* Posts by Nate Amsden

1076 posts • joined 19 Jun 2007

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Another day, another load of benchmarketing, this time from HDS

Nate Amsden
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So what's the alternative?

Having a level playing field is a good thing, unless someone can come up with a better test than SPC-1. It sure as hell beats the 100% read tests so many vendors like to tout.

It's not realistic to expect people to bring in a dozen platforms(even if they can, a big reason I am a 3PAR customer today is NetApp outright refused me an evaluation in 2006 so I went with the smaller vendor and well I'm happy with the results) to test with their own apps.

When my (current) company moved out of a public cloud provider 3 years ago, we were looking at stuff(of course I have a 3PAR background) and were looking at 3PAR and Netapp at the time. We had *NO WAY* to test ANYTHING. We had no data centers, no servers, nothing(everything was being built new). Fortunately we made a good choice, we didn't realize our workload was 90%+ write until after we transferred over(something I'm very confident that the NetApp that was spec'd wouldn't of been able to handle).

I spoke to NetApp(as an example, I don't talk to EMC out of principle, same for Cisco) as recently as a bit over three years ago and again they re-iterated their policy of not giving any eval systems(the guy said it was technically possible but it was *really* hard for them to do)

Last time I met with HDS was in late 2008 and they were touting IOPS numbers for their (at the time) new AMS 2000-series systems. They were touting nearly 1M IOPS.. then they admitted that was cache I/O only(after I called em on it - based on the people I have worked for/with over the years most of them would not of realized this and called them on it).

So unless someone can come up with a better test, SPC-1 is the best thing I see all around, from a disclosure and level playing field standpoint by a wide margin(beats the pants off SPEC SFS for NFS anyway).

I welcome someone coming up with a better test than SPC-1, if there is one (and there are results for it) please share.

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HDS blogger names HDS flash array as latency winner

Nate Amsden
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They aren't completely in charge of it, they could pick an artificially lower level if they wanted, but there is some upper limit(forgot what exactly been a couple years since I looked at it) that say if ANY of the response times are above something like 30ms the results at that level are not accepted.

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SOLD: Emulex – for 34% less than shareholders were offered 6 years ago

Nate Amsden
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I'm just one

but I have no plans to shift away from FC for my primary storage protocol for new and existing deployments. The cost of FC is minimal(in the grand scheme of things for me anyway) and provides a high level of availability and maturity that others still can't touch (includes FCoE).

My environment is small though, at this point about two dozen physical hosts powering $220M/year in e-com transactions. Maybe we get to a $billion/year with four dozen hosts who knows (FC still cheap then).

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Give in to data centre automation and change your life

Nate Amsden
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Re: Puppet & Chef

I have crons on all ~500 of my systems that use chef to auto restart chef if it takes more than 80MB, runs every 4 hrs. 408 restarts in past 24 hrs. Seems to be pretty reliable, set the cron up over two years ago, never have had an issue that I can recall. I have several other crons that are set to restart chef under various failure scenarios(getting stuck etc).

The topic came up of possibly migrating off of chef because it is too complex. As much as I hate chef, migrating off is more work than I'm willing to invest, I remember simply just replacing a broken CFEngine implementation at a company a few years ago with a good implementation, not even changing the version by much. In the four 9s environment to do it safely took well over a year to do. Chef sucks for most things I want it to do(wasn't my choice and I wouldn't use it today, not sure what I'd use, CFEngine v2 worked great for me for ~8 years), but it's not bad enough to switch to something else.

I hate ruby too, using chef just rubs salt in that old wound. Fortunately there are other people on the team that do much of the work with chef, so I can focus more on stuff I care about (one of the driving reasons why I didn't fight the fight to replace it two years ago).

But automation.. there are of course levels of automation. The author of the article basically lost me at "web scale". Obviously 99% of orgs will never see anything remotely resembling web scale. We pumped more than $200 million in revenue through a dozen HP physical servers and two small HP 3PAR storage arrays. Have since added more gear, still sitting at less than 3 full cabinets of equipment though. Getting to $4-700M in revenue maybe we add another cabinet(have one sitting empty at the moment already and with our new all SSD 3PAR I/O is really not much of a concern - I can get 180TB of raw flash in the 4 controller system that is installed now without taking more space/power).

