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* Posts by Stuart Castle

539 posts • joined 19 Jun 2007

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City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub

Stuart Castle

Re: So basically...

If the city had a kebab shop, I'd be a little concerned about the contents of the kebabs... In my local town, in one row of shops, there was a pub, a kebab shop and a funeral director.. The pub was quite friendly and busy. The kebab shop was never visited by locals. Mainly because most of us are uncomfortable eating meat served next to a place where they handle dead bodies..

Never saw any evidence they were using bodies, but also never saw any cats around there either.

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Not even CRIMINALS want your tablets, Blighty - but if that's an iPhone you're waving...

Stuart Castle

Re: Stating the obvious

"But Shirley is the phone is in ones pocket then the thief can't know the OS it's running."

Depends where the phone was nicked. I travel fairly regularly on the London Underground and often see people hanging around the above-ground station exits (checking texts etc as they suddenly have a signal). All a thief would need to do is watch a station entrance, pick someone, follow them and quietly take the phone when the opportunity presented itself. It would be difficult for the victim detect they are being followed at some of the busier stations (especially in the West End as the thief would just appear to be one of the thousands walking up the street). Something that the Police do regularly remind people of.

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Apple, FBI: YES we're, er, looking into the NAKED CELEBRITY PICS. Aren't you?

Stuart Castle

titillation.

I love the way the media have gone for the titillating aspect of this (ie 'slebs showing tits) and largely ignored the more serious aspect of the story. Namely that using Find My iPhone, the hackers could easily have located the 'slebs and done things to them, maybe even killed them.

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EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday

Stuart Castle

Not so easy if you are mid way through your contract. It likely you will not be able to afford the early termination penalty, which for a lot of networks is paying off the remainder of your contract.

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Stuart Castle

The problem is that once they have your contract, they have you for two years. Yes, you can leave if they continually fail to live up to expectations, but, TBH, they make this so difficult that a lot of people don't bother. A friend of mine had broadband with Orange. Even though his connection was consistently worse than advertised. Even though this was the case and Orange eventually let him cancel the contract early (as they are required to), they only did it after a lot of phone calls, a lot of emails and a few letters. The process also took several weeks..

Personally, I've been with T Mobile for a few years, and, up until this year, I've had no real problem with them. This year, the data rates and reliability of the network have (in my experience) been getting steadily worse.

Of course, my friends on 4G via EE have no problems, but I'm not seriously considering changing to a 4G tariff (and paying more for less data) on a network where I can no longer get a reliable 3G connection.

Then, having no data on 3G on Friday irritated the hell out of me, but the excuse staggers me. They are running a network supporting (potentially) millions of users on a single connection? I personally would expect just their London network to have multiple connections.

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Things are looking up in Flappy Bird sequel

Stuart Castle

Looks like someone took flappy birds and tuned it on it's side.

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EE: STILL Blighty's best mobe network, says 'Frappucino' Moore

Stuart Castle

Re: Twice the network

Actually, sure I read somewhere they don't have twice the network. They've been shutting a lot of base stations down.

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One in 12 Tweeps are bots

Stuart Castle

Twitter...

Surprised at the number of people looking down their noses at what can be a useful tool. For instance a lot of companies, including all the train companies and a lot of other transport companies, push out updates via Twitter..

That said, my membership of twitter is purely so I can "Follow" these companies. I don't actually tweet. As such, my twitter account is purely a handy list of "bookmarks".

Twitter has a huge amount of twats on it though. I remember during the riots looking for news about Bromley. According to twitter, Primark was blown up and utterly obliterated seven times during the night. When a journalist got up the next morning, photographed the intact (and undamaged apart from a smashed window) Primark and uploaded the photo, he got threats of legal action.

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Yosemite Siri? Apple might plonk chatty assistant on your desktop - report

Stuart Castle

Re: It doesn't like my northern English

I thought that was obvious..

After all, in Star Trek IV, the Mac ignored Scotty when he tried to use voice to control it.

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Microsoft fixes all those shaky GoPro vids nobody wants to watch

Stuart Castle

Re: Hours...

Maybe not soon, but technology advances and they have the algorithm now, so I don't doubt they'll be optimising it as much as they can. Combine that with the fact that computing power is increasing exponentially. I daresay the phones available in a decade will have near enough CPU power for this..

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DON'T PANIC! Satellite comms hacking won't be able to crash an aircraft

Stuart Castle

Re: VHF?

