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* Posts by Unicornpiss

247 posts • joined 7 Oct 2011

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iPhone 6: Most exquisite MOBILE? NO, it's the Most Exquisite THING. EVER

Unicornpiss
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Childcatcher

Drugs bad

Well, actually they can be rather nice... Can I get some of whatever the author imbibed prior to writing this?

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First Irish boy band U2. Now Apple pushes ANOTHER thing into iPhones, iPods, iPads

Unicornpiss
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Re: "old" iPad 2?

I know you're being facetious here, but for all the... fine intelligent human beings... that think EVERY piece of hardware since the dawn of time should be supported forever by the most recent OS update, they should try running Windows 7, 8, (or even XP) on their Packard-Bell "Intel Inside!" Pentium I desktop PC. Or OSX on their Lisa, etc. You get my point.

Now what's the control key on this Commodore 64 to send a message... oh, there it is...

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'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux

Unicornpiss
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Re: Allways on Top

You don't want MS to buy Notepad++ If they do, you will begin paying $29.95 for it or at least be prompted to upgrade to the "Pro" version to use more features, and it will stop working if it cannot contact "the cloud"

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Unicornpiss
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Linux

Still some catching up to do...

Windows will have caught up with Linux when the following occurs:

-There are no more "helpful" pop-ups telling us every 2 minutes that something can perform faster, isn't secure, "a problem was detected", etc.

-Microsoft learns to make applications truly not steal focus from each other, which is probably my number one pet peeve with all versions of Windows.

-When Windows begins to hold a candle to Linux in frugal use of resources and just plain performance, all other elements of the same system being equal.

-When my computer is idle, it is truly idling, waiting for my next command, not grinding away at my hard drive re-indexing or doing some other pointless background task on the off chance it may speed something up that I do twice a year, if that.

-When windows updates don't take aeons to install, require a reboot, then another period of installation at the next reboot, followed by 2nd reboot "Preparing to configure windows"...

-When I no longer receive pointless warnings such as "Do you trust this printer?" or "This action contains an unspecified security flaw." What?? Are you just trying to make me paranoid?? (I wouldn't leave that printer alone with my kids, but other than that, I'll vouch for it..)

-When IE doesn't market to me at every opportunity such as "Suggested Sites" whether I want them or not, "Web Gallery", etc.

-When Windows can figure out what to do with a file by what it contains, not its extension.

-When I can boot up a Windows box without just plain feeling like I sold out on what being a geek is all about.

Not that Windows doesn't have a few innovative features that Linux can learn from, and Linux does have some failings, but not bad for a totally free (as in both beer and speech) OS.

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The sound of silence: One excited atom is so quiet that the human ear cannot detect it

Unicornpiss
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Puzzled...

Since sound is vibration of atoms or molecules in whatever media, such as air, water, etc., how can one atom influence whatever medium it is in significantly enough to be distinguished from Brownian motion? Admittedly I have not read the paper...

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Read The Gods of War for every tired cliche you never wanted to see in a sci fi book

Unicornpiss
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When I really want to geek out

I turn to Greg Egan for dry, insanely visionary sci-fi that I nearly have to take notes to understand. Permutation City is an amazing concept, if a bit lacking in character development.

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The Apple Watch and CROTCH RUBBING. How are they related?

Unicornpiss
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I just wanted to thank you

...Mr. Dabbs, for brightening my day with that hilarious article.

And I don't disagree with your observations either.

A small observation of my own... People that wear watches expect them to work for more than a day without having to recharge them. The whole point of wearing one is convenience. When I used to wear a watch, I'd shower with it routinely because I couldn't be bothered with taking it off. I figured it and me were getting clean at the same time. No one likes the annoyance of putting a watch back on, or possibly forgetting it in the charger. If they can come up with a smart watch that will last, say, a week between charges, is more autonomous than current offerengs without a phone being in proximity, and is waterproof to boot, I'll consider it. It shouldn't be that hard... older non-smart cellphones had days or even weeks of standby time.