We have quite a bit of automation, but to get significantly further, to me the return just isn't there. Spend 6 months to automate the hell out of things that may otherwise take you two weeks to do manually during that time? Seems stupid. I got better things to do with my time.

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May the fourth be with you: Torvalds names next Linux v 4.0

Nate Amsden
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don't break compatibility since forever

So binary drivers built against 2.6 will work fine against 4.0 huh? Yeah, that's what I thought. Breaking compatibility seems to be by design.

Of course I gave up on hopes of Linux ever getting a stable ABI for drivers probably 10 years ago.

I do miss the even odd releases of what was it 2.2.x and 2.3.x? days? where one was feature and one was stable. Course since they abandoned that concept I abandoned the thought of compiling kernels ever again.

(Linux user for 19 years - desktop linux for past 17 years including now)

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Superfish: Lenovo? More like Lolnono – until they get real on privacy

Nate Amsden
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I used to love thinkpad

Back when it was IBM.. when Lenovo bought it I switched to Toshiba. Currently my daily driver is a i7 Tecra A11 from 2010 with Nvidia graphics and Samsung 850 Pro SSD (primary OS is Linux). Works great.. though I miss my on site support contract, that expired last year. It's not ultra portable by any stretch but it spends 97% of it's life plugged in sitting on a table or desk anyway.

Last Thinkpad I used I think was 2006.

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HP flicks white box switch: NOT a Facebook wannabe? Stuff our open kit in your cloud

Nate Amsden
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How is HP not a "big boy" in network switching? Last I recall they were a clear 2nd to Cisco, *way* ahead of any of the other players by double digit % market share.

Not that I plan to use this, I am happy with my switching platform (not Cisco, and also not HP).

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Hitachi smashes SPC-1 benchmark, boasts: We HAF ways of crushing 2 million IOPs

Nate Amsden
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Re: Who would use

yeah discounted to the tune of 58% off hardware and 39% off software. List price is just over $4.4M. Also they are less than 1% away from being disqualified due to too much unused storage -- 44.31% vs 45% is the max). Still very impressive results in any case, even if it does take up two cabinets :)

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HTTP/2 spec gets green light: Faster web or needless complexity?

Nate Amsden
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i can see myself

using http/1.1 for the next decade. The bottleneck in my experience is in the apps, not in the network or protocols.

I'm sure super optimized people like google etc that is not the case but it seems to be for most of the folks out there.

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Traditional enterprise workloads on an all-flash array? WHY WOULD I BOTHER?

Nate Amsden
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for me

The cost of the AFA (3PAR 7450) was so good that it made sense to get it with the 2TB SSDs, because we are more I/O bound than space bound (though not I/O bound enough to *really* need an AFA). The data set is small enough that it fit easily in the system(about 12TB of logical data). Moving from a 3PAR F200 which is 80x15k disks, to the 7450 which is obviously much faster, consumes much less rack space(I can get about 180TB of flash in less space than the F200 has about 64TB of disk), less power etc.. F200 is end of life anyway, and end of support in November of next year.

Before the 2TB SSDs I was planning on perhaps a 7400 hybrid.. but the big SSDs made it an easier decision to just go AFA. Though I would prefer to have a 7440 which allows both disk and SSD (purely a marketing limitation not a technical one).

Note that most of the AFA offerings out there seem to be stuck using small SSDs (well south of 1TB from what I've seen) for whatever reason. I'm expecting to see at least 3 or 4TB SSDs on my 7450 easily within 2-3 years which means way north of 200TB of raw flash in my initial 8U footprint. I don't need millions of IOPS(average now well south of 10k), but to know everything is on flash and will get consistent performance is a nice feeling -- and the cost is not bad either.. and the data services are there in the event I need em (I do leverage snapshots heavily, not replication etc though). Also I get a true 4 controller system which is important to me for my 90% write workload. Add HP's unconditional 5 year warranty on all my 3PAR SSDs, and I don't have to care about wearing them out (obviously they have proactive failing etc and I have 6 hour call to repair support).

YMMV.