After all, any ILS beacon is designed to transmit, which would make it difficult to hide because you'd just need to look for the signal.

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EE rolls out London bus pay-by-bonk app – only fandoids need apply

Stuart Castle

Erm, OK..

OK, so instead of digging round my pocket for my oyster card which, should it get stolen, can be cancelled within a couple of minutes and replaced within a few days with no real hardship to myself (beyond having to pay for my journey home), I get to dig around in my pocket, bring out my £700 phone and hope that either it does not get nicked, or that my insurance covers the theft (on my daily commute, I have to travel through an area that is a bit of a bad area for muggings, so any insurance may not cover me). In the mean time, while all this is being sorted out (which might take weeks) I am without a phone, which I do, increasingly, have to rely on.

Even assuming that my insurance covers me, it's likely I'll end up paying with increased premiums.

Please, bearing that in mind, someone tell me exactly WHY having this ability on your phone is an advantage?

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'Things' on the Internet-of-things have 25 vulnerabilities apiece

Stuart Castle

Re: Not surprised, but...

btrower, I am personally happy to support change. I just have to be persuaded that the benefits outweigh the costs. No one has managed to persuade me that having my lightswitches and door locks hooked up to a cloud service will give me that though.

What you say is right, in theory, we do need to ensure that the IoT is properly secured. Bearing in mind that a lot of the products we buy and connect to the internet will be using proprietary software, or open source software that has been heavily modded by the manufacturer, who will be doing that? Do you really think any manufacturer is going to update products that are a few years old? The aformentioned door locks. If someone discovered a vulnerability (and it *will* happen, look at how many car locking systems have been compromised) when the lock was no longer being manufactured, do you *really* think the manufacturer is going to update the software on that lock? At best, they'll patch it so the vulnerability is not so easy to access.

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Adam Afriyie MP: Smart meters are NOT so smart

Stuart Castle

Re: EVERYTHING translates back to monetary value.

" Why save CO2? Atmospheric CO2 has been rising steadily these past 17 years, but global temperature has remained static. We've been misled that there is a definitive link."

A friend of mine is doing climate research for Imperial College. He said a few years ago that the way the media has presented the concepts behind Climate Change is wrong and has simplified the problem too much. CO2 is apparently far from the only cause of Climate Change. Our weather system, along with many others in Nature, is incredibly complex. As such, IMO, it's entirely possible that the CO2 is too high, but that the system is compensating in some way.

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Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers

Stuart Castle

Re: What century are these guys in?

The problem with enabling autoupdate is simple. A patch may break something. This is annoying on a personal level, but usually fixable.

On an enterprise level,it could be devastating. If that patch broke a system the company relied upon, it could bankrupt the company. You can blame (or even sue) the manufacturer or distribution provider all you want, but that won't bring the company back.

This is why, as a sys admin, you test every change or patch repeatedly and as thoroughly as is possible. Preferably with multiple testers. This is why patching costs a lot.

The other problem is a lot of companies run legacy systems, These systems may require something only offered by a particular version of a system component. However, the company may have no access to the source code for those systems. Even if they have the source code, they may not have access to a development system that can use that source code. Either way, they will be unable to alter the system.

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Google went behind our backs and really HURT US, squeal upset porn kingpins

Stuart Castle

Ok. Fair enough, it's Google's choice who they allow to use Adwords, after all, it's their service, and we don't automatically have a right to any privately owned service or company.

Bearing in mind this new, apparently moral based stance on who they serve ads to, I take it we can look forward to them refusing to serve ads to weapon manufacturers, tobacco companies, alcohol companies as well as any other industry that has some links with killing people?

No?

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ANGRY ALIENS hit by BEBO SPAMGASM probably don't exist

Stuart Castle

Poor, innocent aliens..

They were looking for intelligent life, received the transmitted Bebo messages. Thought that the Universe is fucked when a race that can develop the technology required to send a message between planets uses it to send a load of narcissistic crap like that posted on Bebo and promptly removed their own planet from our plane of existence.

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USB charger is prime suspect in death of Australian woman

Stuart Castle

Re: More official advice completely divorced from reality

" Both have completed safety tests, both their own and those dictated by regulations in all of the places they sell them".

That is a massive assumption. Particularly if she bought the charger in a cheap shop or market, although the chains have been fooled by clone products from time to time.

