* Posts by nijam

179 posts • joined 4 Nov 2011

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Google: Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right, here I am – stuck in the middle of EU

nijam
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Re: Pro (DUH!)

> a EURO Google that only shows EURO results for EURO shoppers.

"This is a LOCAL shop for LOCAL people", I think you meant.

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You're hosting Uncle Sam's files in the cloud. You get hacked. This is what happens next

nijam
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Oh, the irony.

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Net neutrality: How to spot an arts graduate in a tech debate

nijam
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Another Orlowski diatribe against - well, this time it's not clear, probably Google because it usually is: "Google support network neutrality, so that must be a *bad* thing". Who knows. I really must stop reading anything with his name on, his wonky perception of the world is becoming tiresome.

And for all the people supporting him in the comments, wake up, we aren't talking about packet pixies, we're talking about throttling trolls.

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FBI probed SciFi author Ray Bradbury for plot to glum-down America

nijam
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> A psychiatrist once said that optimists are people who should be certified as clinically insane.

The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true.

-- James Branch Cabell (1879-1958), in "The Silver Stallion" (1926)

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That thing we do in the UK? Should be ILLEGAL in the US, moans ex-State monopoly BT

nijam
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> Anyway, let's not forget why the railways were nationalised in the first place (they were bankrupt)

Lest we forget... they were bankrupted by the goverment not paying them for the rail services requisistioned for the WWII war effort.

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nijam
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> They all have issues, just one less layer of blame if your isp is bt.

Wow, what an optimist you are! Actually, BT seem to be able to use OpenReach as a kind of tame scapegoat in cases like this.

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Shadow minister for Fun calls for Openreach separation

nijam
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Re: Back in the real world

I think you have that back-to-front. Openreach should be separated, obviously, but it doesn't mean that all the (financial) resources stay in BT; most of BT's income comes from selling services carried by Openreach cable/fibre/whatever. Maybe the question to ask is "how will BT keep splashing out on content for yet more superfluous sports channels, without the resources of Openreach behind them?" Without its income being restricted so that BT can fund media content, maybe Openreach could do its job better.

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The good burghers of Palo Alto are entirely insane

nijam
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Exactly so. And in fact, the phrase "The answer is for the council to buy some land not currently zoned for such housing and then so zone it." is a pretty accurate description of insider trading.

But apart from that, I'd generally agree that the whole lot of them are insane.

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Sony Xperia M4 Aqua 4G: The Android smartie that can take its drink

nijam
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Interesting review, but you left out the crucial bit, needed in any review of a Sony product these days, namely: how long until Sony pull out of th market segment and leave users high and dry?

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Linux boss Torvalds: Don't talk to me about containers and other buzzwords

nijam
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Re: This seems a very level-headed and straight forward discussion

> Isn't it about time any OS worthy of the name got hardened by making full use of the hardware's rings of protection. Just doing that would reduce the attack surface by quite a large amount.

That might have been true when the hardware was (a) actually hardware, not microcode, and (b) simple enough to validate. Now, it's just a completely different set of attack surfaces.

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Stop taking drug advice from Kim Kardashian on Twitter, sighs watchdog

nijam
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I realise it makes me an awful person, but I couldn't help thinking that perhaps someone could persuade her to tweet about how cyanide cures morning sickness. (And it's probably cheaper and "more natural" than some naff proprietary drug.)

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Apple, Google should give FBI every last drop of user information, says ex-HP CEO and wannabe US prez Carly Fiorina

nijam
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Re: Oh dear

> Why would anyone vote for this loon?

Same reason they vote for any of the others.

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Sane people, I BEG you: Stop the software defined moronocalypse

nijam
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Re: The 80% of us who think they are "better than average" drivers

> Otherwise there would be no lotteries, casinos or bookies.

Or marriage.

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Telcos' revenge is coming as SDN brings a way to build smart pipes

nijam
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Re: And we will all be introduced

@ Ledswinger

Ummm ... only if this is not a monopoly market. Lots of companies make/sell shavers, so that's an example of a non-monopoly market. Network services, not so much. If I want to watch (say) Archery, Badminton, and Curling, but have no interest in premier league football, tough - I get all or nothing on a sports bundle, and almost all that money is going on the pointless football coverage. For example.

My personal definition, BTW, of a monopoly market is one where any supplier has more than 30% of the market. I realise that's not a widely agreed definition, but I think it gives a fairly good representation of whether or not there is genuine consumer choice.

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Intel emits Skylake CPUs for gamers, overclockers (Psst, you'll need new RAM and a new mobo)

nijam
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> fine-grain overlocking features

And it does needlework as well!

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Clueless do-gooders make Africa's conflict mineral mines even more dangerous

nijam
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Re: Bandit theory

> explain why all the richest countries have public sectors between a third and a half of GDP...

Bloated (bandit) govermentents are a symptom, not a cause, of that wealth.

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Are users undermining your mobile security efforts?

nijam
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> Many IT professionals are of the opinion that the world would be a better place without mobile technology.