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ONTAP isn't putting NetApp ONTOP

Nate Amsden
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i wonder

Given the state of FlashRay if NetApp can't make progress fast enough on it, given it is a whole new platform that is not related to Ontap if they don't throw in the towel and acquire some startup to provide the technology(while quietly smothering FlashRay with a pillow in the night). I don't know who they should acquire if anyone I haven't been playing too close attention to the storage startups in recent years.

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Brocade reels in app delivery controller biz from Riverbed

Nate Amsden
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Re: What is...

Nothing

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Nate Amsden
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new name

Others may remember it as Zeus load balancer..I used it for a bit before riverbed bought em, seemed like a pretty good piece of software.

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HP’s Mr 3PAR, David Scott, is retiring

Nate Amsden
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I met david

For the first time in vegas last year at discover. Really cool guy. I had no idea what to expect. He said he reads all my comments on el reg, so if you're reading this David you rock!!

Nate

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Storage BLOG-OFF: HP's Johnson squares up to EMC's Chad Sakac

Nate Amsden
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I have been interested in trying some of the newer things, I just don't have an environment where I can take that kind of risk. Past companies had a lot more gear to play with..everything is so efficient and important here though that I try to be careful.. We do have a Nimble array at another site (sourced by IT I wasn't involved in that).

But I suppose the advanced data services aren't all that critical - I mean I don't use a whole lot on 3PAR. I don't use replication, I don't use many of the more advanced things (same goes for most tech I use, for some reason I tend to stick to the core stuff which tends to be the most solid whether it be storage, networking, vmware etc..). But the maturity aspect was important obviously. I've had my share of issues on 3PAR over the years.. I didn't think they would make it into the all flash world, I've been amazed at what they have accomplished though.

I'm sure XtremIO can work for a lot of folks..same for Pure storage and others..

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Nate Amsden
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my 7450

My 4-node 7450 (while far from heavily loaded) is averaging around 0.4ms. The official HP tools say this configuration is rated for 100,000 IOPS @ 90% write with sub 1ms latency w/RAID 1 (my workload is 90% write). With dedupe on I don't know what the number is(I'm sure it's less), but my actual workload these days is in the range of about 6,000 IOPS(migrating from 3PAR F200 with 80x15k disks 100% uptime since it was installed just over 3 years ago), so it's good enough for me for a long time to come.

I chose RAID 1 because I have 4 disk shelves (including two which house the controllers), RAID 1 gives shelf level availability so I can lose a shelf of disks and stay online(not that it has ever happened to me). That and 90% write is hard on the backend for RAID 5. That and given the large SSDs capacity was not an issue.

The cost was good enough to easily justify this route vs a hybrid or all disk setup -- though I wish I could of had a 7440 instead of 7450(identical hardware) so I would have the option of running disks for bulk storage if I wanted. Perhaps HP will unlock this self imposed marketing limitation in the 7450 in the future I don't know..

Main reasons I went with 7450 vs others outside of 9 years of 3PAR experience is I wanted a true 4-controller system(mirror cache writes in event of controller issue which is important in my 90% write workload), I wanted a mature platform for running this $220M+/year of transactions.

EMC cold called me earlier in 2014 and I talked to them for a couple hrs, but I was never about to consider XtremIO it is too new(also too inefficient power/rack/etc wise at the time this environment had 2 cabinets now it has 4 which will last 2-3 more years - 7450 takes up 8U and I can grow to nearly 200TB raw flash without more space). I do like the prospect of being able to have upwards of 500TB of raw flash in my system if it came to that(currently have ~30TB, maybe go to ~45TB some time this year - don't really see going beyond 75TB in the next 3-4 years but who knows).

I've learned a lot about storage over the years, by no means claim or even try to be an expert, but one thing I've learned is be more conservative. So for my small environment I opt for a mature architecture.

