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* Posts by Nate Amsden

975 posts • joined 19 Jun 2007

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What's this 'pay as you go' cloud crap? Dunno about you, but my apps don't work that way

Nate Amsden
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I don't know how

with a straight face you can reccomend someone develop something on top of amazon while at the same time saying "pay for what you provision" is bad. Amazon practically created that whole thing, and it's been a disaster from the start. Their model is so incredibly broken it's sickening. There are some services they offer that are pay for what you use (S3 and a few others that I can't name off the top of my head). But their EC2/RDS/etc type services are all not only functionally terrible, but the pay for provision model is just bad bad bad.

I can't speak to google/azure services I have never used them.

There was a video presentation I saw of a guy at a conference a few months ago:

http://vimeo.com/95066828

He talked about all sorts of concepts whether it was cloud, nosql, security etc. On the clould front he said there were two types of people:

1) people that have actually implemented cloud services

and

2) other

It is quite funny and he manages to nail so many good points while keeping the audience entertained, it's hard to get me to laugh out loud but he did it on all of the times I have re-watched that video.

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Canonical, AMD, team up with OpenStack-in-a-rack

Nate Amsden
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dropped atom

Was kind of surprised to see Seamicro dropped Intel Atom support, that was what they were built on after all, I guess Atoms don't cut it anymore?

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NetApp's running with the big dogs: All-flash FlashRay hits the street

Nate Amsden
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seems like they were forced

to release it before it was ready, kind of sad I suppose. Given it took them what 4-5 years to integrate the spinmaker(?) stuff might it take a similar amount of time to make a bulletproof all SSD platform? Obviously an all-SSD Ontap platform doesn't cut it or they wouldn't of built Flashray. I mean even a soft launch with only one controller is just shocking. I can imagine beta testers etc using 1 controller but it is shocking to do any sort of public release controlled or not that doesn't even have dual controllers.

This and the recent EMC upgrade issues with XtremeIO makes me happy I stuck with 3PAR 7450 for my all flash workload - low cost, high performance, and bulletproof (normally you're only supposed to be able to pick two of any three!). My 7450 is just a bare bones system though it has 27TB raw flash just to start, expandable to over 180TB raw flash with current SSD sizes without adding any disk shelves, or roughly 500T flash with adding some shelves.

No way in hell would I trust Skyera for my mission critical several hundred million dollar/year transactional businesses - not for a good while anyway. Their tech looks interesting, they need a lot more time to demonstrate they have a solid/stable platform though (same applies to any storage startup not them specifically).

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Xpliant targets white-label Ethernet switch vendors with shiny new silicon

Nate Amsden
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Re: Wishlist item

since you say "everyone else included" what makes you think this company would do any better ? For me I have had just one broadcom driver related issue that was about 5 years ago related to buggy MSI-X on Linux. The fix was to disable MSI-X in the driver, but took about a year of off and on troubleshooting to narrow down.

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A SCORCHIO fatboy SSD: Samsung SSD850 PRO 3D V-NAND

Nate Amsden
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have had this for about a month now

a 512GB 850 Pro, only complaint is it lacks power fail protection like the enterprise drives do (I was very close to buying the Intel 730 for this reason - it wasn't until after I ordered it that I realized it lacked this feature hopefully I will not need it - it is in my laptop, not concerned about losing power as much as I am system crashing or hanging which for me is pretty rare).

It seems pretty fast, given this is a 4 year old i7 laptop with SATA 2 no real point in benchmarking it, but it got rid of the lag experienced in firefox when downloading lots of things at once, running VMs is quicker too. I wouldn't say it's revolutionary compared to the Seagate Momentus XT hybrid I was using before but that may be because my workload generally isn't I/O intensive at all.

Also "upgraded" from Ubuntu 10.04 to Mint 17 at the same time(and on the windows side of dual boot XP->7), managed to keep 99% of my GNOME 2 user interface which makes me happy.

With the 10 year warranty I can imagine I'll probably be transplanting this drive into my next machine whenever that comes round.

