* Posts by WatAWorld

826 posts • joined 24 Feb 2012

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Timeout, Time Lords: ICANN says there is only one kind of doctor

WatAWorld
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Doctorates go back to the 1100s. Medical doctorates go back to 1780.

http://www.findaprofessionaldoctorate.com/advice/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctorate#Professional_doctorate

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20130704133923315

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctorate#History

History

The term "doctorate" derives from the Latin docere meaning "to teach". The doctorate (Latin: doctor, "teacher," from doctum, "[that which is] taught," past participle of (docere), "to teach") appeared in medieval Europe as a license to teach Latin: (licentia docendi) at a medieval university.[1] Its roots can be traced to the early church when the term "doctor" referred to the Apostles, church fathers, and other Christian authorities who taught and interpreted the Bible.[1]

The right to grant a (licentia docendi) was originally reserved to the Catholic church, which required the applicant to pass a test, to take an oath of allegiance and pay a fee. The Third Council of the Lateran of 1179 guaranteed the access—at that time largely free of charge—of all able applicants. Applicants were tested for aptitude.[2] This right remained a bone of contention between the church authorities and universities that were slowly distancing themselves from the Church. The right was granted by the pope to the University of Paris in 1213 where it became a universal license to teach (licentia ubiquie docendi).[2] However, while the licentia continued to hold a higher prestige than the bachelor's degree (Baccalaureus), it was ultimately reduced to an intermediate step to the Magister and doctorate, both of which now became the exclusive teaching qualification.[2]

University doctoral training was a form of apprenticeship to a guild. The traditional term of study before new teachers were admitted to the guild of "Masters of Arts" was seven years, matching the apprenticeship term for other occupations. Originally the terms "master" and "doctor" were synonymous, but over time the doctorate came to be regarded as a higher qualification than the master's degree. Makdisi's revised hypothesis that the doctorate originated in the Islamic (Ijazah), a reversal of his earlier view that saw both systems as of "the most fundamental difference",[3] was rejected by Huff as unsubstantiated.[4]

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WatAWorld
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Re: Alternatively...

Medicine is not the only professional doctorate (non-Phd doctors) anymore.

There are veterinarians, dentists, optomistrists, lawyers, professional doctorates are becoming increasingly common.

All these people call themselves doctors despite not having earned Phds.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Sadly the wrong answer.

Why not make it .MedDoc if you want to restrict it to medical doctors?

Imagine all the people from other languages looking for engineering PhD or dentists and not finding them.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Sadly the wrong answer.

You don't unregistered physicians to have quacks when you have the Doctor Oz's of this world.

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WatAWorld
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I can foresee lawsuits against ICANN over this.

ICANN has decided foreign locums should have the same status as locally licensed physicians and surgeons.

So ICANN has decided to give the impression that any medical school graduate is qualified to practice medicine anywhere in the world?

US doctors are not going to be happy that "poorly trained" people from third world countries can present themselves as fully qualified US doctors.

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WatAWorld
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It could have been .MD, .Surgeon, .Physician

Who made ICANN the definer of the English Language?

So what about UK surgeons who call themselves Mr?

It is like in the UK where an Asian is someone from India or Pakistan, or the USA where an Asian is someone from China.

It's a kind of imperialism and overarching sense of entitlement.

In Canada and the USA, dentists, surgeons, chiropractors, veterinarians are common and generally call themselves doctors in the medical environment. (Homeopaths and naturopaths are rare.)

And Phds in other fields call themselves Dr in academic environments.

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Tony Abbott says food importers deserve help denied to telcos

WatAWorld
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Storing comms data will make Australia more like Russia

The main effect of storing comms data is going to be that spy agencies and police become more powerful and politicians become weaker.

Comms data will give spy agencies and police data ("embarrassing stuff") to bend politicians to its will.

In the end Australia, Canada, the UK and USA will become like Russia, where the leaders are chosen from the ranks of spy agency alumni.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Playing to the voters?