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Google Nest slurps your life into the Matrix? The TRUTH

Stuart Castle

Re: "a thermostat which could tell when a person was on holiday"

Or, if you have a combi boiler like mine, just switch the boiler off.. The termostat can do what it wants then, it won't be able to heat the house

Ok, it means that you come back to a cold house, but my house warms up in a couple of minutes even when the central heating is cold started.

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Code Spaces goes titsup FOREVER after attacker NUKES its Amazon-hosted data

Stuart Castle

Something to be said for tape..

This is the problem with a lot of these free or even cheap services. They save money by not having adequate backups in place. After all, backups cost a lot of money and if everything is working properly, you'll never use them, so they don't contribute anything to the bottom line right?

We have network accessible storage areas at work, with limited space for each user (and quite a low limit). I am a sys admin, but don't have responsibility for that side of the network, so when a user asked me why their space was so limited, I checked with the sysadmins who are, pointing out that storage is relatively cheap. Apparently the problem was not purchasing the storage, but the cost of backing up (we use a full multi-generational backup system with on and off line backups off site, at least two of which are not even in London) and storing the tapes.

It does apparently cost us a lot of money to do the amount of backing up we do (even though we really back up the bare essentials of what we need to, so could spend a *lot* more), but we've balanced that against the amount we'd lose if we didn't backup. It's unlikely we'd be able to continue trading if there were a major disaster or failure and we had no backups.

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Virgin Media boss AND ex-Murdoch man: BSkyB broadband is 'lousy'

Stuart Castle

Re: I can confirm...

"Braindead support is braindead though. Be had excellent support lines, even the Bulgarians were super knowledgable and could fix any time I had issues."

True, and you can have the best and most reliable products or services on the market, but if you give your customers a bad experience when attempting to fix any problems, you aren't going to do well..

I've never dealt with Sky, but I am a long term VM customer, and found that *if* you can get through to an operator who knows what they are doing, and *if* you can get them to send a techy out, then they can be good. Having said that, when I got them to upgrade cable, the techy they sent to change the box happily disconnected the rest of my AV equipment and just hooked the new box up to the telly. Took me hours to get it all connected and working how I wanted it, and I have spend hours on the phone trying to persuade the customer support person that my slow download speeds where a result of their bad networks and not my computer.

The less said about BT the better. Suffice it to say, I needed the main socket in my house replacing once. They told me they'd do it free. I asked for a Saturday appointment (couldn't get time off work) and asked if it would cost me anything. They said no.. Engineer turns up on Saturday. Apparently they'd already done some diagnostics on the line and determined that the socket needed replacing (I had not told them this). The engineer replaced the socket and a few minutes later was gone. I got a bill for £110 a few days later.

Regarding Be, I used them as an ISP for a while . Couldn't fault them. When I had the Be modem installed, BT initially refused the order to enable ADSL on my line. Be could not tell me why this was, as they were not informed, but they told me who to phone and exactly what to ask them. As it turns out, when BT installed my phone sockets a few year ago, they did not update some database somewhere (something they repeatedly failed to do during the several visits I had to fix problems with the line in the intervening years as well), so, when I ordered ADSL, the system refused as I was not down as having phone sockets. BT corrected the database and allowed the order. Anytime I had a query with my Be service, it was dealt with efficiently and politely, and any problems were solved.

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IoT cup claims 'instant' identification of what's in it

Stuart Castle

The difference between Starbucks and coffee..

Just glad I am not the only one who can spot the difference between Starbucks and decent coffee.

Don't get me wrong. I like the odd Starbucks, but it *is* massively overpriced for what you get..

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The cute things they say

Stuart Castle

Some of the things I've heard..

I work in IT support for a major Uni, dealing primarily with students, and here are a couple of my favourites..

Student: Your server is down.

Me: Which server? (We have a lot of servers students may need to access depending on what they need to do).

Student: My website is not accessible. (Again, we have multiple webservers the students can access depending on what server and technology they need to use for their courses).

Me: Which server?

Student: Your web server.

Me: OK, Show me what you are doing..

Suffice it to say the student was trying to view the site using a file:// URL pointing to the local hard drive, which of course meant that none of the actual PHP script for the site was being run..

Another time, I was emailed by a student who said their site wasn't working and their lecturer told them the server was misconfigured. I'd not heard anything about a server fault, and this server hosts thousands of student website, so if it was misconfigured, I'd have heard, even though it was a Saturday when I got the email.

