* Posts by Nate Amsden

1636 posts • joined 19 Jun 2007

We grill another storage startup that's meshing about with NVMe

Nate Amsden
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hey lior

just saying hi to lior(one of the founders, I know him and a couple other Excelero folks from Exanet days) I assume he is reading this article.

On the topic of host vs controller caching one important aspect is if you are caching reads or writes. Caching writes at the host layer is much more complicated of course. Qlogic wanted to try this with their Mt Rainier tech(and I was excited at the time), but from what I heard that aspect of the tech never got close to making it.

Now if you are hyper converged then caching writes at the host is more feasible I imagine.

For me, the bulk of my org's workloads are in excess of 90% write. Most of the read caching is handled in memory in the app layers (wasn't designed with that purpose in mind just ended up being that way)

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Standards body warned SMS 2FA is insecure and nobody listened

Nate Amsden
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educate the users

but don't remove the option.

At my org where we use Duo approx 18% of the users (according to monthly Duo report) use SMS or Voice, about 65% use the Duo Push app(most of the rest use a duo generated pass code). This number hasn't changed over the past 6 months. At one point I noticed for whatever reason people located in what might be considered non 1st world(not knowing off the top of my head what constitutes 1st world) countries seemed to be more likely to use voice as the 2nd factor, at least in my org.

I don't expect Duo to remove the option, though I suspect their admin UI has the ability to turn off various forms of 2 factor if the companies wish to(I haven't checked).

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Congrats America, you can now safely slag off who you like online

Nate Amsden
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now if

only every social media type thing that allows you to "like" something would allow you to "dislike" as well then maybe we can make some more progress.

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Nutanix makes thundering great loss, stock market hardly blinks

Nate Amsden
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Re: So

judging a company on one quarter's numbers? The graph is right there in the article. It reminds me a lot of Violin's graph, here is an article from 2013 about them

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/11/25/mistuned_strings_on_violin_cause_financial_discord/

heat is on to keep the growth going.

I think if anyone is buying into VDI right now it is probably safe that Nutanix will be around in 3-4 years even if they are in the toilet at that point(see how violin continues to hang on by a thread).

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Internet Archive preps Canadian safe haven to swerve Donald Trump

Nate Amsden
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Re: Over reaction?

yeah for sure it's over reaction, internet archive is already subject to existing laws whether it may be copyrights, porn or other things. Whether or not anyone has ever gone after them for such things I have no idea.

If they are going to move somewhere there have got to be better places to go than canada, which is what the 52nd or 53rd or something state?

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Storage newbie: You need COTS to really rock that NVMe baby

Nate Amsden
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what does that mean?

"The idea behind E8 is that not 100 per cent of what an AFA does inside the array must be done in the AFA itself, and since NVMf requires a high-bandwidth low-latency network anyway, there will be no performance hit if those things are done outside the array"

What are those things ? It sounds like this thing has absolutely no data services, so they get high performance(which is how Violin started??). How can some of those things like replication, or snapshots be done outside the array on a shared volume ?

It will probably be a few years until controllers can catch up to NVMe, just like it took several years for them to catch up to regular old SSD. Maybe by 2020 ?

Until then people will have to make due with compromises on features if they need raw performance.

Fortunately for most customers this is a non issue since as the article says regular old SAS SSDs are plenty fast already, and will be fast enough for a long time to come.

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I'm not having a VMware moment – there's just something in my eye

Nate Amsden
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Re: Hooray for single points of failure!

Mission critical(which is really in the eye of the beholder) data already sits on centralized storage for probably 98% of organizations out there. You simply cannot get the reliability and stability(and data services) with internal storage systems on any platform. Even the biggest names in cloud and social media make very large scale usage(relative to your typical customer anyway) of enterprise class storage systems internally.

Certainly you can put "critical" data on internal drives, though it's highly unlikely that truly mission critical stuff (typically databases and stuff - that may be responsible for millions or more in revenue) would sit on anything other than an external storage array (likely fibre channel). Ten or so years ago VMware brought a whole new life to centralized storage simply because of vMotion.

If you don't understand that then I don't have time to discuss it further.

Though the person who is touting this idea in the article sounds neat, getting that kind of thing done right is far easier said than done and am not sure when it may happen (certainly none of the solutions on the market are even close). Some solutions do file well, others do block well, others do object well. Nobody comes close to being able to do it all well on a single platform. Maybe it will be another decade or so before we get to that point if we ever do.

