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* Posts by Nate Amsden

940 posts • joined 19 Jun 2007

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Object storage bods Exablox: RAID is dead, baby. RAID is dead

Nate Amsden
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seems kind of limited

They only support SMB (CIFS) ? Really? I think most would argue that NFS is a far more commonly deployed protocol amongst servers anyway.

I suspect these guys are not using RAID as in mirroring whole drives, they are probably mirroring (or more likely triple mirroring) objects across systems. So if a drive fails the objects are mirrored elsewhere, you don't need to wait on that drive or a hot spare or something to kick in. They may be using RAID for the operating system disk(s) on their controllers (or perhaps just a small SSD).

3PAR has a nice RAID system too which is similar, breaking the drives up into 1GB (as of a few years ago before that 256MB) so rebuilds are very fast and the design is quite scalable. You can even yank a drive out of an array and the system will go into "logging" mode writing data that would go to that drive to other locations for up to something like 7 minutes at which point the system assumes the drive is dead and rebuilds. You can gracefully evacuate drives as well for seamless maintenance.

IBM's XIV does something similar too I believe but last I checked they still limited themselves to 7.2k RPM disks and RAID 1 only (I suspect their CPUs can't keep up with the calculations for RAID 5/6 at that level, with 3PAR that is handled by their ASIC).

XIO (assuming that's what they are called now) does RAID across drive platters, which I thought was quite creative too, they can fail individual platters in drives and not have to replace the disk (system ships with enough spare capacity that you don't take a capacity hit over the 5-8 years or so of the system warranty).

It's not uncommon for a 3PAR array to have more than 50,000 RAID arrays on it with just a few hundred spindles(much more for those on systems older than current generation since the size of the chunklets is smaller).

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Nexenta reckons it has Edge in squeezing your object storage BLOB

Nate Amsden
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also competing

I'm sure there is more but DDN comes to mind(absolutely massive object scale with 1 trillion objects/cluster), as does Red Hat storage server(which is software only). I think NetApp has object storage too though last I saw it was quite limited in scale (relative to say DDN anyway).

I think the potential market for this stuff is pretty small, much of the object storage systems I suspect will be in the service providers and well there's only so many of those.

Most small orgs don't need object storage, NAS is more than sufficient (say up to and including a few PB).

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The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?

Nate Amsden
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Re: i can't patch

just tried to install KB2929437 and the patch says it is "not applicable to your computer". thanks for the tip though

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Nate Amsden
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Re: i can't patch

LDS - I don't know. I don't tend to skip patches I just let the system patch whatever it wants. I looked and indeed I do not have KB2929437, I'll take a snapshot of my VM and see if I can get that one to install(faster to recover with vmware than with windows system restore for me)

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Nate Amsden
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i can't patch

my main windows 7 VM that I use on my laptop anymore. There is an outstanding patch for IE11(KB2964444 - was failing since 5/2) that if it gets installed the system will BSOD on reboot(not installing it seems to hold up other patches). I cannot uninstall IE11 due to some sort of internal corruption in the system. Tried a few basic things I found online to try to fix it nothing worked.

The system functions fine otherwise.

I suppose at some point I need to reinstall it (tried doing some basic recovery stuff to fix the issue everything failed), the system is pretty well protected as-is anyway, but hasn't seen a patch in several months. I've personally never had this kind of issue with windows before, though I haven't been a serious windows user in some time(still not).

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Microsoft Azure goes TITSUP (Total Inability To Support Usual Performance)

Nate Amsden
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Re: 512K Day?

No way, Microsoft runs SDN. And SDN will save the world, it doesn't have any limitations, you could put a billion routes into it and it won't skip a beat because it's web scale.

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New Sprint CEO says he will lower axe on staff – but prices come first

Nate Amsden
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anyone know

how well (or not) Sprint's $20 billion iPhone commitment from 2011 has worked out? Seems like quite a big bet.. I left Sprint after 10 years about a year after they announced that, after they got rid of their customer appreciation program too.

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Docker kicks KVM's butt in IBM tests

Nate Amsden
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Isn't this less about docker

And more about LXC? Or does docker not use LXC anymore. My impression was docker was simply a way to package things and had little to do with the container itself.

