* Posts by Grikath

788 posts • joined 9 Feb 2012

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Uitsmijter

Grikath
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The uitsmijter in its basic variety: 3 white bread slices, one with cheese ( gouda or edam) , one with ham, one with rosbief ( sliced roast beef) , three eggs on top. Any green/vitaminy stuff is a sidedish and should never, ever be used as a topping...

There are many interpretations possible from this basic recipe. The most common varieties are (extra) cheese, usually melted on top. Spek (dutch variety of bacon) in many variaties depending on area, grilled or not instead of the rosbief. Rye/dark bread for (to) taste in case you want the fibery stuff.

To the Barbarians here: an uitsmijter is never stacked, it's a treasonous offense to do so and will get you foul looks/immedeately pegged as a dumbforeigner. You eat it with knife and fork, however messy it may turn out to be.

Given that it's originally a farmers' breakfast dish, ordering it in the morning or during lunch works quite well, and with the proper hung-over look tends to have anyone around you treat you with a proper amount of caution. In a sense it's the dutch variety of a full english, and soaks up the post-party malaise quite well.

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Boffin: Will I soon be able to CLONE a MAMMOTH? YES. Should I? NO

Grikath
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Re: Wrangel Island

Point in question is still the same..

The beasties were still around when "Mankind" had already progressed into "civilisation" ( and then some). Of course.. all the stone age megalithic sites in europe/north asia, many predating the pyramids, do, of course, not count as "civilisation". The buggers didn't write anything down after all, and being practically nextdoor they are less interesting.

Whether or not we should re-introduce an elephant species in its more-or-less original environment? Well, we're talking about the siberian tundra and taiga. The local insects wouldn't mind, they won't disturb the birds much, and the bears and wolves would love the extra protein. It may even give the tigers left there there a chance on a decent lunch. And it's not as if the area there is prime real estate for its biggest potential enemy: humans.

I'd say it's worth a shot.

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It's the hottest day of the year. So check out John Lewis' Xmas tech range!

Grikath
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Re: Food processors...

Ummm Simon... whatever Domino's claims, whatever yellow stuff they put on top of their cardboard-in-a-cardboard is not cheese.

The stuff they use is specifically banned from being called "cheese", at least in this be-diked country. Funnily enough "cheddar" seems not to be as well protected here, so guess what they put on top nowadays...

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Teaching people to speak English? You just need Chatroulette without the dick pics

Grikath
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why english?

The smart ones are betting on chinese...

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World+dog will soon watch 'at least 200 pr0n vids a year'

Grikath
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really not that much...

Nothing in the trick-cycling is said about watching a clip/movie in its entirety or at least during its ...conclusion. So there will be a lot of flicking through clips before a ..correct match is made.

A quick check ( For Science, of course.. ) on the site of one of the main providers, using the "most popular" feature, I've found that you need at least a couple of tries to find something..stimulating.., given the sheer vastness of the range in tastes that becomes apparent immedeately when observing the .. menu..

So 200 views can rather rapidly translate to "once a month" , which I find a rather low estimate given the subject at hand, and the rather well-known ways of our Willies. YMMV though.

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Yikes! Facebook will run on TELEPATHY, thinks Zuck, in Q&A

Grikath
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how about .... "NO!" ?

"One day, I believe we'll be able to send full rich thoughts to each other directly using technology,"

hmyeah... unfortunately that means technology that would need to bypass my normal modes of input and my personal internal firewall filters ( which I've nicknamed "Common Sense") . I really don't think I'll be picking up on that one. I prefer the airgap between a retina screen and my own retina, thankyouverymuch.

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Giant FLYING SPACE ROCKS could KILL US ALL, warns Brian May

Grikath
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Re: So what's the chance...

about 1, I guesstimate, given that "most of Britain" lies well above sea level, and even the EcoHippies' worst case scenarios don't have the sea level rising that much.

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Kamikaze Rosetta probe to ram comet it's chased for billions of miles

Grikath
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Re: "This is fantastic news ... FOR SCIENCE!!!"

Hmmm... some napkin calculations tell me that the difference in mass between the orbiter and the comet would be in the region of several times 1*10^9 even if the comet manages to shed an insane amount of mass during this flyby.

Somehow I don't think the comet's trajectory would be significantly altered if the orbiter is crashed into it, unless the boffins at ESA figure out a way to get it upt to an appreciable fraction of c.

