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* Posts by WatAWorld

702 posts • joined 24 Feb 2012

Angela Merkel: Let US spies keep their internet. The EU will build its own

WatAWorld
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That is how I read it. She wants to do what every large company does at its headquarters

There would be the 'EU except UK' segment of the internet with 'EU except UK' controlled equipment.

It would have its own internal mail servers and DNS that people could choose to use, or not. They would be under the care custody and control of people with EU-only citizenship.

Then there would be an interface to the rest of the WWW where the undersea cables connect to the UK, Africa, and the overland cables connect to Asia.

It would be as if the EU was Microsoft, Apple, GM, or IBM headquarters. An internal network interfaced with an external network.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Too late..Angela

Terrorism?

You've not been keeping up with the news. It is about trade negations, hot chicks, former girl friends, NATO partners, EU ministers discussions, etc.

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WatAWorld
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Yes, see Article 8 here

http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Convention_ENG.pdf

Yes, see Article 8 here

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WatAWorld
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I'm glad you've figured out that the UK will be excluded

Gold medal.

German citizens and residents are even more protected from domestic spying than US citizens. They are protected by laws put in place by the legislature they elected.

German citizens and residents have no legal protections from US spying because the US courts do not recognize foreigners as human beings with human rights.

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WatAWorld
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US human rights legislation does not recognize non-US persons as humans.

True that you can never stop spying 100%, but you can make it difficult enough that the spying must be targeted rather than mass.

And while it is true that EU nations and the EU itself will still spy (obtain wiretaps) on their own residents, those wiretaps will be subject to EU human rights legislation, legislation passed by various the elected parliaments of various EU nations -- rather than non-leglislation passed by some imperial power somewhere elected by its alien populace.

US human rights legislation does not recognize non-US persons as humans. We foreigners have no human rights protections under their law.

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WatAWorld
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Siemens or some other EU country can make the equipment, no problem there.

Merkal has the right idea.

She is not doing anything to the EU's internet that the USA hasn't already tried to do, but she is doing it from the point of view of protecting EU residents rather than spying on them wholesale.

Siemens or some other EU country can make the equipment, no problem there.

And then you interface the EWW to the USWW and UKWWW through an NAT firewall.

The technical challenges are trivial.

True that you can never stop spying 100%, but you can make it difficult enough that the spying must be targeted rather than mass.

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Samsung flings sueball at Dyson for 'intolerable' IP copycat claim

WatAWorld
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The patent system desperately needs to be made looser pay

"hidden prior art is occasionally found and ways to design around existing patents identified"

1. If there is prior art you have nothing to protect.

2, If people find a different way to do something they aren't infringing your patent and you don't deserve any money.

That companies don't see it that way is why the patent system desperately needs to be made looser pay, except in unusual circumstances.

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Apple Mac Pro: It's a death star, not a nappy bin, OK?

WatAWorld
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Re: Final Cut Pro X?

Ivan, that's one video. There are dozens of top professional movie industry editors who have complained about Final Cut Pro X being a betrayal of professional editors.

Many are sticking with earlier versions of Final Cut.

"After Final Cut Pro debacle, does Apple still care about creative pros?

Apple's contentious Final Cut Pro X release has created uneasy feelings among …"

http://arstechnica.com/apple/2011/07/does-apple-still-care-about-creative-pros/

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WatAWorld
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Re: It is NOT expensive... My first IBM 370 cost $1.3 million.

My first IBM 370 cost $1.3 million.

And true, compared to that the R2D2 is dirt cheap.

I suppose the valid question is not whether the new R2D2 is cheap compared to historical computer prices but whether it is cheaper than other Xenon power machines with similar professional video cards.

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Didn't Apple deep-six profssional users with Final Cut Pro X ?

I only mention this because the article suggest loyal pros will get this $5000+ R2D2 like machine to run Final Cut Pro.