I deployed a few lxc containers earlier this year. They serve their purpose fine. I looked into docker at the time and found no reason to use it. Just used lxc as built into ubuntu 12.04. We built the containers months ago and haven't had to touch them since(from an OS/container standpoint at least). If you are frequently destroying and recreating containers perhaps docker is good. Life cycles for my systems typically measure in years.

So I adapted our existing provisioning system that I have been using for 7 years that works on physical as well as virtual hardware and added simple LXC hooks into it. So installation and system configuration is very similar to the other systems we have.

Performance is good but containers are quite limited in functionality which will limit my usage of them to specific use cases.

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Boffins find hundreds of thousands of woefully insecure IoT devices

Nate Amsden
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just wait

till we get this "smart grid" bullshit, it will make these security bugs look like I don't know pretty trivial by comparison.

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It's time for PGP to die, says ... no, not the NSA – a US crypto prof

Nate Amsden
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Re: He's right! PGP sucks to use!

hey man I like the ability to telnet to a SMTP server on port 25 and issue SMTP commands directly to debug things.

same goes for HTTP.

and other protocols.

Myself I've never really had a need for encryption in email. I've run my own mail services since the mid 90s and I've never felt I needed fancier SMTP or to even deploy PGP (I think I used PGP a couple times back in the 90s for email never since). Though my mail system does support SASL/TLS I did add that a few years back so my mobile devices could email remotely without using webmail or VPN. Though I rarely even do that, I haven't sent an email through my email server from my phone since last year (it doesn't even work anymore and I can't be bothered to figure out why and fix it).

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Hey, biz bods: OpenStack will be worth $3.3bn by 2018

Nate Amsden
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can't keep it up

One of the tech leads for HP's Helion/Openstack told a group of blogers(inc me) a good quote at HP Discover in June -

"The easiest thing about OpenStack is setting it up - organizations spend the majority of the time simply keeping it running after it is set up."

My former boss works at a company who is working with Openstack and agreed completely. It's not ready for prime time.

I think Open Stack has a bright future, that future is just a few years out still. My personal tipping point to seriously consider Open Stack will be when the likes of Red Hat and HP offer 3-5 year support contracts for it, that will tell me they have confidence. As-is both offer max of 18 months (in HP's case at least the last 6 of which are dedicated to upgrading to the next version which they emphasized was not trivial, and depending on organization size you may be in an endless cycle of upgrading - me on the other hand the bulk of my servers still run ESX 4.1 quite happily).

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NetApp: Revenues are down – but own brand kit wasn't to blame

Nate Amsden
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Re: Hmmmmm

I don't see how you can compare HP/Compaq to NetApp/Engenio(sp?) - there is (almost?) no product overlap in the NetApp case. The platforms are built for totally different markets. It doesn't take but 30 seconds of looking at the capabilities of each to see this.

I think perhaps it is more of companies that used to buy from LSI are less comfortable buying from NetApp as they are obviously more of a competitor in other storage spaces as well, and so perhaps are shifting towards Xyratex and other suppliers, I don't know.

As for Flash Ray I agree with the first poster that is NetApp's goal, though the slide that El Reg implies that they are further away from that goal than many folks might think(assuming the slide is recent) and are trying to temper expectations for launch day.

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Golden age of invention or hyped-up age of overblown marketing?

Nate Amsden
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seems to be quite a bit of innovation

going on these days, I suppose the most obvious one is SSDs, but a good storage system is a hell of a lot more than just slapping a bunch of SSDs in it and allocating LUNs or exporting file systems. Finding good ways to best utilize the underlying technology's performance while maintaining high levels of reliability/availability and if your lucky scalability too.

I don't think there is much over hype in the storage industry at all. Now by contrast the networking industry and their software defined bullshit THAT is hype(hype to roughly 99.999% of organizations anyway). Networking has traditionally been a very boring thing, and they are desperately trying to get attention with software defined.

Some folks are trying to capitalize on that and offer "software defined storage" which I view as hype as well. There are some interesting approaches but too many platforms are claiming software defined when it doesn't make any sense.

That said I still find myself a loyal 3PAR customer/advocate 8 years after getting my first system. They continue to give me reasons to stick to them. I told their leadership at Discover that if you asked me two (and for sure three) years ago did I think the 3PAR architecture would make it in the SSD world I would of been very skeptical. What they've managed to pull off without having to do any ground up rewrites or acquisitions in the past 18 months has just blown me away(and there's more to come as always).