More people use IT stuff every day than eat berries every day.

And if it is like Canada, Australia's tech industry now dwarfs its agricultural industry.

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WatAWorld
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Squeeky wheel gets oiled - OR - You get what you paid for

Two possibilities:

1. The squeaky wheel gets oiled. Maybe the berry industry would run a huge PR campaign and say that prices are going to go up or whatever, the PM is against nutritious frozen foods, etc.

Maybe that includes the farmers unions threatening to block vote for the other party.

2. The wheel that oils the political machine gets favoritism. Maybe the berry industry buys its politicians and the politicians are merely delivering the favours that have been bought and paid for in campaign donations.

Most likely I figure #1 because Australia is going to be more like Canada and the UK than the USA.

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Pathetic PC sales just cost us a BILLION dollars, cries Intel

WatAWorld
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Actually Intel would have bumper sales if Windows were the problem.

If Windows were the problem Intel would be selling tons of CPUs to be used in new Apple and Linux machines being used to replace Windows machines.

Intel's problem is partly that people are satisfied with Windows.

And when Windows 10 comes out, it, like Windows 8.1, will be lightweight and able to run on existing computers. It is not going to help Intel.

Intel must help itself and make products with new features that compel customers to shell out $800.

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WatAWorld
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Intel's graphics is only the most popular graphics choice for laptops and inexpensive desktop computers, i3s and i5s.

Putting fancy graphics on Core i7s displays a lack of understanding of customer needs.

Most people who buy desktop computers with Core i7 are going to want equivalent to nVidia GTX740 performance or better.

Since Intel can't put that in the CPU Intel is wasting money putting stuff in CPUs that is never going to be used.

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WatAWorld
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Intel products are used by Apple and Linux to, this is not a Windows issue.

@Ted: Apple's use Intel chips too. Linux runs on Intel too.

That trashes the "blame MS for everything" argument.

Intel's problem is Intel's problem, it isn't producing anything that makes old products obsolete.

Intel's problem is nothing to do with Microsoft.

Another point, MS's job is selling copies of its software, not selling Intel CPUs.

So when MS produces a new OS one of MS's objectives will be to make it lightweight so it does not require a bigger processor, that it can work on existing computers.

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WatAWorld
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Intel, you want people to buy your product, give them a reason to buy your new product.

Dumb people will blame Windows 8, but real people with half a brain, real people using computers for useful purposes, they don't buy new computers just to get new operating systems.

When Windows 10 comes out, people will install it on their Windows 7 computers, since those computers will be powerful enough to run it.

You want people to buy your product, you must give them a reason to buy your new product.

All new Intel CPUs have offered us lately is lower power consumption.

Why spend $800 on a new computer to save $1 a month in electric power?

Laptops, tablets, yes. Desktops, I'd have to be stupid.

And in hardware,. the NUC, the little boxes, those aren't going to persuade me to ditch my desktop either.

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Pentagon 'network intruder', dozens more cuffed in British cops' cyber 'strike week'

WatAWorld
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Let's hope police forces around the world go after these criminals.

It is about time. Let's hope police forces around the world go after these criminals.

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Adobe launches cashless bug bounty

WatAWorld
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The problem is cost.

The problem is cost.

Thousand dollar, even hundred dollar bounties are out of the question.

Adobe would go broke if it merely tried to buy a cup of coffee for everyone who found a bug.

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US watchdog: Anthem snubbed our security audits before and after enormous hack attack

WatAWorld
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It is policy holders that should cancel, not the hackers.

@mybackdoor It is policy holders that should cancel their policies to exert monetary pressure, not the hackers.

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WatAWorld
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Why does US OPM use suppliers that don't meet standard requirements ?

Anthem is obviously motivated by money, like most of the rest of us. Why let them save money by saving the effort of cooperating with OIG audits?

Why does the OPM give Anthem a commercial advantage? Why the favoritism?

And why does the OPM not remove Anthem from its list of suppliers in order to use the money lever to motivate it to accept a standard OIG audit?