I logged on to the server, went through the student's code and 5 minutes later, found a missing comma. Replaced it, and the site worked fine..

Another one.. We used to have a lab where every computer had a VHS/Mini DV combi VCR so students could digitise video tapes. I had a student come and see me to say the computer had taken their blank CD, did not recognise it and would not give it back. I was busy, so another techy went up to have a look. She came back down and confirmed the student's story, so I went to have a look.

When I got up there, they had both stuck the blank disk in the VHS slot of the VCR, apparently not noticing that the computer was a tower unit under the desk.

One final one. When I first started working here, we had a lecturer run in the office panicking. When he calmed down, he said that we'd had a few PCs stolen. Obviously we take that seriously, and I ran to the lab with him, expecting to find a mess of broken security cables (we do lock everything down).

When I got to the lab, I realised what had happened. For the computers I mentioned above, we had separate monitors used for previewing what was on the tape(s) in the VCR. Even though these looked nothing like PC monitors (they were actual video monitors and actually looked like portable TVs without an aerial socket), he had assumed they were PC monitors and, when he found no PCs, thought they'd been nicked.

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Greenpeace rejoices after getting huge renewable powerplant CANCELLED

Stuart Castle

Re: And who will not be happy

Having said that, producing tar presumably isn't very environment friendly and neither is obtaining the feathers... :D

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Tech talk bloke compares girlfriend to irritating Java tool – did he deserve flames?

Stuart Castle

FFS

Some people need a sense of humour. Apart from his mention of a girlfriend in the title, those comments could apply to *anyone* in a relationship, be it with a man or woman.

Hell, the comments could apply to a lot of people I know, and I'm certainly not in a relationship with them.

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Patch NOW: Six new bugs found in OpenSSL – including spying hole

Stuart Castle

Re: @ Andy E Quick to fix in Open Source, but it leaves questions.

If you buy in a closed-source piece of software, the law affords you certain protections. Namely that the product is fit for purpose. Failing that, the act of purchasing gives you a target for any legal action.

Open Source is a good thing, and can be, theoretically, more secure than closed source. Simply because more eyes can, again theoretically, see the code. The fact they can, unfortunately, does not mean they do.

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PCIe hard drives? You read that right, says WD

Stuart Castle

Re: The 1980's called

I remember one company I worked for had one of those. When I saw it, I thought "32 meg? Wow. How am I ever going to fill that?". How times have changed. The browser I am using is probably using more than 32 meg of RAM while I'm typing this.

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It's Google's NO-WHEEL car. OMG... there aren't any BRAKES

Stuart Castle

Will this launch anytime soon in the UK?

The reason I ask is because I am under the (possibly wrong) that UK law requires that every car have a manual braking system (incase any electrical problem takes out the power assisted brakes).

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Privacy International probes GCHQ's mouse fetish

Stuart Castle

Re: @ obnoxiousGit

The industry has always done this... I remember way back in the dark ages of the 90s, when I was doing my degree, I heard of a trick ICL used to pull on their mainframes.

They launched a range of mainframes, then, offered an expensive "upgrade" that doubled the disk space available. Do you know what the ICL engineer did while "upgrading" the disk storage? Flicked a switch that enabled the read/write heads on the other sides of the existing disks.

Going back to the subject of what GCHQ has asked the Gruaniad to destroy, it may just be nothing more than them being over zealous and ordering the destruction of *anything* that might have cached even part of the data.

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JJ Abrams and Star Wars: I've got a bad feeling about this

Stuart Castle

I think the problem with Star Trek: Into Darkness is simply that the Wrath of Kahn worked so brilliantly. Ricardo Montelban wasn't a great actor, but he played Kahn brilliantly. He conveyed the impression of being menacing, but intelligent. The story also gave him a reason to hate Kirk.

Also, the final battle between Kirk and Kahn works brilliantly. The SFX are excellent, as is the music, but the way it's directed is excellent as well. Especially the way that, although both characters are in command of powerful ships, with good crews, it comes down to a battle of wits between two men. Well, one man and a genetically enhanced man.

Star Trek:ID was a good summer blockbuster, but I didn't have the same feeling of awe that the Wrath of Kahn gave me when I saw it.

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We'd switch mobile networks, but we can't be bothered – survey

Stuart Castle

Would I change networks..

