* Posts by Rustident Spaceniak

183 posts • joined 31 Jan 2012

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A cracked window on the International Space Station? That's not good

Rustident Spaceniak
Stop

Re: Guidelines - credit to SpaceX...

Credit where credit is due, but that's to all.

Not sure what you've "seen" from NASA and ESA, but all modern launch vehicles separate the payload fairings well below reaching orbit. In the case of Ariane 5, it's typically between 110km and 125km, depending on payload - anyway, as soon as the heat flux from atmospheric friction is low enough. No launch provider would carry unneeded panels any longer than necessary; payload mass is much too valuable for that.

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Who'd be mad enough to start a 'large-scale fire' in a spaceship?

Rustident Spaceniak
Mushroom

Why would NASA want to turn a strip into a crisp? (Or into smoke)

This is not your granddad's Apollo 1 anymore, hasn't there been a requirement around to use only non-flammable construction materials for, well, almost ever? [scratches head]

...Or is it that they came to realize some materials classed as non-flammable still may be ignited, given the right amount of heating?

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Computer says: Stop using MacWrite II, human!

Rustident Spaceniak
Gimp

Re2: Ooh yeah, MacWrite!

Err, where's that rusty two-handed sword again?

I actually tried writing the document using Word for Mac first, with OLE. It was just so much easier to do in MacWrite, no comparison!

It's really a pity, to this day, that Apple (err, Claris) gave up on the application-software race.

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Rustident Spaceniak
Thumb Up

Ooh yeah, MacWrite!

One of the nice features about Macwrite was the "publish and subscribe" feature, a bit like hypertext years before html became popular. If you edited your embedded image, the new version automatically appeared in the text document. Of course you had to be careful with frivolous editing...

In one university computer lab I was in, essentially all the study papers got written on the four Macs (can't remember the type but might have been Mac IIci's) and couple of Silicon Graphics heavy irons, while the fifteen or so PCs (grey 80486's) stood idle or were used to play Indiana Jones on. Then again, one certain type of mischief, connected to the availability of online bulletin boards, was centered on the Macs: Certain, er, anatomic representations just looked so much nicer in 65k colors than in 256!

[minor editing for wording]

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Silent Nork satellite tumbling in orbit

Rustident Spaceniak
Joke

They passed over the Levi stadium?

It's clear - the launch was one hour late due to a mix-up in the timezones! That dear short ingenious leader just wanted his own independent aerial view of the final Superbowl moments. Give the man a break, those constant supervillain comparisons must be getting on his nerves.

More seriously, who'd ever want a nuke to communicate? Who with?

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Microsoft pitches lobotomized Cortana for iOS, Android handsets

Rustident Spaceniak
Terminator

Siri, launch Cortana!

- I'm afraid I can't do that, Dave.

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ISS 'nauts prepare for Cygnus space truck consensual grappling

Rustident Spaceniak
Facepalm

Re: All it needs is The Blue Danube as a sound track.

In space, no-one can hear you waltz.

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China, for one, welcomes our ROBOT SPACE ANT overlords

Rustident Spaceniak
Boffin

Re: Stupid question...

If it's the Earth-Moon L2 point they mean, no, you can't see it from Earth. Which makes this plan a bit funny, as there are two stable Lagrange points L4 and L5 in the Earth-Moon system, from where you could see a bit less than half of the Moon's backside (think Selene's rear in profile) [edit: though not necessarily the lunar poles at all times].

A satellite in [edit: reasonably high, e.g. GEO] Earth orbit would help, though it would need to follow the Moon with a receiver antenna, so you'd probably need a dedicated satellite.

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NASA boffins on Pluto: We see skies of BLUE and... RED water ice

Rustident Spaceniak
Boffin

Re: Pictures of Pluto

Funny though it may seem, the illumination is like an early evening on Earth. The images were taken mostly with 150ms exposure time (some with 100ms); a bit too long for hand-held work with a telelens, but short enough so they could take a large number of pics during the overflight.

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So, what's happening with LOHAN? Sweet FAA, that's what

Rustident Spaceniak

Re: Denmark?

Are you really sure about that, Lester? I'm fairly sure the corresponding regulations differ between EU countries (except if your motor reload is considered military hardware, in which case the US of A won't let it out of the country). Maybe check with the other Euro rocketry guys over at www.europerocketry.com; or consider Switzerland: They have an annual high-power amateur rocket event so there must be a possibility there to operate largish amateur rockets.