Professional editors were complaining all over the web about Final Cut Pro X being a betrayal of professional users with FC being trimmed down so much it would only appeal to home and casual business users -- people unlikely to waste $5000 on a machine, let alone the upper limit of $10,000.

Sample complaint article here:

http://thecreativeorganization.com/final-cut-pro-x-creativity/

I'm sure Apple will find a market for its machine. But I'm not sure any of them will be running Final Cut Pro X on it.

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The UNTOLD SUCCESS of Microsoft: Yes, it's Windows 7

WatAWorld
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Re: New Wheeze

I believe the problem is that XP is simply patched too much.

But they have made XP support available at an extra cost as you suggest. Problem is it is thousands of dollars.

I find it hard to believe that people can't figure out Windows 7. You go online, you order Windows 7 from Amazon, and you install it.

And if your computer is 7 years old you might as well junk it anyways since it will be suffering a hardware failure sometime soon.

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WatAWorld
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Re: What the hell did they expect?

People are still complaining about Windows 8's touch interface when Windows 8.1 is out there without that touch interface.

Try to keep up people.

And how did Linux approach this? Linux's approach shows it doesn't matter if MS had performed as well as Linux, since Linux isn't taking over the desktop marketplace.

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WatAWorld
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Selling Windows 7 is like selling an iPhone 5

Selling Windows 7 is like selling an iPhone 5.

It might not be the latest thing but the vendor still makes money on it.

PC vendors need to stop blaming MS for their lack of sales. Their lack of sales is their own darn fault.

If they made new computers with compelling new features not available on existing computers they would be making sales.

The fantasy vendors and "industry analysts" (with their liberal arts degrees) have that some new OS with more junk bloatware added to it would boost PC sales is a junk theory.

If a different OS would boost hardware sales then Linux or Mac OS would have done that already. Even the dumbest consumer wants an OS that sits in the background and requires no learning.

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'Wind power causes climate change' shown to be so much hot air

WatAWorld
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religious proselytization by climate change theologians.

There are three kinds of climate change deniers.

1. Those who deny climate ever changes. These are very rare.

2. Those who deny mankind can change climate. These are rare.

3. Those who deny nature can change climate. These have somehow become exceedingly common, in part due to religious proselytization by climate change theologians.

We need to run the theologians out of climatology and restore it to being a science, a science that meets the academic standards set by physicists and chemists, the sciences climatology is a subset of.

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an accurate model to predict weather? then tell us average temperature in the UK be in August 2014?

"the impacts of wind farms “remain much weaker than the natural climate interannual variability”.

Only nature can create 3 km deep glaciers that completely cover the UK, Russia and Canada, not anything man can do.

But looking at the short term, if this guy has an accurate model to predict weather, what will the average temperature in the UK be in August 2014? Can he tell us that ± 5C ?

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iPhone maker Foxconn to pump $1bn into new Indonesian factory

WatAWorld
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If unions are a problem why is the German economy better than the US economy?

If unions are a problem why is the German economy better than the US economy?

The USA has less unionization than most countries.

It probably has to do with education levels, how seriously people take their work, and how efficient they are at being productive, as opposed to showing up.

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Not many unions in the USA compared to other countries.

Not really. Not many unions in the USA compared to other countries.

Labour regulations are pretty slack too, only 2 weeks vacation a year. Easy to avoid paying OT. And so on.

What big business wants is freedom and US employees aren't free. Chinese, Indonesian, are very close to that.

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Re: "no-one is brave enough to move into Africa as it's too politically unstable"

I live your sarcasm. As you imply, big business loves regulations, of the people and of small business.

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'No, I CAN'T write code myself,' admits woman in charge of teaching our kids to code

WatAWorld
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Few CIOs or VP ITs can code

I've consulted for 2 dozen companies and worked for a dozen more in my career, which is coming near an end now.

Few CIOs or VPs of IT can code. Even many managers were never able to code.

Even most analysts and project leaders are poor coders.

Our industry is run by sales people and accountants. This is especially true for big organizations like governments, banks and body shops of all sizes.