I do see interesting things that some storage startups are doing - if I worked for a much bigger org that had more silos of storage laying around I'd be interested in test driving them. As-is, for the most part anything we get has to be capable of being a backbone driving tens to hundreds of millions of revenue each year(over $200M/year is driven by roughly two racks of equipment today). Which for me means I don't want to take the risk and use the startups for that kind of thing - I've learned a lot about storage over the past 10 years or so and perhaps the most important lesson is I've learned to be conservative in the risks taken(and yes I have had my fair share of issues on 3PAR over the years, by no means is it a flawless platform - which just re-iterates my feelings against relying on the startups for such a system).

(not a storage guy specifically I do networking servers, ops stuff etc as well)

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VMware hangs with the cool kids in the Containers gang

Nate Amsden
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Vapp

I thought the vApp concept was containers on vsphere. Though I could be wrong and I never noticed vApps het traction. The concept was apps running directly on the hypervisor somehow. I think initially it was limited to java apps or something. I lost track a few years aho seems like.

Of course I could be wrong on what a vApp was I first heard about it maybe 2008 or 09

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The internet just BROKE under its own weight – we explain how

Nate Amsden
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Subset of smaller ISPs perhaps. I see names like AT&T, Verizon, Comcast being tossed about(datacenter knowledge article).

I don't wish to single out my data center provider but all of their facilities were impacted as well and they have several million square feet of data center space, the facility my equipment is in is one of the largest data centers in the world (colo anyway - it feels like a half mile walk from the parking lot inside the building to get to my cage probably closer to .3 miles). But again we don't use them for IP transit, so their problems did not impact us.

This particular data center I believe came online in the last 5 years, so it's not as if they were running the same equipment for the past 15 years or something. To their credit they had their first facility that was impacted(the one I was in) upgraded by about 2PM pacific time.

A monitoring service we use was impacted as well and they are in a well connected data center(s) too. I don't know who operates those facilities though.

So this goes well beyond end user connectivity into lots of data center facilities probably around the world.

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Nate Amsden
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Re: forgot to mention

the DPI widget may very well of been overwhelmed, though that's still a layer 3 thing. The original article somewhat implies (though I suspect most of the readers are techy enough to see past it) that the problem may of impacted specific protocols rather than connectivity in general regardless of protocol.

but in any case not a big deal

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Nate Amsden
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Re: It's happening, get over it

Not forever, but for the foreseeable future yes. I see absolutely no reason to deploy IPv6 myself. Any IPv6 deployments right now basically require IPv4 connectivity in some form to reach the majority of internet sites out there anyway. I can understand IPv6 is more important for the really large service providers much less so for the small companies like the ones I have worked for.

None of the people I have spoken to over the years have expressed any interest in IPv6. I refer to the people who really want IPv6 as "internet hippies" (same goes for the IoT advocates not interested in any of that either), and have written about it on occasion. It's like the folks who want to ban grocery stores from using plastic bags, it's kind of funny.

IPv6 people argue IPv4 with NAT breaks so many things like peer to peer (I don't do any peer to peer myself). My funny counter argument is - fine, deploy some IPv6-only clients and see what breaks by comparison relative to IPv4-only clients.

My phone is on carrier grade NAT when it is on the telco network. Everything I have done over phone (tether) works fine whether it is the likes of SSL or IPSec VPNs, skype, and everything else. No issues.

IPv6 may come sooner or later, I suspect it is many years out still though.

I may not even be doing networking anymore by the time it really hits.

The thing I dislike most about IPv6 is the addressing scheme it looks like a MAC address, seems like it will be difficult to remember IPs relative to IPv4 addressing. Some people have said "but we have DNS!" yes we have DNS but that doesn't always work or isn't always configured correctly. I don't need to memorize every IP in my network but I have quite a few memorized of the key devices (just out of habit, it's not something I tried to memorize specifically).

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Nate Amsden
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forgot to mention

oh and routing RDP has nothing to do with the 512k route thing. Not sure why you mentioned that. These are layer 3 routes, RDP is layer 4 and up, which requires layer 3, but of course not vise versa.

