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* Posts by Bleu

148 posts • joined 16 Jun 2012

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The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?

Bleu

Re: Latin, softwre and misunderstanding

I agree with you within limits.

From what I can see from outside, and from hearing from people I know who've had the misfortune of direct experience (temporary teaching and having children unfortunately subjected to the closest bad school), the school system in most places in the UK has two purposes.

1. Ideological programming according to the luvvie agenda

2. Keeping people who hate learning out of unemployment statistics until the end of their high school years, doesn't matter how much it wrecks the chances to learn of those they bully along the way.

Apart from the private schools, selectives, doubtless many good ones in rural centres, that seems to be the reality.

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Bleu

Re: Lots of skills are needed

Only the marketeers and the ignorant say app to mean program.

It is interesting that our NTT was the first to bring out a system for distributing limited Java programs to run on phones. The programs are called 'appli'. NTT should sue Apple, clearly a case of theft by contraction!

What next, bevelled corners?

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Bleu

Some nice points

from Mr. Orlowski, and from other commentards.

I must add that your luvvies hate technologists, technicians, and technology (except on the 'Look at me, have I not got the luvviest fondle-phone' or 'Look at me, I am on the INTERNET! and famous on twatter' etc. level).

Appreciated the woodwork and all. Nice to learn about the techniques, metalwork, too, later introductory sessions on fitting, turning, tech. drawing, welding, and so on, but that was later, end of high school years.

Nice to learn how it is done and to experience doing it yourself, having small hands, fitting was painful, but am happy to have the experience.

Being in not-luvvie-dominated East Asia (most Chinese leaders after Deng have been engineers, our political class is infected by the lawyer disease, but most of the tech. companies are headed by engineers), we also had basic electricity from early high school (or the last year of primary, I can't recall).

I think that is a very good idea.

To be more to the point, I think it is a good idea to introduce the more mathematically talented late-primary pupils to Logo, and slower ones to the same in high school. After all, that is what the language is designed for, education. It is also fun.

For the really interested, and in later high school, machine-code programming or logic-circuit design as an option for bonus marks within maths (whichever part covers Boolean algebra or symbolic logic), or simulation in a high-level language as an option for bonus marks within physics or chemistry might be good ideas.

I agree with the OP who points out that the basics of maths and physics are much more important.

Also, although I can't stand the luvvie mentality there, I've always kept up my humanities education, even extra subjects at university.

Victory of UK luvvies = death of lively 80s 90s UK tech.

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Jonny Ive: Flattered by rivals' designs? Nah, its 'theft'

Bleu

Re: To quote Saint Jobs himself:

Double irony, saint Steve also plagiarised that line.

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iPhone 6: Most exquisite MOBILE? No. It is the Most Exquisite THING. EVER

Bleu

After reading this, I had to find the original

article of which it was a parody.

Pretty funny, but Fry's purple prose is a parody in itself (although, no doubt, the pompous fool can't see that).

Thanks for the laughs, Mr. Pie!

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Bleu

Re: I can't even...

Are you missing your irony bone?

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iPhone 6: The final straw for Android makers eaten alive by the data parasite?

Bleu

Re: Emerging markets

Agreed, but only after they are fully over their stupid error in trying to push the same UI model onto the desktop. Business buyers don't want to upgrade from Win 7.

The tiles-only interface of Win 8 for phones should be great for addicts of twitter, facebook, & c., should get them some market share at some stage, once they get it into the right physical package.

Not that I care for Microsoft.

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Bleu

Shallow analysis?

I enjoy Mr. Orlowski's analyses most of the time, but cannot agree with this on the whole.

For one thing, I like the old bricks, never had a clamshell, the only reason I switched from the brick was not being able to use the broken USB port for charging.

... but bought a new charging cradle, it lives, albeit limited to camera, IRDA port (still important here), and easily accessible SD card.

Sure, Google is a data parasite, I don't like them, but if you have an Android phone, nobody is forcing you to log into all of their services or to turn geolocation on and then use their maps.

I never do.

It irritates me no end that if you click on any program or upgrade to download, you are automatically thrown to the google shop. Why can't I download my upgrade for Opera mini from Opera's site, etc.? Opera sure isn't 'spyware is us!'