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Friends don't do tech support for friends running Windows XP

WatAWorld
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Re: This time Microsoft has gone too far

You got scammed by the person who sold you the 4 year old netbook running Windows XP.

That person wasn't MS was it.

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WatAWorld
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I'm tired of reading people who claim the only computers available are Windows 8

"No, because as we all know Windows 8 is not a destination,"

Windows 7 computers are widely available in Canada and the USA.

Retail and OEM copies of Windows 7 are widely avaiable.

Linux is widely available.

Macs are widely available.

MS says, "Buy a new computer".

Where in that do you find a requirement that that new computer be Windows 8 ?

And the common complaint about Windows 8 were the metro UI. As of Windows 8.1 that complaint is obsolete.

I have read zero complaints about stability or speed on Windows 8. Just, "Me too, other people are bitching about 8 so I should too."

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Re: isn't MS reducing its own profits and risking loss of market share with this advise?

From the customer point of view, I have a brother who wants to keep running a 7 year old XP machine in his SOHO.

The thing is it is much easier and cheaper to replace a computer on a planned basis than as an emergency.

Getting maybe 3 more years out of a 7 year old machine is false economy.

An emergency computer replacement is going to take at least 2 business days (get the computer and initial software, get the remaining software, do conversions).

Then there is training on the new software packages (Quickbooks, etc.).

Then there is discovering at tax time that key files are in an obscure directory on that old failed disk drive and he must now manually recreate them.

Boom $1200 lost billings right there. All to prevent tossing out a cheap business computer 3 years early.

Much better to do the replacement while the old machine is still working.

If he had an XP machine that was less than 3 years old, or if he had a high end XP machine that was less than 5 years old, I would probably just install Windows 7, a mere $120 at amazon.ca.

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WatAWorld
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Re: An Alternative Possibility

The problem is infections can come in on the internet connection even if nobody is using it. They'd need to unplug the network cables.

Also infections can come in on USB drives and optical disks.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Really?

Didn't Windows 8.1 render the metrosexual UI complaint obsolete?

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WatAWorld
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You need this book, "When I say no I feel guilty".

You need this book, "When I say no I feel guilty". You can borrow it at your local public library too.

http://www.amazon.ca/When-Say-No-Feel-Guilty/dp/0553263900

And if that doesn't work take a course in assertiveness training.

That is the problem we IT people have, we are not assertive. We think we have to do things just because someone asks us or someone expects it of us.

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WatAWorld
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What is the MTBF for a hard drive that is already 7 years old?

That is the thing, a 5 year old or 7 year old computer is likely to fail at any time.

And when it fails it will probably be the hard drive that fails.

Most home users and SOHOs do not have through complete backups.

And the unplanned emergency installation and configuration of a new computer with a new OS is going to take 2 working days minimum.

So from the consumer point of view it makes sense to buy a new computer if the old computer is more than 3, maybe 5 years old.

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WatAWorld
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isn't MS reducing its own profits and risking loss of market share with this advise?

Someone correct me if I'm wrong (again ;)).

MS makes more money selling a retail Windows 7 or Windows 8 license than they do selling an OEM license.

And they make much more money selling individual OEM licenses than OEM licenses to Dell, HP, and so on.

And when someone buys a computer there is a chance they won't even select Windows but might select a computer with a totally different operating system.

So isn't MS reducing its own profits and risking loss of market share with this advise?

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Snowden documents show British digital spies use viruses and 'honey traps'

WatAWorld
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We have to make the rest of the world unsafe so that we feel safe

We have to make the rest of the world unsafe so that we feel safe -- that seems to be what Obama is saying.

But does he make us safe when he undermines democracies, including western democracies?

Does he make us safe when he spies on regular citizens, including regular citizens of his own country?

And how does Cameron (and Blair) spying on industry, probably including UK industry, make anyone safe?

Isn't their betray of our allies really spreading hate around the world?