Yes. When my contract ends, I always look at the deals available at the time. I've been on O2 and T Mobile twice, and Vodafone once. My current contract ends in August, so I dare say, I'll be looking for the best deal around then. Yes, I do factor in network availability and reliability in the areas I am likely to visit.

Regarding switching phones. Before I had an iPhone, I always switched to the best phone for me at the time, whoever manufactured it. With the iPhone, it's been a little different. While I do actively look at Android phones from time to time (indeed, I am thinking I'll probably move to Android come the end of my contract), but I've spent a lot of money in the past on iOS specific apps and media. While there are equivalents available on Android, I've been a little hesitant to switch as it has felt like I'll be writing off an awful lot of money. This time, I've been thinking I'll keep my iPhone, but use it as an iPod..

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Web firms, DON'T PANIC: The Euro Google 'right to be forgotten' isn't a problem

Stuart Castle

A sad fact of life

It's a sad fact of life that there are those seeking to profit from this, as much as there are those seeking to profit from our (sometimes) private information.

I looked at the ruling and, TBH, I never thought it was intended to do anything but ensure that the big multinational companies remove our details from their systems should we ask them to. But, it's in the interest of these lawyers to perpetuate the myth that it applies to every company. After all, the Ambulance chasing market is pretty much saturated with lawyers, so I suspect there are a lot of them not doing much.

It's a fair bet that 99% of company owners and CEOs will not read this report, so they could be easy pickings for the snake oil salesmen that run these legal advice firms.

Don't get me wrong. I have nothing against lawyers as such. They can be good, although I have some reservations about the lawyer who handled my mum's estate when she died. He had us do all the leg work (including form filling and any research required), talked to us for about 90 minutes and charged us for 4 hours work at £190 an hour.

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Cisco reboots PC with $1500 'Scandafornian' Android fondleslab

Stuart Castle

Re: The trouble with 'touch' on the desktop...

Personally, I don't know if it's any worse for you than (say) typing at a keyboard for 8 hours a day (which is, admittedly, bad for you).

I don't, however, think it's that comfortable to use (especially at first), which is a major consideration for a consumer when buying a new piece of tech. Remember, as a checkout operator, you are paid (probably minimum wage, based on my experience of working in Sainsburys) to be sitting at that machine 8 hours a day. A consumer would be paying to use this tablet.

Plus the photo makes the device look, to put it bluntly, fugly. Something which some computers get away with because they are insanely powerful, but this being a (admittedly large) tablet, I suspect it's not insanely powerful.

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Apple, Google: WE SURRENDER ... to each other in patent war truce

Stuart Castle

Re: eh

They also beat Samsung in South Korea. Surely that's Samsung's back yard?

http://appleinsider.com/articles/13/12/11/apple-gets-court-win-in-south-korea-as-court-tosses-samsung-patent-claim

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Amazon granted patent for taking photos against a white background – seriously

Stuart Castle

Can I patent something?

Can I patent an idea for an office, where multinational corporations can register even the most vague or stupid of ideas? This office will do minimal checking of the idea, including whether it describes something that has been done or registered before, or is even possible.

This office will then allow said corporations to sue anyone who does something even vaguely similar to the registered idea, for billions if necessary.

I ask this because clearly the fact it's been done before does not bother the US Patent Office.

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Dell charges £5 to switch on power-saving for new PCs (it takes 5 clicks)

Stuart Castle

Where I work, we used to build our own PCs. We were able to do it relatively cheaply, and they were normally better spec than PCs we bought it.

The trouble is, where I work, the company likes to buy things in because that gives us all sorts of protection in the event something goes wrong (warranties, legal rights etc), and, in the event something really goes badly wrong, someone we can sue.

That and the fact that we are increasingly buying Macs, and we have to obey the terms of any software licences we use, so Hackintoshs are out (the OSX licence forbids running OSX on hardware that is not Apple branded).

Regarding what Dell are doing, I am not defending them because I think what they are doing is at best wrong and at worst, a con, but they aren't the first computer company to do this. I read a story while doing my degree that to upgrade the storage space on one ICL mainframe, you needed to call an Engineer. All the Engineer did was flick a switch and activate the read heads on the other side of the discs.. Another example of how the computer industry can sometimes scam people. Where I work now, we used to have a lot of Sun workstations. To replace the CDRom in these usually cost around £500 to £600. These were generic CDRoms with a different firmware and slightly different interface (IIRC). Had we been able to use normal CDRoms, they would have cost us about £150-£200 at the time.