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Germany says no steamy ebooks until die Kinder have gone to bed

Grikath
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Re: Confusing

Germany at large? yes, very liberal, especially compared to the UK/US. German Official Chairwarmers? Not so much.

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Heinz cockup sees Ketchup's QR codes spurt saucy sites

Grikath
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Devil

"Comdiment" ?

Come on El Reg.. Go whole hog and use that "U". We know you want to...

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Graphene sheaths could boost processor signal speeds by 30 per cent

Grikath
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Re: Contradiction? @ chemist

It would work that way if you consider the graphene not as a sheet of carbon, but two layers of hydrogen stabilised by a lattice of carbon + electron soup ( extremely simplified, of course).

To migrate to the silicon any copper atom would have to react with the H of the graphene first.. and there it stops, really. Given the purity of the environment, only direct synthesis would be possible, and while the gods of Quantum could pull a fast one and provide the energy, the local temperature would ensure any CuH formed would revert near-immedeately. ( reverse reaction "happens readily" at 20 K, let alone 20 C...)

Then there is the issue of inserting into/breaking the benzene-ring lattice itself. And the Si-facing layer of H in the sheet ( with even more ...impressive... energies in play..). Let's just say the odds are stacked against it.

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Grikath
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Re: Contradiction?

not a contradiction at all.. electrons will flow much easier within the plane of the graphene sheet than jump from the sheet to the nearest conductor. It wouldn't surprise me if the resistance within the plane of the graphene is actually lower than in the copper main conductor locally..

It's like the old trick with the tablecloth.. If you pull it away fast enough things on it will stay on the table.. mostly..

The same "trick" is often used in nature in a host of enzymes, actually.

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Airbnb beats actual posh hotel chain with stupidly large valuation

Grikath
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Facepalm

the new bubble, same as the old bubble..

They never learn, do they?

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Fess up: which one of you Galaxies made all that gas?

Grikath
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Re: Correct your correction

well the galaxies obviously aren't dead, so would be quite prolific... ;)

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Japanese female fish in sperm-producing strangeness

Grikath
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Re: Confusion in paragraphs 4 and 5

"Is it so unusual to find that vertebrates share a DNA similarity with invertebrates eg a fruit fly?"

The proper scientific answer to that would be: "Funny you should ask that..." followed by a three-hour lecture.

the TLDL version is: Vertebrates aren't supposed to be able to switch germ cell fate independent of gender. That particular switch is thought to be buried too deep within the gender instruction set to be messed with (at least not without Horrible Effects.. ). ymmv depending on exactly how gender is determined in a species, though. XY ( like with mammals ) is by far not the only method, and some mechanisms leave room for shenanigans.

Gender-wise, fish are morphologically very similar between the sexes, with very little differentiation between the sexes' gonads, other than the type of germ cells they produce, so it's not impossibe per sé. Just very surprising, especially the viable de-coupling between gender-morphology and gamete production.

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Unlucky, Palmer: Facebook's going to BAN Oculus pr0n apps

Grikath
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Re: Sabotage your own product?

Wouldn't kill it off. Most peeps would still buy the thing for non-nookie applications if it adds sufficient value.

But, yes... The biggest internet industry in the US (ironically..) will find a way onto it. one way or the other..

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Sun's out, guns out: Plucky Philae probot WAKES UP ... hits 'snooze'

Grikath
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Thumb Up

is all :)

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Boffins, feeling around in dark for Philae, lit up by bright spot on Comet 67/P

Grikath
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Re: Oh so?

They did.. briefly... before going "b00m!". Bombs land on target. Intent is everything: V2 landed ( albeit very, very briefly.), Philae crashed.

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GAZE upon our HI-RES DWARF PICS of Pluto, beams proud NASA

Grikath
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Re: Jebus!

Not dissing voyager.. I still have the projector slide set of Jupiter I got in my Youf. But the mechanics of the flyby's of the Voyagers was such that they'd *never* get near Pluto, so most of us assumed we'd never see whatever was out there in our lifetime, because no-one would be mad enough to send out a probe off into that direction. We'd missed our chance..

Even theze foggy images are already 1000% percent more than I , and with me a lot of amateur astronomers, ever expected to see.. And I can fill my slide tray with the final pics of the Nine.. :)

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Belgium trolls France with bonkers new commemorative coin

Grikath
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"who could evidently sit through Fawlty Towers: The Germans without cracking a smile "

That's not difficult, as Cleese isn't nearly as funny as he thinks he is.