I think at this point speeds of flash is really not important anymore(outside of edge cases). What is far more important is simply cost. Cost is improving but obviously has quite a ways to go still. Many data sets do not dedupe, and lots of datasets come compressed already (e.g. media files). Need to wait to continue to get the cost of the raw bits down further.

SAS-based SSD systems will be plenty fast for a long time to come for most workloads.

I have some mission critical systems that do not use our SANs, though they are generally stateless(web or app servers), there is no mission critical data on them.

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Fancy the new HTML vSphere client? Go get it: The old one has a security problem

Nate Amsden
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.net client still works fine

For my vsphere 5.5 clusters (no plans to upgrade yet maybe in 1 year)

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Debian putting everything on the /usr

Nate Amsden
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only thing I ask

As a debian user since 2.0 in 1998.. (whose personal servers still split /usr /var and /home etc on different logical volumes)

is they keep system rescue utilities on /

But sounds like they won't.. stupid stupid.. sad to see.

reminds me of one time I tried to rescue a solaris system many years ago, the /usr was not accessible for whatever reason I forgot why at the time, and of course I couldn't even run 'ls', I had to rely on 'echo *' to see what files were on the system to try to find the command to mount or fsck or something.

oh well, like systemd that I haven't had the misfortune of using yet I guess I'll have to get used to this move too eventually.(*trying not to think about it*)

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Dell EMC's Pure-crushing benchmarks are flawed, says, er, Pure

Nate Amsden
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how can you not know

how many SSDs are in the system? for Pure it says 40 (estimated) for each test. I tried looking for a link to the results in the article but did not see any.

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HPE core servers and storage under pressure

Nate Amsden
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Re: What to do with $5B?

as a long time HP customer I agree(and I tried going the white box route for a couple years only to learn the hard way and came back to HP), they do a lot of stupid things. Though it seems like many (most?) companies are doing stupid things recently when it comes to wanting to show some kind of growth. If you are not showing growth then you might as well be dead in the eyes of many stock holders, even if it might take you a decade or two to actually "die".

Which is of course one of the big reasons Dell went private.

The next full recession whenever it hits (I thought it would of really hit 2-3 years ago, some people argue we have been in one the whole time and I partially agree with that but think there is significant pain on the horizon) will be interesting to see what happens across the various industries.

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Continuous Lifecycle 2017: Ten days to tell us how DevOps really works

Nate Amsden
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here's mine

https://youtu.be/PivpCKEiQOQ

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Arista cats escape US quarantine, for now: Customs says it's OK to import networking gear

Nate Amsden
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I can picture

someone at Cisco throwing chairs around right about now

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Fancy a wee quasi-DRAM? Supermicro bulks up server memory

Nate Amsden
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2TB?

I know these don't use the fancy flash but I was just curious what a typical HP DL360 Gen9 (1U) can do, and HP says can go up to 3TB/server with 128GB DIMMs.

They can do NVDIMM too, though 128GB max ?

https://www.hpe.com/h20195/v2/GetPDF.aspx/c04375623.pdf

So other than cheaper what is special about this supermicro thing

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Dyn Dyn Dyn – we have a buyer: Oracle gobbles Internet of Things DDoS victim

Nate Amsden
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seems like a good deal for Oracle

(Enterprise Dyn customer for 7 years now across 3 companies, have never used their free services)

I bet the attack got Dyn on Oracle's radar just how important they(Dyn) are to many companies out there in cloud. Oracle has lots of cash to blow and seems like Dyn is likely to be dirt cheap compared to a lot of their purchases.

As a Dyn customer I like the idea of Dyn staying independent, certainly do not believe the attack hurt their business all that much(all of their paying customers especially the big ones are well aware of the DDoS risks).

I just think that some big exec had an "aha" moment(again after the attack surfaced how critical Dyn is) and decided to give Dyn an offer they felt Dyn wouldn't be able to refuse.

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Why I just bought a MacBook Air instead of the new Pro

Nate Amsden
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Re: I'm in a similar dilemma with my 2008 unibody 13" MacBook 8GB ram 256GB SSD

Not sure what your drinking but I want some.

Not an apple customer either. With my recent laptop upgrade I too don't expect to upgrade storage for a while. 512G maybe pushing it for now, which is why my lenovo P50 has 2TB of SSD (2x512G samsung 950 pro and 1x1TB samsung 850 pro). My previous laptop(2011) had a 512G samsung 850 pro as well(that laptop went through 3 HD upgrades over it's life )

For a 'tech pro' 512G is likely bare minimum these days.