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Nate Amsden
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kind of weird

that it took el reg over 24 hrs to write about it? If you had people contacting you for 12 hrs it would of been nice to see an article earlier :)

I think I first realized what was going on at around 1:15 yesterday afternoon (Pacific). There was nothing that directly affected me but I got notices early in the morning from our data center provider they were doing emergency memory upgrades on all of their switches/routers at all of their data centers (we don't use them for IP connectivity). Then I got another email from a service we use saying they were having problems with their carriers. Then I contacted a friend and he pointed me to a reddit thread (I don't spend any time on reddit otherwise) which had a bunch of folks talking about it.

A co-worker late yesterday afternoon searched google and said he found nothing other then the reddit thread on the issue. Which prompted me to write a blog post on it(I don't have much to write about these days..).

interesting to hear that network admins were turned down for upgrades in preparation. Seems like an easy sell "look at this graph: http://bgp.potaroo.net/bgprpts/rva-index.html when it gets to 512,000 - we go down unless we buy X" (I realize that most providers didn't go completely down but rather degraded but it's easier to explain to just say you go down). I've worked for some really cheap bastards over the years and I don't think any of them would of given me shit had I told them that.

On that note however I looked up the specs of the core switches I was using 10 years ago and they had capacity of 1 million unique BGP4 routes in hardware as well as 2 million non unique BGP4 routes in hardware(we did not use BGP they were just powerful switches). How service providers 10 years later could be running equipment that can't do at least that is just pathetic. I would expect switches/routers of today to handle at least 5 times that without blinking.

I had some reports of some of our customers reporting bad experiences on the interwebs - but neither of our IP providers reported any problems and none of our monitoring indicated any issues with our site internally or externally which was nice.

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Mirror, mirror on the wall, who has the best TSM backend of all?

Nate Amsden
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just curious

was looking at the HP StoreOnce 4900, I haven't used this box but the paper specs claim max write speed of 8.5TB/hr (Catalyst performance of 22TB/hr not sure if that is read or write or both?) which google says is about 2.3GB/sec. Max of about 140 drives in 12U of course and 430TB usable with full inline dedupe etc..

The next step up is a big one to the 6500 which goes up to around 17GB/sec (Catalyst is 38GB/sec) which I think is around 560 disks (just dividing the raw capacity by 4TB disks which is what they use) though it seems to take two cabinets for up to 1.7PB of usable(before dedupe etc).

I think the optimal protocol to use with Storeonce is probably VTL over ISCSI. They support NFS/CIFS too but I'd expect performance is less there.

I've never used TSM nor worked at a place that used it but it seems it is a supported software package for StoreOnce.

just had storeonce on my mind based of another article on el reg from earlier today. I use one of their smaller boxes (about to install a 2nd one at another location - not going to use built in replication though don't need it).

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Flash could be CHEAPER than SAS DISK? Come off it, NetApp

Nate Amsden
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Re: Is NetApp talking price not cost?

What I got out of the article was NetApp was specifically referring to the "5TB bulk disk" you mention as the cost/price point.

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Gartner mages throw deduping backup appliance bones, claim EMC's in lead

Nate Amsden
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Re: Where is Oracle/Sun/StorageTek? CommVault?

zfs dedupe is in a different league. It's more for online storage not for backups. I am in the midst of migrating from a ZFS (Nexenta) based dedupe+compression store to HP StoreOnce, ZFS gives me less than 6:1 dedupe(on a data volume dedicated for backups).

StoreOnce on my biggest file set is over 40:1 and still going (I suspect will continue to grow as I expanded the # of backups to store from 14 to 60 and I'm not even at 30 at the moment). My biggest backups are from our OLTP mysql instance - StoreOnce says there is 10.9TB of user data stored in 241GB of disk space (less size than one full pre-dedupe backup!). All other backups combined are less than 1.5TB of user data written.

Wherever possible (mysql especially) we are doing full unencrypted, uncompressed backups to get maximum dedupe (same as we were doing on ZFS). Percona xtrabackup is our backup tool of choice for MySQL at the moment.

By contrast devices like HP StoreOnce(or data domain etc) are REALLY REALLY bad for online transaction type stuff(they urge you in their docs to not attempt it). It's really built for sequential operations.

I only use StoreOnce in NAS mode, so can't vouch for any other abilities (an update in July increased it's NAS scalability to 1 million files per share from 25k which was too limiting for us - 1 million is plenty though). The one thing that StoreOnce can't do that I'd like it to do is support for symbolic (or hard) links on the NAS. I exchanged some emails with the HP product manager for StoreOnce a few months ago and they were going to look at whether or not they could add that feature.