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Rustident Spaceniak
Facepalm

Re: Can´t you

Incidentally, you could launch from Germany with clearance from the local authorities - in this case the DFS - and after having followed a mandatory three-day (?) explosives-handling course to obtain a license to, you guessed it, handle explosives. But if you'd even consider going to rougher climates than Spain or New Mexico, I'd recommend Denmark or Sweden, where I understand the regulatory situation is much easier.

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Rosetta comet boffins: We can explain why there's a rubber ducky IN SPAAACE

Rustident Spaceniak
Paris Hilton

Two bodies joined in eternal embrace?

So what would they be in egyptian lore - Isis and Osiris maybe?

Paris 'cos it's not Helen.

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WATER SURPRISE: Liquid found on Mars, says NASA

Rustident Spaceniak
Alien

Meanwhile, on the underground Telesense network of Mars -

- The docudrama "Invasion from Planet Earth" is going into its nineteenth season since Viking I arrived, back in 1976.

Young Martians still can't understand why the high council hasn't put a stop to this yet.

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How green is your ROCKET FUEL?

Rustident Spaceniak
Boffin

NASA is just playing catch-up again

The LMP-103S propellant is already in use by the Swedish on their PRISMA satellite. It's a technology demonstration that apparently showed the stuff works, which in turn interested NASA enough to sample the Swedish liquor for themselves.

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Airbus to build 900 mini-satellites for OneWeb's orbital internet system

Rustident Spaceniak
Terminator

Putting them up there is certainly the big issue -

Although designing and building hundreds of sats on a shoestring budget, but with quite up-to-date capabilities, is no mean feat either. Yet, there's absolutely no reason to be concerned: Richard Branson is on the board of OneWeb and is understood to have a contract in his conveniently-sized pocket for launching the satellites - on a vehicle yet to be revealed to the astonished public. And we all know that Sir Richard has never failed to deliver, don't we? Don't we really?

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Config file wipe blunder caused deadly Airbus A400M crash – claim

Rustident Spaceniak

Re: "trying to fly on one engine would make the aircraft very difficult to control or land safely."

Actually, the bird should have been perfectly controllable with one fully functional engine. In fact they were on their best way to a successful emergency landing in that field, when they hit a powerline pole, apparently damaging a wing and resulting in a crash landing and subsequent fire. Without that impact, the engine failure probably would have resulted in just some red faces.

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Wink if you want to see more of me, say Swiss boffins

Rustident Spaceniak

It'll be a popular product - with certain types.

I just imagine a guy wearing this thing while watching another tab the access key to some fancy apartment building (so obviously not the type where the access code is 4321). Will give security providers a whole new market.

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Forget robo-butlers – ROBO-MAIDS! New hotel staffed by slave-droids

Rustident Spaceniak
WTF?

Did I miss anything?

How will they deal with non-Japanese speakers?

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A docket, tweet and selfie can reveal your identity, boffins find

Rustident Spaceniak

It really just automates snooping

I think, as a phenomenon, this isn't all that new. In the olde days, when someone bought exactly one bottle of Glengrouse every week at the off-licence in Littleton-behind-the-woods, you could easily figure out from gossip that the buyer would be old Colonel Mumblewick. Now you just collect the same data electronically and profile everyone in Littleton the same way. Scary? Not very. Annoying? Probably a bit, to some. Useful? Dunno, might be at some point.

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Secret Service on alert after drone CRASHES into White House

Rustident Spaceniak
Black Helicopters

Re: How much C4

<It if it was detected on time it could have been jammed. >

Don't you think it was? Why did it crash in the first place?

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Humanity can defeat SkyNet with BOOKS, says IT think tank

Rustident Spaceniak

Re: Reading books - wats dat ?

That point is quite well fictionalized in Dave Eggers' The Circle. And yes, I do think all those people who read "1984" in the '80s were influenced by it, to a degree. Certainly, where I come from, it was considered almost mandatory reading, and was quite often cited in public discussion or in the press. Sadly, that has become less frequent.

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Elon Musk SNOWED UNDER with Googley DOLLARS for Space Internet

Rustident Spaceniak

Re: Sat Comms.

Well, your Telstra sat is a geostationary one that's about 40000km away from you in ME - in very rough numbers. Elon's sats will be in low Earth orbit, about 1200km or so, and probably no more than 4000km from you while you have contact with any individual one - rather less. That allows you to get your ping ten times faster, and to use a much simpler antenna into the bargain.

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Rustident Spaceniak
Paris Hilton

Re: Sat Comms.

That is *not* the 64.000$ question. That's the ten beeellion dollar question.

Paris doesn' seem to know. And Elon isn't telling anytime soon.

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I'll build a Hyperloop railgun tube-way in Texas, Elon Musk vows

Rustident Spaceniak
WTF?