That might be a carrier or local manufacturer thing, would appreciate comment on that from any fellow reg. commentard.

It's a great shame that nothing much but android and iOS is available for touch-screen phones, windows 8 models, blackberry remnant aside. Nice if webOS was still on phones, nice if our micro-iTron had a souped-up version for touch-screen phones (companies were pushing touch-screen dev kits for micro-iTron well before the Jesus phone, only they required a stylus). Bricks and clamshells here are micro-iTron, many Android devices also have a micro-iTron segment. Mine does.

Apple of now is a rapacious company, like Google and Microsoft a US national champion, and their top people can visit the president and get whatever they want.

Apple is also so associated with a certain type of poseur that I will never buy one of their products, was tempted by the mini when it was still powerPC, the nano with a decent camera (or not, never tried it), the pod Touch because they are dirt-cheap second-hand, but then you have to sign up to their shop to run anything on it.

No thank you.

Mr. Orlowski, a meandering piece from you, I am surprised.

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Bleu

Re: Thinning the herd

There are many aircraft manufacturers.

What you refer to as consolidation is more akin to monopoly.

Take, as recent examples, the Airbus A-380 and the Boeing 'Dreamliner'.

While the Airbus was running a little late, the US mounted a massive propaganda attack, attack articles were repeated or echoed in Japan, all english-speaking countries, europe, doubtless other places.

The 'Dreamliner' ended up much further behind schedule, had serious technical and production problems, but the articles were all 'Aw, can't be helped, it's gonna be just the GREATEST PLANE EVAR!!!'

Check for yourself if you don't recall.

Apple is similar.

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SCREW YOU, Russia! NASA lobs $6.8bn at Boeing AND SpaceX to run space station taxis

Bleu

Musk not likely on Mars, but perhaps near-death?

He says he will get himself there, too.

I wouldn't give too much credence to it, until he feels life here is up. Somebody has told him of the radiation hazard by now. He may make the infrastructure for a colony of folk who know they're going out soon anyway, others who want to be on Mars so much death is alright.

No way he will be supervising creation of the necessary and necessarily unpleasant underground habitations for survival, nobody even knows the conditions of rocks there, though we can guess a little.

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Bleu

Not probably

Boeing does. By Whitehouse links and demonstrably doing the better job here, space-X avoids the eclipse.

Note that Boeing, a very profitable company, is getting a far bigger handout for a project at the concept or Autocad stage.

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Bleu

Another massive case of state-funding

I have some admiration for Mr. Musk's ventures, but this gives the absolute lie to it being an independent business venture.

2,600,000,000 as a payoff, it means launching 36 or 37 people on Soyuz.

It also means that Space-X is not a commercial venture, but massively subsidised by the state.

So much for all who were claiming otherwise.

Boeing is, of course, much worse, their project appears to be a CGI creation, they have probably developed some physical parts, but if they had anything substantial to show, they'd be showing it.

They had a great record with their Dreamliner, constant criticism of the A-380 becoming a bit late totally hid the Dreamliner being much later and much more trouble-prone.

Just have to wonder how that works.

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BBC Trust candidate defends licence fee, says evaders are CRIMINALS

Bleu

Praising sliced bread

only displays a general lack of taste.

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Bleu

... but do you watch

dead TV?

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Is there life on Mars? Cloud-gazing Curiosity accused of lacking scientific focus

Bleu

Whiners will whine; to mods, hit post by accident

Curiosity may have some shortcomings as a science mission (and I am not comfortable with its little load of Pu238, an element and isotope not present on Mars for thousands of millions of years, if it ever was) but this seems like a bit of a beat-up article (ooh-er, I am supposed to be a paid reg writer, what can I write about today?).

Nothing except some of the Soviet Venera probes (if you haven't, read about them), comes close to matching its landing for audacity.

I rate Venera-series probes as the most audacious planetary exploration even now, given the sulphuric acid in the atmosphere,insanely high pressures, lead-and-tin melting temperatures. unimaginable winds.

Yet they sent back measurements, photographs, and live sound.

The mechanical ballet of Curiosity's landing was magnificent, I enjoyed seeing how the controllers used at several (most?) steps were much the same as the ones to fire airbags in cars. All proofs of concept for techniques that will land people or send them supplies.