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No biggie: EMC's XtremIO firmware upgrade 'will wipe data'

Nate Amsden
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this isn't disruptive

At least to me - disruptive simply involves downtime, total data loss is in a different category than the simple term of disruptive.

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As bankruptcy looms for RadioShack, we ask its chief financial officer... oh. He's quit

Nate Amsden
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i heard recently

that Radio shack had something like $65M in the bank left, and they wanted to close 2,000 stores but that would require ~$75M - more than they had available.

I grew up just a few years after Radio shack hit what probably it's hay days in the late 70s/early 80s (I assume) so was never really a customer of theirs.

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This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...

Nate Amsden
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Re: Not as big a problem as it looks

I don't agree with that myself. Even as a 18-year linux veteran I still have not even tried to root my Note 3, yet alone even consider replacing the operating system (I'd wager the s-pen wouldn't work well etc). If you choose your phone carefully based on Cyanogenmod support then maybe yes but obviously not many do that.

For me it's not too critical I just don't use any app that needs too much permissions. I do hope that future android versions fix this as it seems to be becoming an ever bigger problem.

Samsung keeps pestering me to accept a new license agreement on my phone and I keep declining.

Only been using Android since December so still somewhat of a newbie (was WebOS before that)

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Behold our SPINNING DATA GRAVE: WD carts out 6.3TB cold storage drive

Nate Amsden
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WD behind Hitachi

given WD owns hitachi hard to see how they could be behind them.

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Flash data storage: Knocking TAPE off the archiving top spot

Nate Amsden
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Re: Huh?

yeah.. no I don't think so. Bluray is not the future, tape was around before blu ray and it will be around after blu ray is a memory.

blu ray made it into facebook because there were folks there (probably still are) that hated tape(maybe their QIC 80 drives back in the 90s gave them some trouble so they figured tape was dead)

There was over 6,400 Petabytes of tape capacity shipped in Q1 of 2014 - 24% year over year growth and an all time record.

http://h30507.www3.hp.com/t5/Around-the-Storage-Block-Blog/Where-is-tape-media-headed/ba-p/167540#.VBEc-fFVLg4

tape is not going anywhere for archive.

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Ex Red Hat CTO installs self as Google Cloud boss

Nate Amsden
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slow news day

I like Red Hat but I really don't care about exec changes, how is this anyone's business other than the person involved and perhaps the people they work with? Can't imagine anyone else caring (nothing specific to this CTO it applies to exec changes in general, or changes in general, no point in news stories about "oh this person is now over at this company!"

I can certainly understand caring if you know the person but otherwise, don't care. Even big wigs like Microsoft getting a new CEO - again I can understand if your going to be impacted by that change if you work at MS, other than that don't care who is CEO.

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VMware updates vSphere, recommends new security fixes

Nate Amsden
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web client sucks

I remember having sort of high hopes when word first came out that a web client was coming, but it's just been crap. As a linux user for 18 years I'd rather use windows and the .NET client (normally interface with vCenter through Citrix XenApp + .NET client on windows because the vmware client on Linux Xenapp client doesn't work very well).

I know that the latest VM hardware version 12 requires the web client so for the 4 VMs (windows 2012) that need this hardware version I'm forced to use the web client when making configuration changes. It's painful. It sucks (I've only tried it on windows). I have a pair of ESXi 5.5 hosts (about to add a few more) the rest of the servers are ESX 4.1U3 (good 'ol thick ESX I like that much more than ESXi).

Fortunately even today I hardly ever have to touch the web client. Maybe by the time I have to regularly interact with it they will have it fixed, yeah probably not.

I read somewhere recently that vmware was (or perhaps has) turned the web client into an .exe instead of a browser plugin based interface.

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Use home networking kit? DDoS bot is BACK... and it has EVOLVED

Nate Amsden
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Quick!

Better go check to see if my bridged cable modem connected to my Soekris system running OpenBSD is vulnerable..

nope..

on with my day!