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Power your temperature sensor with this BONKERS router hack

Grikath
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Re: Energy Efficiency @ dr. Mouse

but the places you mention will mostly never fall below the traffic treshold mentioned in the article.

Call me silly, but other than proof-of-concept this idea is, as the headline says, BONKERS.

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Chips can kill: Official

Grikath
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Re: Acrylamide toxicity is nothing new

I once attended an Environmentalist lecture where the speaker was ranting about the Dangers of polycyclic aromatics in the environment. He was rather... exreme in his views, and quite boring to boot.

At the post-lecture chinwagging, he was still raging on a bit so we made him a nice cup of Earl Grey.

I'm pretty sure that up to this day he still has not figured out why we were trying to control our grins so much.

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Festival tech: Charge your mobe while you queue for a pee

Grikath
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the "wtf?!" diss.

1) aside from the fact why the HELL you'd bring such an amount of gear with you to an event.. With the general jostling to get close to *anything* you're looking at a couple of star-endowed screens if you wear Stuff in the designed places. Let alone a decent mosh pit. +500% on the "I'm a twat" front though. (Which in and of itself is an open invitation to said event-enhanced screens if you're even thinking of coming close to anything)

2) you can get a decentish foldable water-tightish dome for about € 10-15 for 2 + luggage. That should save you enough dosh to actually spend cash at the event, *and* avoid the peeps with fibulas/pins/pocket knives.. And the beauty of it is.. at the price of two burgers ( and a fraction of admittance..) at the festival, you can *afford* to write off the Cheapo at the close..

3) Might come in handy, if alone because of northwestern european weather nowadays. This is not really festival gear, but could possibly be a worthwile expenditure.... If you start with not taking € 500+ equipment to Mudfest. If you got to call Mum/mates/the BeerGuy, a simple prepaid brick for the occasion will do, and can be had at less than half the price of the cover.( I am , possibly mistakenly, assuming you're there for the actual event..)

4) It's funny that the article marks the only thing of sensible equipment as "Knobbish". Or is escaping the torture ( of quality and pricing) of Festival Food seen as Not Done nowadays? That being said, at 4 kilo + this simple device already weighs more than my medieval shoulder armour ( I do full-contact medieval combat re-enactment...) and I can point you to several setups that weigh less, have more Late-Night Campfire potential *and* BBQ useability... oh at half the price..

5) srsly... pewter. mug.. on belt.. on a handforged hook if you want to be posh. Learn the damn ropes already...

6) By all means, buy this.... It's immense fun to be able to immedeately spot the camps that used Amplified Shyte for their party last night. Especially if they're also in the previously featured inflatable tent...

7) wait a moment... even the most basic mobile brick has built-in radio nowadays. so that's covered.. The previous part already had bloody speakers for the more advanced models of dumbphone to whatever-flies... If you want tinny mono from a crank radio, a couple of quid gets you the Third World Model ( along with the warm fuzzy feeling of Supporting the Cause..) so why lay out 60 quid? At All?

8) Really.. if you do want to sport a multitool ( and get the thing cleared past "Security" nowadays...) you pay a bit more than 20 quid. It will also not eat your fingers, fail after first use, and, y'know, work as a tool. Really, by not buying *any* of the above, you will have the means to shell out, even Splurge, on a proper multitool *and* be able to afford the local catering at Carnival Prices at leisure and zero twinges of conscience.

9) Oldie, goldie.. but the same amount gets you a proper flashlight, a flood for your tent, and enough burn-once fake tealights to survive a fire ban due to drought. It's not that it's *bad* ... It's simply too easy to think of cheaper alternatives that do the same thing, or don't fall into the quadruple backup category.

10) So your stuff is clean and dry.. Now try taking stuff out and change into them.. You're either camping out in a dustbowl or a swamp, the local amenities are , oh right.. Dixies ( or local variety), if there *is* a shower, it's either Backstage, or the line is longer than the one for the original Ark... The backpack you need anyway to get your gear onsite works just as well, y'know?

But maybe I *am* becoming a Fossil nowadays..

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Grikath
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Re: This is all wrong

*grin*

This is just a "stuff you don't want/miss at Events" list.