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vSphere 6.0 is BADASS. Not that I've played with it or anything. Ahem

Nate Amsden
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Re: plugin hell

I run a Citrix XenApp fundamentals server(5 user license - which is damn cheap though no support) for my team. Has vSphere on it, 3PAR mgmt tools, firefox and IE browsers(mainly for managing Netscalers), and in combination with our VPN allows me to use all of them from my phone(Note 3 w/stylus which helps a lot running vsphere client on it) remotely if required. XenApp has Linux, Mac, Windows etc clients too. Myself I run a local windows VM for other things, and run Xenapp client in that (even though my host computer is Linux). My team mates are all macs though, they use the mac native xenapp. The time it saves managing the netscalers alone with their thick java client(vs running the client over a WAN connection) pays for Xenapp by itself, yet alone vsphere etc..

I've barely touched the vsphere web console, I used to think the .NET client was bad, now I prefer it (as a linux user). I have a couple of windows 2012 VMs which need the latest hardware version which means I have to use the web console if I want to change their configs (fortunately that is a rare occasion).

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Nate Amsden
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I guess I'm old

I read the article and don't see a single thing that excites me. There is some cool stuff, but unlike the 3.5->4.x migration 5.x and 6.x for me are nothing to get excited about. I'm sure there are cool features for certain market segments out there. VVOLs sound pretty neat but in the grand scheme of things they aren't going to do much for the org I work at. VSAN - not going to touch it - 4 vCPU FT sounds cool too, but with count em 1 sudden host failure in the past 3 and a half years I'm not exactly in a panic to get that in place either (measured against the risks of a new release). I already have automatic MySQL failover by means of ScaleArc, which would be my most important application level single point of failure -- of course that auto failover covers far more than just host failure.

So by contrast, as I mentioned in the other vsphere 6 article just recently, last week even, started upgrading my ESX 4.1 to 5.5U2, for literally no other reason than 4.1 is beyond end of support, and well it doesn't make a whole lot of sense to be paying for gold support when the software is no longer supported. 4.1 has treated me very well over the years..

I'm hoping 5.5U2 is solid though I've already had several instances where VMs have failed on 5.5U2 to the point where I have to login to the host and kill the process manually, something I never ever had to do in any other version of vsphere, at least personally.

I find that quite a bit of the stuff I have is at or near end of support, I mean I upgraded my network switches in October to a new release, the other release went end of support in June (after being in my production for about 3 years), my Netscaler load balancer software goes end of support in March (again, I see no reason to upgrade other than end of support, at this point I won't make the deadline). My Splunk installation is past end of support(still running 4.x - it works quite well, the last splunk bug I had took more than a year to trace down and nobody is even asking me to upgrade). ESX is of course end of support (RIP - I prefer the thick ESX over ESXi as a linux person).

The shit is working, so I'm less inclined to rush to upgrade.

Not that I plan to leave vmware, been a customer for almost 16 years, a happy one too. vSphere has been overall probably the most solid piece of software I've ever used (note by no means do I utilize every feature of enterprise+, I prefer to keep it simple, the core stuff has been very solid for me).

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Six-starved storage bods rush to support vSphere and VVOLs

Nate Amsden
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Re: Why Flash Array

If you have to ask the question there's probably not much point in having a discussion, but it all comes down to maturity, trust, track record, predictability.

Back when I first dipped my toes in storage about 8 years ago I would of asked the question you asked.

Since then I have learned a significant amount. The biggest one is to be more conservative when it comes to storage technology, which has in part led to having 100% storage uptime over just over the past 3 years since my company moved out of a public cloud provider(includes hw/sw upgrades, controller and disk failures etc).

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The joy of six: VMware ecstatic after finally emitting new vSphere

Nate Amsden
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2k VMs per host

looking at the what's new pdf

http://www.vmware.com/files/pdf/vsphere/VMware-vSphere-Whats-New.pdf

it says hosts support 2,048 VMs, not 1,000 as the article says..

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Nate Amsden
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just in time

I just started upgrading my ESX 4.1 hosts (not ESXi) to ESXi 5.5 late last week..

ESXi 6 here I come maybe 2017. Well sooner perhaps depending if there is anything cool that interests me in 6. There has been no changes between 4.1 and 5.5 that I found compelling(by contrast there was a lot of good stuff between ESX 3.x and 4.0 for me), the only reason I am upgrading is because I didn't realize 4.1 went end of support last year. 4.1 has been so solid for me.. HP pesters me politely that it is no longer supported but they haven't yet outright refused to support me yet..