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Rack-mount 24TB RAID 5 disk array for $5,000. Let's just check the label here. Uh, it's TiVo

Nate Amsden
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needs more tuners

6 tuners for that much space? I think it should have at least a dozen tuners. I can imagine a household having this kind of thing may have several people in there, each person should have at least two tuners.

I would really like it if tivo made a smaller version of this system, in the form of a tivo with two disks in RAID 1.

(tivo customer since ~2001 - currently have a series 3 and series 4)

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OwnCloud: Fiddly but secure host-from-home sync 'n' share

Nate Amsden
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easy to share on owncloud

I've been running v5 for about a year now(both on my colo server and at work), it's very easy to share with people that do not have accounts, simply click on the "share" link, click on "share with link" check box, optionally assign a password to it(either file or folder), as well as an expiration date among a couple other options.

I do this all the time.

Maybe owncloud v6 and 7 are different I am not sure.

I've never used any of the public cloud services so I don't know how they compare.

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Reddit wipes clean leaked celeb nudie pics, tells users to zip it

Nate Amsden
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i don't understand

with so much quality porn out there why most anyone would give a crap about some naked celebs.

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Shitty what? Almost half of MPs have never heard of Tech City

Nate Amsden
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what is a MP

When I see that I think of military police.

I assume it means something different here.

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White box switches out-sell Brocade, Arista in the data centre

Nate Amsden
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only 50%?

Last I heard Cisco's market share was up in the 70-75% range, with HP about 10-15% and most of the rest of the vendors sub 5% each. I seem to recall Juniper being in the 6% range (at one point in the past year or so anyway), Extreme was in the ~3% range until they bought Entarasys and doubled their market share to 6% (they were something like within 0.2% of Juniper's market share at the time they said). Brocade was in the 3-4% range as well, not sure on Arista.

If Cisco is down to 50% that is quite a hit.

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Not so ESXi? Open sourcery could help VMware win... virtually

Nate Amsden
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Re: VMware is probably screwed

I had a conversation with my former boss who has been using OpenStack for almost a year now (he is building a platform based on it for his new company's technology stack for customers). I quote him "Openstack sucks, but I know it". Something along those lines anyway. Openstack is not ready for prime time unless you have significant internal resources to keep it going or have a support partner like HP to help. A quote from HP "The easiest thing about Openstack is installing it, most organizations spend the bulk of their time simply keeping it running". You're in an endless upgrade cycle because the support cycles are so short both with community and with the enterprise editions from the likes of HP and Red Hat.

The storage on Openstack is even worse from what I'm told, a lot of organizations are finding that out the hard way and deploying enterprise storage behind it. The networking in Openstack sucks too, again quoting HP "after about 50 nodes neutron falls apart".

You can certainly make it work, I am told ebay has something like 200 engineers working on openstack there, most organizations don't have the time/money/resources to devote anything remotely resembling that to running stuff.

Openstack has a bright future, but it will be years(still!) until it's ready to be a product that you can install, support and be stable for 3-5 years without constant hacking/fixing/patching/upgrading.

A sign that it is getting stable will be when the likes of Red Hat and HP begin offering 3-5 year support agreements on Openstack, right now both are at 18 months. In HP's case the last 6 of those 18 months are dedicated to assisting migrating to the next version of Openstack which they emphasize is not trivial.

ESXi is not cheap to be sure (though the price you quote above seems pretty cheap perhaps that is not enterprise plus or maybe you have good bulk discount licenses). For me I compensate as much as I can by getting the most powerful processors I can to better utilize the license(which for us w/enterprise plus and 3 years production support comes to about $5k/socket without any fancy vmware addons none of which I need).

The value is still there for me, the stability and performance of vSphere and compatibility across operating systems (not likely many Linux shops are going to deploy Hyper-V). I had my first vSphere crash(PSOD) in 8 years of using it back in June (support believes it was a rare condition that was fixed by a firmware update released in May).

I don't understand the article's author though they seem to think that open source is the answer to everything when it is not. (I say that as a Linux user for 18 years now in personal and professional use, and have been a Linux user on the desktop for 16 of those years including right now).