Re: It needs to be asked . . .

Err - just why would there be a gloopy mass?

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Rustident Spaceniak
Thumb Up

You gotta give the man credit -

he certainly has a knack for trying out things, and a surprising tendency towards reasonable engineering in his wacky schemes. Obviously there are some issues with the necessary reliability of all the technologies in this thing, but you could imagine way more stupid approaches than getting a hundred volunteers to sort out these issues, and then building a prototype. Who knows, at the end of the day it might actually work.

Certainly beats spending money on tropical islands for the entertainment value. Oh wait...

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'F*** you', exclaims Google Translate app, politely

Rustident Spaceniak
Joke

Re: Lost in translation

... you mean like mentioning Gary Neville in Liverpool?

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IBM hastens END OF HUMANITY with teachable AI 'brain'

Rustident Spaceniak
Windows

Ah, neural networks!

It must have been like 1989 or so when I last read about a serious attempt to do these things. But can it do self-reference? Recursion? Can it take us to where Douglas Hofstadter was trying to take us in book form way back in- what, was it really that long ago??

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Dark matter-hunting boffins spot EXCITING signal in X-ray spectrum

Rustident Spaceniak
Meh

Dark matter particles are a bit like singing talents -

All those people keep scouting for them, and every time they think they've come up with one, after a while it's just another dud.

Maybe we should just organize a particle contest?

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NASA prods sleeping New Horizons spacecraft: Wakey, wakey, Pluto's calling

Rustident Spaceniak

Re: Horizon name

Nah, you're not alone. In fact you're right. But it's just a sign of the times (at the day), selling a little deep-space robot as someone who'd explore vast unknown spaces, visit strange new worlds where no-one has been before... oh well.

Nonetheless, it is a fine and interesting mission and the best thing about it is, it won't be over just yet. After Pluto it'll probably continue to yet another dwarf planet even further out, so at least it'll have two horizons to peek at - Pluto's and the one of its to-be-decided-upon next target (dubbed, I think, PT-1), and who knows what else?

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Euro spacemen clear Ariane 6 for liftoff

Rustident Spaceniak
Stop

Re: I see that ...

Skylon is certainly nowhere in a project with a 2020 first-launch target. It is, however, in ESA's long-term plans and that's already a great success for the British (and a tantalizing prospect for all of us). So, just get your facts straight before you start complaining. Oh well, apparently you're British. Just give it a try, OK?

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Rustident Spaceniak
Boffin

It's actually two-and-a-half stages!

Nothing is settled yet, but the latest iteration of Ariane 6 isn't four stages any longer. It's the so-called industrial compromise version that comes in two sizes; each with a liquid first and second stage, plus solid boosters - two for the so-called Ariane 6.2 (or 62), four for A6.4. Apart from that, they're pretty much the same.

This latest iteration (which may still evolve quite a bit) was mentioned by Mr Dordain, ESA secretary-general, as the current baseline, and we may assume (I hope) that he knows what he wants.

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Give nerds their own PRIVATE TRAIN CARRIAGES, say boffins

Rustident Spaceniak
Meh

Re: Nerd carriage?

I think the first problem with nerds is, they like getting actual work done on the train, such as writing a quick analysis on a complex problem, or at least setting up a spreadsheet that helps them analyse a simplified version thereof. And those nerds i know hate being interrupted by people talking on the train.

Second problem: in the real world, including (to a degree) the Oxford-London-Cambridge triangle, the density of nerds working in the same field of business is low, even on board trains; there are so many different varieties of nerds that the partial pressure of each is low enough to make direct interaction unlikely.

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Rustident Spaceniak
Holmes

Re: Can't we have a murder carriage?

Yeees, but what about nerds who like reading crime novels?

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FIRST for HUMANITY: Fridge-size PROBOT headed for COMET TOUCHDOWN

Rustident Spaceniak
Boffin

Re: Lighter than a feather...

Er, we did that feather-and-ball experiment at school in a one-meter vacuum tube, many moons ago.

Nonetheless, isn't it impressive to think this thing just falls down from 20km up, and reaches ground after seven hours and at walking speed? Try that, Franz Baumgarnter!

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Rustident Spaceniak
Alien

Re: In space no one can hear your sonar

Pssst - don't tell anybody yet! We're not sure what'll be generated.

Edit: In any case, alien worlds, like our Earth Mother, are female. Philae provides the male element.

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Rustident Spaceniak

Re: In space no one can hear your sonar

The trick is to stick your emitter and microphone right into the comet. The sonar equipment is attached to Philae's feet - much like the legs of a spider or cockroach I understand.

