* Posts by Bleu

611 posts • joined 16 Jun 2012

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SPACESUIT, once FOUND ON MOON: Crowd action saves it for the public

Bleu
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Astro-nappy

Is 'nappy' a banned word? Sorry, the version of English I learnt (a little) does not include 'diaper' as a natural word.

Babies wear nappies, old people with no control wear 'incontinence pads', if I recall correctly from overseas.

Not to saying anything against 'diaper', but it is not how I learnt to speak in English, and I am not going to use US dialect by force, nobody else says 'diaper'.

So, Lisa Nowak's astro-nappy that she used to avoid toilet breaks on a 600-km dash.

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Bleu
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Re: he wore it

Thx. TimR, too.

I will check those links tomorrow, thx again.

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Bleu
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Re: he wore it

Thank you.

Although I still imagine Apollo 13's must have gone much beyond Earth orbit, but I guess, not as far as Mars.

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Bleu
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Re: he wore it

What we need now is a crowdfunder for OJ Simpson's spacesuit from Capricorn 1, which expressed the truth of the 'Moon landings'.

Not that I'll be throwing cash in either way, it is a disgrace that the Smithsonian had to resort to Kickstarter for this, I am not Nord Americano, but respect the achievement.

I wonder where all of the LEMs or LLMs (they did change the name) are now? None had solar escape velocity, if Apollo 13's is still out there, it must be wandering around the asteroid belt, at least. by now.

The others, eaten by or on the way to the Sun.

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Happy birthday, Amiga: The 'other' home computer turns 30

Bleu
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Akihabara still had

a specialist Amiga shop until the very early 2000s, sure, mainly for Video Toaster by then.

A big factor in the overwhelming success of the DOStel and Wintel PCs which is overlooked was the ability to pirate software at work and run it at home.

I am convinced that was a conscious M$ policy, as were the CD-copying facilities in Win 98, technically illegal in many places, but tolerated for the US 'national champion' company, in the same way as the massive piracy on you tube is for Google.

Digital crack, as they say.

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ROBOT SEEDS to be scattered into upper atmosphere of JUPITER: NASA scheme

Bleu
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'or too', think you meamt 'two'

Are you using silly dictation software, can't spell, or very drunk?

That is an awfully bad error.

I like the idea of probes based on the aerodynamics of dandelion seeds dancing about in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter or Saturn, very poetic, but surely it raises problems in terms of signals and orientation?

i agree with the OP who suggests a plain old blimp as a more practical solution.

BTW, thanks to Opera and/or the Reg.for making it possible to log in from Opera Mini.

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An EPIC picture of Earth, sunny side up, from one MEEELLION miles out

Bleu
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Re: Eclipse.

Downvote only because in before with a more detailed comment with the same idea, but mods took longer to approve mine.

Friends of yours?

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Bleu
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Re: @Doctor Syntax

Camel toe.

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Bleu
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From the photograpy PoV

can't wait to see what's sent back from this vantage point with the Moon in frame, side-by-side, Moon entering a lunar eclipse, Moon and shadow crossing in a solar eclipse, don't know the field of view, perhaps even an animation of the dance of Earth and Moon.

All a bit 'intro to 2001', only IRL! Wow!

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Ant-Man: Big ideas, small payoff

Bleu
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Of the great Joe Dante's

movies for children of all ages, your comment made me think of 'Small Soldiers'.

If you haven't seen that or 'The Explorers', you are missing out.

Both are brilliant.

From the little I've seen of 'Red Dwarf', it is too arch for me, also too much propaganda.

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Bleu
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Re: Oh Dear!

I have read an article or two quoting workers at Marvel and DC saying 'underpants over tights', not 'trousers', but with a little thought, I strongly recommend 'short girdle over tights' for the future.

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Bleu
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Re: Worst... Comment... Ever!...

Absolutely agree, Mr. Witt, US superhero crap has nothing to do with science fiction, it is just an ugly fantasy pushed as a kind of cultural poison.

I found when overseas, however, that the child most unbalanced by fiction I met was obsessed by the Power Rangers, a cynical copy of Japanese tropes, definitely a theft of ideas, that has netted the copier an immense fortune.

However, that was before the wave of Marvel crap since they sat up after seeing the success of the first Sony-CBS Spiderman film.