If you want an open source hypervisor there are at least two of them out there. What was that? They suck? (Why else are you asking for VMware to opensource vsphere?) Well you get what you (don't) pay for.

Meanwhile my vSphere 4.1 clusters keep humming along running our ~550 or so Linux VMs.

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Oracle's MySQL buy a 'fiasco' says Dovecot man Mikko Linnanmäki

Nate Amsden
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how is oracle hurting with mysql?

The legions of mysql users that weren't paying Sun/MySQL for support still aren't paying Oracle for MySQL support? Oracle didn't care about those people anyway, probably in excess of 90% of them were not going to consider paying Oracle for support regardless.

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We're not on the Gartner Magic Quadrant? Just imagine our concern, says HDS

Nate Amsden
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it's bullshit like this

that made HP feel forced to make the 3PAR 7450 and the new badly named 7200 All flash versions not able to support disks(when there is nothing technically preventing them from supporting disks) to appease these sorts of people because there are a lot of folks out there that put stock in what Gartner says.

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Australia deflates Valve with Steam sueball

Nate Amsden
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isn't that what Steam's DRM is for? revoke access to the title. I've only played a couple steam titles (both of which I bought on physical DVD), but I can't play them unless Steam is logged in and up to date (and I never play online).

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Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts

Nate Amsden
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Re: Half of the Story

You have the option to participate in open source true. The reality for probably 98% of orgs out there is even with that prospect they do not participate because they don't have the skills/etc to do so.

I've seen countless companies including every one I've worked for use open source stuff for various things and pretty much never contribute back. If they found problems with some open source package the solution was typically not to use that package and try something else, rather than spend time beyond basic community mailing lists to get help resolving it.

Many folks see open source not as freedom but as "don't have to buy something". Which in some cases creates many more problems than going out and actually buying something that may work better.

(Linux user for 18 years, 16 of those spent supporting it and other open source tech along side commercial tech, so not a MS fanboy by any stretch!)

If your a Linux user and want to support open source, use a commercial distribution like Red Hat. You get quality software, and you know you are supporting a lot of open source projects at the same time. It's a much easier sell to management then saying they should donate $$ or hire some developers to contribute code back.

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Dropbox cuts cloud storage prices $10 per terabyte, matching Google and Microsoft

Nate Amsden
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Re: "1 TB (1,000 GB)"

I think it's safe to assume the version with all zeros.

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HP busts out new ProLiant Gen9 servers

Nate Amsden
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request to HP

hire Jordan Carver to help market those new racks.

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Better be Nimble, tech giants, or mutant upstarts will make off with your sales

Nate Amsden
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take that nimble nay sayers

that statement should of been right below the image instead of above it.. the image says more than the text of the story.

Would be nice to see a comparison of the nimble results relative to Fusion IO and Violin.

I think they have some decent tech, my company even has one of their arrays(maybe two I forget), not in my department though. I think it does a fine job for what it is used for, mission critical will remain 3PAR for some time to come though here anyway.

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Hey FCC, Comcast-TWC merger is bad news for Netflix, says Netflix

Nate Amsden
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how does the merger impact broadband consumer choice

Since cable orgs are generally granted monopolies over their areas, there should be little to no overlap between the two, so consumers don't have a choice between comcast and time warner in a given market.

I'm against the merger myself as well since I think they would be too big, and I like the concept of separating content creation (NBC Universal etc) from distribution. But anyway I don't see the reasoning behind broadband competition.

I do find it somewhat amusing some folks though they whine and complain about lack of competition when often enough there is multiple broadband providers in their area whether it is DSL, mobile internet, sattelite or something like that. Then they say "oh yeah well all those suck, they are too slow". Which basically means cable companies are doing a good job at providing competitive service.

Some folks (I was one at one point) want the cable isps to be regulated like common carriers. But again look at the state of the DSL market -- you're likely to see the cable internet market go the way of that if they are regulated in a similar manor.

