* Posts by WatAWorld

771 posts • joined 24 Feb 2012

Women! You too can be 'cool' and 'fun' if you work in tech!

WatAWorld
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Re: Sexism against men? No way.

"Just as you can not be racist against white people."

Hitler was racist against white people.

Stalin was racist against white people.

People all over the world have racial slurs for white people.

In China the oppressors are Chinese.

In Zimbabwe the oppressors are black.

In a over 50% of Anglo marriages in the USA the oppressor is a woman.

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WatAWorld
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Re: I don't understand

Where will the savings come from.

Women, immigrants, the powers that be want them because the powers that be think they can be paid less. Paying people less, that is where the savings come from.

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WatAWorld
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They think they can drop IT salaries because women don't care about money.

"the lack of women in ICT roles was costing the European Union billions of euros"

Exactly how does that work?

The sexists think they can drop IT salaries because "women don't care about money".

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MH370 airliner MYSTERY: The El Reg Pub/Dinner-party Guide

WatAWorld
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Why are emergency locator beacons so failure prone in water crashes ?

ELT beacons are supposed to work in the event of crashes even if the crash is on water.

So why did they fail in both the AF 422 and the MH 370 case.

And Aviation Herald had a report of another crash on water a month or two ago where it took a few days to find the wreck site, so again an ELT failure with a crash on water.

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IBM: We gave NOTHING to the NSA, stateside or elsewhere

WatAWorld
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How does data get to IBM?

IBM would not have to turn over data from foreign governments, companies and individuals to the NSA if the NSA intercepted that data on its way from overseas to IBM USA or when it traveled between IBM facilities over US owned or US controlled networks.

So even if IBM issued a broad statement and was truthful, the issue still stands that the data is passing through the USA or US controlled networks, and so IBM cannot assure anyone that that data is not being intercepted during that transmission.

Part of the solution is for foreign governments, companies and individuals to keep their data in their own country (or the EU) so their own country's human rights laws and privacy legislation can protect it.

It is not IBM's sole responsibility that its government does not recognize the ordinary citizens of long-time allies as human beings with human rights, but that is how it is. IBM has to live with that fact until it can convince its government that treating the rest of the world's population as untermenschen is bad for business.

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WatAWorld
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Localization apparently actually accomplished and accomplishes quite a bit then.

"Governments should reject short-sighted policies, such as data localization requirements, that do little to improve security but distort markets and lend themselves to protectionist tendencies."

"Do little" he says.

[I added the numbering below.]

"1. IBM has not provided client data to the National Security Agency (NSA) or any other government agency under the program known as PRISM.

2. IBM has not provided client data to the NSA or any other government agency under any surveillance program involving the bulk collection of content or metadata.

3. IBM has not provided client data stored outside the United States to the U.S. government under a national security order, such as a FISA order or a National Security Letter."

Analysis:

1. Denial only covers PRISM.

2. Denial only covers bulk collection.

3. Denial only covers data that was localized to a foreign country.

In other words what US law forces IBM to do is results in a privacy benefit to foreign governments, foreign companies and foreign private citizens who localize their country's data within their own country, or at least localized anywhere but the USA.

Localization apparently actually accomplished and accomplishes quite a bit then.

Probably the only downside of localization is that it hurts the bottom line of large multinational storage and cloud providers.

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Daring danger-drone dives into VOLCANIC eruption – what happens next has to be seen

WatAWorld
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What is Error #2035 ?

What is Error #2035 ?

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Hacking Team snoopware found on US servers

WatAWorld
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I suspect the entire rest of the "Munk School of Global Affairs" is hiding in shame.

I suspect the entire rest of the "Munk School of Global Affairs" is hiding in shame as the rest of U of Toronto laughs and points fingers.

I wonder if Peter Munk will ask to have his name removed.

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WatAWorld
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Re: And so it spreads.

To me, it is only news when a country is doing snooping on all of its own people or all of the people of a long-time alley.

Are these servers big enough for that? I didn't think so.

Uzbekistan, Poland, Mexico, Colombia, Morocco, Thailand, the UAE, Korea* Morocco and Azerbaijan.

It is likely that they are doing normal spying on government and military of military enemies.

Poland is only a new ally (it illegally hosted a torture camp for the USA and joined NATO).

And Mexico and Columbia, well we (at least those of us who follow the news) know Mexico and Columbia have been heavily spied upon by the USA.

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WatAWorld
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The news is actually available in Canada, Citizen Labs just doesn't watch it.

Isn't the official US position that spying on elected leaders, elected and un-elected officials, and regular ordinary people is perfectly acceptable behaviour.