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Bleu
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I'd love to see

Mills and O'Neill's Marshall Law clean out the whole Augean stables of superhero crap. Law doesn't have super powers, except extreme hate of underpants over tights lunatics, which they all were in the comics (Law and what it was reacting to, Mills and O'Neill clearly hated US superhero comics, and I thoroughly concur, although I have a few collections to enjoy the stupidity, and in the cases of Djikstra and Kirby, the art).

I loved the anti-superhero trend, Accident Man was also brilliant, an amoral creep with class and a sarcastic tone who set up 'accidents' for money. He'd be a great one to make 'accidents' for a 'superhero' or two.

Judge Dredd would do a good job of collecting them and throwing them into the perp tanks.

People saw Miller's take on Batman as being in similar territory, but of course, it was not, people perceived irony, but he was expressing his own real views. Not that I think his work is without value.

He is I suppose most responsible for the 'edginess' of Marvel and DC offerings since, not that I have ever been a fan of those, we used to have import shops for them (amecomi), the number of frames per issue made it clear that it was just an exploitative joke. I would only ever buy collections.

I haven't seen any of the movies since the first Fantastic Four, at home, the only good point in that was Jessica Alba in her underwear, and that exploitation was hardly a good point in the artistic sense.

Once saw the seventies Spiderman movie at a theatre specialising in old B-movies, liked the style.

Harryhausen-esque.

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Pan Am Games: Link to our website without permission and we'll sue

Bleu
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Re: Okay... let me be the first to do this here...

Well the done.

I will follow.

http://www.toronto2015.org/

Any regtards who are also in the bad places of the Internet, to turning up the heat may being the enjoyable.

This Pan-Am games sounds like the dull event, world's most advanced sports drug programmes (step up USA) thrash everyone else in most sports.

If a fellow Regtard is to take explaining how I am wrong there (and not about USA's prodigious use of steroids and all) but why anyone may be interested by Pan Am games?

I like the contraction being the same as the very iconic and long-dead airline.

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Satoru Iwata, Nintendo chieftain and gamer titan, dies aged 55

Bleu
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Re: GBA

The Micro is a great machine for arcade style, but not much good for games with text (adventures, Super Robot Wars, etc.), impossible for Japanese, I would guess easier but not too easy to read English on it, too.

... but then, I suppose Advance Wars has text, so must be easier to read for English. Fewer pixels needed.

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Bleu
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You do not have much of a point

Sure, the prototype of the DS was two GBAs slammed together, to me the GBA wasn't much more than a vehicle for recycling Sufami (SNES) titles, but there is much more, loads of demos and non-licenced programmes.

The DS was a revolution, Nintendo's Wario, ports of N64 games like Goldeneye and Super Mario 64, third-party offerings like Pac-Pix (it is not impossible, just takes a lot of patience) and Pac-and-Roll (never got the final level open on that, and the DS I had it in was stolen), Love Rabbits (I think that was the title) and its sequel from Sega, also Sonic Rush, Namco's Goemon DS, many more. Chinatown Wars was also pretty brilliant.

I watch people play 'smart' phone games on the trains, the games all look so boring.

Do not have a Wii, the number of enjoyable Dreamcast, X Box, Wonder Swan, Neo-geo Pocket, Sufami, Gameboy, and DS games that I have not finished will be ample forever. Must investigate modern PC gaming, though. ... also could do with the bigger screen 3ds, text in some of the games is unreadable on a normal DS.

The Wii was very special, not just a gimmick, young families like the party game aspect, an older friend bought one to keep her aged mother active, she says it has the desired effect.

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Bleu
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Untimely

Thanks for all the fun, Mr. Iwata.

Never met you, but saw you speak.

You'll have a lot of mourners here.

R.I.P.

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'Real' vampires reluctant to 'come out of the coffin' to social workers – barmy prof

Bleu
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I am sorry for you, for feeling forlorn for

the 'vampire' girlfiend.

Hope the rare secks made it worth while.

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Bleu
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One or two

may have overdosed on something, but the whole thing is too precious and thumb-sucking to take seriously.

Quite big in Tokyo, and 'psychic vampire' is a fitting term for the ugly atmosphere they exude.

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Bleu
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Except for the 'good people'

pathetic passive-aggressive morons, but you do seem to have an idea of that of which you speak.