Why is the US OPM sending money to an uncooperative supplier that won't allow the standard auditing of US suppliers?

But setting the precedent that the mandatory audit is optional, the US Office of Personnel Management is making the audit optional for all suppliers.

This could result in corporate standards at other organizations forcing the to refuse to be audited too.

The fault in this, as far as government personnel breaches, is 90% US OPM and its failure to remove a supplier after the supplier failed to meet OIG standards.

Anthem is responsible for the breaches that lost other data.

Those who have a choice should stop doing business with them.

If you have a choice and don't stop doing business with a company that can't meet relatively simple security requirements, then its partly your own fault.

(Note: Nobody has been able to make a bullet-proof general purpose full function PC operating system. So using Windows after Windows breaches is not the same thing. There are alternatives, but those alternatives are not secure either.)

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SIM hack scandal biz Gemalto: Everything's fine ... Security industry: No, it's really not

WatAWorld
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Re: Stupid Question

"If the keys were on a network not connected to the internet then how did they get them to their customers?"

Read up on Stuxnet.

Read up on the Equation Group (The Register hasn't covered this story much).

http://observer.com/2015/02/equation-group/

In plain terminology, usually enemy spies put stuff on internet-connected computers that gets hand-carried over to the victim's non-internet connected computers via disks or USB sticks.

There is also a history of some national intelligence agency intercepting US mail to alter conference proceedings CDs. So intercepting the physical transfer of information by mail or courier.

But they can also do spying via monitoring energy usage or physically copying the contents of the non-internet connected computers.

Nothing you can imagine as possible is impossible for the major state-sponsored spy agencies.

It does not matter how much care you take, the NSA, GCHQ, their Russian, Israeli, French and Chinese counterparts can get at your stuff if they decide you are a target.

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WatAWorld
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An enemy spy is a spy who spies on us.

An enemy spy is a spy who spies on us.

Isn't that what GCHQ, the NSA, and CSEC do?

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Microsoft's patchwork falls apart … AGAIN!

WatAWorld
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Re: Improving the stability of PowerPoint

True.

And in IBM terminology, stable means no further fixes, ever, for any reason.

"Stable" is the buzz word for no longer supported.

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WatAWorld
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Re: What do you mean "some?"

A 24 to 72 hour delay in patch application for a large production environment seems like a wise precaution.

But a 14+ day delay in security patches would be stupidity.

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WatAWorld
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This is what happens when you rush regression testing to meet external 90 day deadlines

This is what happens when you rush regression testing to meet externally imposed arbitrary 90 day deadlines.

We can work fast, or we can work accurate.

I've never worked for MS, but this has been true in every organization I've ever worked in.

And big organizations take a lot of time just to coordinate changes to system AA with changes to system ZZ.

90 day deadlines are a receipt for disaster. 180 day deadlines might be possible.

Unless of course if there is an exploit widespread in the wild, in which case errors may be justified in the name of security.

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ICANN CEO criticizes domain 'hoggers'

WatAWorld
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What is this new 'domain investing' and how is it different from the cybersquatting?

"particularly connecting domain investors with cybersquatters"

What is the difference?

Why do we need two terms?

Is it domain investing when you do it, and cybersquatting.when someone else does it?

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'Linus Torvalds is UNFIT for the WORKPLACE!' And you've given the world what, exactly?

WatAWorld
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How bad is Torvalds?

He's so bad that despite all the hard work other people have put into creating and enhancing Linux regular people still prefer to spend money on Windows.

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Go Canada: Now ILLEGAL to auto-update software without 'consent'

WatAWorld
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Re: Not bad

"Uh huh... so an ISP can try to force you to install software. What if you are running Linux? Will they justify kicking you off their network because they can't install their security tools?"

You are dreaming up stuff to worry about. You're the only one suggesting people not be allowed to run Linux.

The law says ISPs can assume consent to install security software that is solely to protect the security of the network. Getting the software to work is the ISPs problem. And if their software breaks your computer then they've broken the law.