And the US position is that a government doesn't have to obey a foreign government's laws.

So the US can't have a complaint.

It might be illegal, it might be unethical, it might be anti-democratic, it might be a step in Putinizing ones own country, but the USA has led the way in doing it on an unprecedented scale.

"“The extensive and deliberate use of dedicated US hosting companies by foreign countries’ wiretapping activities raises a number of pressing legal and policy concerns,” Citizen Labs says. “These include whether RCS client countries violate US law and longstanding international legal principles on sovereignty and nonintervention through use of this spyware. Moreover, RCS client countries, by exposing wiretap data to US and other jurisdictions, may have violated internal laws governing the safeguarding of wiretapped material.”"

They're completely ignorant of current affairs.

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New FBI boss says cyber crime, not terrorism, is top of Feds' todo list

WatAWorld
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"You must live in fear so that we can feel secure"

"Security has promoted liberty, there's not a tradeoff,"

What about those governments that say to the people of other nations, "You must live in fear so that we can feel secure" ?

Historically, in the Americans, Africa, Asia and Europe, excessively powerful "security services" have been the main big threat to democracy.

Security promotes liberty when that security is tightly focused by publicly known laws that enforce publicly known regulations established by elected legislatures rather than bureaucrats and executives. Hopefully the FBI will go in that direction, but from the article that isn't clear.

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WatAWorld
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On the surface of it, I would say these comments give me some hope.

On the surface of it, I would say these comments give me some hope.

We definitely need law enforcement to help protect our cyber security, and crime is a bigger threat to our lives and liberty than terrorism in both the physical and cyber worlds.

Of course perhaps the biggest or second biggest obstacle is the international nature of much (not all) cyber crime. Will other countries cooperate with the FBI? Will the FBI cooperate with other countries?

Up there with the international nature of much cyber crime is the obstacle that much of it is not illegal in the country from where the attacks are launched -- because it is being done by government employees "just following orders" without regards to morals, ethics or religious principals (like "do unto others as you would have others do unto you").

I doubt the FBI will be able to help protect us from the NSA, GCHQ, CSEC or their Israeli, French, Russian, and Chinese counterparts.

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Q&A: Schneier on trust, NSA spying and the end of US internet hegemony

WatAWorld
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I would rather be spied upon by the Russians and Chinese than USA or UK

I'm in Canada, a dual Canadian/UK citizen.

I'm never going to visit Russia or China. I do not care if I am on their "no fly lists".

Russian and Chinese network spies are not my neighbours. I do not need to worry about them stalking my teenage daughter.

And Russian and Chinese companies do not compete with my employer.

The USA and UK, they export the same sorts of goods and services Canada does. Our corporate secrets are much more valuable to them.

Politically, Canada does much more trade with the USA than it does with China or Russia (and the USA does more trade with Canada than it does with China or Russia or anyone else).

That means the USA has much more motive to spy on our companies than China or Russia do.

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New Flash vuln exploited (again). Adobe posts emergency fix (again)

WatAWorld
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Re: Hangonamo...

Undoubtedly. Which is why big banks and governments mostly run Windows. Windows has been far more thoroughly tested for vulnerabilities than competing PC operating systems including full function open source operating systems for generalized computing.

You don't think a big bank could afford Apple? Of course they could. But banks and governments face the threat of custom written malware targeted just at them. It doesn't matter what malware is out there so much as how difficult it would be to write a new piece of malware.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Nobody is taking this seriously enough.

"Things like this happen for one reason alone: Nobody but Adobe has the Source Code to the Flash player, and therefore nobody but Adobe can search for and repair vulnerabilities."

If what you said was true there would never be vulnerabilities in Linux or Apache.

Open source is no magic bullet.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Chinese State espionage + Flash = Fail

I took it to mean a country with less expertise than the USA, UK and China.

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WatAWorld
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Re: "Your technological terror is insignificant..."

And by definition it isn't terror if the USA or some other national government does it.

It is "shock and awe".

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WatAWorld
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From Fire Eye "this actor has the tradecraft abilities and resources"

Exploits are going to be happening more and more frequently as foreign spy agencies worldwide are forced to emulate what the NSA is doing (spying on friendly nations, their citizens and their companies) in order to maintain their own national security and national interests.

From the Fire Eye blog:

"This threat actor clearly seeks out and compromises websites of organizations related to international security policy, defense topics, and other non-profit sociocultural issues. The actor either maintains persistence on these sites for extended periods of time or is able to re-compromise them periodically.