Good thing to know what the trend in To-Haves is to add to the List for the Ritual of Ridicule.

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ISIS command post obliterated after 'moron' jihadi snaps a selfie, says US Air Force

Grikath
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Re: Geotagging hack

I have a feeling that they checked one way or another.

22h is a pretty long time between spotting the pic and delivering the presents, especially in a theatre where your potential targets like to move around regularly, and are not beyond misdirection by, for instance, bragging next to something they can use for some instapropaganda about the Evil of the Infidels like , say, a hospital or school, or...

Religious fanatics, may be nasty, insane, unscrupulous, merciless, or any combination, but "stupid" is generally only reserved for the cannon fodder.

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Doom, Mario, Pac-Man level up to video gaming's Hall of Fame

Grikath
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Devil

Re: You never even read the announcement Shaun!

"The Strong Museum is in ROCHESTER, NEW YORK over 400 miles from "New York Shitty"!!!!!!"

That's actually better accuracy than the average US-ian manages when it comes to places in europe.. At least the country is correct..

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Sorry we called you a fatty, say Kiwi spies to Kim 'Slim Jim' Dotcom

Grikath
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Devil

to be fair...

Given that the guy is full of bloat and hot air, his actual weight might be less than his physique indicates..

Anybody got a pin?

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Sawfish are the VIRGIN MARYS of the SEA thanks to virgin births

Grikath
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Re: Some Female Lizards in the Wild @ John H Woods

Must have been *quite* a while then.. between recombination and paternal and maternal masking at meiosis alone , you get the advantage of having a backup in case mutation ends you up with something undesireable, and a *much* higher expression of , potentially beneficial, mutations in the phenotype. It's all about rigging the numbers to be able to fill the existing habitat as quickly and as efficiently as possible.

I do like the flame-bait in the article though. But if even single-celled eukaryotes see reason to produce gametes on occasion, and even bacteria see fit to merge and do some DNA hussling if circumstances allow, I think I can safely say that "males" are pretty much indispensible in the whole process.

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Fish boffins: Big-brain babes are brilliant, but benefit for boys is bijou

Grikath
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not contradictory at all...

Assuming brain size and coloration are indeed linked, expressed in males it stands to reason the big brained females are better at dodging predators. The evolutionary hurdle is in the male line in this case.

The more colourful males are the ones most likely to actually mate. Those males also tend to have the biggest brains due to the brain size/colouration linkage. Those males that are the most successful in avoiding predation, even while more flashy in colour, and make it to the mating season, will pass on their brain size and wiring to the next generation. This will mean that the females of that generation will inherit the predator-evation routines, but will not express the male colouration, making them doubly effective at predator evasion.

Never forget that in nature, especially in the species that work the system by sheer numbers, males are expendable. You only need a couple to produce the next generation, and the harder they're "tested", the better for the species.

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IT-savvy US congressmen to Feds: End your crypto-backdoor crusade

Grikath
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Re: There's a simple way to explain it to them... @ Charles 9

"They'll add, "If that were true, you can do it with physical keys, too. Why aren't we seeing a rash of break-ins into high-security sites courtesy of copied keys, hmm?" "

Well, Real Life comes to aid there, since most of the physical breaking and entering in "secure" sites revolves around getting access to the physical keys to the place, either through theft, copying, coercion, or simply the "inside job".

Only an idiot would.... oh wait... we're talking about U.S. politicians, right?

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Dutch efforts to decapitate Pirate Bay could end up before ECJ

Grikath
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Re: Easy Peasy...

Nice sentiments, but us dutchies don't work that way. The Terror Card doesn't fly over here, there's no such thing as "aiding and abetting" in our laws, and stichting BREIN has about the same status as an ambulance chaser or patent troll at best.

The way things stand now over here is that while it is technically illegal to dowload "pirated" copyrighted content, the whole mess is officially considered Unenforcable. This means that unless you're actively distributing for profit, the authorities won't bother, at all. (If you do want to try and turn a profit on someone others' wares you have another problem.. we're a country based on Trade.. that's sacrosanct.. We have a different set of laws for that one, where the "with intent to profit" is the working ingredient.. )

When it comes to the Pirate Bay, who are only just "pointing the way to ...", there is nothing in Dutch law that forbids them to do that. On the contrary, making a profit of Knowing Where To Get Stuff is a time-honoured Dutch form of enterprise and as such protected in Dutch law and custom. Criminalising the Pirate Bay on that would have severe repercussions for several trade and service sectors here, so that's a political no-no.