"a program that is installed by a telecommunications service provider solely to protect the security of its network from a current and identifiable threat to the availability, reliability, efficiency or optimal use of its network;

a program that is installed to update or upgrade the network by the telecommunications service provider who owns or operates the network on the computer systems that constitute all or part of the network; and"

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WatAWorld
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It requires informed consent, not just consent. See my earlier post with a lengthy quote on this.

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WatAWorld
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Re: hmmm...

What matters is whether the company has assets here that can be seized or a sales office that can be shut down.

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WatAWorld
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a download button is no longer conscent

http://www.cwilson.com/resource/newsletters/article/1143-preparing-for-canada-s-anti-spam-law-part-two-the-installation-of-computer-programs.html

"To obtain express consent, certain information must be set out clearly and simply by the person seeking consent and installing the computer program. This information includes the purpose for which the consent is being sought, information identifying the person seeking consent6, their mailing address and either a telephone number, an email address or a webpage7, and a statement that the person whose consent is sought can withdraw their consent8. Although the consent may be given orally or in writing, it must be sought separately for each act described under CASL9 – that is, consent to receive a commercial electronic message is not also consent to the installation of a computer program.

"However, for the installation of computer programs, there are two additional consent requirements that don't apply to commercial electronic messages. The first of these is that the person seeking consent must also clearly and simply describe, in general terms, the function and purpose of the computer program that is to be installed if the consent is given.10 The second of these relates to specific functions of the computer program, and is discussed below."

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WatAWorld
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Re: hmmm...

Okay, so you'd do without laws on murder, rape and child molestation.

But in this case the need for the law goes beyond for that for those clear cut crimes.

In this case many people think these white collar crimes are legal and are committing them based on that belief, despite the fact that these crimes have always been unethical and immoral.

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WatAWorld
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More details on the law are here

1. It looks like security and bug fixes are exempt, provided they don't add "features".

2. It looks like permission boxes must be de-selected by default.

http://www.cwilson.com/resource/newsletters/article/1143-preparing-for-canada-s-anti-spam-law-part-two-the-installation-of-computer-programs.html

"... Express Consent Requirements

While there are three main exceptions under which consent may be implied or is simply not required, the default position under CASL is that consent must be obtained before taking any action which would otherwise be prohibited. Because any person alleging to have obtained consent bears the evidentiary burden of proving such consent5, it is important for any company that installs computer programs to implement clear policies that provide for the proper documentation of customer consent for any computer programs that are installed. ..."

and later it says

"Exemptions

There are three exemptions to the above rules, where consent is deemed to have been obtained or is simply not required. These exemptions apply to upgrades, cookies and telecommunication service providers. ..."

And those exemptions are then defined.

"... The regulations under CASL also provide that a person is considered to expressly consent if their conduct is such that it is reasonable to believe they consent and the program is one of the following:

a program that is installed by a telecommunications service provider solely to protect the security of its network from a current and identifiable threat to the availability, reliability, efficiency or optimal use of its network;

a program that is installed to update or upgrade the network by the telecommunications service provider who owns or operates the network on the computer systems that constitute all or part of the network; and

a program that is necessary to correct a failure in the operation of the computer system or a program installed on it and is installed solely for that purpose.22"

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WatAWorld
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Re: No, you can't

We shouldn't have a law because some criminals will break the law anyways?

By your reasoning murder, rape and child molestation would be legal, because some people commit those acts despite their being laws against them.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Excellent news

Actually it affects every company with a physical presence in Canada, even if that presence is just a sales office.

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WatAWorld
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We wouldn't have any laws at all, if we used the reasoning of some.

Criminals, sure criminals will still commit crimes -- but if "some people will still break the law" was a reason to not have laws, we wouldn't have any laws at all.

Laws are what gives "bottom-line oriented" greedy people their consciences. You know the sort, they consider anything they can get away as totally acceptable.