IT professionals have *always* been of the opinion that the world would be a better place without ${latest_technology}.

> Life was so much easier before users.

FTFY

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If you installed Windows 10 and like privacy, you checked the defaults, right? Oh dear

nijam
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Re: 'Cheap' in terms of food, now means selling your privacy too.

> AFAIK a number plate is not private information.

True. However... what *is* private information (as per the DPA, etc.) is that it is *your* car's registration number.

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And on that bombshell: Top Gear's Clarkson to reappear on Amazon

nijam
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> ... as they have been with Hachette ...

Hachette probably not the best - or even a good - example to have used to support your point, I think.

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Let kids delete their online rants, demand campaigners

nijam
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Re: Kids these days ...

Much the same thing...

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HP slaps dress code on R&D geeks: Bin that T-shirt, put on this tie

nijam
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Fortunately for me, I'm still employed for the contents of my head, not of my wardrobe.

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Top Euro court ends mega ebook VAT slash in France, Luxembourg

nijam
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Re: VAT Fraud!

> It is also a regressive tax (try reading up on this eh?)

In taxation, "regressive" is a politically-loaded pejorative term. Its only meaning is that people who hold certain political opinions are engaging in what one might call "stealth criticism". People of a different persuasion could equally readily describe it as a progressive tax, e.g. because it shifts the balance of taxation from production to consumption.

Since all tax is essentially "demanding money with menaces" (as the law might say), it's of little significance anyway.

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Google robo-car in rear-end smash – but cack-handed human blamed

nijam
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Re: "hit surprisingly often by other drivers..."

Well, the most dangerous component of a car is the nut that holds the steering wheel.

As we're re-visiting old jokes that are actually amusingly-phrased statements of simple fact.

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Happy NukeDay to you! 70 years in the shadow of the bomb post-Trinity

nijam
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Re: Bombing Japan

> before the war fizzled out

The Japan vs. USA part of the war was showing no signs of fizzling out at that point.

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Feel like you're being herded onto Windows 10? Well, you should

nijam
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Re: What CIOs say

> I can't believe there are that many corporates still on XP.

Open your eyes - many of the biggest are.

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Tech bubble? Pah. IPOs just return cash to early-stage investors

nijam
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> ... another complaint that we're seeing around the place, that corporations aren't investing money back into their businesses ...

Which makes the current criticism of Amazon - namely that it *is* doing that with its profit, rather than "splashing it all over" - somewhat ironic.

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YouTube is responsible for user content, says German court #1

nijam
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> GEMA, which represents around 70,000 members...

I think we all know what "represents" means in this context.

> ... this ruling was good for artists.

Because artists totally don't want anyone accessing their art, except via extortive middlemen. Youtube, in other words, isn't extortive enough.

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Linux Mint 17.2: If only all penguinista desktops were done this way

nijam
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Re: Goodness.

The difference being that a major new OS release is extremely likely to earn criticicisms, whereas a minor point-release or update - such as that reviewed here - might reasonably be expected to be a set of slight improvements, that in turn might even warrant a review that isn't at all critical.

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Google harms consumers and strangles the open web, says study

nijam
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> But now they are just another listing site trying to shove shopping and other listing sites (that they probably own) down my throat. Selling what they want you to buy, not supplying the information you seek...

Strangely, that doesn't happen to me ... put in a search query, get results, get no listing sites. Are you sure it's Google you're using?

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Why OH WHY did Blighty privatise EVERYTHING?

nijam
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Re: More balance please

> Conveniently missing were mentions of all the cases where companies were nationalised because the private sector failed

I was always told that the rail system was bankrupted by the Government not paying enough (or anything in some cases) for rail transport during WWII. If true, that would not be a failure of the private sector, obviously.

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Ditching political Elop makes for a more Nadella Microsoft

nijam
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> The problem is that he reached for the mobile vision with which he was most familiar: Microsoft's

In other words he was a Microsoft mole after all, albeit implicitly rather than overtly.

I've worked in organsisations which have taken on management from outside, and it's always that same story.... you intend to get new ideas, but all to often end up with another organisation's discards. It's not even surprising.

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Hi-res audio folk to introduce new rules and weed out impure noises

nijam
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... and that one loses frequency sensitivity as one listens to MP3s ...

FTFY

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nijam
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You (and he) aren't hearing the ultrasonics, though; you're hearing intermodulation distortion.

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nijam
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Re: Nyquist-Shannon

> Are you saying the music is a truly periodic signal, or that it is sampled in time from minus infinity to plus infinity or something similar? If not, how do you apply the theorem to get *perfect* reconstruction for finite non-periodic signals?

As I recollect, the periodicity only gives uniqueness of decomposition. That uniqueness may perhaps have some practical benefit, but any decomposition would still be correctly re-composed. As for the infinite duration issue, you can easily show that you get the same results (at least so far as human hearing is concerned) as by feeding an arbitrary duration of silence into the sampling process before and after the recording.