Even worse, what BREIN wants amounts to censorship. This is an extremely sensitive subject in this country, given that our whole existence and success is based on the fact that we have none. You will have people up in arms if you even try, as it's felt to be on par with ( or even worse than) capital punishment, and cases where it's applied are rare.

On its own, our government can issue a law that would indeed make things like the Pirate Bay illegal, and even block it. Technically speaking. The original injunction has already cost some parties seats in parliament as they failed to address the censorship issue immedeately, or even defended the injunction. It's actually only fuelled the anti-Brussels sentiments over here.

BREIN is tickling the bear while pulling the tigers' tail here, and our Advocaat-Generaal knows this. The checking-back-with-the EU-court is simply a delaying tactic to avoid middens hitting windmills. Which will happen eventually, since BREIN is like a rabid terrier. It won't quit until it's taken down the back and shot.

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Georgens out at NetApp – new chairman, interim CEO named

Grikath
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My heart bleeds...

I bet his severance package is a wee bit more ...lavish.. than the rest of the lot got.

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Naked cyclists take a hard line on 'aroused' protest participant

Grikath
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Re: Been there, done that...

"the swarm of middle-aged men with cameras. They were scarily aggressive and swamped any poor girl who so much as took her top off."

Those are pretty much universal, and can generally be spotted in the wild on any event where Cleavage (or more) is to be expected. Dunno about the UK, but over here in Holland they're known as Fapparazzi.

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Creationist: The Flintstones was an accurate portrayal of Dino-human coexistence

Grikath
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Re: How many sources? @Grikath @yet another AC

a quick google tells you the story from the horses' mouth:

"The obvious question, though, was how soft, pliable tissue could survive for millions of years. In a new study published today (Nov. 26) in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Schweitzer thinks she has the answer: Iron.

Iron lady

Iron is an element present in abundance in the body, particularly in the blood, where it is part of the protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the tissues. Iron is also highly reactive with other molecules, so the body keeps it locked up tight, bound to molecules that prevent it from wreaking havoc on the tissues.

After death, though, iron is let free from its cage. It forms minuscule iron nanoparticles and also generates free radicals, which are highly reactive molecules thought to be involved in aging.

"The free radicals cause proteins and cell membranes to tie in knots," Schweitzer said. "They basically act like formaldehyde."

Formaldehyde, of course, preserves tissue. It works by linking up, or cross-linking, the amino acids that make up proteins, which makes those proteins more resistant to decay.

Schweitzer and her colleagues found that dinosaur soft tissue is closely associated with iron nanoparticles in both the T. rex and another soft-tissue specimen from Brachylophosaurus canadensis, a type of duck-billed dinosaur. They then tested the iron-as-preservative idea using modern ostrich blood vessels. They soaked one group of blood vessels in iron-rich liquid made of red blood cells and another group in water. The blood vessels left in water turned into a disgusting mess within days. The blood vessels soaked in red blood cells remain recognizable after sitting at room temperature for two years."

See? Nothing miraculous about it, the blood vessel experiment pretty much speaks for itself. The bone marrow is simply metal-tanned in situ. With the bone as a container ( note that the original bone was fossilised intact.) the marrow inside would have been pretty much sterile upon death so could actually be preserved in this way. Even a hairline crack would have ruined the process though, so you'd have a hell of a time finding another specimen.

As for the specific substances you mention: she did not find hemoglobin but heme, the active compound in hemoglobin. There's a reason that stuff is safely packed up in globins in your body, y'know... Collagen doesn't surprise me at all, since that's terribly hardy stuff. In fact.. stone/iron age clothing finds that were stitched with spun tendon filaments still hold their stitches up to this day. tanned in a sealed container? who knows how long that stuff can last. Actin and tubulin.. oh you mean muscle components. They're part of the inner workings of every cell, and also really, really resistant to anything but proteases. Which degrade much faster than actin or tubulin, so any amount released upon cell death would have had no chance to eat it all, and with no bacterial action the stuff would stay there, even if the cells themselves are gone. Osteocalcin, same thing. An extremely hardy protein that needs to be specifically degraded in the body to be disposed of at all. DNA? Yes, in fragments, which is as it should be. DNA is extremely stable, and the only reason it's so damned hard to find is that bacteria love a free lunch, as the components take a lot of energy to make. DNA itself, especially repeat sequences, is extremely stable. So stable, in fact that it self-mutates to the most stable form possible if given half the chance. If left undisturbed it does indeed have a half-time measured in millennia. Wouldn't trust the code on it for one bit though.