And how is 3GB per sec enough for swapping in place of ram? I looked up the specs of my i7 6820HQ cpu and it has 34 gigabytes per second of memory bandwidth. I assume that is with all 4 memory slots filled, currently using 2(16G upgradable to 64G)

My 6 year old toshiba with i7 620M CPU apparently has 17 gigabytes per second of memory bandwidth.

Apple has the money and skill to make machines for that market, probably their longest most loyal userbase. I bet most of them would be perfectly happy with the older form factors just with updated components.

Sad that they just don't care.

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Surveillance camera compromised in 98 seconds

Nate Amsden
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you must be new to this then, amazing to me that it would be amazing to someone else to think there wasn't such protections in place. It's not as if botnets are new. What was it a decade or so ago people clocked unpatched XP systems at being hit by botnets in a matter of seconds too?

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/08/19/infected_in20_minutes/

oh sorry 20 minutes, I guess bandwidth was tighter back then. Though the brief outbreak of that SQL slammer had MSSQL systems infected in a shorter period of time. If people were running (and continue to run) SQL servers (and mongo etc) exposed to the internet on server class platforms I'm not sure how people can expect non technical folks to run their cameras in any more of a secure manor.

(not to knock XP specifically just that sticks out in my head)

and as for government intervention, wasn't it someone in the U.S. government anyway recently saying they are not equipped to handle this ? They need a new department etc. That will take time to spin up, fund, and stuff. Enforcement will be difficult as well, look how well the copyright enforcement goes and they are equipped to handle that.

I don't know what the solution is myself, whatever it is it will likely take a bunch of time and resources and will probably be full of holes anyway. In the mean time do your best to protect yourself.

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Windows cmd.exe deposed by PowerShell

Nate Amsden
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Wouldn't want a power shell

Any more than I'd want a perl shell.

I'm sure it makes a fine interpreter but as a shell it has always sounded pretty terrible. I say sounds because I've never spent more than a minute or two at a time in powershell.

Windows does have the disadvantage of having to deal with objects like the registry instead of text files. Some may like that approach more but if course isn't for everyone.

My favorite native shell for Windows dates back maybe 20 years.. 4NT. And for dos 4DOS. Fond memories of both. I use cygwin these days though my usage is pretty limited to a dozen or two commands. 98% of my computer time is in linux

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EMC crying two SAN breakup tears

Nate Amsden
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Re: Whats new?

Most people writing apps haven't either.

Good luck running RDMS etc on object stores?

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HP Ink shrinks workstations to puckish form factor

Nate Amsden
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less powerful

than my Lenovo P50 laptop which has an Skylake i7 (Xeon capable), 16GB ram (64GB capable), and 2TB of SSD (1TB SATA 2x512GB NVMe), and Nvidia M2000M 4GB GPU, running Linux Mint 17 MATE.

My laptop is a bit bigger(14.86" x 9.93" x 0.96-1.16") probably because it has to include a full sized keyboard and 15.6" LCD.

Though I'm assuming it's cheaper than my $3400 laptop(probably doesn't include a 4k screen by default even though I run mine in 1080p). I don't see pricing for this new HP thing anywhere.

I love HP Proliant and 3PAR though this workstation doesn't seem like much of a workstation if a basic laptop easily out classes it. (I have a HP xw9400 workstation next to me here though it is about a decade old, by no means is it small though).

per above poster my laptop is pretty quiet and comes with a 170W external AC adapter.

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And with one stroke, Trump killed the Era of Slacktivism

Nate Amsden
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net neutrality

From what I have read in user comments over the recent years it seems the bulk of what people call net neutrality could be re-worded as "Unlimited netflix streaming".

It also seems as if the people that want this unlimited netflix streaming really don't care how it's done, they just pile on to Net neutrality as if it will save them.

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Forget razors and blades, APIs are the new gotcha

Nate Amsden
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merchant silicon

Has been out there for over a decade. Nothing new. Same with 3rd party optics. Which is why many first tier vendors flag 3rd party optics and won't support them (or may for a premium)

I wouldn't be caught dead deploying a supermicro ethernet switch though. Plenty of low cost options out there that have real support and better software.

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Qumulo bangs out new software, Apollo server support

Nate Amsden
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read-write snapshots?

Seems most NAS systems are limited to read-only snapshots, useful for data recovery but not quite as useful for testing with stuff that wants to write. Not sure why it seems so hard to do for NAS when SAN folks have had read write snapshots for a very long time now.