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Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS

Stuart Castle

Re: Lizard People?

"Where the funniness of the lizard thing is lost is that it's based on a misunderstanding on the technical point: You don't revoke the fingerprint!"

You do realise humour is often based on a misunderstanding? See the Four candles sketch from The Two Ronnies for an example.

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Stuart Castle

Re: Biometrics...

I'd say the same. I use self service tills regularly and have never been asked to re-scan a barcode.

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You'd better get out before the sync 'n' share bubble POPS

Stuart Castle

Re: Turning a product into a feature?

You do realise that the primary reason (in our case at least) for limits on the amount users can store is not actually the cost of storage as such, but the cost of storing all the backups. We use a multi generation off site backup system, so are paying three or four times more than we would for backups. But we can guarantee that should something serious happen, users will not lose much work, if anything.

You also realise that Dropbox do not back up your data, and, IIRC, make no guarantees it will be available should they have a problem with their system? After all, if something happens to your data server side (maybe it's corrupted by a HDD failure) and your client logs in and syncs it's data, you may lose some or all of that data.

Dropbox is fine (I use it myself), but I cannot serious recommend it for important, enterprise level data.

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Apple has THREE TIMES as much cash as US govt, TWICE the UK

Stuart Castle

Sounds like something I once heard. It went something like this;

If you owe the bank £200, they've got you by the balls. If you owe them £200 million, you've got them by the balls.

I think the problem is that people or corporations with a lot of money also tend to end up with a lot of power. Even if they don't, the perception is often that they have power, which still makes people a little scared.

Look at Vodafone. They owe 10s if not 100s of millions in VAT, yet HMRC was proud to announce that they'd reached a deal with Vodafone even though that deal involved Vodafone paying a fraction of what they owed. Yet, a local businessman I know of owes around £8 million and they are going after the lot. Don't get me wrong: He owes the money, he should pay it back, so I am not defending him. It just seems that when people do bad things at that high a level, those in power suddenly don't know how to deal with it.

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So you invent a wireless network using LEDs, what do you do next? Add solar panels. Boom

Stuart Castle

Re: Inherently uni-directional

Actually, bi directional. So, by your definition, Microwave links and Laser communications must also be a waste of time. After all, both methods are also bi directional.

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Murdoch says Microsoft needs 'big clean out'

Stuart Castle

Re: Maybe not the best source of advice

OK, I am no great fan of Murdoch (on the contrary, I think he is the worst thing to happen to the media), but he is a man that, in a little over 60 years, went from being the owner of one small, Adelaide based local paper to owning one of the largest media conglomerates on the planet. He has taken over many failing companies, cleaned out the deadwood and restored them to profit.

OK, so he may not have technical knowledge, but the technical side of Microsoft isn't the side that's struggling (IMO). Like them or loathe them, they are still turning out products and updates much as they always were.

Where Microsoft is buggering up is that the company itself continues to misjudge the various markets it is competing in. This is a business problem, not a technical one. This is also an area that Murdoch apparently excels at sorting out.

Microsoft would be well served to listen to him.

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Apple to flush '£37bn' down the bog if it doesn't flog cheapo slabtops

Stuart Castle

"The analyst also had a bad prediction for Intel, and warned that Apple's own in-house-designed, A-series chip would probably be used in its next generation of laptop machines."

I've heard this a few times, and I'm thinking the same I have every time I've heard it before.

No chance. Yet.

Why do I say bull? OSX. while (IMO) an amazing OS was very much a niche player on the OS market. It still is, but sales have improved massively. Regardless of the abilities of the Mac, it was not compatible with Windows. As such, any customer would have to buy new versions of any software they use (assuming a Mac version was available). This has previously (combined with the high price anyway) has been a major obstacle to selling Macs.

Apple got a *huge* boost in sales when they switched to Intel. While Windows is still a viable OS, they aren't going to risk the Mac sales going back to the level they were.

I'd also like to point out that while in Mountain Lion (and some extent Lion), they appear to have been aggressively moving toward a more iOS style interface, with Mavericks, they appear to have stopped.

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Google kills fake anti-virus app that hit No. 1 on Play charts

Stuart Castle

Re: 10,000 downloads is #1?

Android may have a billion users, but how many actually bother to install apps?