I am sad that our Nozomi probe did not get there, the IAU ordered it destroyed because of a chance of it hitting Mars, and it hadn't been sterilised to the required level.

I watched the launch after driving for two hours after midnight, beautiful sight, and in a beautiful place, so of course felt an emotional attachment to its progress.

Also sad for Russia's Phobos-to-Ground and ESA's Beagle 2, but I only shed a tear for Nozomi.

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'4chan may be just a sysadmin who knows his way around', claims so-called expert

Bleu

Re: 4chan is a sysadmin

Ho, ho.

In real life, he has recently done interviews with major media.

As a pseudonymous character on the Internet, direct statements go back six or so years.

Don't comment when you haven't a clue.

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Bleu

Re: False analogy

Your argument is silly.

1. If the reproduction is clearly of a space and not a copy of the work itself, it is a photograph of a place.

2. If the work is old enough to be beyond the scope of legal protection, the original creator is dead and descendants and gallery operators are filthy rich through the corrupt system of our time, there is no reason to be ashamed of taking a photograph.

3. Earlier conventions are dropped, people suggest that photos of buildings have some kind of copyright, this idea seems to be centred on Noo Yawk (surprise, Senator 'kawpyrite should be eetoinal' Sonny Bonobo was not hispanic). I take many good photographs, but if it has a building in it, the point will be the play of light on it, emphasising its ugliness, or its beauty in a particular light.

One grandparent liked Sonny and Cher, so as a child I liked the sounds, but between Cher's Autotune and plastic surgery adventures and Sonny's 'eetoinal kawpeeroit' mania, I can see the mediocrity of their music.

Those architects who claim rights to photograph or sketch their buildings should be locked in stocks outside them and loudly mocked for at least three hours, the only motive of the photographer or sketcher, if they have an eye, is in all cases to capture an image of the 'creation' in a particular light, to emphasise the ugliness of it, or to make a contrast with the surroundings.

4. You are screaming about protecting creators, but only on behalf of the very wealthy. I take great photos, among other things (this little rant included in 'other things', but I don't mind contributing on the Reg. gratis, because they sometimes used to have good articles, which I read), damned if I will upload them or any other creative work to a 'soshul' site.

On that point, indy and small-scale group creators, and the rape of their production by the Googles and Facebooks and Twitters, the current Internet is most horrid.

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Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE

Bleu

Re: roselan Human Nature

Always interesting posts from Matt, so you get an 'up' from me, will look at whether the book is worth reading.

OP's 'fascist' is pretty silly.

Still, in my experience, people in maritime and air services dread the thought of armed conflict, army people in a country at peace or in our case, a constitutional ban, frequently bemoan a lack of action.

Doesn't make them fascist, though I have my doubts on that in our case.

... but it does make them warmongers.

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Bleu

Re: Human Nature

... not to mention the global telephone, telex, and telegraph networks, telex deceased afaik, telegraphy still going in a few places.

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Bleu

Re: Human Nature

Back in the eighties, there were already at least three global 'nets: what has now become the Internet, mainframe-based Compuserve, and Fidonet.

Personally, my strongest feelings are for the last, truly an independent development.

You might try not to comment when you don't know what you are talking about.

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Bleu

Re: Philosophical crap aside

Moral to the story: when searching for information, try anything that is not google (good lord, they were unable to even spell their intended company name correctly).

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Bleu

Stucks

'They' will place the new test version of Stuxnet at the address where the reset vector points on your new washing machine, just to see if it works.

This will happen immediately after the warrantee on your washing machine expires.

It will then spin itself into destruction the next time you switch it on and press the button for the type of washing you want.

On a serious note, I find switching from true numerical control circuits to emulation by PC-connected microprocessors in sensitive situations as hard to comprehend as the 'need' to connect sensitive intranets to the Internet.

Yet both now appear to be near-universal practice.

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Bleu

Better before; withdrew earlier version because of a typo.

The 'net was a lot better before the trick cyclists and marketeers gained 'access', a much-beloved word of the trick-cyclist and 'fine-arts' crowds.

One watershed moment came when a Californian real estate company used a mail account and mailing list to mass-mail advertising. Admins told them to stop, the reply was effectively 'Fuck you, we will not.' Thus was spam born.