Looking at what this article says is in ESXi 6, I don't see anything that gets me excited.

Last week when I upgraded my first host in my main ESX 4.1 cluster I came across a bug where I cannot vmotion from a 5.5U2 system to a 4.1 system with a vmware distributed switch(I can go the other direction no problem), the VM loses all connectivity until it is moved back to the ESXi 5.5 host (powering the VM off and back on again doesn't help). Vmotion over standard switch is fine. So I'm expediting my upgrades so this particular bug doesn't impact me too much.

(loyal vmware customer since 1999)

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FUMBLE! NFL app drops privacy ball just before Super Bowl Sunday

Nate Amsden
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really

what is the purpose for this app needing such info (other than obvious selling that data to advertisers)

so many mobile apps are rendered useless immediately when I see what sort of stuff they want, I don't even bother to install on my phone (though on a tablet maybe I'd try one since it has no personal data on it). I don't lose any sleep over it though.

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Linux chaps want to recycle your mobe as a supercomputer

Nate Amsden
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Re: What an amazing idea...

this makes about as much sense as people who used to want to collect a bunch of old computers to build a beowulf cluster or something. It's a cute idea, but beyond being cute it is quite pointless. (same goes for folks that like building clusters out of Rasberry Pis, cute for about 30 seconds).

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SimpliVity claims fivefold sales boost, hugs Cisco tightly

Nate Amsden
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Re: I smell bullshit...

any idea what a license covers? (I sure don't have a clue) I would think they would advertise whichever number is biggest, so would not expect them to say 1,500 licenses if that covered 4,000 deployments or something.

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Samsung's 850 EVO 1TB SSD appears live ... in 3D

Nate Amsden
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Re: Let's hope

Curious what is heavy load for you? I've been running 850 pro on my 4 year old laptop(SATA 2 only) since September and no issues. 99% of the time in linux, though I have booted to windows a few times. I wouldn't consider my workload heavy though I did notice that I was writing about 1TB/mo to the drive according to the samsung tools. Haven't checked in a month or so.

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Want an Internet of Stuff? Not so 4K-ing fast ... yet – Akamai

Nate Amsden
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sounds like a solution

to cut down on the attacks just block those ips, unless you need traffic from China but I imagine most smaller websites and companies don't need anything to do with them. Certainly none of the companies I have worked for has ever sought sales or coverage etc in China

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Yep, we'll judge WHOLE DARN storage config. Problem with that?

Nate Amsden
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Re: Big Data

using big data analytics to work out storage array requirements? How high are you? I'd say give me whatever you are on but I'll hold off on drugs until the superbowl (go hawks)

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Microsoft Azure was most FAIL-FILLED cloud of 2014

Nate Amsden
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meanwhile in the real world

storage uptime

System is up and running from 2011-12-19 16:15:58 EST

(that was when that particular system was installed, before that my company was hosted in one of the public cloud providers), through software upgrades, hardware failures etc.. of course probably no big surprise to anyone in the industry to have 3 years of 100% uptime on storage.

What pissed me off most about being in a cloud an reliability was not the full big outages but the small fails that occurred seemingly constantly. Since moving out we haven't had to "rebuild" a VM even once in over 3 years. That was a semi regular occurrence when we were in "the cloud".

We've had one sudden physical host failure in 3 years, I was in bed watching tv, phone went nuts, got up to walk 10 feet to my desk and by that time vmware had moved the VMs to another host and was starting back up, and the underlying HP server detected the failure and automatically restarted(first time I had personally experienced that since being a ESX customer since 2006, I didn't even know HP servers had a feature called Automatic Server Recovery). There was some additional manual recovery steps for some apps but wasn't too bad. HP diagnosed the problem as a system board issue, forget what exactly and they replaced the board the next day(4 hour support on everything but I wasn't in a big rush).

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SAN upstart Coraid AXING staff, struggling to survive – sources

Nate Amsden
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became a niche player?

When were they anything but niche? ATA over ethernet itself I'm not even sure I'd say that is niche, it's something below niche..if such a thing exists I don't know.

I knew someone who worked there a few years ago, the concept sounded a bit interesting but the product wasn't something I could find myself using at any of the companies I have worked at. I'm sure it has it's use cases, just not in my network.