I'm not personally aware of a dedupe Disk to disk backup appliance that is similar to StoreOnce or EMC Data Domain from Oracle or Commvault (though I haven't looked at either recently).

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Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4: 4G Android tablet is easy to swallow

Nate Amsden
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Re: Whither Nexus 8@ FartingHippo

I don't have this device though my personal track record attempting procedures like this has me confident I'd break the device in the process.

I am glad my note3 has a user replacable battery will probably get near the 1 year anniversary of owning it.

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Nate Amsden
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Let me at that battery

I drained my note 3's big battery by 40% in 20mins with vpn, citrix reciever and skype on LTE not long ago. Video doesnt hit the battery much I assume because its almost all GPU.

Im sure battery isnt the most efficient these days as the phone spends about 18 hrs a day charging on one of a few inductive chargers that I have.

When will tablets get wireless charging? Or maybe there are some other than the HP touchpads (of which I have 3 one is unopened -got 5 at fire sale decided to keep that one wrapped up. Two other android 7 and 8" tablets go unused just not big enough relative to phone to be useful for me)

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On test: Samsung 845DC EVO 3-bit Toggle MLC and 845DC PRO 3D V-NAND SSDs

Nate Amsden
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Re: Awesome drives..

I just ordered a 512GB 850 Pro yesterday, and was pretty happy with it until I realized it did not have power fail protection, I was looking at the Intel 730 before that which does have power fail protection. The drive is going into a 4-year old Toshiba i7 laptop that spends 99% of it's time plugged into the wall (currently runs off a Momentus XT 750GB hybrid).

I imagine the likelihood of serious data loss due to power fail/system crash is probably low but this has been on my mind today. I had a crucial SSD a few years back get pretty large data corruption after a power failure(UPS battery was dead and when self test kicked in the system went down - this was in my home not a business!).

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How to deal with server hogs: Throw them out of the frying pan and into the Solidfire?

Nate Amsden
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3 words

3par priority optimization

or a few more words

"Create SLAs to protect mission critical applications in enterprise environments by assigning a minimum goal for I/O per second, bandwidth and latency. Performance for that specific tenant or application is assured."

All SSD, spinning rust, or multi tier available on any configuration. No billing interface that I am aware of though. The most recent enhancements to this capability were released in June 2013 (before that it was more rate limiting(like most other arrays) rather than true QoS).

Solidfire's QOS seems a bit limited by comparison at least from what I just watched on their youtube video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRZ0McgJwWg

It implies their QoS is limited to IOPS only (could be inaccurate but that's all they show in the video). No mention of throughput (low IOPS big I/O size etc can tax a system) or even better latency-based.

Details on this tech is very light on their website from what I can see they just have a series of videos, and the above is the only one that specifically covers QoS.

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Microsoft OneDrive tip-off leads to arrest over child abuse images

Nate Amsden
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obviously another example of

"Terms of service" that nobody bothers to read. printing it to pdf tells me it is 29 pages long. wtf.

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Android banking apps vulnerable to cash theft by CAS hole hackers

Nate Amsden
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fixed already

deleted all the banking apps on my android phone. Didn't trust them anyway, if anything maybe, maybe i'll use firefox to access the web UI but haven't even done that (on phone anyway).

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Shuffling Zombie Juror – aka Linux kernel 3.16 – wants to eat … ARMs?

Nate Amsden
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can't wait to upgrade..

eh.. no.. 2.6.32 works well for my laptop and desktop (both 3+ years old)

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Hey, big spender. Are you as secure as a whitebox vendor?

Nate Amsden
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my supermicro ipmi is still down

From when I upgraded the firmware back when that security thing made news. I haven't had time to go out on site to fix it.

The issue was upgrading the firmware required wiping all configuration from the ipmi controller as part of the upgrade process. Something that I don't recall ever happening with ILO or DRAC.

My IPMI wasn't behind a firewall mainly because it is a standalone 1U server in a colo with a single power outlet available to it. I have thought about putting in a soekris box with a power strip running off the colo's power strip (as long as it doesn't have a circuit breaker they say it's fine), but hasn't been a priority.

ILO 4 is just crazy good though, I love it anyway. Especially the integrated email alerting. Had a memory upgrade in a DL380Gen8 a few weeks ago and when the system powered up ILO emailed me that the memory was not installed correctly and it would not be used (wasn't aware there was a specific installation sequence required). Was able to look up the correct installation procedure and tell the on site tech to fix it.