The next, in the early part of the mid-nineties, was when students and teachers of trick-cycling and kindergarten-level creativity started swanning about boasting about how their vaunted 'Innanet access' somehow made them into especially unique snowflakes.

The commerce types were in on this, too, although quieter about it, so the mass-phenomenon age was clearly imminent, and indeed followed within a year or two.

It may be shinier now, have more buttons and lurid porn, ads and tracking, the WWW as the absolutely central component, but the 'net was better in many ways when restricted to engineers and other technologists, serious scientists, and students in those fields.

In the same lab where I did my own thesis, I was quite close friends with a doc. student who was more 'into it' than I. A very decent chap, he was the first person I met to boast of having megabytes of porn, all downloaded as uucp mail or usenet attachments. I strongly suspect the main reason was 'Just because I can.'

He would also use recipes from the same sources to make small quantities of explosives which he would try out in the back garden of his parents' home, entirely in the manner of fireworks.

This was just before the advent of the WWW.

Hacking was almost entirely for curiosity.

My own biggest thrill (except for victimless hacking) at the time was downloading and printing photos from Voyager well before any were in the mass-media.

Apart from the rare cases of credit-card number theft (and those were from Compuserve, entirely different at the time), I cannot think of one case of people doing or being inspired to do something seriously despicable by the 'net, up to and including the earliest days of the http.

General access has surely acted to greatly reduce freedom in ways too many to list, partly by engendering moral panics, partly by genuinely encouraging despicable acts.

The Internet of today is also full of state and commercial actors and their dupes.

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Bleu

Re: Is Abandoning the Internet “The Next Big Thing”?

Good points from Prof. Knuth.

It also offered good prospects for independent creators, but the last time any new site was thinking on those lines was long ago.

Instead, we have what Jared I-can't-recall-his-surname says, a situation where the top of the tree is making unprecedented piles of cash, but the middle is wiped out. True in many fields.

Youtube is particularly bad. Massive breaches of copyright, but between the dupes and the desire of the US government to build up Google as a national champion by addicting people to digital crack, we will never hear of any action.

P.S. I am not a freetard, but also despise the absurdities of made-by-Disneyland and Sonny Bonobo copyright law, nonsense patents, and so on.

Our government has many bad points, but at least they are not stupid enough to sign a 'free-trade agreement' that would make nonsensical US laws applicable here. For the naive and misled, that is the purpose of 'free-trade agreements' offered by the US.

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Bleu

Re: Human Nature

More than anything, it seems to have become a major factor in de-evolution.

Only way it could have gone, given current cultural, political and social trends.

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Bleu

Re: "teenagers hogging the phone line "

Way to display ignorance, as the Americans say.

CXX means 120, not twentieth century.

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Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate history' story made into TV series

Bleu

Re: alternate reality??

Ooh, aren't we the clever one, ballistic trajectories is the intended meaning. Have you had a flight on a ballistic trajectory lately?

From what I hear, until Branson gets his overpriced fun-fair ride off the ground, cheapest way is in a high-altitude fighter in Russia.

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Bleu

I'd go along with you but

I only agree with your first point.

Your second is odd at best.

Both are completely off-topic.

I must watch Prometheus at some stage, sounds pretty stupid, but I am an effects fan, small-time maker at times, missed my vocation.

Am quite sure that Scott will f*** this up completely, since he is not a reader, and his scriptwriters will be intent on imposing their own orthodox and cretinous visions, you, current anonymous coward, are doing a very good job of suggesting a possible very propagandistic twist.

Mr. Nagomi will become a cameo for someone, everyone in fictionality will be subject to a reality shift like Mr. Dick was so deft at depicting.

I didn't leave the cinema during Stargate, felt like it, but the angle was pretty obvious (and I loved the small scenes that brought the gods of ancient Egypt to life).

You may consider changing your user name from anonymous coward to keen user of Internet megaphone?

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Bleu

Re: Also ...

BTW, I very much doubt that you read all of them, but congrats for enjoying A Scanner Darkly once upon a time.

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Bleu

Re: Also ...

Guess your tastes have radically changed since 'long ago'. Of all PKD 'property' taken up by Hollywood, that is the only one that is faithful to the novel and its good points.