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HPE and SimpliVity may be at church door

Nate Amsden
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nutanix needs

Dell OEM deal to fight off... Dell... hmmm

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IPv4 is OVER. Really. So quit relying on it in new protocols, sheesh

Nate Amsden
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Re: Exhaustion? and yet...

Try getting a /24 it is pretty painful. But even /27s not hard to get still.

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Nate Amsden
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what new protocols?

Does anyone have an example of new protocols or ideas that this might impact? Just curious, I can't think of any new protocols that I have heard of that would have been useful to me in the past decade.

Or if someone can just name some useful protocols that have come out in the past decade?

I have been doing networking for the past 16 years or so, though generally base stuff. There is a bunch of fancy shit out there I know that has never had any value to me(e.g. TRILL -- but that is a layer 2 thing totally independent of course of layer 3 IP).

Would HTTP/2 count as such a protocol ? I suppose it would but again I'm perfectly happy with HTTP 1.1.

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Handling tech baggage: How American Airlines, US Airways merged IT

Nate Amsden
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no way

They are applying kernel updates to 200 systems and rebooting them in 5 mins without significant impact to availability(otherwise they would talk about much more than 200 systems)

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Kaminario's K2 mountain is about to be uplifted

Nate Amsden
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100 customers

After all this time seems really low for them.

A quick search shows an article saying they expect to hit 100M in annual revenue in the next couple of years. Quite a tough market for storage "startups" these days.

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Web security still outstandingly mediocre, experts report

Nate Amsden
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Re: How do they know?

I no longer actively blog but tgat is where my WP admin is at too. Someone cracked into it earlier in the year somehow (I've never run the vulnerable plug-ins,maybe compromised one of the admin accounts).

Ended up locking it down by limiting access to the admin to my private VPN. Also deleted all other accounts(been 3 years since anyone other than me wrote articles), no issues since fortunately.

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Nate Amsden
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Which is one reason why the deadline keeps being extended.

For my org we've been unable to go beyond 1.0 due to a blocking citrix netscaler bug I was working with them for 18 months on(unrelated to TLS, but blocked upgrading). Now they have a fix which is due in early December for public use. Which means immediate deploy to test envs then production hopefully in late January. Assuming no further blocking bugs discovered.

Not vulnerable to the major TLS attacks according to SSL labs though.(qualys does regular scans to validate we are PCI compliant)

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Living with the Pixel XL – Google's attempt at a high-end phone

Nate Amsden
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Re: Convert ahoy

Hit submit on accident and can't edit posts on mobile.

Wanted to say only complaint about camera is low light. Though i generally work around that by recording a video in low light then taking a screenshot of the video.

Long live android 4.4

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Nate Amsden
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Re: Convert ahoy

Reading your comment on my note 3, still my main phone (and a 2nd for backup). Haven't found something good enough to entice me to switch yet. 160Gb of total flash storage, finally enough that I don't feel constrained.

I've never recorded 4k video and the camera has never been set beyond the 8Mp setting (14Mp max I think? )

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Twitter trolls are destroying democracy, warn eggheads

Nate Amsden
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the solution

Is to destroy twitter, facebook, and other sites like them.

I think linkedin is somewhat helpful(to me anyway), though the stupid feed that people post pictures to and write comments is dumb.

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Nest turns off oven, vacuum

Nate Amsden
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leave the stove on

I figured nest smoke detector would be able to text you that your home is burning down in that case :)

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Why Apple's adaptive Touch Bar will flop

Nate Amsden
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Never been an apple customer

But I do feel for those pros getting burned. What's worse is apple literally has more money in the bank than any other tech company so has resources to build a product that fills the niche of power users. I didn't pay attention to the event, seeing the macbook air get canned in this article is the first I've heard of that.

For whatever reason last night I was bored and spent some time reading comments on arstechinca about the new pros. Lotsa upset people who waited years for a lackluster update.

I recently upgraded my laptop after 5 years. It was a massive upgrade for me whether cpu or ram or gpu or storage or screen

Went from a 2011 era Toshiba Tecra A11 dual core i7 8GB 1600x900 Nvidia video with 512Mb and samsung 850 pro 512G(5.6 pounds), all the way to Lenovo P50 quad core i7 with 16G (upgradable to 64, don't see going past 16G for a long time), nvidia video with 8G a 1Tb samsung 850 pro *and* DUAL samsung 950 pro 512G (total 3 SSD and 2TB). Oh and 4k display (but due to windows 7 remote desktop and vsphere client being unusable in 4k I run at 1080p, works fine for me).