As far as C14 dating is concerned: As far as I can find out there have been no attemtps to use any C14 dating methods on the samples the good doctor acquired. I would love it if she does an attempt on the samples she did get, and do so as publicly and peer-reviewed as possible though. the result might surprise us, but I have 5-sigma confidence that they won't be able to find any C14 beyond background. It would at least cut off another avenue of waffling for the Apologeticists.

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Grikath
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Boffin

Re: How many sources? @MacLeod

You do realise that only the structure of the soft tissue is preserved in the fossils, right? It's not as if there's still squishy bits inside we can sample and do Stuff with. It's just as much "stone" as the solid bits that got preserved.

There's actually two well-understood processes that do preserve and "harden" soft tissues: tanning and saponification. Both being responsible for the remarkable preservation of human and animal remains on display in several musea. Once preserved this way, soft tissue should be tough enough to withstand the rigours of permineralisation to complete the fossilisation process. No Magic needed there, just sequential steps of preservation of [organic remains] using processes observable in nature to give you a fossil with the Soft Bits more or less intact.

As far as the radiometric method of dating is concerned: you can argue endlessly about the actual timescale involved, but the technique is eminently suited to establish the order in which Things Happened. And that order alone ( not even considering all the other other evidence in determining the exact sequence of (dis)appearance) is pretty much damning for the notion that dinosaurs and any variety of Man ever co-existed, whether you make the timescale 6000 years, or 15 billion years.

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Aye-aye Eyeo, go safely on your way-o, says German judge

Grikath
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Re: According to Eyeo, AdBlock Plus is used on 50 million devices

nah the admen will insure that obscure driver will only be deployable by an installer that will silently co-install "helpful" tools with convoluted routes to the mandatory opt-out menus..

or that can only be downloaded by first dowloading their dowload client which...etc...

No need for ads there.

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EU net neutrality could kneecap the Tories' opt-out pr0n filter plans

Grikath
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Re: @PeterGriffin @AC

"6 years old is not old enough for sex education, and is why your entire argument disappears up its own bum."

Oh boy.. are you wrong..

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NASA picks tools for voyage to possibly LIFE-SUPPORTING moon Europa

Grikath
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Re: too cold, no life

I doubt we'd be able to any time soon. Conditions there would be similar to earth's Deep Ocean, with probably a much higher salinity. You'd need a hell of a pressure container to bring any stuff that evolved there back up alive and well.

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Virtual reality pr0n on the Rift? 'Why not?' says Oculus founder

Grikath
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Re: Could they block it?

well.. in theory they could, if they had chosen the proprietary driver/interface route for the thing. How long it would last before that was cracked is another matter, of course..

In the end the adult industry will adopt it, or make Stuff for it, if there's $$ in it for them. The niche market is pretty much low-turnover high-profit, so no doubt we'll see reports of something in that direction within a year after the set is available.

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Pundits ponder perilous placement of STANDING STONES on Comet 67P

Grikath
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Re: more like stuck? @ brandon

I very much doubt that the surface of the comet is water ice.. The comet is practically black..

I was thinking more about an unholy mixture of methane, ammonia, carbon mono/dioxide, hydrogen cyanide, and possibly assorted complex carbohydrates/sulfur compounds thrown in. Makes for a very sticky mess when half-melted, and at seriously lower temperatures than pure water would even budge.

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Grikath
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more like stuck?

It's still a microgravity environment out there.. Those things could have gotten dislodged in an earlier solar pass, and landed back on the main body. You'd only need a little bit of melt of the ice from the kinetic energy to stick the rocks to the main body again. It's not as if there's huge forces or erosion at work there when the comet is not near the sun.

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YouTube Kids 'showed nippers how to make nooses, play with fire'

Grikath
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funny thing...