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Airbus developing inkjet printer for planes

Unicornpiss
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Be sure to deselect the staple option

I hate inkjets. I'll hold out for the laser version. True, the toner carts will cost a couple $M each, but you will be able to print more than one plane before it starts streaking or telling you it's running low on cyan. Or refusing to print any B/W text because of same. Of course lights might dim in neighbouring cities when the fuser starts to warm up...

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Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps

Unicornpiss
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Meh

Re: Android on windows anyone?

Bluestacks. Agreed. I have used it, and it works well. What I don't like about it is that it seems to be partially adware and runs components of itself at bootup, not just when using an Android app. However, since it has been possible to use Bluestacks on Windows for a long time, I don't see why it was so tricky to port Android apps to what is already Linux, essentially.

Re. why didn't Chromebook run Android in the first place, that's a good question. My old Motorola phone was meant to be used with the "Atrix" dock that never took off. But you could plug a HDMI cable into it and use it with a TV or monitor, and the results were very good. It automatically would switch to mouse mode if you chose the "Webtop" option, which was one of 3 given. The other two being "clone display" or more of a movie/photo friendly mode. Throw in a BT keyboard and you really didn't even need a laptop, although the performance could have been a bit better. If the price of the Atrix dock hadn't pushed the overall cost into the land of netbooks, it might have done very well.

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Apple's SNEAKY plan: COPY ANDROID. Hello iPhone 6, Watch

Unicornpiss
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Re: Says it is for right handers only

I live in the US, and am left handed, so I do rather insist on driving a left-hand drive car. When I used to wear a watch, I wore it on my left wrist. Oddly, I keep my phone on my right hip and usually use my right hand to operate it. And for other things...

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Unicornpiss
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Battery issues?

As someone who is tasked with supporting hundreds of iThings, among other duties, I can say that Apple devices, including their batteries, are pretty tired and worn out after about a year and half of use in an enterprise environment. Oh, except for the somewhat fragile screens, they are built pretty well, but I have a drawer full of iPhone 4s and now some 5c devices that have crummy battery life and that exhibit erratic behavior like random reboots, lockups, unresponsive screens, poor radio reception, etc.

To be fair, when we had Blackberry devices, we had a drawer full of those too, though at least you could easily change the batteries and backup/restoration of data was not an exercise in frustration (well, not as much anyway) like it is with iTunes. With BB you could at least selectively backup and restore, not the "all or nothing if it feels like working" that you get with iTunes.

I'm sure if we had Samsung or other Android devices company-wide, we'd have a bin full of problem children too: Enterprise devices see hard use and are not treated as gently as consumer devices.

The iPhone 6 looks a bit fragile to me. The myth that Apple builds better quality hardware than others is only true when compared to the cheapest offerings from other companies.

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4th Century GOBLET could REVIVE CORPSE of holographic storage

Unicornpiss
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Forget the article for a moment...

I'm just blown away that someone created something that amazing 17+ centuries ago, and that it's survived all these years intact! Imagine what such an artisan could do with modern equipment and techniques. Truly a genius.

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NASA finds ancient films that extend Arctic ice record by 15 years

Unicornpiss
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The blind men and the elephant

Agreed that 50 years isn't much to go on as far as determining trends, though it's a start. Our climate (and many other things in the environment and life in general) is made up of cycles within cycles within cycles, and 50 years of observing same ain't much to go on. Varying solar output needs to be taken into account as well besides human factors, IMHO, as it's literally shining on our faces and is utterly beyond our control. Fortunately some researchers seem to be looking at this now.

So the moral of the story in my opinion is to not jump to any conclusions about "Global Warming", "Global Cooling", or any other current fad theory. Most of the most vocal supporters of these theories don't even understand how the electricity in their homes works, much less any grasp on any deeper scientific principles. People say "that's bad" and they jump on the bandwagon and freak out: "Why aren't we doing something about it?! Think of the children!" Sure, we should do what we can to control CO2 emissions and other things that may be detrimental to our world--it is after all currently the only world we have to live on. But all the people screeching about global warming need to STFU, as do its detractors. We just don't have enough data to make a conclusion.