This actor also has early access to a number of zero-day exploits, including Flash and Java, and deploys a variety of malware families on compromised systems. Based on these and other observations, we conclude that this actor has the tradecraft abilities and resources to remain a credible threat in at least the mid-term."

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Angela Merkel: Let US spies keep their internet. The EU will build its own

WatAWorld
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The US uses Chinese microchips in military equipment including Air Force One.

I totally agree that IP protocols need a huge overhaul and I share you wish that that would happen.

I suspect she is really suggesting something more minor, at least for Phases I and II.

- ISPs with no board of US citizens liaising to process surveillance requests, as is mandated by the USA for undersea cable connections in Asia (the connections not routed through the UK).

- Hopefully a requirement of EU citizenship (or only non-UK EU citizenship) for technicians working on the EU's internet backbone.

- Either routing tables that mandate sticking to intra-EU pathways where possible, or an NAT router between the non-UK EU and the rest of the world.

The US uses Chinese microchips in military equipment including Air Force One. I don't see a need for the EU to be even more paranoid than the USA.

But I would not be surprised to see EU designed electronics components used all over the world by African and Asian countries seeking privacy from the US, Five Eyes, Russia and China.

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WatAWorld
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That is how I read it. She wants to do what every large company does at its headquarters

There would be the 'EU except UK' segment of the internet with 'EU except UK' controlled equipment.

It would have its own internal mail servers and DNS that people could choose to use, or not. They would be under the care custody and control of people with EU-only citizenship.

Then there would be an interface to the rest of the WWW where the undersea cables connect to the UK, Africa, and the overland cables connect to Asia.

It would be as if the EU was Microsoft, Apple, GM, or IBM headquarters. An internal network interfaced with an external network.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Too late..Angela

Terrorism?

You've not been keeping up with the news. It is about trade negations, hot chicks, former girl friends, NATO partners, EU ministers discussions, etc.

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WatAWorld
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Yes, see Article 8 here

http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Convention_ENG.pdf

Yes, see Article 8 here

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WatAWorld
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I'm glad you've figured out that the UK will be excluded

Gold medal.

German citizens and residents are even more protected from domestic spying than US citizens. They are protected by laws put in place by the legislature they elected.

German citizens and residents have no legal protections from US spying because the US courts do not recognize foreigners as human beings with human rights.

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WatAWorld
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US human rights legislation does not recognize non-US persons as humans.

True that you can never stop spying 100%, but you can make it difficult enough that the spying must be targeted rather than mass.

And while it is true that EU nations and the EU itself will still spy (obtain wiretaps) on their own residents, those wiretaps will be subject to EU human rights legislation, legislation passed by various the elected parliaments of various EU nations -- rather than non-leglislation passed by some imperial power somewhere elected by its alien populace.

US human rights legislation does not recognize non-US persons as humans. We foreigners have no human rights protections under their law.

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WatAWorld
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Siemens or some other EU country can make the equipment, no problem there.

Merkal has the right idea.

She is not doing anything to the EU's internet that the USA hasn't already tried to do, but she is doing it from the point of view of protecting EU residents rather than spying on them wholesale.

Siemens or some other EU country can make the equipment, no problem there.

And then you interface the EWW to the USWW and UKWWW through an NAT firewall.

The technical challenges are trivial.

True that you can never stop spying 100%, but you can make it difficult enough that the spying must be targeted rather than mass.

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Samsung flings sueball at Dyson for 'intolerable' IP copycat claim

WatAWorld
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The patent system desperately needs to be made looser pay

"hidden prior art is occasionally found and ways to design around existing patents identified"

1. If there is prior art you have nothing to protect.

2, If people find a different way to do something they aren't infringing your patent and you don't deserve any money.

That companies don't see it that way is why the patent system desperately needs to be made looser pay, except in unusual circumstances.

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Apple Mac Pro: It's a death star, not a nappy bin, OK?

WatAWorld
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Re: Final Cut Pro X?

Ivan, that's one video. There are dozens of top professional movie industry editors who have complained about Final Cut Pro X being a betrayal of professional editors.

Many are sticking with earlier versions of Final Cut.

"After Final Cut Pro debacle, does Apple still care about creative pros?

Apple's contentious Final Cut Pro X release has created uneasy feelings among …"

http://arstechnica.com/apple/2011/07/does-apple-still-care-about-creative-pros/

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WatAWorld
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Re: It is NOT expensive... My first IBM 370 cost $1.3 million.

My first IBM 370 cost $1.3 million.

And true, compared to that the R2D2 is dirt cheap.