"EVENT (14 Jul 21:27): POST Error: 207-Invalid Memory Configuration - Processor 1, DIMM 10 incorrectly installed. Please refer to Memory Population Rules in Documentation. This Memory will not be utilized."

And I love Advanced ECC(along with pre failure warranty - they replaced the memory chip no questions asked):

EVENT (13 Jul 05:18): Corrected Memory Error threshold exceeded ((Processor 2, Memory Module 12))

Also emails when NIC links go down, when the firmware is updated .. and the KVM remote console is crazy fast pretty much as good as being local. I think ILO4 has something like a dual core processor and 1GB of ram.

I've never personally had an ILO go unresponsive on me.

Though I do recall about 10 years ago at a company we had a network loop for a bit and it killed the redundant management interfaces on our HP Itanium systems. HP support said those modules were hot swappable so you could just yank them out of the chassis to reset them(regular reset methods did not work). We learned the hard way that they were in fact not hot swappable and it caused the systems to crash(well the first one we tried it on we obviously stopped after that one).

I liked ILO3 and ILO2 as well (though in some cases liked ILO2 more than 3).

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HP storage revenue downturn? It's just a 'kink', says exec

Nate Amsden
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tape

I haven't dug into the numbers myself as that is not my thing but in my talks with David Scott last month he attributed the decline almost entirely on tape. He said 3PAR had something like 90% year over year growth in Q1 anyway (and Q1 2013 was post 7000-series launch) and significant market share gains. I don't remember all the specifics but tape may of well played a big factor revenue wise. I think IBM sells tape too?

Though HP recently wrote that tape capacity shipments reached an all time record high in 2013 of 6,472 petabytes(I believe that is industry wide not just HP).

http://h30507.www3.hp.com/t5/Around-the-Storage-Block-Blog/Where-is-tape-media-headed/ba-p/167540#.U9vOJvEpKIA

Of course that is largely on the back of really big tape sizes, so fewer drives, fewer tapes but bigger sizes..

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Veeam's vigorous voyage vindicates virty servers' backup virtues

Nate Amsden
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why

didn't vmware buy veam instead of companies like that mobile device management, and that zimbra collaboration (I think they owned that at some point) among other non core tech. Veam seems to have been doing well for a long time and it's not as if vmware is short on cash.

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VMware builds product executables on 50 Mac Minis

Nate Amsden
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sounds absolutely stupid

what is the point? Because they think it's cute? I know vmware has hundreds of racks of servers in their labs, it boggles my mind they would use macs for anything other than vmware for mac products.

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YES, iPhones ARE getting slower with each new release of iOS

Nate Amsden
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nothing worthwhile in kitkat

for me. My phone upgraded about a month ago (Galaxy Note 3 on AT&T). I postponed it as long as I could until it wouldn't let me anymore(sadly that was only about 3 days). I had to clear the "app cache" or whatever it's called that caused most of the problems I was having to go away. But a month or so into using kitkat I really see no difference, other than accessing the camera on the lock screen(which has been more of an annoyance than useful since I have hit that area of the screen to unlock only to have the camera pop up when I didn't want it on several occasions).

I greatly feared the new "flat" look was going to come to my Note3 with kitkat(as I've seen on pictures of more recent Samsung devices) fortunately that did not happen.

The phone works about the same though.

I'd pay money for a subscription service that basically just gave bug fixes and not bring new features that I'm not going to use(especially significant UI changes such as the aforementioned "flat" stuff that came to IOS7 and is apparently the standard on windows phone which I have not used). But the happy-go-lucky mobile developers like to release the latest shiny..

So I guess the moral of this story is I feel quite relieved that the phone still works more or less the way it did under Android 4.3, I was very (and remain so) nervous about what will come in the future.

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VVOL update: Are any vendors NOT leaping into bed with VMware?

Nate Amsden
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the real question perhaps

is when will vvol-like tech reach the other hypervisors..

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HGST polishes Ultrastar SSD whoppers, stuffs with denser Intel flash

Nate Amsden
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is it really enterprise grade

if it's also shipped as a laptop drive? Or perhaps another way of asking is flash still so unreliable that you need "enterprise grade" in a laptop drive to make it reliable.