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VMware finds new post-paranoia RAM-saving tricks

Nate Amsden
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tps doesn't work for me anyway

one such example

PMEM /MB: 393179 total: 800 cos, 3167 vmk, 212022 other, 177190 free

[..]

PSHARE/MB: 4775 shared, 1758 common: 3017 saving

ooh, saving 3GB out of ~200GB that is in use (386GB total memory)

another system

PMEM /MB: 393163 total: 800 cos, 2992 vmk, 215446 other, 173924 free

[..]

PSHARE/MB: 2920 shared, 426 common: 2494 saving

2.5G!

that is mostly linux, I have noticed TPS seems quite effective with windows VMs for whatever reason. I've never seen it work with linux VMs though.

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DDN chap throws in towel, taps on Accenture’s door

Nate Amsden
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wouldn't want to work there

one of my friends who was a "Global VP" at DDN left recently to start his own gig, DDN is not a place I would ever want to work myself...ugh. Have one friend there left last I checked anyway.

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DANGER: Is that 'hot babe' on Skype a sextortionist?

Nate Amsden
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Re: For the love of all that's precious!

I'm on skype 24/7 ita what my work uses for communication

My profile must be set to private or

something as I almost NEVER get requests to connect from strangers.

My experience goes back 4 years. 99.99% of my skype usage is work related or with people I used to work with.

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Cash-burning Box makes yet ANOTHER IPO promise

Nate Amsden
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Re: Investing in data centers

I'd bet those professional services add up fast too. One company I worked at flew people on site to their customers to hold their hands while they used the app. They saw they were spending more on that then the customers were paying. So they stopped the practice, and usage of the app nosedived, the company closed a couple years later.

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Disk areal density: Not a constant, consistent platter

Nate Amsden
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Re: Doesn't everyone who works in storage know this?

Maybe I'm missing something here but one revolution of a platter on the outside tracks will pass over a ton more bits than the inside tracks(more surface area), I don't think it has much to do with how dense it is, I suppose density could play a role if the inner tracks were much more dense than outer but the gist from the article I get is they don't have that much control over it, some tracks are dense others are not sounds kind of random.

I lay my 3PAR storage out the opposite way, new data goes to the inner tracks and work their way out, to sort of ease the burden of a system as it fills up, or something.

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Are we ready to let software run the data centre?

Nate Amsden
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Blah

Ive been on the server AND network team for over 10 years and have gotten by just fine without SDN, which is far overhyped. It has its limited use cases in very large orgs but for the rest it is a waste of breath

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This week it rained in San Francisco and the power immediately blew out. Your tech utopia

Nate Amsden
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Hate sf

SF sucks. Well I guess all big cities suck to me anyway. I live near SF airport and have been to SF 3 times this year (two of which were to meet people from out of country). I hate every aspect of the city. Though SF is not alone same goes for Seattle(lived near there for a decade). Theres two places I like in seattle, hate the rest.

I cant think of a single place worth visiting in SF that would make up for the otherwise horrible experience being there.

I drove to orange county this mornin just missed the rain. My UPS said I had a 21 min outage this mornin but the batteries held up.

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Net neutrality: Cisco, Intel, IBM warn FCC NOT to crack down on ISPs

Nate Amsden
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just look at the DSL market

for an example of the title 2 stuff right.. Lots of folks seem to want title 2 applied to cable companies, when they already have title 2 providers in their area in the form of DSL. But DSL is "too slow" so they don't want to use it.

I suspect the same will happen to cable(over time) if they go that route.

I don't care too much either way myself my internet usage is pretty minimal these days.

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NGINX scores $20 MEELLLION to remind people it sells stuff

Nate Amsden
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Apache works fine

For most websites the webserver is not the bottleneck but rather crappy apps that run on top of them.

http://www.eschrade.com/page/why-is-fastcgi-w-nginx-so-much-faster-than-apache-w-mod_php/

(The title is misleading)

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Furious GTA V gamers seek similar ban on violent, misogynistic title: the Holy Bible

Nate Amsden
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GTA V is a blast

I haven't been much into games in nearly 15 years, but GTA V caught my eye last year (had never really played any GTA before), I really liked the open world it seemed to portray. When I saw that an enhanced version was coming for the next gen consoles it was enough for me to buy a GTA V+PS4 bundle a couple weeks ago. It's been quite fun to play. The flexibility is pretty amazing to me anyway, the visuals are stunning.