Don't the hawks applaud the spying because the hawks no the spying will cause more ill-will and more wars?

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WatAWorld
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Re: Posting negative information about a firm on online firms or actively ...

1. Snowden did not fabricate the information. So that is one difference.

2. Snowden did this to aid the US public.

Snowden is a patriot to his nation working to defend it as a democracy run by its citizens.

Who are the NSA and GCHQ doing it for when they do it?

Their employees are patriots to their agency, not their country.

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WatAWorld
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Re: When booking a hotel...

The desk clerk is unlikely to know unless it is a tiny owner operated hotel.

In the UK and USA it would be a violation of the law to spread knowledge of security letters beyond the bare minimum people needed to carry out the request and the company's lawyers.

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WatAWorld
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Insider Knowledge to Violate Fair Tradingi Laws

"... there is a profit motive to espionage, and we all trust that the GCHQ has imbibed enough of the Thatcher spirit to monetarize their snooping ... "

It isn't just selling porn.

I don't imagine anyone at the SEC or Serious Fraud Office, Financial Services Authority or Office of Fair Trading is checking to see if NSA or GCHQ employees are using insider knowledge to violate fair trading laws.

Look at Russia. If you want to be rich, if you want to succeed in business, join the FSB or be ex-KGB. This is where we are headed if we don't change course.

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Re: LinkedIn (etc) and browser security

Sadly yes.

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WatAWorld
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Fictional spy shows so ironic they must be a hipster's dream.

Please try to remember that fictional TV programs are not news reports.

You saw it on Spooks. Spooks isn't a new show.

I'm sitting here watching the US TV show "Alias".

When it was made 10 years ago it was a fictional account of an agency called SD-6, sort of a new world order type organization. And its employees thought they were working for the CIA.

Alias portrays all sorts of psychopathic bad guys and dirty tricks by the English, the French and people in turbans.

Most of it still is over-the-top fantasy. But what isn't, the dirty tricks that are no longer fictional, they're what the CIA and NSA have been doing.

And rather than the employees of SD-6 thinking they're working for the CIA but actually working for some fantasy "new world order" it seems the reality is that the CIA is working for SD-6 working for some new world order.

It isn't precise. It is still fiction. But the irony is monumental.

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WatAWorld
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Is this technique why Tony Blair forced the UK to join the Attack on Iraq?

"Targets can also be discredited with a "honey trap", whereby a fake social media profile is created, maybe backed up by a personal blog to provide credibility. This could be used to entice someone into making embarrassing confessions, which the presentation notes described as "a great option" and "very successful when it works.""

This particular technique would work great against politicians in democratic countries.

I cannot see it working against terrorists.

So how many democracies has the UK undermined? How many elected officials? How many foreign prime ministers and presidents?

Did GCHQ use this technique to undermine the UK's own democracy, by subverting our elected officials, perhaps including prime ministers?

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WatAWorld
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Parliament is the UK's only legislature. Are ministers commiting sedition

Parliament is the UK's only legislature. Are ministers or bureaucrats committing sedition by usurping Parliament's role as the UK's sole legislature?

"All of GCHQ's work is carried out in accordance with a strict legal and policy framework," said the agency in a statement, "which ensure[s] that our activities are authorized, necessary and proportionate, and that there is rigorous oversight,"

From what is reported, we know what they're doing and that they're doing it to companies -- not terrorists.

From what is reported, we know what they're doing and that they're doing it to governments -- not terrorists.

Only a psychopathic criminal would consider what the UK government authorize such measures as necessary and proportionate against such targets.

If there is rigorous oversight, then that oversight must be provided by people with similar high levels of psychopathic criminality.

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Sputtering storage space portends poorly for PCs

WatAWorld
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Windows has nothing at all to do with it, regardless of what you've read.

Windows has nothing at all to do with it, regardless of what you've read.

People want the OS they have. Which is why they don't all switch to Windows 8.1, MacOS, Linux, etc. We want what we already know, it doesn't matter how easy to learn the new thing is, it can't be easier than what we already know.

