathedrals of steam

An addendum to my statement that the rest of the Deltaworks are not as visit worthy, I've never been there but the information center at Neeltje Jans might be interesting (http://www.neeltjejans.nl/en/delta-works/). I can say that the Oosterschelde storm surge barrier is one heck of a feat of civil engineering. It's just a bit of a drive through some the flattest and emptiest bits of the country. (Zeeland is a nice place if you like to visit the beach though)

0
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: The cathedrals of steam

Another thing just jumped into my mind. The radio telescope at Dwingeloo. A 25 meter radio telescope that is now retired, a national monument, restored and used by amateur HAMs and astronomers. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwingeloo_Radio_Observatory) For a visit, try contacting CAMRAS, the organisation in charge of its upkeep/schedule: http://www.camras.nl/index.php?lang=en (not the best website but I'm sure you'll find the info you need. If not, give me a shoutout and I'll try to dredge up the info needed.)

(I realise by now all my suggestions are all over the country. Luckily most of the Netherlands can be reached within a few hours drive from any other part of the country)

0
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: The cathedrals of steam

Well, if you are going to be visiting anyway, plenty of other museums to visit too :-P.

For a more high tech/modern outing I also recommend the Maesland surge flood barrier (near Rotterdam, so if you take the ferry from Harwich to Hoek van Holland it'll not be far out of the route.) They have guided tours on saturday and sunday in the high season. The sheer scale of the construction is almost mindboggling. Photo's really don't do it justice. http://www.keringhuis.nl/index.php?id=37. The rest of the Delta works are interesting in their own right but not as visitworthy.

There are several more (steam-driven) pumping stations dotted around the country. Two of the more notable ones:

The oldest in the country is Gemaal Halfweg (http://stoomgemaalhalfweg.nl/en/index.html)

There is a steam museum in Medemblik built in/around an old pumping station (Bit crowded, with lots of machines crammed together. They don't seem to have an english language website: http://stoommachinemuseum.nl/het-museum/), This is also near the museum tram/railway Hoorn-Medemblik (http://www.museumstoomtram.nl/en)

In keeping with the steam theme, there is the Veluwsche Stoomtrein Maatschappij near Apeldoorn (again, no english website http://www.stoomtrein.org/index.html). This is only a short stretch of track, so mostly interesting if you are into steampower. They run german Baureihe locomotives.

The rest of what I can think of is the more standard tourist stuff you'd also find in the normal brochures (like the harbour museum in Rotterdam). The National Maritime Museum in Amsterdam recently got an upgrade, I've been told its also well worth a visit.

1
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge
Thumb Up

The cathedrals of steam

It seems that wherever you visit a restored or still operation steam driven facility there is always just such care for the aesthetics of the whole thing. Its not always the overly ornate painted victorian cast iron, but even the very basic interior of for instance the Dutch pumping stations like Cruquius or the "Ir. D.F. Wouda gemaal". Still care is taken for looks. Proportions and lines are just right. Things are kept looking nice and as if they belong, instead of tacked on "for looks".

Then on top of that you get the symphony of mechanics that is a running steam engine where almost every important bit of it's construction is visible. Hundreds or even thousands of horsepower with barely a whisper of sound. It just leaves an impression you won't soon forget

BTW, if you ever get to the point where you start doing a Geeks Guide to Europe, I'd highly recommend visiting the Wouda gemaal (http://www.woudagemaal.nl/7434/information-in-english) and the Cruquius (http://www.museumdecruquius.nl/?lang=en)

Especially the Wouda! Even better if you manage to visit on one of the days it's still running (get there early and bring a thermos of hot tea. You WILL be waiting in line on days it's running. Your visit will be short as you only get a few minutes inside because of the amount of visitors, but it is SO worth it) Nothing beats standing in the machine hall of a fully operation steam pumping station spewing out 3000 to 4000 m^3 of water every minute. (Short impression randomly plucked from youtube: https://youtu.be/aL13IXlGYaQ)

1
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: Make these travel guides a series

Seconded and upvoted! These articles are always interesting.

0
0

Case for drone usage now overwhelming as Enrique Iglesias concert almost stopped

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: It was his own fault

The belt of a car engine is well protected. You have to make an effort to get your fingers in there. Multicopter rotors are out in the open, ready to cut anyone foolish or unfortunate enough to get too close. Car belts also don't have a tendency to come falling out of the sky if the battery unexpectedly dies or some electronics blow up or someone makes a pilot error, etc, etc.

It's fine racing around a racetrack, but that's with sturdy barriers and a good distance between the speeding cars and their timing belts. You don't go racing a car around with its front end bodywork removed through a shopping center. So why would you fly a (large) drone over a crowd?

0
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge
Facepalm

It was his own fault

The guy clearly stuck his own fingers up there while holding the quadcopter below it's CG. Gust of wind blows it out of balance, leveling system tries to intervene but ends up pulling it even futher out of balance because it's being held and it ends up rolling straight into his hand.

Remind me, why do I keep saying that flying ANY remotely piloted craft near a person or crowd of people is a bad idea?

4
1

Airbus confirms software brought down A400M transport plane

imanidiot
Bronze badge

If bad install can bring down a plane

Then I'm not quite convinced its not ALSO bad programming.

1
0

High-flying LOHAN fan raises ale-filled tankard

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: I am a tad jealous

It's an option I've looked into, but right now I still need to do my first XC flight. Not quite ready to buy my own wings yet.

The club libelle is also just not as sleek looking as the standard. That sleek bubble canopy really sets it apart from a lot of other ships.

0
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge
Thumb Up

I am a tad jealous

The Glasflugel Libelle is IMHO one of the most elegant gliders ever built. That thing just looks stunning from every angle. The only downside is that it's too sleek and compact for me to fit comfortably.