I suppose the valid question is not whether the new R2D2 is cheap compared to historical computer prices but whether it is cheaper than other Xenon power machines with similar professional video cards.

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WatAWorld
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Didn't Apple deep-six profssional users with Final Cut Pro X ?

I only mention this because the article suggest loyal pros will get this $5000+ R2D2 like machine to run Final Cut Pro.

Professional editors were complaining all over the web about Final Cut Pro X being a betrayal of professional users with FC being trimmed down so much it would only appeal to home and casual business users -- people unlikely to waste $5000 on a machine, let alone the upper limit of $10,000.

Sample complaint article here:

http://thecreativeorganization.com/final-cut-pro-x-creativity/

I'm sure Apple will find a market for its machine. But I'm not sure any of them will be running Final Cut Pro X on it.

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The UNTOLD SUCCESS of Microsoft: Yes, it's Windows 7

WatAWorld
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Re: New Wheeze

I believe the problem is that XP is simply patched too much.

But they have made XP support available at an extra cost as you suggest. Problem is it is thousands of dollars.

I find it hard to believe that people can't figure out Windows 7. You go online, you order Windows 7 from Amazon, and you install it.

And if your computer is 7 years old you might as well junk it anyways since it will be suffering a hardware failure sometime soon.

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WatAWorld
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Re: What the hell did they expect?

People are still complaining about Windows 8's touch interface when Windows 8.1 is out there without that touch interface.

Try to keep up people.

And how did Linux approach this? Linux's approach shows it doesn't matter if MS had performed as well as Linux, since Linux isn't taking over the desktop marketplace.

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WatAWorld
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Selling Windows 7 is like selling an iPhone 5

Selling Windows 7 is like selling an iPhone 5.

It might not be the latest thing but the vendor still makes money on it.

PC vendors need to stop blaming MS for their lack of sales. Their lack of sales is their own darn fault.

If they made new computers with compelling new features not available on existing computers they would be making sales.

The fantasy vendors and "industry analysts" (with their liberal arts degrees) have that some new OS with more junk bloatware added to it would boost PC sales is a junk theory.

If a different OS would boost hardware sales then Linux or Mac OS would have done that already. Even the dumbest consumer wants an OS that sits in the background and requires no learning.

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'Wind power causes climate change' shown to be so much hot air

WatAWorld
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religious proselytization by climate change theologians.

There are three kinds of climate change deniers.

1. Those who deny climate ever changes. These are very rare.

2. Those who deny mankind can change climate. These are rare.

3. Those who deny nature can change climate. These have somehow become exceedingly common, in part due to religious proselytization by climate change theologians.

We need to run the theologians out of climatology and restore it to being a science, a science that meets the academic standards set by physicists and chemists, the sciences climatology is a subset of.

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WatAWorld
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an accurate model to predict weather? then tell us average temperature in the UK be in August 2014?

"the impacts of wind farms “remain much weaker than the natural climate interannual variability”.

Only nature can create 3 km deep glaciers that completely cover the UK, Russia and Canada, not anything man can do.

But looking at the short term, if this guy has an accurate model to predict weather, what will the average temperature in the UK be in August 2014? Can he tell us that ± 5C ?

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iPhone maker Foxconn to pump $1bn into new Indonesian factory

WatAWorld
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If unions are a problem why is the German economy better than the US economy?

If unions are a problem why is the German economy better than the US economy?

The USA has less unionization than most countries.

It probably has to do with education levels, how seriously people take their work, and how efficient they are at being productive, as opposed to showing up.

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WatAWorld
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Not many unions in the USA compared to other countries.

Not really. Not many unions in the USA compared to other countries.

Labour regulations are pretty slack too, only 2 weeks vacation a year. Easy to avoid paying OT. And so on.

What big business wants is freedom and US employees aren't free. Chinese, Indonesian, are very close to that.

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WatAWorld
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Re: "no-one is brave enough to move into Africa as it's too politically unstable"

I live your sarcasm. As you imply, big business loves regulations, of the people and of small business.

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'No, I CAN'T write code myself,' admits woman in charge of teaching our kids to code

WatAWorld
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Few CIOs or VP ITs can code

I've consulted for 2 dozen companies and worked for a dozen more in my career, which is coming near an end now.

Few CIOs or VPs of IT can code. Even many managers were never able to code.

Even most analysts and project leaders are poor coders.

Our industry is run by sales people and accountants. This is especially true for big organizations like governments, banks and body shops of all sizes.