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Colbert report reveals VMware's AirWatch integration plan

Nate Amsden
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stupid

that vmware continues to try(and fail) to diversify away from it's core competency. If vmware actually spent over a billion on buying this mobile device management company that was a big waste, much better use of that money should go to making their various cloud things (even) better (thus far their higher end management things do not interest me anyway).

(vmware customer for 15 years)

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Need a US visa, passport? Prepare for misery: Database crash strands thousands

Nate Amsden
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Re: 100M records? 75M photos

big oracle DB, one company I was at a long time ago their largest OLTP oracle instance at the time I left (I'm sure it grew a bunch after that) was about 60TB. Oracle told them at the time it was by far the largest single OLTP in the world(next biggest was apparently Amazon at well under 10TB for a single instance). It consumed that much space due to bad application design not because they were doing trillions of transactions.

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How long is too long to wait for a security fix?

Nate Amsden
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Re: rarely update my home rooters

ssh is exposed that is it, my previous openbsd install I think was limited to keys only my current one is not will change that now :)

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Nate Amsden
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rarely update my home rooters

yeah I called em rooters, sounds funny.

My current home internet gateway is a Soekris box running OpenBSD 5.4 i386. Before the CF card failed roughly 222 days ago (current uptime) it was running I want to say OpenBSD 4.8 (maybe 4.4?) for however many years that was out for(never applied any updates). System is pretty locked down running pf (the only reason I use OpenBSD otherwise I do not like it at all). I login to the openbsd box maybe 3 times a year seems like. Haven't had to adjust the firewall rules in years.

I have a very old netgear WRT54G or whatever they are called running a version of DD-WRT (???) from about 6 years ago. It works, don't feel a need to change it (never crashed, never caused a problem). It's locked down as well as it can be I think. It's on a segmented network that routes through the Openbsd box before it can get to my main LAN or internet. I don't even login to the UI to this thing more than 2-3 times a year.

99% of my traffic runs on wired ethernet.

I have another wifi access point a netgear powerline extender thing-a-ma-bob. it's directly connected to my main network and has the max encryption it supports (forgot which offhand) and mac filtering (far from perfect but anything helps) enabled (WRT54g has both as well).

my laptop and work desktop for that matter run ubuntu 10.04 LTS (end of life was a year ago I believe). At some point I will buy a SSD for my laptop and install Linux mint (whichever one feels closest to Gnome 2 I forget which off hand). Don't plan to upgrade my work desktop unless something fails.

Never once to my knowledge anyway has any of the systems I personally manage either at home or work been successfully hacked in the 18 years or so I've been doing this, so I feel pretty confident that the stuff I do is adequate.

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Indie ISP to Netflix: Give it a rest about 'net neutrality' – and get your checkbook out

Nate Amsden
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nice to see

another voice of reason. Too many people think Netflix does no wrong.

(myself I killed my account when they had the first price hike because I realized how little I was actually using it at the time - have not seen any reason to re-subscribe to it or any other streaming media service)

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Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade

Nate Amsden
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firefox ESR updated too

after that ugly as sin UI change in a recent firefox I converted all my systems to ESR. I heard a couple folks say the new firefox UI looks more like chrome (I've never used chrome). I suppose if I wanted Chrome's UI I would use that.

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vBlock user says EMC bug slipped through VCE's matrix

Nate Amsden
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known bugs

I remember a LONG time ago I was at a company that used BEA Weblogic, and we had a lot of problems with JMS. One of our top engineers engaged BEA and asked them if they had any outstanding issues with that subsystem, they said no.

About 3 months later we had about 36 hours of downtime, due to JMS in weblogic. We "worked around it" by deleting all of the data in the JMS queues(last resort). After about 2-3 weeks of investigation the teams determined not only was it a known bug, but BEA had a fix for it all along and did not tell us even when we explicitly asked. It was their policy at the time not to disclose bugs to customers unless the customer was experiencing that specific problem.

The customer of ours that was down for 36 hours was one of the largest telcos in the world also a big customer of BEAs directly. BEA changed their support policies very quickly(at least for us) after that.

It was an interesting experience to be in my then boss' office with about a dozen senior software engineers and architects and all of them shrugging "I have no idea why it is broken, it shouldn't be doing this".

I talk to people since and they say "oh my god we've had a 2 hour outage! the horror!" pfft. Wake me up when you've been up for 24 hours straight and still don't know what the problem is.