One of my fellow clubmembers (a slightly elderly pipe smoking gentleman who rarely flies nowadays) has an early Libelle he lovingly restored himself. That thing is a beauty. He would always get on the horn to the winch himself to talk to the winch driver about how he needed to be started slow and careful. After 2 or 3 starts with me driving he never called again if he knew I was on the throttle. He simply refused to be towed by any plane/pilot he didn't know.

0
0

Sex disease surge in US state partly blamed on hook-up apps

imanidiot
Bronze badge
Holmes

More sex means more STDs

Who knew??

1
0

Land Rover's return: Last orders and leather seats for Defender nerds

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: The downsides of Landy ownership...

You do know how the oil refill indication works on a LR right? If it stops leaking it needs more oil.

9
0

US Air Force reveals what's inside its top-secret space plane, this time

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: The X-37, again.

Yes, if its fired from orbit its banned. Specifically the treaties ban ANY weapon system that follows a non ballistic trajectory. A weapon system is not allowed to get into a state where it would continue to orbit without the use of an engine. Thus, yes, fitting a weapons system to the X-37 would be in clear violation of the weapons treaties.

0
1
imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: The X-37, again.

@AC, If they are fired from orbit, they are space based weapons. It doesn't matter if they STAY there. (Eventually few sattelites do. Granted it'll take a couple of millenia)

1
1
imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: The X-37, again.

I doubt even the US is brazen enough to break the international bans on spacebased weapon systems.

1
3

SpaceX signs off on another successful mission with Pacific splashdown

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: Sending the dirty laundry home to Mom...

Doing laundry on the ISS would probably involve a lot of heavy and maintenance intensive equipment. It's therefore probably just not cost effective to lob a washing machine up there and do the laundry on the ISS.

0
0

Last flying Avro Vulcan, XH558, prepares for her swan song

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: Didn't have any plans for a visit to the UK

Looking at the current schedule I'd try to make it a weekandahalf trip around the middle/end of August (15th at Eastbourne, 23rd at Shoreham or Bournemouth.) That way I get multiple chances of seeing it fly (and visit some of the many museums around those parts) Only problem now is that I don't really have the budget to blow on a trip "just to see an airplane" having just bought a house and all that... dangnamit I hate having to set priorities.

0
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge

Didn't have any plans for a visit to the UK

Not this year anyway as its not really in the budget. But now I'm considering it.

It'll be a sad day when it touches down for the last time.

1
0

Airbus warns of software bug in A400M transport planes

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: "The project ran late and over budget. "

The problem is not just the engines. The entire A400M project is just one giant clusterfuck of epic proportions. (Possibly on par with the Joint Strike Fighter program, and thats saying something)

3
0

LOHAN's final test flight set to honour PRATCHETT

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: 4 years

I doubt the aviation authorities in any other country are going to be much faster than the FAA in giving a verdict. Packing up and moving now would probably mean even more lost time.

Civil aviation beaurocracies are just slowmoving entities. Wherever they are located.

1
0

PANIC! RSA keys are compromised!

imanidiot
Bronze badge
Alert

So it's the usual

Media are having a fieldday over someone overstating their own non-peer-reviewed embiggened "research conclusion". Color me surprised...

(We need a "Nicolas Cage/You don't say" icon)

6
0

KA-BOOM! Russian rocket EXPLODES over Siberia minutes after lift-off

imanidiot
Bronze badge
Mushroom

their old stock of soviet built equipment and technology has dried up

Seriously [citation needed].

Building rockets from venerable tech of 25 years ago? A likely story.

Most components of the older lines of Soyuz, Progress and Proton rockets are Soviet era. Either in production date (for some of the computer and rocket components) or at least in design and level of technology. The basis of the Soyuz is the R-7 rocket. Most of the components for the structural parts and large parts of the engines will have changed very little from that first basic design. That is in part what gives the older series of Soyuz their great reliability (All those little niggles that plague a new design have been optimised and engineered out).

And yes, there are probably parts being used made in the good old USSR. In that regard they are/were like the americans. Massive overstocks of lots of parts were made to keep people in work, have strategic reserves in case of war, etc, etc. Problem is, stocks of those old parts are starting to run low, some of the production processes needed to produce new parts are no longer available (because we now actually pay attention to environmental and human safety concerns, drawings are lost, they moulds were tossed, etc) or the old farts who just knew how to build those hard to assemble subassemblies with no real documentation in existance are starting to retire and/or croak.

There is a reason the Soyuz, Progress and Proton lines are all getting major refurbs on electronics and component levels and its not just for nice to have eyecandy. Structurally they are fine, in terms of payload to orbit they are fine. Electronics wise they are just getting old. Hence the update program.

However, any update of old technology is going to run into the same problems one would encounter with entirely new technology. And then on top of that the problems and complications from combining new and old technologies. I'm sure the russians will be able to get things back under control, but I'm also convinced we'll be seeing more of that --> before this is all said and done. (Loss of a Soyuz with crew is not likely, they are using the Progress to "proof" any new tech for Soyuz launches)

And yes, I am typing this at 4am, aren't night shifts wonderful...

2
0
imanidiot
Bronze badge
Flame

Roscosmos seems to be heading for a difficult time now that their old stock of soviet built equipment and technology has dried up and they need to reinvent everything. I predict more flaming debris falling from the heavens before they get things under control.

6
0

Right Dabbsy my old son, you can cram this job right up your BLEEEARRGH

imanidiot
Bronze badge

Re: There are times when Starbucks is the best choice

"but in Europe it feels invasive, creepy and insincere"

IMHO that pretty much describes the entire American service industry.

25
1

Page:

Forums