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Friends don't do tech support for friends running Windows XP

WatAWorld
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Re: This time Microsoft has gone too far

You got scammed by the person who sold you the 4 year old netbook running Windows XP.

That person wasn't MS was it.

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WatAWorld
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I'm tired of reading people who claim the only computers available are Windows 8

"No, because as we all know Windows 8 is not a destination,"

Windows 7 computers are widely available in Canada and the USA.

Retail and OEM copies of Windows 7 are widely avaiable.

Linux is widely available.

Macs are widely available.

MS says, "Buy a new computer".

Where in that do you find a requirement that that new computer be Windows 8 ?

And the common complaint about Windows 8 were the metro UI. As of Windows 8.1 that complaint is obsolete.

I have read zero complaints about stability or speed on Windows 8. Just, "Me too, other people are bitching about 8 so I should too."

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WatAWorld
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Re: isn't MS reducing its own profits and risking loss of market share with this advise?

From the customer point of view, I have a brother who wants to keep running a 7 year old XP machine in his SOHO.

The thing is it is much easier and cheaper to replace a computer on a planned basis than as an emergency.

Getting maybe 3 more years out of a 7 year old machine is false economy.

An emergency computer replacement is going to take at least 2 business days (get the computer and initial software, get the remaining software, do conversions).

Then there is training on the new software packages (Quickbooks, etc.).

Then there is discovering at tax time that key files are in an obscure directory on that old failed disk drive and he must now manually recreate them.

Boom $1200 lost billings right there. All to prevent tossing out a cheap business computer 3 years early.

Much better to do the replacement while the old machine is still working.

If he had an XP machine that was less than 3 years old, or if he had a high end XP machine that was less than 5 years old, I would probably just install Windows 7, a mere $120 at amazon.ca.

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WatAWorld
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Re: An Alternative Possibility

The problem is infections can come in on the internet connection even if nobody is using it. They'd need to unplug the network cables.

Also infections can come in on USB drives and optical disks.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Really?

Didn't Windows 8.1 render the metrosexual UI complaint obsolete?

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WatAWorld
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You need this book, "When I say no I feel guilty".

You need this book, "When I say no I feel guilty". You can borrow it at your local public library too.

http://www.amazon.ca/When-Say-No-Feel-Guilty/dp/0553263900

And if that doesn't work take a course in assertiveness training.

That is the problem we IT people have, we are not assertive. We think we have to do things just because someone asks us or someone expects it of us.

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WatAWorld
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What is the MTBF for a hard drive that is already 7 years old?

That is the thing, a 5 year old or 7 year old computer is likely to fail at any time.

And when it fails it will probably be the hard drive that fails.

Most home users and SOHOs do not have through complete backups.

And the unplanned emergency installation and configuration of a new computer with a new OS is going to take 2 working days minimum.

So from the consumer point of view it makes sense to buy a new computer if the old computer is more than 3, maybe 5 years old.

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WatAWorld
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isn't MS reducing its own profits and risking loss of market share with this advise?

Someone correct me if I'm wrong (again ;)).

MS makes more money selling a retail Windows 7 or Windows 8 license than they do selling an OEM license.

And they make much more money selling individual OEM licenses than OEM licenses to Dell, HP, and so on.

And when someone buys a computer there is a chance they won't even select Windows but might select a computer with a totally different operating system.

So isn't MS reducing its own profits and risking loss of market share with this advise?

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Snowden documents show British digital spies use viruses and 'honey traps'

WatAWorld
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We have to make the rest of the world unsafe so that we feel safe

We have to make the rest of the world unsafe so that we feel safe -- that seems to be what Obama is saying.

But does he make us safe when he undermines democracies, including western democracies?

Does he make us safe when he spies on regular citizens, including regular citizens of his own country?

And how does Cameron (and Blair) spying on industry, probably including UK industry, make anyone safe?

Isn't their betray of our allies really spreading hate around the world?

Don't the hawks applaud the spying because the hawks no the spying will cause more ill-will and more wars?

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WatAWorld
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Re: Posting negative information about a firm on online firms or actively ...

1. Snowden did not fabricate the information. So that is one difference.

2. Snowden did this to aid the US public.

Snowden is a patriot to his nation working to defend it as a democracy run by its citizens.

Who are the NSA and GCHQ doing it for when they do it?

Their employees are patriots to their agency, not their country.

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WatAWorld
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Re: When booking a hotel...

The desk clerk is unlikely to know unless it is a tiny owner operated hotel.

In the UK and USA it would be a violation of the law to spread knowledge of security letters beyond the bare minimum people needed to carry out the request and the company's lawyers.

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