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Stuart Castle

Re: Because there is no "they" at Google to turn a blind eye or not. Having built systems and platforms as automated as they have, there is no human arbiter or route of appeal, no human managed customer services, no editorial discretion.

This is true. Where I work, we use gmail for certain users email. AFAIK, we have the relevant SLAs in place and this is under a business contract. As such, you'd expect that we'd have little trouble getting hold of actual people to solve a problem. Not so, according to the guys that deal with them. In fact, quite the opposite.

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Stuart Castle

A non technical person probably wouldn't know about which permissions an antivirus would use, assuming they knew about permissions at all.

Similarly, a non technical person would probably have no way of ascertaining that a virus scanner is doing nothing other than display some pretty graphics on it's UI..

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iFixit boss: Apple has 'done everything it can to put repair guys out of business'

Stuart Castle

Re: Apple DON'T repair your iThing

Unless you go to a dedicated repair company, no one repairs devices then gives them back to you in my experience. What happens is they swap the device for one with equivalent specs, then send your device to the manufacturer who repairs and refurbishes it, then it's given to someone else when their device dies, or it's sold as a refurb.

I know that if you take a faulty Apple device into an Apple store, the "Genius" will attempt to repair it if it's a simple repair (even to the point of replacing damaged screens), and I've two Apple devices go bad on me. Both times, the "Genius" tried to run some simple diagnostics, poked around the device, then said they'd have to send it for repair. Actually, the first was an Apple Time Capsule with a blown power supply. That was fun watching them try and run simple diagnostics on a device that wouldn't even power up.

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Life support turned off: NHS Direct dies silent, undignified death

Stuart Castle

My GP actually said that NHS Direct was a bit of a double edged sword.. He said it gave good information that was certainly good enough for people to help themselves, but it also gave ideas to hypochondriacs.

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Improbable: YOU gave model Lily Cole £200k for her Impossible.com whimsy-site

Stuart Castle

So, the same organisation that gives inventors a pittance and only after they can demonstrate that their product is going to make money is throwing money at rich people to set up websites? I am actually not criticising the website. It sounds like it has worthwhile goals, but sounds a lot like various other websites that also have lofty goals of getting us to recycle and help each other.

The concern I have is that it seems a *lot* of british inventors, engineers and scientists are making wonderful breakthroughs, but have to go abroad to get finance. These are products that could make serious money, and help the economy. One example: IIRC a lot of the engineers behind the Psion Organiser series developed a new MP3 player while at Psion. Psion could not get funding for it, so they went abroad. Some ended up at Apple, and some of what they developed ended up being used in iPod.

We are giving people like this a pittance, and making them fight for that while throwing money at millionaires..

The government's reaction to this? Do they see the benefit of developing new products in this country, then allowing British companies to manufacture and market them and vow to help these companies? No. They ensure the orginisation that distributes the money becomes a charity and under no obligation to release information given an FOI request..

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Microsoft to get in XP users' faces with one last warning

Stuart Castle

Re: Yes I predict it will be exactly as terrible as Y2K!

You are forgetting the tens of thousands of computer systems that were audited, found to faulty, then patched. Which, in the case of bespoke systems, is a little more than just applying the latest patch, update or service pack from the vendor. I know of a few cases where to alter a system, due to it being written in an archaic language like Cobol, they had to pay a programmer to come out of retirement to do it. Even where systems did have a ready made update, any company with a proper change procedure would still have had to ensure that any patch for mission critical systems is thoroughly tested before deployment.

Another way to look at it.

The Airlines and Banks were amongst the first adopters of computer technology. This, combined with a slight reluctance to change core systems and processes mean that companies in both industries have a *lot* of computers and software that is old (some dating back to the 70s). That nice, pretty GUI the check in desk person sees when you check in to the airport probably sends keypresses back to the mainframe (which is still running the original software), and "scrapes" the output..

Now, did you see any Airline disasters during y2k? No? How about Finance? Did any major banks collapse during Y2K? Did any major economies collapse as their currency sunk to a point where you'd need a mortgage to buy a packet of sausages? No?

Why not? Because tens of thousands of people tested these systems to ensure that there would be no problem, and tens of thousands of programmes wrote updates to ensure it wouldn't happen.

We came of relatively lightly (only a couple of old, easily replaced, systems failed our Y2K compliance test, but even we only found that out after testing thousands of items.

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