Two which are faithful to short stories are Screamers, and Impostor: the short (40 minute) version of that is great, with padding for feature length, execrable. I think Screamers worked well as a feature.

Honourable mention to Total Recall, captured some themes, and fun, wish Verhoeven would make another SF movie, that, with Robocop and Starship Troopers, made up a tour de force.

Semi-honourable mention to Bladerunner, exploited side themes and decoration from the novel, great movie, but absolutely contradicted the central themes, so a derivative but simply exploitative work.

There is also a good French movie faithful to Confessions of a Crap Artist, but that is not SF.

*All* of the numerous others are execrable, as is the long version of Impostor.

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Bleu

Scott Doesn't Read

Ridley boasted of not having read Do Androids before (and after) making Bladerunner.

Bladerunner is a good movie, but not bothering to read the rather short novel implies that Mr. Scott is a bit of an ignoramus outside the (not always effective) exploitation of talented scriptwriters, effects people, cinematographers, and so on.

I shudder to think what kind of travesty he and a US network will make of High Castle.

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New Star Wars movie plot details leak, violate common sense and laws of physics

Bleu

Re: As fans on the expanded universe know...

I am a little bit of a fan of the 'Expanded Universe', hear that a few of the novels are alright, but I don't read them because it is a tragedy that Star Wars and Star Trek books have almost replaced good speculative/science fiction at bookshops.

I like a certain period of the comics, there were a few really good ones. Have finished some of the video games, only on small platforms and at arcades, but they are all based on events in the films.

I think only a fanatic will know arcane details from the expanded universe.

However, I can understand and sympathise with your disappointment at the new product ignoring the expanded universe.

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Bleu

Re: Garbage pod!

Also one that is supposed to be in the setting of Bladerunner, mostly not a good film, but has a few moments, setting is a rubbish dump planet.

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Bleu

Re: H2G2 style

Now. there is a high concept, as I am led to believe they say.

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Bleu

Re: The floating hand...

Sorry, it's a hotel, if you are cockney, my apologies, if not, pretension.

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Bleu

Re: The floating hand...

Bullshit, just a Noo Yawker with pretentious pronunciation of 'herb' and 'homage'.

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Bleu

Re: Stormtrooper turned good guy?.

Reference to 'nuking Hiroshima' is more than a little tasteless at this time of the year.

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Bleu

Re: Tom_

Soon to be contacting you, forces of the dark side are!

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Bleu

Re: El Reg... Really?

Sorry,

Your post is incomprehensible.

Best of luck.

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Bleu

Re: Tom_

Wow, you might try previewing your posts, but maybe your local education system didn't give you the grounding in written language.

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Bleu

Re: El Reg... Really?

Open on your browser all day?

Not to condemn, but you must be retired and have a very cushy payout or be rather above all at work.

I only look at the site from work when bad code and descriptions start to drive me to death, so I need a little clarity, never have it open all day.

Each to their own.

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Bleu

Re: El Reg... Really?

The Kardashian thing has two tech. angles, cosmetic surgery and manipulation of 'social networks', thankfully the Reg. chooses to ignore both.

Interesting, though, neither tabloids nor 'quality' papers comment on the obvious cosmetic surgery.

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BOFH: The Great Backup BACKDOWN

Bleu

Re: Cloudy McCloud and the Vault of falsely sensed security, Chapter 1

I am not looking forward to the 'ribbon' interface the next time I have to encounter it, tomorrow morning. Design disaster?

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Bleu

Re: Stupid request for advice

I do not know, but Hans, Terry and Richard, thanks for food for thought. I tried to reply earlier, but must not have pressed the 'post' button.

Person who points out the idea of a physical print also has a good point (I thought the idea was the BASIC command at first). Screens surely do not do justice to good photographs ... but a print is not a backup, audio recording principle, always keep the original, even if the cleaned-up version sounds better.

Same applies to *good* digital video and photographs, I would think.

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Bleu

Re: What timing!

Not holidays yet, on call until Fri., looking forward to escaping.

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Bleu

Re: I suppose the BOFH'S Helldesk

I prefer unix or linux, but was adept at that in DOS and early Windows.

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Bleu

Re: We all moved to sharepoint.

Since you are posting as anon. coward, how would I know?

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