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Comcast bosses: THAT pushy sales rep was only obeying orders

Nate Amsden
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It was easy for me to drop comcast

Not that I was not a happy customer, I would be a customer again if they were in my new area.

"I need to cancel my service because I am moving and you don't have service in my new area"

"Oh, are you sure you want to cancel what is your new address?"

(tell them my new address)

"Oh we don't serve that area, sorry to see you go!"

Took all of about 2 minutes.

My new cable provider to me is about the same as Comcast service(overall probably less service but those services that they lack are ones I don't use), performance and cost wise, though it is a small fry by comparison only serving the city I am in (apparently has ~42k people).

My bill is about $170/mo with most premium/HD channels and standard broadband (~16Mbps down / ~2Mbps up). It serves me well I just wish I had better upload speeds(I have a server at a colo with unlimited bandwidth and TBs of space about 15ms away). Even their top tier 100mbps service has only 5Mbps upload.

I'd be happy to pay Comcast $110/mo for their business class service with 50/10. There are no plans with 10Mbps on my cable provider for any price(on the website anyway).

AT&T Uverse keeps pestering me at least twice a month every month to sign up, but my Tivos don't work with them, so that is a big drawback, they don't offer anything special over my local cable company anyway (internet speeds may actually be worse with IPTV I am not certain).

I was a Comcast (and before that AT&T Broadband) customer for about 10 years or so, never really had a problem. I did stream netflix for about 6 months or so before I lost interest in their lack of content and haven't been a customer since their first price hike (mainly because I realized I wasn't using the service). Never used any of the "on demand" services from comcast, nor voice, nothing but tv(via tivo) and internet.

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ARM: We've signed 41 new deals and we are IN to the Internet Of Stuff

Nate Amsden
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90% market share

and from the looks of it not much to show for it. Yeah I know they just license the designs but still, seems puny. Samsung could probably buy the whole company with the spare change in the couch in the office of their CEO

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What kind of Big Data is yours? Is it data bauxite, data aluminium ... or data Dreamliner?

Nate Amsden
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good data is valuable

I'd rather have no data than bad data. Some people think it's better to have SOMETHING (even if it's wrong) than nothing, not me.

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Intel teaches Oracle how to become the latest and greatest Xeon Whisperer

Nate Amsden
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who cares about power?

With the cost of these systems(both hardware and software) the cost to power them has got to be a rounding error by comparison in most data centers anyway.

The consolidation factor alone should pay for power costs probably 10x over.

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Virty server bones thrown: Gartner mages see Microsoft rising

Nate Amsden
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vmware dedupes memory

Though it's not very effective for linux VMs in my experience, windows VMs seem to get massive deduplication benefits

11:30:19am up 21 days 18:09, 486 worlds; MEM overcommit avg: 0.42, 0.42, 0.42

PMEM /MB: 393179 total: 800 cos, 3164 vmk, 198343 other, 190871 free

VMKMEM/MB: 389783 managed: 23387 minfree, 123791 rsvd, 265992 ursvd, high state

COSMEM/MB: 91 free: 1521 swap_t, 1521 swap_f: 0.00 r/s, 0.00 w/s

NUMA /MB: 96512 (60234), 97916 (68875), 97916 (56153), 97916 (21283)

PSHARE/MB: 5145 shared, 821 common: 4324 saving

SWAP /MB: 0 curr, 0 rclmtgt: 0.00 r/s, 0.00 w/s

ZIP /MB: 0 zipped, 0 saved

MEMCTL/MB: 0 curr, 0 target, 345823 max

I think that equates to about a 3% savings for transparent page sharing? (ESX 4.1U3 host)

I really can't think of anyone who would consider Hyper-V if they weren't already primarily a Microsoft shop.

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BMW i8 plug-in hybrid: It's a supercar, Jim, but not as we know it

Nate Amsden
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supercar?

Really? 0-60 in 4.4 seconds? Seems kinda slow.

Get it under 3.5 seconds and maybe you can call it a super car. Get it under 3 and you've really got a super car.

People who drive super cars don't give a shit about gas mileage etc. Make it go fast.

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Two years in the making: Sneak peek at VMware's future VVOL tech

Nate Amsden
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vmotion doesn't move storage now

vmotion doesn't move any data on shared storage systems now. vvols won't change that.

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