People can easily buy Windows 7 computers, and they can buy Windows 7 software to install on a Windows 8 machine.

And they can buy Apple computers or download Linux.

Desktops and laptops are not constrained to only running Windows. Windows and MS could vanish and sales would remain the same, after a blip.

Bundling some compelling new software with a Windows 9 wouldn't going to do it either. People would buy Windows 9 for $120 instead of a new computer for $800.

The problem is merely that we've all got laptops and desktops already and won't need replacements for several years.

We don't all have smart phones and tablets. And the ones that we have from two years ago were underpowered. So that market will stay alive.

How often do you buy a TV? Every 8 years? Nothing is going to make you buy one ever year. How often do you buy new shoes? Every 1 year. Shoes and portable electronics wear out quickly.

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WatAWorld
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The PC and laptop market is mature. What does anyone expect?

The PC and laptop market is mature. These machines last 5 to 10 and 3 to 5 years. Everyone who wants one has one.

Why would any reasonable person not expect sales to drop down to an equilibrium level where new purchases match failure rates of old machines.

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Snowden leak: GCHQ DDoSed Anonymous & LulzSec's chatrooms

WatAWorld
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Re: Wrong analogy

Quote: "Except this is more like allowing the police to go around crashing the cars"

Standard practice in the USA and Canada too.

It is taught in most state's and province's police schools.

But you can't just do it whenever you want. There are certain criterion (low levels of criterion in many states, high levels of criterion almost never met in Canada).

The criterion for permitting attacks, military, cyber or otherwise, by government workers and troops need to be high, the supervision needs to be close, and the laws of parliament should be followed.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Why?

"There's no lasting damage, it's just disruptive. A common comparison is the sit-in protest in the real world:"

If we accepted that reasoning we'd have to accept that government employees could do it too without needing a court order or warrant.

They would not even need the agreement of senior managers, they could just do it on their own.

I reject that reasoning.

1. DoS attacks do cause lasting damage. They cause great expense in preventing them happening again.

2. Sit-ins done for *some* reasons are not peaceful political protests, but rather are a form of extortion. As with most criminality, it comes down to intent. Is the intent legal.

Is the intent to force someone change how they do business -- illegal?

Is the intent to force someone to spend money -- illegal?

Or is the intent to make someone consider something -- legal, provided it doesn't cause harm. Harm includes paying service providers for protection against future attacks.

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WatAWorld
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Re: DDOS

Not just Ed Milliband but just under half of Cameron's own party.

Politically active people often quarrel within their own party, it is a normal state of affairs.

But LulzSec and Anonymous are neither political parties nor political discussion groups.

They are groups that actively break the law and disrupt the normal functioning of governments and companies.

I see the problem as only that GCHQ or Special Branch should have had a warrant from a judge to do this.

Government workers should be made to work within the laws set by parliament, and they should be fired or sent to prison when they violate those laws. Being a government employee should be considered an aggravating circumstance that makes the punishment worse, rather than a 'get out of jail free card'.

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WatAWorld
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Acts are seldom ever either "legal or illegal"

Acts are seldom ever either "legal or illegal".

Shooting someone. Locking them up. Putting milk in their coffee. Holding a door open.

These are all acts that can be either legal or illegal depending on the circumstances.

Shooting someone? It could be self defense. Locking someone up?

It could be locking the door to your house and keeping you and your infant inside.

If you put milk (instead of non-dairy creamer) in the coffee of someone you know has a serious allergic reaction it would be a criminal act.

Holding a door open to knowingly facilitate a robbery is a crime.

Acts are seldom ever either "legal or illegal". Intent is a major part of the law, and necessity can be a defense.

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WatAWorld
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DoS attacks should only happen with court orders

While LulzSec and Anonymous are not physically violent groups, they are not law-abiding political organizations either.

DoS attacks on peaceful mainstream or even peaceful fringe political groups would be outrageous.