The "high functioning" psychopaths and sociopaths whose disregard for ethics and morality brings them to the leadership of many companies, they care about laws and jail because laws and jail can reduce their personal enjoyment of life.

And of course fines reduce profits which reduces their personal enjoyment of life too.

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WatAWorld
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This affects foreign companies with an office in Canada.

So it actually does affect companies that Google and Yahoo that have offices here to sell advertising. It affects what they can do to Canadian residents.

(And of course it affects companies that EA, AMD, Corel, Microsoft, IBM that do major development work here.)

For foreign-based companies with no Canadian presence: If the company committed serious damage to computers by what it was doing, any officer of that company visiting Canada could be arrested. However I don't think extradition would work because extradition *usually* (not always) is only for acts defined as crimes in both countries.

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WatAWorld
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Re: So...does this mean

Yahoo does business in Canada -- they have people here who sell advertising.

You know how so many companies get stuck obeying US law because they do business in the USA, accept our laws or don't do business here.

That's how it works other countries too.

This won't affect companies with little or no presence in Canada.

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Sony hack was good news for INSURERS and INVESTORS

WatAWorld
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I feel sorry for you if your world is like Sony's and you act the way Sony executives do.

Most of the rest of us find Sony executive behaviour extraordinaryly strange, outrageous and appalling.

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WatAWorld
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Too smart for those outside the only demographic advertisers care about

Firefly was cancelled because it was too smart for those outside the highly prized 12 to 21 year-old female demographic -- almost the only demographic TV advertisers care about.

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WatAWorld
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Put two things together and you see Amy Pascal was the employer

"If Amy Pascal loses her job heading Sony Pictures Entertainment, her credibility fatally damaged by an unending stream of private moments made public, who is liable? Pascal surely believed Sony would take appropriate precautions regarding her private business correspondence. If the theft and publication of that correspondence renders her unemployable, wouldn’t Pascal have grounds for a massive lawsuit against her former employer?"

and

"Sony Pictures Entertainment co-chairs Amy Pascal and Michael Lynton".

Amy Pascal was the employer, together with Lynton. The lack of security on her watch was her responsibility.

That said, she's got big bucks, she's an executive, so I'm sure she'll get a lovely golden goodbye despite the problem being her own negligence in failing to properly set corporate policy.

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What do UK and Iran have in common? Both want to outlaw encrypted apps

WatAWorld
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Politicians will come into power completely at the mercy of the police and secret police.

The percentage of the peaceful population being spied upon, no matter which government is in power when it is increased, will end democracy.

The reason it will end democracy is that it will cause intelligence agencies to have huge banks of information on the childhood and teenage years of future politicians.

Future politicians will come into power completely at the mercy of the police and secret police, completely under the thumb of police and secret police.

Judging by how government politicians in the USA, UK and Canada act towards intelligence agencies and police, we may already be there and just the rest of us don't realize it yet.

Spying on the peaceful public is an issue on the totalitarian/libertarian political axis.

Spying is on the peaceful public is not a left-wing/right-wing issue. Stalinist, Maoist and Marxist Communists do it. Nationalist socialists did it. Absolute monarchies do it.

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Saudi Arabia to flog man 1,000 times for insulting religion on Facebook

WatAWorld
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Re: Don't bet on it

Okay then, sort of like Texas and 99 year sentences.

The actual prison rules of Texas state any sentence longer than 30 years is interpreted as a 30 year sentence. It then goes on to explain how one day can earn two or even three days towards a sentence based on prisoner behaviour.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Religion of Peace? Protestants and Catholics

"There's two major sects and they are basically violently opposed to each other and regard each other as heretics."

How can any one say that makes Islam different from Christianity?

Individual preachers who can make their own interpretations? Islam and protestantism.

Go back a couple of hundred years and you'll see Islam is Mickey Mouse compared to Christianity.

And Christianity could return to evil at any time in the future, and probably will, because the bad stuff in Islam is all in Christianity, it is all teachings of Abraham, all still in the Christian Bible, and none of it has been declared apocryphal by any Christian preacher.