For me - I use cable internet from I guess what you could call a "municipal" provider - they serve the city I'm in of ~41k people only (and I'm spitting distance practically from Youtube's HQ, I walk by it on the way to work). Other ISPs in my area include AT&T Uverse, and a couple others. The broadband offered by this small cable provider is somewhat on par with what I got with Comcast before I moved here, though there is no business class offering(that I know of anyway) that can give me faster upload speeds (I have a server at a local colo and it would be nice to have faster upload to it - as-is I get about 2Mbit - if I paid more the most I could get is about 5Mbit upload).

I won't do Uverse at least in part because last I checked(just now actually) it was not compatible with my Tivo S3 or S4, and I have no interest in using their DVRs in place of Tivo, even if Uverse was free. That doesn't stop them from sending me stuff in the mail to sign up at least once a week seems like.

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VMware EMC partner Cisco inks reselling deal... with Simplivity

Nate Amsden
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isn't

scale computing bigger than Simplivity at least? I've never used any of them myself but

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/08/14/scale_computing_scales_sales_up/

"It has amassed more than 900 customers who use more than 3,500 HC3 appliances, "surpassing the number of customers of its closest competitor by a wide margin.""

From your own article and yet you seem to forget so quickly.

Hell I don't know why I remembered, I don't even really care.

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Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years

Nate Amsden
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woke me up

first earthquake to ever wake me up I think, I am close to SFO airport, felt like it was going for quite a while down here.

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Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays

Nate Amsden
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cheap is relative

What is cheap x86 servers? My fairly loaded HP DL380Gen8s (24 core/48 thread 192GB 4x10G 2x8G FC w/4 hour onsite support) and vSphere enterprise plus are around $30k each. The cost hasn't changed too much since we bought our DL385 G7s 3 years ago (other than the systems are about 2x faster than our 3 year old boxes in the same power envelope)

Maybe to some that is cheap, maybe to others it is not. To me it's reasonable with the ability to get good consolidation ratios out of them, and they have been *extremely* reliable.

Though HP 3PAR has done pretty amazingly well at being a low cost leader in all flash systems recently(relative to their main competition anyway)

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HP lets the SAN shine: StoreVirtual now bigger, flashier, OpenStack-ier

Nate Amsden
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I think

the 7200 designation for that array is incorrect in the article, at least it's not the number I heard it was going to be called. The 7200 is an entry level system that was released in December 2012. I would not expect HP to re-use that number for a brand new system that would not be smart. But I will confirm with 3PAR. Not that you can't equip a 7200 with all SSDs if you wanted.

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Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable

Nate Amsden
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Re: Way too simple.

honestly I probably couldn't (quickly) do multiple of those things without referring to previous examples I have used in the past. I feel I am adept at Linux having used it for almost 18 years now and well I just know I'm very good. I also know where to draw the line, I'm not going to go out on a half baked expedition to try to get some obscure open source project to work when I can get a commercial solution that does the job just fine (I used to do this back in the 90s, then I learned that was a bad approach oh how I remember the struggles of configuring linux to be a PPP dialup server what a pain that was).

But (like many I suppose) I don't have every little bit memorized (esp detailed configurations) if I'm not doing that every day (last time I really configured postfix was probably 3 years ago, it's just run since then). But I have all my docs, all my config examples. I also actively avoid doing things like rewrite rules in apache as well because they are PITA (prefer to do it at my real load balancers it's far easier).

And don't get me started on squid, that thing is a PITA. Always has been, I've set it up maybe 3 times in the past 14 years. Even with docs and examples it's a major PITA.

So I honestly, very honestly would probably not do so hot on this test, but I absolutely know that I am very good with Linux (having been tech lead on every project I've been involved with more or less since 2003) and have employers falling head over heels constantly trying to hire me (sorry, not interested I am happy where I am at now).

I've never put any faith in certs, generally they are not worth a whole lot. When I look at candidates I generally rank them lower the more certs they have, especially if they have really stupid ones like A+ type stuff. To-date my intuition on that has been accurate, generally candidates that have a lot of certs don't tend to know a whole lot. Same goes for candidates that have long resumes, the longer the resume the less they seem to know.