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BONFIRE of the MEGA-BUCKS: $200m+ BURNED in SECONDS in Antares launch blast

Rustident Spaceniak

So, was it Dr No after all?

And if it was, how did he escape that reactor basin? And where's James Bond when you need him?

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ROGUE SAIL BOAT blocks SPACE STATION PODULE blastoff

Rustident Spaceniak

Good point. Incidentally, do we have any information about the type and course of the sailboat and how they managed to contact or intercept it (if they even did)?

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Rustident Spaceniak

So, next time Dr No doesn't need his own island complete with mechanical dragon -

a little sailing dinghy with a suitably expendable minion in it will be sufficient to interrupt the US' top priority rocket launches.

Would've loved to hear what the coast guard patrol had to say to the skipper.

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Now: The REAL APPLE NEWS you need to know

Rustident Spaceniak
Windows

In fact, the reason that it's usually depicted as an apple tree might have something to do with the Latin word for it - malus means apple, but also bad.

But back to the original topic: It's astonishing when you make a quick google search for historic trees in Britain, how many different and fascinating results you get. Wonder if there's a market there for a book telling the story of the land by its arboreal reference points.

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Rustident Spaceniak
Angel

Not a tree in Britain?

Disclaimer: The following is not an earnest discussion of a theological subject.

You don't know - the location of Eden in Mesopotamia is by inference at best. It might well have been someplace in Hampshire.

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COMET 67P is basically TRAILING a HORRIFIC STENCH through space

Rustident Spaceniak
Joke

Go away 67P!

We don' need no stinkin' comets round here.

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RUMPY PUMPY: Bone says humans BONED Neanderthals 50,000 years B.C.

Rustident Spaceniak
Windows

So - modern humans were interbreeding with Neanderthals in 70k AD - and before that?

Who else may they have boned before? Various early human species among each other? Maybe those faraway love-ins laid the foundation for our tales of strange creatures, like elves, dwarves, and giants, meeting (and loving, or fighting) humans in some far, faraway past? Mind, no matter how old a fairy tale, the action alway plays "long ago".

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Apple's new iPADS have begun the WAR that will OVERTURN the NETWORK WORLD

Rustident Spaceniak
Meh

The question is, do you *have* to use the software SIM card?

-- or can you just swap it like an ordinary one, for whatever other SIM you like? In that case this would be at best a nice feature, at worst a sneak peak of the future you describe.

In any case, if great income fosters great investment - something that does not seem to be borne out by the financial industry, at least not investment into innovation - then it won't matter much, on a global scale, who makes that profit, as they will all have an incentive to make you spend as much as possible for the possibility to send your data around.

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That's no – actually it is: DEATH STAR MOON 'could be full of life-friendly water'

Rustident Spaceniak
Alert

Minas - wasn't that the one that looks like Pacman in infrared?

This one really seems to hold mre than meets the eye.

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Scientists skeptical of Lockheed Martin's truck-sized FUSION reactor breakthrough boast

Rustident Spaceniak

Re: Physics 101

100MW is a lot, but these guys are used to dealing with jet engines, which tend to generate that sort of power. Granted, most of that is produced as kinetic energy, but it does start as heat; so if they can produce the power in the first place, I'm reasonably confident they'll find a way to use it.

Then again, those containment walls are frightfully thick, so to get much power through, they'd probably have to be full of cooling channels. Not sure what that'll do to the design, but I'm fairly confident the Lockheed guys have given it some thought. I've only been thinking about it for as many minutes as they have years, after all.

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Ice probe peers at hidden BOTTOMS of oceans from SPAAACE

Rustident Spaceniak
Boffin

Re: How is that thing at finding Malaysian airliners?

Quite right. What Cryosat is looking for is more like in the many-million-ton range; and anyway, as a submerged sub has the same density and therefore the same gravity as the surrounding water, it won't lead to a surface-level depression!

If my task was to look for a missing airliner, though, I'd still appreciate a good subsurface map as it would certainly help to interpret what I'd see on my echo sounder. Though I guess I'd end up with a more detailed map from that anyway.

Back to a former topic: A sunken gazillion-ton ancient spaceship, now, that would be something completely different from a sub - that would create a signal.

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DOCTOR HELL and his henchmen score Nobel for the NANO-SCOPE

Rustident Spaceniak
Devil

So, to Hell with the Nobel prize!

Great job Stefan, Eric, Bill, I'll drink to you later tonight.

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Cut-off North Sea island: Oh crap, ferry's been and gone. Need milk. SUMMON THE DRONE

Rustident Spaceniak

Re: The puzzle of the Skies

Nope, the island gets invaded every summer, by tourists. That's what they live off.

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