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GitHub.io killed the distro star: Why are people so bored with the top Linux makers?

Unicornpiss
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Re: Why would I need to look at new distros?

Agreed. Trying out different distros can be fun... if you have an abundance of free time to burn and a lack of things like a job and other obligations. Most of us find one we like after trying a few and then stick with it. Unless you're a grandma who only wants to search the interwebs and get on The Facebook, you're going to want to configure your machine to suit your needs and preferences. Installing and customizing an OS to your liking, as well as getting everything to work satisfactorily is as arduous in some ways as moving to a new home. It is an investment of time and effort, if not as physically as actually moving. And it has some of the same pitfalls as moving--things get lost, broken, and things end up in boxes (folders anyway) until you have time to deal with them.

Most people don't decide to pick up and move for the fun of it, arbitrarily, when they've found a residence to their liking; most folks don't jump ship to another OS unless it's falling apart or the neighbourhood isn't what it used to be. Barring a drive crash or hardware failure--which is perhaps equivalent to a home catastrophe like a fire or flood, most people want to stay put, kick back on the porch, and enjoy the familiarity and fruits of their hard work getting everything "just so". For the record, I'm using Mint as well.

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Unicornpiss
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Re: Why would I need to look at new distros?

Agreed. Trying out different distros can be fun... if you have an abundance of free time to burn and a lack of things like a job and other obligations. Most of us find one we like after trying a few and then stick with it. Unless you're a grandma who only wants to search the interwebs and get on The Facebook, you're going to want to configure your machine to suit your needs and preferences. Installing and customizing an OS to your liking, as well as getting everything to work satisfactorily is as arduous in some ways as moving to a new home. It is an investment of time and effort, if not as physically as actually moving. And it has some of the same pitfalls as moving--things get lost, broken, and things end up in boxes (folders anyway) until you have time to deal with them.

Most people don't decide to pick up and move for the fun of it, arbitrarily, when they've found a residence to their liking; most folks don't jump ship to another OS unless it's falling apart or the neighbourhood isn't what it used to be. Barring a drive crash or hardware failure--which is perhaps equivalent to a home catastrophe like a fire or flood, most people want to stay put, kick back on the porch, and enjoy the familiarity and fruits of their hard work getting everything "just so". For the record, I use Mint as well :)

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iPhone owners EARN MORE THAN YOU, says mobile report

Unicornpiss
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Most likely because it's perceived as a status symbol

I think that what would mostly account for this would be that people that are better off have more disposable income to spend on "status symbols", which is what Apple's powerful marketing has made i-Stuff in a lot of peoples' eyes, not because somehow people that are better off financially have made a smarter choice somehow using the same "wisdom" that has gotten them "further" in life.

As someone who supports iPhones in an Enterprise environment, and who has had 3 generations of Android devices for personal use, IMHO, Android's functionality blows away anything currently available from Apple. And if you've never had the joy of dealing with Apple's customer service to get a locked device unlocked, let's just say you don't want to.

And I'm sure I can vouch for the countless Sysadmin/support folks here in saying that a higher income does emphatically NOT mean that the person in question is in any way more tech-savvy or more intelligent in general than the "rest". Seriously, a lot of affluence can be attributed more to good luck and a somewhat diminished set of core scruples rather than skill or some sort of uber-worthiness. For every executive that has rightfully earned his or her position (and to be fair, people at the board level are generally intelligent and reasonable people), there are 10 more managers just below that level that practically need a keeper, and that if I asked them the time of day, I'd check my watch before believing them.