But these two specific groups are not groups set up merely to exchange and develop political viewpoints or engage in peaceful lobbying. They do advocate law breaking and denying the civil rights of other citizens.

There may be other issues I have not thought of, but only issue I currently see is why wasn't the DoS done openly under a court order. Police and security agencies must not be allowed to become an all-in-one legislative, policing, judicial and punishment system.

Police and security agencies must remain under democratic control of our parliaments and our judges -- otherwise it means the Soviets and Maoists won the Cold War.

To me this is far far less disturbing than spy agencies gathering material on regular peaceful citizens of long-time allied countries and their current and future political, business, academic, technological and religious leaders.

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NSA, GCHQ, accused of hacking Belgian smartcard crypto guru

WatAWorld
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In other news Benedict Arnold hailed as a true patriot and idol

Spy agencies spying on the people they're supposed to be protecting.

In other news Benedict Arnold hailed as a true patriot and idol of US spy agencies.

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WatAWorld
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Re: I thought my marching days were over

And yet you and I both took time to comment on the story, Obama takes time out of his day to comment on it, the CBC, NY Times and NY Post to articles on it.

People care, just not enough. They don't realize how serious this is.

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Is it the position of the Reg is that German PM Angela Merkel was up to something nefarious?

"As the story points out, the attack could be the first known instance of a spookhaus action against an individual not under investigation for something nefarious."

"spookhaus action against an individual not under investigation for something nefarious."

They're investigating all of us, just generally not doing anything with the info they gather.

So what is your definition of nefarious?

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Cameron: UK public is fine with domestic spying

WatAWorld
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Re: Puppet

Exactly my fear. It *may* be that our politicians are already under spy agency control.

Listening to US Senator Dianne Feinstein (Democrat from California and Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on 'Intelligence') on the news, I can't believe she supports the words coming out of her mouth on this issue.

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WatAWorld
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Re: I've given this some thought

I look at it differently. Politicians aren't the only danger.

It is the spies themselves grabbing power that is the biggest danger.

- Look at J. Edgar Hoover in the USA. What he did over decades makes what Nixon did in a few years look trivial.

- Look at Russia today and the old USSR.

- Recall the Warsaw Pact.

- If you know 20th century South American history, look there.

Politicians can be a problem, but they are not the main problem. The main problem is the security and military apparatus taking control and destroying democracy through intimidation, coercion and later, after they have power, more extreme methods.

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Re: Caught in the cookie jar denials

As Lars said, if Cameron really did think the public was okay with this he wouldn't have kept it secret from the public.

The succession of lies coming from Cameron and Obama, each lie revealed in the next day's news. Total disgrace to our puppet politicians.

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WatAWorld
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Tories and Labour will give us a UK resembling Putin's Russia

Any politician worth 2 pence would stand against spying on his own people.

In the early stages it won't be the general public being intimidated and coerced by our own spy agencies, it will be politicians.

Sure GCHQ and the NSA can help you keep down backbenchers and opposition parties, but take the long view, look at your legacy Mr. Cameron.

Do you want to join Tony Blair as the other PM who destroyed British democracy?

And that is what all this is about.

Democracies are not destroyed by terrorist attacks (with one debatable middle eastern exception).

Democracies are destroyed by their own spy agencies, with or without external spy agency help.

If you don't think Warsaw Pact history is sufficiently close to the UK situation, look at 20th century South American history. Lots of democracies as good as the UK's (if younger) toppled. They're like the black death.

Time and time again it is spy agencies who topple democracies.

Yes we need spy agencies, but not invasive spying on our own political, business, academic and scientific leaders.

I'm a UK expat.

What Blair did, what Cameron is doing, out-of-control domestic spying will transform my homeland into a UK resembling Putin's Russia were government and business is dominated by spies and ex-spies.

We need GCHQ. We do not need a UK equivalent of a super Stasi or super KGB monitoring every cellphone and every landline and able to subvert our leaders and our democratic methods.

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