I still suck badly at the game, but have had a lot of fun exploring and causing mayhem.

Also got the PS4 for that game demo P.T. which I heard was pretty good. though when I tried it I got a headache pretty quick and had to stop, maybe the motion wasn't smooth enough, and/or I'm old. Tried playing my old FPS games like original Unreal Tournament a couple years ago and had to stop after a few minutes because of headaches, used to be able to play them for hours on end w/o issue.

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Another lick of Lollipop: Google updates latest Android to 5.0.1

Nate Amsden
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eh

I've kept wifi off on my note 3 to prevent it from getting the latest kitkat update from AT&T. I'm too afraid it's going to break shit(especially since restoring from backup or rolling the update back seems non trivial if not impossible unless the device is rooted etc which mine is not). for 5.0 I see absolutely nothing remotely interesting to me.

OS updates on mobile seem so hit and miss. Really there was nothing worthwhile in the android 4.3->4.4 update for me anyway on Note 3. Maybe I'm just getting old.

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Huawei and Inspur Electronics challenge Q3 server status quo

Nate Amsden
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Re: Supermicro?

I think they fall under "other", with so many resellers selling servers with their parts(which I would expect would each be counted separately)..I doubt supermicro sells too many servers (direct) enough to show up on a chart of even the top 10.

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If the COMMISH says block that email account, BLOCK IT!

Nate Amsden
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Re: Finally a use for POP3.

POP3 can be configured to leave mail on a server, likewise IMAP4 I believe can be configured to delete mail from a server too(though this use case is probably really rare).

Seems like all the more reason to run your own email server, don't use a service provider whom can snoop on you (likely) without you knowing about it (I have hosted my own email for about 18 years now)

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Feds dig up law from 1789 to demand Apple, Google decrypt smartphones, slabs

Nate Amsden
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still have a backdoor though right?

for IOS anyways from what I've read it seems the contents on the phone are encrypted, but contents stored in icloud are not encrypted in the same manor so if the data happens to be in icloud (or in google equivalent) then perhaps apple/google could provide *that* data, just not the data on the handset itself..

me, I don't plan to encrypt, hell I'm still pissed off I have to assign a pass code to unlock my phone in order to install a SSL CA for one of my personal services. Have never lost or had a phone stolen, and worst case there really isn't too much of value/secrets on my phone. Oh maybe you can use my corporate email, big whoop! I could have IT change my password pretty quick.

Much more important to me is more the work it would take to get a new phone, put my data back on it, customize it etc....

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Wikipedia won't stop BEGGING for cash - despite sitting on $60m

Nate Amsden
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they are emailing too

got this a short time ago (after I read el reg story)

Dear (me),

Thank you for helping keep Wikipedia online and ad-free. I’m sure you’re busy, so I’ll get right to it. We need your help again this year. Please help us forget about fundraising and get back to improving Wikipedia.

[..]

If all our past donors simply gave again today, we wouldn't have to worry about fundraising for the rest of the year.

[..]

To protect our independence, we'll never run ads. We take no government funds. We survive on donations from our readers. Now is the time we ask.

If Wikipedia is useful to you, please take one minute to keep it online and ad-free another year.

[..]

Thanks,

Jimmy Wales

Wikipedia Founder

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Docker: Sorry, you're just going to have to learn about it. Today we begin

Nate Amsden
Bronze badge

Re: Differences from virtualisation?

one major one in my experience is networking. In my experience deploying LXC it seemed not practical to have multiple network segments (and thus routing tables) existing on a host that has LXC. So for example we have our nonproduction VMs on one VLAN and production on another, both have different default gateways(IPs on the switches). In my testing I was not able to have both co-exist on a single LXC host. I read that it *might* be possible at the time(6 months ago on Ubuntu 12.04) but highly experimental and complex, so I decided to not even bother as those two things are not something I am interested in trying to support.