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Seven Apple Store staff cuffed in alleged $500k stolen iPhone scam bust

Unicornpiss
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Diamond-encrusted jockstrap

Too bad Apple's high resale value isn't related in any way to usability or enhanced functionality of the units compared with the Android ecosystem. Security? Maybe. And I can say this as someone tasked with administrating ~500 of these little beauties, in addition to other roles. I'd also say that Samsung's latest s5 is probably a hotter commodity on both legitimate and black markets than any Apple phone right now.

And yes, I do have some bias, I am much more of an Android fan, which has only increased over time as I've dealt with more and more i-Stuff.

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Detroit losing MILLIONS because it buys CHEAP BATTERIES – report

Unicornpiss
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@Danceman:

I do the same--when we replace the batteries in our wireless mics at work, which we do whether they need them or not before we do a webcast or the CEO speaks to the huddled masses, I take the castoffs home for use in my cordless mouse and other equipment. They are not fit to go in other equipment at work, but it's wasteful and silly to recycle them when they have usable life left.

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Unicornpiss
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@Danceman:

I do the same--when we replace the batteries in our wireless mics at work, which we do whether they need them or not before we do a webcast or the CEO speaks to the huddled masses, I take the castoffs home for use in my cordless mouse and other equipment. They are not fit to go in other equipment at work, but it's wasteful and silly to recycle them when they have usable life left.

For smoke alarms, mine must be touchy, but used batteries don't last too long in them and it's enough of a pain to change them (after you find out which cussed one is nagging you) that I only use new batteries in them.

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Unicornpiss
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Re: A couple of points.

Ad DC-DC converter or regulator would waste far too much power--that little 9V would run down in no time flat. But I also agree with you about CMOS--I think the parking meters were just poorly-designed for their intended purpose.

I totally agree that it's an enormously stupid design to run these off a 9V battery. Detroit was dumb in cheaping out on the batteries, but even stupider in considering this model when there are solar-powered ones available. Probably they were a few bucks cheaper and either no one factored in changing batteries or were pressured from above to cut initial costs.

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Unicornpiss
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They may indeed have used alkalines

Anyone who has used batteries for years, whether in the technology sector or not, can vouch that cheap alkaline batteries just don't hold out as long as name brands. "Off-brand" companies also don't seem to have the QC that the makers of Duracell, for example have. I have gotten dead or nearly dead batteries in a brand new budget pack before, but Duracell and Energizer have been remarkably consistent.

I've often thought that the company I work for wastes $$$ to save ¢¢, One example would be the 'autoflush' toilets in our restrooms, which they have dialed down to the point that you have to flush them 2 or 3x to be effective, negating any possible savings in water. But Detroit clearly has us beat. Besides the revenue lost, they still have to buy more batteries and pay someone to replace them more frequently.

The parking meters near me have solar cells to supplement whatever internal battery they have.

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Rupert Murdoch says Google is worse than the NSA

Unicornpiss
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More money than brains

Some people's only "skill" in life is to be a nasty P.O.S. It's reasonably easy to get rich if you don't understand ethics or fair play and have just enough brains to not get caught, along with a loud voice for giving orders.

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Top Gun display for your CAR: Heads-up fighter pilot tech

Unicornpiss
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Devil

GM had this years ago

General Motors had a HUD feature on some of their cars a decade or more ago. True, it was a bit primitive. I think it was limited to your speedometer and other gauges. Though some 'premium' cars like Cadillac had an IR camera and night vision display overlaid on the windshield. So in theory you could drive without headlights. Don't get started on why this isn't safe.

I think the HUD for navigation and possibly phone calls would be useful if it can be made as non-distracting as possible, as it will keep the driver from taking their eyes (completely) off the road. But having someone's face pop up on your windshield at the wrong moment could be catastrophic. And with so many apps driven by ads (no pun intended), I really don't think we need to be bombarded with advertisements in the middle of our windshields while trying to drive. Especially blinky, intrusive adds like. "You Have Won!!"