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Bleu
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Also

'Goths' in Tokyo are generally a bunch of passive-aggressive morons, I stay away from their scene, no fun. Then, from time overseas, passive-aggression seems to be common to all of them?

Some also claim to be 'real' vampires, they are correct if you count being mean fun-sucking posers as 'vampirism'.

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Bleu
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I met two or three

who claimed to be real vampires while overseas.

They look like goths who have overdone the hallucinogens and occult to me.

There is a case in Brisbane, Australia, I think, the perpretators claimed to be lesbian vampires, murdered for no reason a man they lured along, unless one is to count an imagined 'need to drink blood' as a reason.

Much before my time there, but easy to look up.

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NASA chooses ace SPACE PILOTS who'll take the USA back into manned flight

Bleu
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$58 million

for a unicorn of a cost-comparison, the 58 does not exist as of the present. Comparing prices for a real service with those for an imaginary service raises logical problems.

The 58 will become inflated.

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Bleu
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When was it ever called 'Dragonrider'?

Recall reading a short story years ago, partly promotion for Musk Enterprises, long before they had anything to show, but even then it was Dragon, not Dragonrider.

Still have the book it was in.

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Bleu
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Re: They didn't pick me.

You could always launch a crowdfunder to go on Virgin Galactic, do something stupid to become famous on Youtube, then stare at the camera and beg.

Although I do not think a Virgin Galactic flight counts as being in spaaace, even if they ever do get off the ground.

If you have access to some aceed, there is an old movie you can watch that will give you the feeling of being there at times, if seen on the big screen.

I tried it once, overseas, the bits the hippys liked are ho-hum, but the spaaace bits are really intensified.

I wish our govt had not banned mushr..ms, but that is how it is.

One does not want to break the law in an authoritarian state.

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Bleu
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All very well to say

78 vs. 58, but a launch of one person at the latter price has never happened, and many times 58 have been and are being poured into the latter.

So the true price of the latter is two orders of magnitude higher, at least.

At least not as high as the F-35, obscenely expensive, no good even against their own old-generation planes, that is a true economic rape of every USA person who is not a bribed politician, working at one of their places, or holding stock in a related company.

I think USA people will also agree, F-35 is the biggest failure (per expense) in aerospace history.

Congrats to the military-industrial-bankster-stock market complex! You really are seeming to have a big win there!

Cost-performance is awful, design is not interesting and ineffective. Price per unit is unbelievable. Please check if you do not know. It will only increase, even when they are delivered in bigger numbers.

I am not a USA person, but I am a human, and I do not like to see cheating of the people on such a scale.

Spending a fraction of that on human spaceflight would make an immense advance.

... but then, it is already clear that it is imaginary money being spent by USA of now and its businesses.

What was the last astronomical debt?

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PLUTO: The FINAL FRONTIER – best image yet of remote, icy dwarf planet REVEALED

Bleu
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Re: Looking at the colour

Are you colour blind? No offense intended.

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Bleu
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Re: Inverse square law

Thanks, Olaf.

I would only believe the real answer if shown the calculations, or doing them myself, I know how, but too tired now, and too busy tomorrow.

Believe you are likely correct, but it still must be very dark once past the asteroid belt. Pluto is much further away.

A tribute to the dynamic range of the simian eye. A forest or other natural place at night under moonlight is very beautiful.

I saw an article on a major Brit. newspaper's site which was claiming that, I paraphrase accurately, 'Pluto, like Triton, may have some form of volanic activity driven by solar heating.'

Unbelievably puerile.

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Bleu
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Inverse square law

Pluto must be very dark. I wonder if, to the eye, it would even appear as bright as the scenery on a moonlit night in places with no artificial lights on Earth.

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Bleu
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Re: Just for a laugh...

'definately', sure sign of a long-dead civilisation here on Earth.

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Bleu
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They

have already announced apparent features as a whale (man the harpoons!), a doughnut etc., for PR, don't blame the nutters for playing the same game if they imagine they spot something odd.

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Sinclair Spectrum

Bleu
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Re: Sinclair Spectrum

You may try World of Spectrum or try asking at the Retrobytes portal (site names, easy to find from a search engine).

... but you probably are already at least knowing the former by now.

I only know because of nice times on programmable DS carts.