I never recall anyone ever asking me for a cert. I think it is more common if I was a dedicated network engineer. I do networking whether it's L2-L3 switching, or L4-L7 load balancing, (no dynamic routing), no certs though.

I suppose the biggest reason I don't recall every nitty bitty configuration detail, is really I have more valuable things to store in my brain.

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Microsoft, Google link arms on browser vid chat

Nate Amsden
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MS has been doing a great job

of breaking their own skype clients recently. Whether it is the older linux clients, killing off support for windows phone 7, or whatever..seems like a bad idea. Earlier today I noticed someone try to invite someone into a group chat (text chat, not voice/video) and skype said in the chat "(username) needs to update Skype to participate in this chat. Help by sending them to Skype.com/downloads. Learn more about new group chat."

stupid.

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VMware buys CloudVolumes to speed app installations

Nate Amsden
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so

how is this different from something like XenApp ? I am certainly not an expert in either but have used XenApp a bit over the past few years(handy for thick management apps like vCenter over a WAN connection), and it makes apps look and feel like they are local, and drive letters are mapped automatically so you can get data from local drives and put it up to the hosted app, and I think it does printers and stuff too.

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WTH? Upstart stuffed with ex-VMware bods grilled on Amazon cloud 'rescue' plan

Nate Amsden
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aws is a f*cking chore to use

it's so limited in it's features/capabilities it's maddening. Those who don't understand that haven't done any infrastructure work in the past 15 years because that's how far back in time you gotta go (if not further).

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Object storage bods Exablox: RAID is dead, baby. RAID is dead

Nate Amsden
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seems kind of limited

They only support SMB (CIFS) ? Really? I think most would argue that NFS is a far more commonly deployed protocol amongst servers anyway.

I suspect these guys are not using RAID as in mirroring whole drives, they are probably mirroring (or more likely triple mirroring) objects across systems. So if a drive fails the objects are mirrored elsewhere, you don't need to wait on that drive or a hot spare or something to kick in. They may be using RAID for the operating system disk(s) on their controllers (or perhaps just a small SSD).

3PAR has a nice RAID system too which is similar, breaking the drives up into 1GB (as of a few years ago before that 256MB) so rebuilds are very fast and the design is quite scalable. You can even yank a drive out of an array and the system will go into "logging" mode writing data that would go to that drive to other locations for up to something like 7 minutes at which point the system assumes the drive is dead and rebuilds. You can gracefully evacuate drives as well for seamless maintenance.

IBM's XIV does something similar too I believe but last I checked they still limited themselves to 7.2k RPM disks and RAID 1 only (I suspect their CPUs can't keep up with the calculations for RAID 5/6 at that level, with 3PAR that is handled by their ASIC).

XIO (assuming that's what they are called now) does RAID across drive platters, which I thought was quite creative too, they can fail individual platters in drives and not have to replace the disk (system ships with enough spare capacity that you don't take a capacity hit over the 5-8 years or so of the system warranty).

It's not uncommon for a 3PAR array to have more than 50,000 RAID arrays on it with just a few hundred spindles(much more for those on systems older than current generation since the size of the chunklets is smaller).

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Nexenta reckons it has Edge in squeezing your object storage BLOB

Nate Amsden
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also competing

I'm sure there is more but DDN comes to mind(absolutely massive object scale with 1 trillion objects/cluster), as does Red Hat storage server(which is software only). I think NetApp has object storage too though last I saw it was quite limited in scale (relative to say DDN anyway).

I think the potential market for this stuff is pretty small, much of the object storage systems I suspect will be in the service providers and well there's only so many of those.

Most small orgs don't need object storage, NAS is more than sufficient (say up to and including a few PB).

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The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?