(I used the Satan icon because it actually looks like a happy little car)

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Know what Ferguson city needs right now? It's not Anonymous doxing random people

Unicornpiss
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Ahh, vigilante "justice"

I truly believe Anonymous has done some good in the world, but they really need to take a couple of steps back and reassess their methods and priorities, as well as their methods for fact checking.

I truly hope these poor people aren't harassed by the unwashed masses over Anonymous' mistake. The whole thing just makes me sad. Sadder is people's willingness to scream for blood before information. And saddest of all is that oppression, frustration, ignorance, and feelings of low self worth can build up in a community to such a boiling point that lynch mobs and riots can be sparked like a wildfire in dry brush when something like this occurs.

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IBM boffins stuff 16 million-neuron chips into binary 'frog' brain

Unicornpiss
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Mushroom

On August 29, SyNet became self aware...

And so it begins... Big Blue merely copied the architecture of the broken CPU they had in their secret vault..

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Top Ten 802.11ac routers: Time for a Wi-Fi makeover?

Unicornpiss
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Meh

I mostly agree with this article

I have not ventured into the world of this generation of wireless yet. For me there's no need as only one of my devices even supports it, and N is plenty fast in my home for now.

But I have to mostly agree with his findings for the brands I've personally used. I have an ASUS router now, and have been pleased with its performance. It replaced a Netgear that was also good. I had a Buffalo that had an amazing UI but very poor speed and range. TPlink has always been good budget kit. Linksys gets the job done but is nothing remarkable. I've never been fond of DLink nor Belkin.

My one disagreement would be with Airport being wonderful to set up and use. Maybe it is if you have bought into the Apple 'ecosystem' For those of us that are used to simply going to a web address and being done in 10 minutes, Apple's Windows software is frustrating and annoying to use. And not fun for Linux users. Also, Apple's insistence on feebly trying to enhance security by using a different standard IP range than the rest isn't doing anything but making it more of a pain to configure. It's well been proven that "security through obscurity" does little to thwart all but the least skilled and makes life a pain for everyone else.

Occasionally our department (being the catch-all for everything that plugs in) has to configure a home router for a customer that brought it in with them, complete with cables, printer, etc. to be thrown on our desks: "Here you go!" When I see an Airport router, I immediately begin swearing...

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Watch this Aussie infosec bod open car doors from afar

Unicornpiss
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Safety?

No matter what the security, cars still have windows that are easily shattered, as those that have mentioned the brick master key have pointed out. And no matter how secure a trunk lock, a beefy crowbar will still make short work of most of them a lot quicker than capturing a signal using electronics. Taking extraordinary measures to secure the door locks on a car is like hanging a high security lock on a door with a window pane in it. You can also buy "tryout" or "jiggler" keys from locksmithing sites that will open a lot of cars with mechanical locks too, and pretty much all cars still have at least one of these for an emergency. Not as elegant perhaps as pushing a button, but it works.

But more worrisome are exploits that can be used on a car that's in motion--if you can disable a car's engine or other systems, or otherwise cause events to happen that can jeopardise the safety of the car's occupants, these are the holes that need to be plugged. It's always been possible to steal many cars relatively easily, and while a nuisance, it doesn't affect public safety.

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Samsung sticks with CHILD labor shame fab: Zero-tolerance means 30% less trade

Unicornpiss
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"Think of the children!"

It's good that child labor is being addressed. However, I don't think the adults are treated all that fairly/well either in Asian factories. True, at least they have more of a choice, but barely.

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14 antivirus apps found to have security problems

Unicornpiss
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@MS software going downhill

Has anyone but me noticed that the least compatible, flakiest, most prone to not interoperate, software on MS Windows systems is the software written by MS themselves? (Office comes to mind first)

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Trying to sell your house? It'd better have KILLER mobile coverage

Unicornpiss
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WTF?