I don't think any of the classic ( or modern-classic ) cartoons would pass muster nowadays in terms of violence, (racial) stereotyping, "unsafe behaviour", and all the other non-PC things we aren't supposed to expose Fragile Kids' Minds to nowadays.. Tom & Jerry, Bugs & Elmer, Tweety and Sylvester, R.R. and Wile. E, the list goes on...

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You're going to have stop calling people 'cold fish': THIS one is HOT-BLOODED

Grikath
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Re: Warm blooded? @Arnaut

If you mean the 2002 paper by James D. Rose as quoted by wikipedia and other sources, his conclusion is the same as mine: Pain, being a psychological phenomenon, needs a psyche to be experienced. And there is no physical evidence whatshowever that fish have actual intelligence, let alone a psyche.

As far as the engineering goes, I could have used terms like "physically and behaviourally optimised for their niche within the phase space", but as a biologist I tend to appreciate the beasties in the wild as well as on my plate, and "beautifully engineered" is just as applicable, especially since "life" engineers itself against the environment it finds itself in. No need for god-bothering there, as you try to imply.

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Grikath
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Re: Warm blooded?

"Fish have very well developed external sensors. What they don't have is the ability to cry out, or show emotions."

Or even the hardware to "feel" things like "pain" , "existential dread", and al the other things the cuddly hippies try to project onto them. Fish are extremely well-engineered, but emotions are simply not part of the package.

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Grikath
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The most important question:

Is there good eatin' on them?

And yes,they be tasty. :)

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CSI GALAXY: Cause of death = STRANGULATION

Grikath
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Re: 'Ere - he says he's not dead!

"If your body stopped being able to produce new cells, you wouldn't die instantly, but you wouldn't be alive very long either."

It's called adulthood, so roughly between 40 and 60 years on average for humans.

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Samsung offers $90,000 if you can fix California's epic drought with tech

Grikath
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Facepalm

@ 1980s_coder

yeah... because promoting the growing of organisms that use the evaporation of water as their primary mode of internal transportation and osmotic control is a really, REALLY stellar idea in an area that's known for droughts. <applause>

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Rand Paul: I'll filibuster the hell outta the Patriot Act, fellow Americans

Grikath
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Re: Non-Americans can sort themselves out. Sorry. @Hollerith

Ummmm yeah.. right..

Are you mayhaps referring to the San Andreas fault? Y'know.. the one near ,for starters, Hollywood, and Silicon Valley?

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Grikath
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Re: Non-Americans can sort themselves out. Sorry.

Iceland is jumping on it at the moment: "free" geothermal, lots of cold in winter, plenty of otherwise unattractive real estate for satlinks and datacenters, good possibilities for cable landings, and a stable government that puts the "L" in Libertarian.

They've got a good shot at it, methinks.

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SHOCK! Robot cars do CRASH. Because other cars have human drivers

Grikath
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Re: "so far caused by human error and inattention"

afaik the cars only use satnav to determine their global position and what they can expect road-wise. They augment that info with what they actually "see" ( hence the almost military-grade sensor/camara package on them.) If A doesn't fit B the driver is urged to grab the wheel and do things himself, so that's at least one of the more obvious "safety" measures.

Given that this whole thing is watched like a hawk by just about everyone having remotely to do with transportation and legislation, I pretty much doubt that the several teratonnes of data that's been collected about those cars can easily be fudged or tut-tutted, especially those fenderbenders. On the contrary, given the way I'm told US insurance works, one of those cars is the last things you want to hit, given that you can't just write of the dent and be done with it, as most people do. Even ignoring all the (utterly non-google) other camera-type things possibly aimed at you at the time, your little scrape has just been Borged, and you cannot avoid Insurance Interference if only just because Google insuror will want to know what happened there...

While technically possible, it's simply too risky and ultimately counterproductive to fudge the data on accidents when it comes to this project, by Google of any of the other hopefuls. There's simply too much riding on it, and even with my paranoïdar deployed I , at least, can't see how any of the companies involved could get away with it for long, if at all.

But I'll one-up my previous challenge: Having successfully circumnavigated the Arc de Triomphe and the vagaries of Parisian coureurs, we shift the scene to Italy. Let's be fair there and do it classic Top Gear: The challenge is to pass through Rome , including the Colosseum **, followed by a leisurely drive to Napoli, and a pass through the city centre there, ending at an appropriate pub with a functioning car, and a maximum of 5 human interventions.

** locals may know better...testing grounds.. But that's one route I prefer never to have to do again..

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