I fussed about with 4k for a week or two but don't see much benefit even if all my apps worked right. It just made everything smaller forcing me to increase things like fonts etc to compensate. I'm sure perhaps for media it is great, but for system andmin stuff I do it has little value (I do use 16 virtual desktops with edge flipping which provides far more value). I do not use external monitors either (never have).

But hey 4k is there for me waiting if I ever change my mind, same with 4 memory slots that can take me to 64G of ram.

New laptop weighs the same more or less same physical size. Old laptop was $2300 new one all in about $3500(company paid for everything but the dual 950 pros).

Both laptops stay in linux mint 17 99% of the time and dual boot windows 7 if needed for games, also run windows 7 in vmware for some work related tasks. ( you can probably guess how I feel about windows 10 despite knowing it surely handles 4k better than win7)

I'd guesstimate battery life in linux around 3 hrs. Which is fine it stays plugged in 99.876% of the time. Only complaint for travel is the power brick is more than double the size of the toshiba. I think the P50 tops out at 200W, though with normal usage with a kill a watt meter I saw about 55w total.

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Broadcom snaps up Brocade for $5.9bn

Nate Amsden
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here's an idea

Spin out the IP business and call it something like Foundry Networks.

I was thinking there would be trouble for broadcom if they bought brocade given so many companies OEM broadcom for their switches etc. Good to see they realized that too.

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Ghost of DEC Alpha is why Windows is rubbish at file compression

Nate Amsden
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Re: Obvious bull

Maybe I am wrong but I recall original NT being for... i98x cpus or something like that (not x86 and not alpha). X86 alpha mips ppc were added later.

I used NT 3.51 and 4 on my desktop(x86) for a few years before switching to linux in 1998.

The article doesn't seem to mention who actually uses ntfs compression. I've only seen it used in cases of emergency where you need some quick disk space. I seem to recall patch rollbacks are stored compressed too (I always tell explorer to show compressed in different color)

Even back when I had NT4 servers 15 years ago, never used compression on em. Saw a spam recently for Diskeeper, brought back some memories.

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Str-NAND-ed: Flash chip drought hits tech world

Nate Amsden
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Re: Things that make you go...

Perhaps I mis remembered but I thought seagate had facilities in thailand that were affected by the floods as well. Perhaps hitachi too.

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Nate Amsden
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7 weeks

To get 8 SSDs for one of my 3par arrays. The person that installed them said he had another customer with a big order get only half of it(this is within past 2 weeks).

Most of the 3par SSDs are sandisk so perhaps the constraint is limited to them. Sandisk is known to make a SD card every now and then as well.

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If any idiot can do it, we're heading in the right direction

Nate Amsden
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hate DACs

Rather just use 10GBaseT. So much simpler. Only use fiber where distances require it.

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Cisco: This $200k UCS S-Series is cheaper than AWS S3 after 13 months

Nate Amsden
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s3 is pretty easy to beat on costs

Object storage is not expensive, see this el reg article from 2 years ago

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/05/06/emc_announces_elastic_cloud_storage_google_amazon/

And obviously EMC is not well known for being the low cost leader in storage (excluding situations where they "buy" the business like cisco likes to)

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HPE: Wanna revive that support deal for your software? Ha ha ha, har

Nate Amsden
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Re: Renegotiation is the issue, this is:

Seems pretty normal to me. Having renewed lapsed support contracts from several vendors they generally backdate them to when the support lapsed(which in my case typically hasn't been more than a couple months). Though am not used to paying a "re activation" fee. Though vmware recently reached out to me and said there is a 20% fee for reactivating stuff from them.

With HP for me what is more frustrating is at least with hardware, care packs vs support contracts, especially in Europe. I renewed support for a pair of fibre channel switches last year through an EU vendor (because U.S. based vendors are not allowed to buy such contracts, I have tried). I got a registration ID, I go to the HP website and register the care packs, and I get an entitlement certificate(s). Then normally I would go to the support website and link that care pack to my account so I can open a case online. Only to find the support site says the entitlement does not exist.