The Reg. user fora are so barren, their system really is needing notification of replies, now, article comments are only for people to making poor one-line bad jokes, and no way to track replies except going through all of the thread.

I am sorry that my reply is probably so late as to be useless.

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ALIEN SLIME SHOCKER: Approaching comet probably NOT inhabited, say boffins

Bleu
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Re: Three things

Thanks, I had not heard of that before, but the comparison is not convincing to me, not a correct analogy, and Russell seems to have been making a different point.

If microbial life is existing in other places in the solar system, it is exactly like the teapot for now, except the teapot is impossible, but the other is unknown. Concede that it is unlikely, but we do not know.

Prof. Wickra. seemed to make a few valid points and says he had devised experiments for checking for the presence of life, which were getting rejections .

I do recommend McLeod's 'The Oort Crowd' if you have not read it, it was published in Nature, the very dry humour.

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Bleu
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Three things

Prof. Wickramasinghe and his colleague (can't be bothered to look the name up) are to be admired for such devotion to that idea of the great Hoyle. I found parts of their argument to be, if not convincing, intriguing.

The bits about 'more hospitable than the Arctic or Antarctic' were over-stated (what happens to that at or anywhere near aphelion, although it is easy to imagine survival as spores or virus-like things), but the other things they were saying were interesting.

Noone here knows if they do or do not have any valid points. Same for the ESA. It seems to me that some of the points they make are valid. Sure, not proof, worth a thought.

Anybody else suffer through Ben Gregford's 'Heart of the Comet'?

An awful novel, I have never re-read it, but haven't thrown it out. It is a great one for a very critical essay, more on the social and ethnic propaganda in it than the physics, mainly well worked out. Strongly favourable review in the New York Times. I want to write that critical essay one day.

A mission with a crew goes to ride a comet, the comet is infested with inimical life, the plot is brain-dead, and it is full of propaganda re. the human riders. If you have read it and think of the central protagonist in particular, you will understand.

A much better one on a related theme is a very short story by Ken McLeod (sp?), called 'The Oort Crowd', it was originally published in Nature, they had a stage of publishing very short stories. The dry wit is beautiful, recommended to any fiction-reading regtard, short and sharp.

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Why SpaceX will sort out Sunday's snafu faster than NASA ever could

Bleu
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Re: Well, I guess we'll never... What? You've figured it out ALREADY?

Well, I guess you might recall Armstrong's words, 'we came in peace for all mankind.'

Interesting that British aid budget to India is paying for the Indian space programme, but not to helping anybody in India who is needing aid, and British space programme is long extinct.

I think they (UK) used to launch rockets in Australia, when not using it for hydrogen bomb tests.

Good luck to the Skylon people, interesting project.

I think it will come to nothing, closest Britain comes to space and rocketry these days is politicians and military watching the single demo launch of a Trident, which is part of the bill when they buy the stupid thing.

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Bleu
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Re: NASA inefficiency: The hint is in the name

You will be laughing from the other side if (I am praying for when) New Horizons starts to sending back good photographs from the Pluto system next week.

BTW, the latest supplies to the ISS were carried by the Progress craft, sure the one before failed, but unlike the two USA private enterprise efforts since, it did not explode soon after launch, entered orbit, and does not get insane levels of funding and cross-funding (so not 'private enterprise') in the way the two US failures are.

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Bleu
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Re: One minor correction

Our pencil rocket (and later ones) also had no failures. Must be many others. IIRC, there has been no explosion soon after launch for a rocket made in Japan.

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Bleu
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Re: No wonder

Downvote for FFS, you as the Musk fanboi, I guess I am just returning what I received.

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Bleu
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OK.

I find it difficult to believe, and other sources that seem to know say otherwise, but I will flick through the book if I find it in a bookshop that has many English-language books or an English-language bookshop.

I admire what he is trying to do with rockets and power storage, but the cars clearly are relying on a less efficient and more polluting energy source than efficient internal combustion and hybrid vehicles.

Simple engineering, thermodynamics, entropy, also rare and diminishing materials. I would be sure you know.

Just because the energy is delivered as electrical charge, does not make the source clean, the obvious point many are forgetting. Conversion introduces much inefficiency, at every stage.