As long as you have some kind of broadband

As long as there is some kind of broadband available that doesn't cost a fortune, what's the big deal? Oh, phone calls. Well, there's a bunch of alternatives for that, including the aforementioned femtocell. But don't most people switch their devices to wi-fi when they're home anyway for data use? I live near a river where there are no towers on once side of me at all. I typically get a 3G signal of limited strength at home... and it matters not at all to me. I can still use the phone with the signal I get, and wi-fi for data. My tablets don't even have a cellular connection. No available broadband or unreliable broadband--well, that could be a deal breaker for me, much more so than cellular.

When I was younger I picked my first apartment partially due to proximity to a decent local bar. But those were the days before cell phones were common.

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Microsoft bakes a bigger Pi to cook Windows slabs

Unicornpiss
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Defeats the purpose

..and the spirit of devices like the Pi. Why would you pay $299 for one of these? You can get a full blown desktop for that much money. The only thing I can see it being even slightly useful for is to build a media center if you're starving for space. And a micro-ATX form factor would be my choice instead if I wanted to run Windows for some reason. IMHO the Pi and Linux capture the essence and freedom of the early days of computing and experimenting but with modern hardware and functionality, and no bloat.

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In the Land of the Free, Home of the Brave ... you can legally carrier unlock your own phone

Unicornpiss
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@Moosh - Cheap Chinese phones

It only makes sense--since iPhones and other devices have been made in China since the beginning, you'd expect they've learned something about how to cheaply produce a good quality phone. In fact all of the Chinese goods are steadily improving. If you live in the USA, Harbor Freight tools is a good example--when they first opened, they had variable quality junk. Now I have no qualms with buying tools there. I think I realized how much things have changed when I broke a Craftsman screwdriver, then switched to a Chinese-made one to finish the job. (which didn't break)

This has been a continual progression--in the 50s and 60s, Japanese-made goods were viewed as junk and as a curiosity. Within a couple of decades their quality improved until they were the world's main supplier of decent electronics. Next a lot of silicon was made in Malaysia. Then Korea followed suit in exactly the same way as Japan. Now the trend is shifting to China. Makes you wonder what country will develop next into an industrial powerhouse.

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Unicornpiss
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Work around the system?

Even before this passed (at our company), we could usually call our carriers and get them to unlock a phone for us. Sometimes it took some creative liberties with the truth as to why we needed it, but we could usually get it done. Oddly, this is easiest with AT&T, though EVERY other type of transaction we made was difficult with them. And of course there are services all over the web that will let you pay to unlock a phone, albeit quasi-legally I guess.

But despite the outcry, I also agree with Ledswinger: Not only is it prohibitively expensive for the average Joe to afford a $600 smartphone without it being subsidized, a lot of people/families also like being able to have insurance coverage on their phones. Despite insurance being a rip-off for most people, it's useful for families that have a few teens that all 'must' have smartphones. People, especially young adults, are always dropping, abusing, getting phones stolen, or just plain prematurely wearing them out from constant use. It makes more sense to have insurance, even with a $50 or more deductible in this situation when you have a teen with a $600 smartphone.

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White? Male? You work in tech? Let us guess ... Twitter? We KNEW it!

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@Political Correctness being a tool

When all you have is a hammer in your toolbox, everything starts to look like a nail.

More worrisome than any population breakdown in a company would be if this was really because of prejudices existing. But you can't tell from statistics if this was because of prejudices/discrimination, because of lack of interest from ethnic groups for certain jobs, or lack of qualifications. I agree that it looks damning that decent, higher-paying jobs seem to be populated by mostly one gender and ethnicity, but if it weren't for the perception that these are choice jobs, would there be outcry over this? Would anyone blink if a study was done showing that there aren't enough female lumberjacks or enough white people working in Indian restaurants, for example?