Another difference is fully abstracted isolation in a VM vs container which gives you things like VM mobility between storage and servers w/o downtime - at least I haven't seen this happen with containers of any type.

We have deployed 6 containers(across 3 LXC hosts) for a very specific production workload (all are load balanced running the same application stack). I could see us expanding container support in very specific production workloads in the future to better leverage the hardware, though I don't see a point in using it for non production stuff as it is not flexible enough(routing tables) and our non production stuff isn't redundant since it is non prod, so a failure would be more of a pain to deal with if it can't be transparently recovered, also scheduled downtime(e.g. kernel update since there is only 1 kernel across all containers on a given host) would be a pain as well for the same reason.

I also do not like how I cannot query CPU/memory usage on a per container basis using regular linux tools they are not container aware (there may be tools that can get this info I haven't seen them myself). Same goes for network traffic - if I query SNMP on a linux container for network data I get 0 data. Also do not like how the LXC "parent" host shows all of the PIDs from all of the containers, makes it very difficult to sort through things. For us it is manageable since the workloads are very specific but I wouldn't want to deploy a dozen different random containers on a host that weren't tightly controlled for this reason too.

Since deploying containers, aside from the annoying things from a management perspective they have been flawless and have served their original purpose - unlock a massive amount of CPU(24 cores (48 threads) x Xeon E5-2695v2 per host) for our main e-commerce platform in production that comes with a $15k/server/year license. Average CPU went from ~40% to about 3%(new systems have much more horsepower than previous VMs). Peak CPU hasn't gone above about 25%, so these have a good 2 or 3 years of growth for them I bet, which was the plan. Massively under subscribed most of the time but that's fine - the cost of the license alone justifies that easily, as does knowing we'll not run out of capacity on that application for a VERY long time under any circumstances.

Unlike some orgs we are not one of the ones that likes to destroy and re-create resources on a regular basis. These containers will have a life span measured in years, like our VMs, ideally anyway.

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That sub-$100 Android slab you got on Black Friday? RIDDLED with holes, say infosec bods

Nate Amsden
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don't trust mobile period

I don't do any online banking, any e-commerce transactions (outside of google play store for a few apps, no movies/music/whatever else they have) on my mobile devices (all Android Samsung Note 3 and Toshiba tablet though I wouldn't do it on IOS either).

I am very very cautious not to install any privacy invading applications either.

anything that needs security gets done on my linux laptop.

exception is I do occasionally login to work VPN from my phone.

in general I think the risk is quite low for me, but I don't do it anyway. There's never been a time where I felt "I have to do this *now* (and can't wait till I get to my own computer)"

also maybe goes without saying I don't use public wifi hotspots (except the very occasional hotel but that is rare I prefer to use my phone's mifi which I pay $50/mo for already).

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Samsung Galaxy Note 4: Spawn of Galaxy Alpha and a Note 3 unveiled

Nate Amsden
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Re: Won't upgrade

what is "the vpn bug" ? does it impact note 3? I occasionally use Dell Sonicwall VPN on my note 3 without any issues (with their app).

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Nate Amsden
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Re: Why so late?

I can drive my note 3 battery down by 50% in about 45mins with intensive usage. Light usage gets me through a day. I think I've lost 20% of the battery capacity over the past 11 months, it goes from 100->80% pretty quick.

to me anyways looping a video isn't a good indicator of battery life, since most of the work is done by the GPU. Drive the CPU hard and tap the screen a bunch, and see what you get.

going to buy a new battery soon.

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Amazon: DROP DATABASE Oracle; INSERT our new fast cheap MySQL clone

Nate Amsden
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Trading one lock in for another

Title says it all

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729 teraflops, 71,000-core Super cost just US$5,500 to build

Nate Amsden
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absolutely, nail on the head there.

this "super computer" didn't cost $5,500 to build, it cost $5,500 to rent. big difference(duh). Obviously 99.9%+ of the workloads out there aren't suited to one off runs of a few hours never to be needed again..

You've been able to "rent" super computer time for a long time, no news here.

This is one of the very very few good use cases of public cloud computing (IaaS anyway - SaaS is a good model, PaaS not sold on either).

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