Nate Amsden
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Re: i can't patch

just tried to install KB2929437 and the patch says it is "not applicable to your computer". thanks for the tip though

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Nate Amsden
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Re: i can't patch

LDS - I don't know. I don't tend to skip patches I just let the system patch whatever it wants. I looked and indeed I do not have KB2929437, I'll take a snapshot of my VM and see if I can get that one to install(faster to recover with vmware than with windows system restore for me)

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Nate Amsden
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i can't patch

my main windows 7 VM that I use on my laptop anymore. There is an outstanding patch for IE11(KB2964444 - was failing since 5/2) that if it gets installed the system will BSOD on reboot(not installing it seems to hold up other patches). I cannot uninstall IE11 due to some sort of internal corruption in the system. Tried a few basic things I found online to try to fix it nothing worked.

The system functions fine otherwise.

I suppose at some point I need to reinstall it (tried doing some basic recovery stuff to fix the issue everything failed), the system is pretty well protected as-is anyway, but hasn't seen a patch in several months. I've personally never had this kind of issue with windows before, though I haven't been a serious windows user in some time(still not).

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Microsoft Azure goes TITSUP (Total Inability To Support Usual Performance)

Nate Amsden
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Re: 512K Day?

No way, Microsoft runs SDN. And SDN will save the world, it doesn't have any limitations, you could put a billion routes into it and it won't skip a beat because it's web scale.

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New Sprint CEO says he will lower axe on staff – but prices come first

Nate Amsden
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anyone know

how well (or not) Sprint's $20 billion iPhone commitment from 2011 has worked out? Seems like quite a big bet.. I left Sprint after 10 years about a year after they announced that, after they got rid of their customer appreciation program too.

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Docker kicks KVM's butt in IBM tests

Nate Amsden
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Isn't this less about docker

And more about LXC? Or does docker not use LXC anymore. My impression was docker was simply a way to package things and had little to do with the container itself.

I deployed a few lxc containers earlier this year. They serve their purpose fine. I looked into docker at the time and found no reason to use it. Just used lxc as built into ubuntu 12.04. We built the containers months ago and haven't had to touch them since(from an OS/container standpoint at least). If you are frequently destroying and recreating containers perhaps docker is good. Life cycles for my systems typically measure in years.

So I adapted our existing provisioning system that I have been using for 7 years that works on physical as well as virtual hardware and added simple LXC hooks into it. So installation and system configuration is very similar to the other systems we have.

Performance is good but containers are quite limited in functionality which will limit my usage of them to specific use cases.

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Boffins find hundreds of thousands of woefully insecure IoT devices

Nate Amsden
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just wait

till we get this "smart grid" bullshit, it will make these security bugs look like I don't know pretty trivial by comparison.

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It's time for PGP to die, says ... no, not the NSA – a US crypto prof

Nate Amsden
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Re: He's right! PGP sucks to use!

hey man I like the ability to telnet to a SMTP server on port 25 and issue SMTP commands directly to debug things.

same goes for HTTP.

and other protocols.

Myself I've never really had a need for encryption in email. I've run my own mail services since the mid 90s and I've never felt I needed fancier SMTP or to even deploy PGP (I think I used PGP a couple times back in the 90s for email never since). Though my mail system does support SASL/TLS I did add that a few years back so my mobile devices could email remotely without using webmail or VPN. Though I rarely even do that, I haven't sent an email through my email server from my phone since last year (it doesn't even work anymore and I can't be bothered to figure out why and fix it).

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Hey, biz bods: OpenStack will be worth $3.3bn by 2018

Nate Amsden
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can't keep it up

One of the tech leads for HP's Helion/Openstack told a group of blogers(inc me) a good quote at HP Discover in June -

"The easiest thing about OpenStack is setting it up - organizations spend the majority of the time simply keeping it running after it is set up."

My former boss works at a company who is working with Openstack and agreed completely. It's not ready for prime time.

I think Open Stack has a bright future, that future is just a few years out still. My personal tipping point to seriously consider Open Stack will be when the likes of Red Hat and HP offer 3-5 year support contracts for it, that will tell me they have confidence. As-is both offer max of 18 months (in HP's case at least the last 6 of which are dedicated to upgrading to the next version which they emphasized was not trivial, and depending on organization size you may be in an endless cycle of upgrading - me on the other hand the bulk of my servers still run ESX 4.1 quite happily).