I want everyone to be treated fairly and honestly, with no bias or preference because of any factor except for actual qualifications and ability to do a job, and hopefully all of us feel this way. Everyone should have the same choices and opportunities available. In the USA, we've long suffered from forms of reverse discrimination called "affirmative action" and company diversity policies where ethnic groups are given preference just because the company wants to be seen as being "diverse" And in certain jobs you can be the highest-scoring candidate, yet not even be considered unless you a member of a minority group that may have scored far worse. For a while in certain jobs being white and male was poison to your chances of landing the job if more "diverse" applicants existed. Fortunately, reverse discrimination like this is becoming a thing of the past in the USA, albeit slowly. "Fake" diversity like this does nothing to promote equality in the long run and only feeds resentment.

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WTF is ... Virtual Customer Premises Equipment?

Unicornpiss
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Security? Hahahaha

Oh yes, I'm sure security will be MUCH better. With DHCP and other services being in "the cloud" (which btw is a term I've always detested anyway--if you had email on Prodigy in 1995, you were using the cloud), instead of Grandma's wireless being compromised or someone getting into her home network because no one changed the default password, now you have the opportunity for thousands of users to be compromised at once--and not even know about it unless the ISP is in a generous mood.

And revenue? What's to stop an ISP from deciding that for each additional IP address in your home, that you shouldn't pay another .50/month? (I know the article addressed this) Marketing? Now demographics on each attached device can be harvested via their MAC address, as well as much more detailed usage statistics. It's a dream for every ISP and a nightmare for every marginally-intelligent customer.

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Microsoft confirms Office 365 price rise

Unicornpiss
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Too bad the quality of the app isn't set to rise

Nuff' said.

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Cisco COO: 'I actually thank God that we had a crisis'...

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I'm sure...

All the laid-off workers are grateful for his piety and humbleness...

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China puts Windows 8 on TV, screams: 'SECURITY, GET IT OUT OF HERE!'

Unicornpiss
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Access to MS source code?

Sounds like it would just make it easier for China to spy on US, as well as to pirate the OS. I wouldn't give it to them either.

But while I am grateful to MS for the fact that while Windows continues to exist, I will always have an IT job, when I am home it's a relief to use Linux.

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AMD tops processor evolution with new mobile Kaveri chippery

Unicornpiss
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Looking forward to it

Hopefully they live up to the hype and aren't ridiculously expensive. I've always been a fan of AMD. Not just because they're the underdog, or a cheaper alternative to Intel, but because they seem to be a bit less shady as a company in their practices. And it's subjective, but AMD processors seem to "feel" faster when multitasking. I hope they got the embedded software right, as this is one way I could see that this could fail. (Think of the famous Pentium bug)

I'm sure they will blow Intel "Integrated HD graphics" out of the water, but re. Intel graphics (and Mythbusters results aside), you can't polish a turd. I'd love to see a comparo with real-world equipment with dedicated graphics cards.

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Android is a BURNING 'hellstew' of malware, cackles Apple's Cook

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Personal preferences

I was going to go on a long tirade about this, but decided it wasn't worth it. I support both devices at work and have used both, and I find Apple's UI to be very lacking and both platforms to have problems.

I just prefer Android's UI, as it seems a lot of IT people do. And I appreciate the freedom of being able to access the FS and use an SD card, among other things. And frankly, Samsung's 5s makes all Apple phones I've used look and feel like poorly thought out toys.

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The hoarder's dilemma: 'Why can't I throw anything away?'

Unicornpiss
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Pint

All I can say is you and me both, brother

Though this behavior is indispensible at work if you are in an environment with "legacy" (to put it kindly) shop floor equipment. Every 6 months or so someone comes through our storage/testing area and has a big hissy fit about "5s" and how we must clean up. Then something used for production breaks and we delve into our crap pile and have it working again in an hour, for nothing, instead of a week later for $10K plus lost production costs.

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Antivirus firm Avast! takes down forums after breach

Unicornpiss
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Off topic, but getting really sick of their marketing popups

Yes, I'm a freetard using their free AV, and I still think it's fairly decent. (especially for free) But now that they've grown a bit, I get an endless parade of "special offers" along with the legitimate notifications. It used to be that "it just works", now "it just annoys". I have shortened the duration of the popups to only a second, which mitigates it, but it's still annoying.