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WatAWorld
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Re: Religion of Peace?

Go read your Christian bible.

All the bad parts of Islam are in there -- just most Christians currently ignore them for the moment.

No rights for women. Slavery. Genocide.

It is all in the Christian bible, mostly in the Old Testament -- a set of books that has never been expunged from the Christian bible in case it's later needed.

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WatAWorld
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Why are our sons fighting to defend a country that evangelizes terrorism?

Saudi Arabia -- birth place of Wahhabi and Salfism -- the Islamic sect of terrorists.

Wahhabi is Saudi Arabia's official version of Islam.

And yet we're at war with countries like Iran and Iraq -- countries that have been attacked and defend against Wahhabis and Salfists.

Why are we defending a country that sends people out to preach that attacking the west is the easy way to get into heaven?

Why are our sons fighting to defend a country that evangelizes terrorism?

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WatAWorld
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The dental student fiasco is an illustration of why the term "feminazi" strikes such a tender nerve

Canada's dental student fiasco is an illustration of why the term "feminazi" strikes such a tender nerve among female extremists -- it is so darn accurate.

As if female dental students don't gossip to one another about their dates and their dates sexual abilities -- male sexual performance is not an uncommon topic among anglophone female Canadians despite it being a betrayal of a confidence.

The misandry of the Canadian legal system ought to be a major issue, but we pretend it doesn't exist.

However misandry is not religious zealotry, its a form of sexism. We in Canada can say what we want about Christianity.

Judeaism and Islam -- we're less free to talk, but still no 1000 lashes. You might loose your job, but there will be no days in jail either.

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WatAWorld
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Canada is not like that. I live here and knock religion all the time. No jail for me yet.

Canada is not like that. I live here and knock religion all the time. No jail for me yet.

And books by prominent atheists are readily available. I've got a few by Dawkins and Hitchens myself, from bookstore.

You can even borrow them from public libraries.

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WatAWorld
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A right is something that is inherently deserved.

A privilege is something given that is not inherently deserved.

Barbaric regimes deny rights and claim they are privileges.

If shutting up to stay safe was the right thing to do the UK would still be in the dark ages like Saudi Arabia.

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WatAWorld
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Re: To paraphrase the villan from Speed.

Protecting the Wahhabists and Salfists in Saudi Arabia is what the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were/are all about.

Our troops, our sons, fight and die to protect Saudi Arabia and its domestic and exported religious extremism.

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His bombing killed 168 people and injured more than 680 others.

Agreed.

And people should not forget the USA's greatest recent Christian terrorist, Timothy McVeigh.

His bombing killed 168 people and injured more than 680 others.

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WatAWorld
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I'll let the Islamic fanatics in on a little secret we've been keeping from them ...

I have spent so much time sticking up for Islamics, pointing out that Christianity and Buddhism also have terrorists.

Pointing out that terrorism by Christians is actually not uncommon -- we just don't call it that.

Think JFK, MLK and RK. Think IRA. Think ETA. And so on.

And then these Islamic extremists come along and blow my entire defense of regular Islamic people completely out of the water.

Now for the little secret we've been keeping from Islamic fanatics ...

This emoticon :)

That emoticon is actually a secret picture of The Prophet Mohammed.

:)

Je suis maintenant Charlie. Je suis Charlie !

You have changed the world. I can no longer argue for tolerance.

It makes me sick to my stomach to admit it, but sadly I must: It is now clear religious people no longer belong in advanced countries.

I look at the USA now and Germany in the 1930s and Christianity.

I look at Buddhism in Japan in the 1930s.

I look at Hinduism in India now.

It isn't just Islam, but Islam is currently the worst.

I feel religion no longer has a place in western countries -- no religion.

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Police radios will be KILLED soon – yet no one dares say 'Huawei'

WatAWorld
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Re: Trolleyism

One root-word, two different meanings.

Its not an uncommon phenomenon in English.

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