I also enjoy the minor flood of downvotes for any questioning Musk, it is much like Apple and their St. Steven.

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Bleu
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How sweet to be an idiot

copied by Oasis to become 'I'm free to be whatever I am', I gather the Pythons never sued, may be misinformed there.

Not bad on the part of the Pythons if they never did.

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Bleu
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Re: My prediction

Not mine either. I make spelling mistakes from phone input (never by speech) when drunk and or tired, but wouldn't make a howler like that.

It suggests being clueless or careless use of speech-to-text, I call bullshit on your reply.

Please study the homophones 'they're', 'there', and 'their'.

Thanks for the downvote for a comment on your failure. That is all.

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Bleu
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Re: What if they don't find a design flaw?

Interesting and valid point.

OTOH, it is a new rocket system, most have trouble, but sure, sabotage cannot be ruled out.

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Bleu
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Re: My prediction

You gain my downvote for writing 'ascent' as 'accent'.

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Bleu
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No wonder

that Musk industries will likely fix all of the problems.

The massive state subsiies will see to that.

Musk Inc., has, if you read the articles after this debacle, free (as in beer) assistance from NASA to work out what went wrong.

Perhaps NASA may have some helpful insight to offer? Perhaps providing that assistance gratis is in itself a massive subsidy?

Interesting to contrast the schadenfreude crowing from many commentards about the last Progress supply ship going into a spin and not reaching the right orbit with all of the word spin on this debacle.

At least, the rocket for the Progress craft didn't blow up seconds after launch.

I would very much like to see an accurate article (sure, difficult for the reg., but from anywhere) on how much of Musk's gargantuan fortune he has invested in his projects, seems to be in the several hundred thousands of dollars range.

The millions and hundreds of millions all seem to pour in from state actors.

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Palaeoboffins discover 500 MILLION year old ARMOURED WORM

Bleu
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You do realise that using 'there' for 'their'

makes you look like the sub-literate fool that you appear to be?

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'Backronym' crowdfunds itself into Oxford English Dictionary

Bleu
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Re: For all those pedantic bastards out there....

I do not recall seeing any correction process on the Reg., except for Regtards noticing the sub-literacy of many of the 'journalists', and correcting them at times.

That is not to say that I have not learnt much from the better and more flawless writers here.

People have this delusion that on-line papers (and I am including the ones that have paper editions) have proofreaders and sub-editors who have facility in their language.

Proofreaders are gone, and most of the sub-editors, as many of the writers, are grads from the easiest of degrees who lack any facility with their own language.

Note, I am not pointing at the Reg., which has a pretty good standard, but enough howlers pop up to see that there is no proofreading.

Major media sites are much worse.

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Bleu
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Re: Twerk

Of whom is that the quote?

Not that I am to doubt your veracity, whit, just curious, would enjoy hearing far more than to looking it up.

I am also certain that its etymology is to having no connection with 'twerk' in the bum-wobbling dance sense, but in the conjunction with 'twist' in that sentence, it is funny.

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Bleu
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Re: 'Meh'

I must, regarding 'tut, tut' and 'tsk tsk', the latter being almost unpronoucable, I have seen British films where people throw a schwa or i or oo between the t and the s, but the only reason they entered your language as words was as onomatopoeia.

The original people using 'tsk' and 'tut' in writing were only trying to express the sound of tongue pressed against palate then pulled away.

They only became words through readers assuming that they were, and perhaps, finding them less impolite than the true monkey-signal sound they originate from, which remains common currency, at least in Japanese, Chinese, Malay/Indonesian, Thai, Burmese, English, other European languages, and I have no doubts, many others.

In Chinese, Putonghua and Fujien, I would guessing all dialects, it has also become an onomatopoeic word, mainly for expressing impatience.

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Bleu
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Re: 'Meh'

The tongue click by separation of tongue from palate to express disapproval, and the one that is incorpated as a consonant in Xhosa, which children everywhere like to play with, also the glottal catch in Scots, no doubt all go back to our prelingual chimp-like ancestors.

OED may not mention the onomatopoeia of 'tut' or 'tsk', but it is blindingly obvious.

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Bleu
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Re: Comedogenic

I agree, it is a very odd choice, does someone having a better range of medical vocab. than mine (broad) have the ability to explain how it is more than a cheap bullying term that will expire very quickly?

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