The thing of it is, I don't think ANYONE's security offerings are worth paying much for these days. I will say that Avast at least isn't bloatware like Symantec's offerings.

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Chuh. Heavy, dude: HP ZBook 17 mobile workstation

Unicornpiss
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Meh

Dell's offerings are better, I think

I'm not a huge fan of Dell, but having used HP and Dell products, supported them, and configured them, I'd have to say Dell's "Precision" lineup is better overall, better built, and less troublesome. Really the only thing to crow about with this HP is the 4GB video card, which apparently has some flaky drivers. Dell's battery life is much better. Even the more "entry level" M4800s have a faster processor and also include a numeric keypad. If you're going to take up that much space, it's stupid to not have one. And seriously, get a better dock. I'm not that familiar with HP's offerings, but the Dells have a much better available dock with 2xDVI, 2xDisplayport, eSATA, and even an old fashioned parallel port available.

As a side note, if I can play BD discs for free with VLC on Linux (albeit quasi-legally), I don't get why MS hasn't come to some arrangement yet. It's like when standard def DVDs came out and you couldn't play them on Windows either. BD has been out for quite a while now and the best that can be done is to use quirky 3rd-party software? It's especially stupid since it's always been possible to copy a disc fairly easily, but you have to jump through so many hoops to play one. Idiocy. The determined will always be able to pirate content.

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Why are Fujitsu and Toshiba growing lettuce in semiconductor plants?

Unicornpiss
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Pint

Seems like there's a better cash crop...

I'm sure they could come up with a more "herbal" crop to maximize their profits than lettuce. As a side note, I wonder what the air quality is like in that room after years of being used to fab semiconductors that contain nasties like arsenic...

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Fanbois Apple-gasm as iPhone giant finally reveals WWDC lineup

Unicornpiss
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Meh

WWJD

I read the title as "WWJD" or "What would Jobs do" (unfortunately, Apple seems to have no clue)

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BEAM ME UP SCOTTY: Boffins to turn PURE LIGHT into MATTER

Unicornpiss
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Boffin

Re: Gooooooowld

I'm sure the solid gold target will still be about the cheapest part of this experiment.

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Welcome to Heathrow Terminal, er, Samsung Galaxy S5

Unicornpiss
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Thumb Down

The icon says it all.

Do we really need more marketing? If anything, this turns me off on buying anything Samsung.

As an aside, I recently got an S5 and while it's a nice phone, the battery life and UI are both utterly dismal compared to my old Droid Razr Maxx.

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FSF slams Mozilla for 'shocking' Firefox DRM ankle-grab

Unicornpiss
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Alert

If Mozilla didn't support this..

With the existing climate all that would be accomplished is that people would start abandoning Firefox to watch their precious DRM'd content on <shudder> IE. And Mozilla would find itself in the same situation Apple did with Flash--people whining and nothing really accomplished.

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Urinating teen polluted 57 Olympic-sized swimming pools - cops

Unicornpiss
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Pint

Where did the water go when they "flushed it"? (and I hope they used the setting for liquid waste and not solid when they flushed to save water-ha) Why, it probably went back into the lake or river from which the reservoir was filled. Then the reservoir was probably filled again from that very same lake or river.

Somehow the beer icon just seemed appopriate here when dealing with taking a wee.

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Mozilla agrees to add DRM support to Firefox – under protest

Unicornpiss
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Flame

The day the music died...

I understand why Mozilla is doing this and have no problem with it. My problem is with DRM in general. The day DRM is finally abolished will be a great day of celebration. With DRM, there is no fair use of content and the only folks that benefit are the huge labels, not the little guy.

And why use Youtube as an example? There are dozens of free Youtube downloaders that get the job done. And re. DRM and music, this is why Amazon continues to get my business for music downloads. For your very reasonable price you get (usually) a decent quality, unencumbered .mp3 that can be downloaded as many times as you want from any device you want.

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