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NetApp: Revenues are down – but own brand kit wasn't to blame

Nate Amsden
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Re: Hmmmmm

I don't see how you can compare HP/Compaq to NetApp/Engenio(sp?) - there is (almost?) no product overlap in the NetApp case. The platforms are built for totally different markets. It doesn't take but 30 seconds of looking at the capabilities of each to see this.

I think perhaps it is more of companies that used to buy from LSI are less comfortable buying from NetApp as they are obviously more of a competitor in other storage spaces as well, and so perhaps are shifting towards Xyratex and other suppliers, I don't know.

As for Flash Ray I agree with the first poster that is NetApp's goal, though the slide that El Reg implies that they are further away from that goal than many folks might think(assuming the slide is recent) and are trying to temper expectations for launch day.

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Golden age of invention or hyped-up age of overblown marketing?

Nate Amsden
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seems to be quite a bit of innovation

going on these days, I suppose the most obvious one is SSDs, but a good storage system is a hell of a lot more than just slapping a bunch of SSDs in it and allocating LUNs or exporting file systems. Finding good ways to best utilize the underlying technology's performance while maintaining high levels of reliability/availability and if your lucky scalability too.

I don't think there is much over hype in the storage industry at all. Now by contrast the networking industry and their software defined bullshit THAT is hype(hype to roughly 99.999% of organizations anyway). Networking has traditionally been a very boring thing, and they are desperately trying to get attention with software defined.

Some folks are trying to capitalize on that and offer "software defined storage" which I view as hype as well. There are some interesting approaches but too many platforms are claiming software defined when it doesn't make any sense.

That said I still find myself a loyal 3PAR customer/advocate 8 years after getting my first system. They continue to give me reasons to stick to them. I told their leadership at Discover that if you asked me two (and for sure three) years ago did I think the 3PAR architecture would make it in the SSD world I would of been very skeptical. What they've managed to pull off without having to do any ground up rewrites or acquisitions in the past 18 months has just blown me away(and there's more to come as always).

I do see interesting things that some storage startups are doing - if I worked for a much bigger org that had more silos of storage laying around I'd be interested in test driving them. As-is, for the most part anything we get has to be capable of being a backbone driving tens to hundreds of millions of revenue each year(over $200M/year is driven by roughly two racks of equipment today). Which for me means I don't want to take the risk and use the startups for that kind of thing - I've learned a lot about storage over the past 10 years or so and perhaps the most important lesson is I've learned to be conservative in the risks taken(and yes I have had my fair share of issues on 3PAR over the years, by no means is it a flawless platform - which just re-iterates my feelings against relying on the startups for such a system).

(not a storage guy specifically I do networking servers, ops stuff etc as well)

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VMware hangs with the cool kids in the Containers gang

Nate Amsden
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Vapp

I thought the vApp concept was containers on vsphere. Though I could be wrong and I never noticed vApps het traction. The concept was apps running directly on the hypervisor somehow. I think initially it was limited to java apps or something. I lost track a few years aho seems like.

Of course I could be wrong on what a vApp was I first heard about it maybe 2008 or 09

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The internet just BROKE under its own weight – we explain how

Nate Amsden
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Subset of smaller ISPs perhaps. I see names like AT&T, Verizon, Comcast being tossed about(datacenter knowledge article).

I don't wish to single out my data center provider but all of their facilities were impacted as well and they have several million square feet of data center space, the facility my equipment is in is one of the largest data centers in the world (colo anyway - it feels like a half mile walk from the parking lot inside the building to get to my cage probably closer to .3 miles). But again we don't use them for IP transit, so their problems did not impact us.

This particular data center I believe came online in the last 5 years, so it's not as if they were running the same equipment for the past 15 years or something. To their credit they had their first facility that was impacted(the one I was in) upgraded by about 2PM pacific time.

A monitoring service we use was impacted as well and they are in a well connected data center(s) too. I don't know who operates those facilities though.

So this goes well beyond end user connectivity into lots of data center facilities probably around the world.

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