So actually it isn't bullshit in practice.

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nijam
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Re: "a brave person who said that HRA has no audible benefits"

> ... and 11dB for quantisation noise...

What? for quantisation noise shouldn't exceed 0.5 bits (unless you're doing it very incompetently), so between 3 or 4 dB. Not 11dB.

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nijam
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Re: for dogs only

Correct, and furthermore the difference and sum signals recombine into the original (that's the other part of the Fourier deal, after all)... *unless* they're distorted en route. In which case, it's the distortion, not the bandwidth, that needs correcting.

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Microsoft releases free Office apps for half of all Android phones

nijam
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Re: Almost a fan

> Apps -such as Office - uninstall very readily on a Windows Phone.

Not so. 'Apps' may do be uninstallable, but MS stuff such as Office and OneNote is locked down, and (maybe) doesn't even count as an app. Maybe you can remove them from jailbroken WPhone.

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Germany says no steamy ebooks until die Kinder have gone to bed

nijam
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> What makes a book sexually explicit, or to use the regulator's words, "youth endangering"?

Any fascist goverment will be able to answer that for you. (They may not all agree, unfortunately.)

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Climate change alarmism is a religious belief – it's official

nijam
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Re: In other words, "When to act"

> The answers, therefore, are in order: "already too much" and "as much as we can".

And there, in a single sentence, is all the evidence for AGW you will get.

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Facebook and Twitter queen Taylor Swift: Facebook and Twitter are RUBBISH

nijam
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No, just another "musician" with a large enough fanbase that the record company uses them as a propaganda mouthpiece.

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Downing Street secretly deletes emails to avoid exposure to FOIeurs

nijam
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> And aren't there any government rules on retention of official documents ? Surely those responsible for instructing for this to happen should be charged for breaking those rules ?

Yes, but as an earlier commentard observed, email is not an appropriate medium for official (or any other important) documents, for one thing it's almost devoid of security. If the documents are official they should be elsewhere, not in email archives.

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MIT bods' digital economy babblings are tosh. C'mon guys, Economics 101

nijam
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Re: @Tim Worstall

> So maybe the lesson is that those with transferable skills will be OK and those without are screwed?

Surely you mean "replaceable" rather than "transferable", or have you missed the the author's point completely? The rise of the motor car didn't mean that farriers started fitting horseshoes to cars (or transferring their skills to apprentice farriers, for that matter), it meant that most farriers had to replace their skill-set with different skills.

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Tech giants gang up on Obama over encryption key demands

nijam
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Weak (or no) encryption only helps criminals, we all know that.

If anyone (e.g. NSA, or GCHQ, or the Daily Mail, or ...) asks for encryption to be weakend or banned, you can immediately deduce that they are indeed amongst that class who will be helped by weak (or no) encryption.

QED

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A 16 Petaflop Cray: The key to fantastic summer barbecues

nijam
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Re: Can anyone clarify?

> I noticed when I visited the USA that many people seemed happy with a forecast of "there's a 30% chance of snow" whereas the standard British response to this on a TV weather forecast seems to be "well, will it or won't it?" so I think they may have a cultural issue on their hands as well.

In your example, the USA version is essentially useless. In information-theoretic terms they may as well have said nothing at all, as far as the "person in the street" is concerned.

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Paper driving licence death day: DVLA website is still TITSUP

nijam
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Re: There is no such thing as "Road Tax"!

> The Road Fund Licence ... was abolished in 1936!

Well, no it wasn't, only the name (more specifically, the goverment's name for it) changed; everything else stayed exactly the same - the price, the little disc you got to stick the windscreen, the way you bought it, ...

So it wasn't actually changed in any meaningful way. Obviously. And that's why people keep calling it by the original name.

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Microsoft spunks $500m to reinvent the wheel. Why?

nijam
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> ... mobile apps that are poor cousins of its own Exchange and Outlook software.

How could *anything* at all be considered a "poor cousin" of those abominations?

> Apps that, in some cases, don’t natively work with Microsoft’s server software.

No, it's Microsoft's server software that doesn't work natively with them.

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Second-hand IT alliance forms to combat 'bully' vendors

nijam
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Well, this is why you look at lifetime TCO. With the subtext "I assume your kit is unreliable - why else would your annual support contract be so expensive".

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Network negotiations nix 2015 Apple TV streaming

nijam
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> disintermediate it from the producers

It's not the producers, it's the competing middlemen that they'll need to disintermediate from.

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Windows 10 upgrade ADWARE forces its way on to Windows 7 and 8.1

nijam
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Re: I'm confused

Having grown up in a medical family, I know that an "application" is like a cream or an ointment, except that it's to treat infections that are not mentioned in polite company.

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Creationist: The Flintstones was an accurate portrayal of Dino-human coexistence

nijam
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Re: Derr.....

> the whole things a pile of crap anyway

Surely not. I have a definite recollection that it was written by Satan.

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