I spent hours on the phone and email trying to track down the source of this problem, and for U.S. support contracts I found the cause, some care packs for some reason automatically transfer to be support contracts and in the process invalidate the care pack IDs. So to register you have to have the SAR and SAID codes, of which HP does not give to you when this process happens (why this process happens at all is just beyond me). With U.S. HP I was able to address a similar issue(they gave me the new codes), but for E.U. HP for the past 15 months I have been unable to find someone to help me on this. I have had my EU vendor for the past 6 weeks trying to figure it out again (year 2 of this issue). In the meantime I cannot open support cases online, and if I really need support I am forced to call long distance to europe because HP (again so stupid) doesn't have any ability to reach their EU call centers from a U.S. phone number for paying customers like myself. (maybe they have not heard of VoIP)

If someone happens to know of a contact at HP in Europe that knows about this stuff it would be good to know. For U.S. based care packs it is (844-317-1454), I was told last year that for EU it was +31 504-0666 though last time I tried that it did not work. HP U.S. specifically said they have no insight into how the EU stuff works and I was even more surprised that they could not get me in direct contact with their EU counterparts (other than some random phone number which I could not get working).

Fortunately on these pieces of equipment they have gone 5 years so far without needing support.

I really like HP stuff otherwise this is one of the few things that really annoys me.

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Microsoft flips Google the bird after Windows kernel bug blurt

Nate Amsden
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is the windows bug

windows 10 specific? The original blog post from google (just looked at it again) was not clear, made it sound to me like many versions were affected.

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Grab your code ASAP: Nitrous cloud IDE evaporates in two weeks

Nate Amsden
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provider longevity

Got that question answered now.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9v-33jcEDk4

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Google drops a zero-day on Microsoft: Web giant goes public with bug exploited by hackers

Nate Amsden
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Re: Google is as much nice with Microsoft...

Doesn't seem like any real value to disclosing it, they don't claim to have a workaround, so other than "be careful" and "install the patch when it comes" (which most people should be doing anyway) see no value to disclosing other than for publicity.

Not that I care(as a Linux user), doesn't really affect me.

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Seagate has a flash early Xmas present for Xbox gamers

Nate Amsden
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SSD on PS4

I bought an Intel 730 SSD on special about a year or so ago, didn't have anything readily available to use it, so I slapped it in my PS4. Thought it would help a bunch, but at least on PS4 load times seemed about the same(I didn't notice any difference). Though the only games I have seriously played on PS4 are GTA5 and more recently Fallout 4.

I have a few other games too but combined equate to about 6 hours of play time.

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KCL out(r)age continues: Two weeks TITSUP, two weeks to go

Nate Amsden
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a lof of the posts here imply to me "system admins" in general working with small data sets in fairly simple environments. It's easy to protect a small amount of data, obviously as complexity and data sets go up the amount of work required to back things up right goes up as well.

An extreme example to be sure, but I recall going to an AT&T disaster recovery conference in Seattle probably about 2009 time frame. At the massive scale AT&T was at they still had stuff to learn.

Specifically they covered two scenarios that bit them after the 9/11/2001 attacks in NYC.

First was they had never planed for a scenario where all flights in the U.S. were grounded. They had the people and equipment but could not get them to the locations in a timely manor.

Second was when they setup a new site after the WTC was destroyed to handle AT&T network traffic probably a few blocks away they had big signs up advertising they were AT&T there, and they realized maybe it wasn't a good idea to advertise the fact that they were there so publicaly.

One company I was at had a "disaster recovery plan" which they knew wouldn't work from day 1(as in 100% sure there was no way in hell it would ever work), but they signed the contract with the vendor anyway just to show to their customer base that "yes they had a DR plan" (the part where "does it actually work" fortunately wasn't part of the contracts). They paid the DR vendor something like $30k/mo to keep 200 or so servers in semi trucks on call in the event they would need them -- knowing full well they had no place to connect those servers if they had to make that call.

A lot of the comments here incorrectly portray the process of true data protection as something that is pretty simple. It is not, and if you can't understand that then well I don't have more time to try to explain.

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Nate Amsden
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I see you stopped reading my post pretty quick, as I covered all of those other factors. You have to ask yourself what are you protecting against? Then solve for that.

Very often you will find when you want to protect everything against every situation the organization will not shell out the $$ to cover even a fraction of what you may want to protect (whether it is $$ for hardware or $$ for staffing to do it, test it etc).

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Nate Amsden
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Re: Overthinking

Time will tell for them if they prioritize this failure as something that can be protected against in the future or if the cost and risks involved mean at the end of the day perhaps they do little or nothing. (I've seen both myself)

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Nate Amsden
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Re: Overthinking

Speaking as someone who has been involved in similar situations on multiple occasions at multiple organizations, more often than not the fault lies as high as the CFO or CEO who signs off on the budgets.

Good luck giving them the pink slips?

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