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* Posts by Richard Lloyd

273 posts • joined 25 Nov 2006

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Google to open flagship retail stores by end of 2013

Richard Lloyd
Linux

Now if you could replace the onboard OS on a Chromebook...

With netbooks pretty well dead, the closest cousin we have left is actually the horrible crippled Chromebook. Now if they did a high-end version of that with an OS that could be completely replaced internally (i.e. not booted off a slow SD card like the current Chromebook Linux hacks do), I'd be in the market for one. No way would I want to run Chrome OS though.

I guess one advantage of a Google bricks and mortar store - assuming they stick to the same prices as their Google Play store - is that you can pick a Nexus device up without paying the hefty 10 quid postage charge. Plus they might actually *have* stock unlike their online store (Nexus 4 only came in stock a few weeks ago after months of no stock and the 32GB Nexus 10 has been out of stock for a long time now).

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Cache 'n' carry: What's the best config for your SSD?

Richard Lloyd
Linux

Not a single mention of Linux anywhere

Sad to see that Linux isn't mentioned (or indeed benchmarked) here, even if it's just to suggest what the equivalent of Intel's SRT is for Linux. If you're building a new machine, I'd expect it to have SATA 3 because SATA 3 SSD prices are continuing to fall.

The only sensible combo, IMHO, is a Sata 3 SSD with 500MB+/sec read/write and a fast multi-terabyte HDD (I use Seagate 3TB's myself at 225Mbytes/sec read). Throw in a fast multi-core CPU and you're not far off 10 seconds boot time, meaning that multi-boot isn't tiresome any more.

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LibreOffice 4.0 ships with new features, better looks

Richard Lloyd
Meh

Separate+ anyone?

I read the earlier (well off-topic) discussion about CMYK and Gimp a few pages ago - has anyone tried Separate+ as a plug-in:

http://cue.yellowmagic.info/softwares/separate-plus/index.html

Seems to offer at least basic CMYK capabilities, though for some reason the only binaries available are for Windows!

As for MS Office and its ribbon, am I the only one who couldn't find the basic File functions? It took me an age to realise that the ribbon itself didn't have any! The round Windows logo in the top left - that looks neither like the ribbon nor a menu - is actually clickable (I had no idea - there is no visual clue for this) and contains the File operations in there. Massively unintuitive and I defy anyone to claim it's obvious for a first-time user.

One thing that perplexes me is why people/organisations can't install both (LO and MS Office) and use whichever one works the best for them (which might vary between document types or even individual documents). The only argument I can see is support - having to handle issues from two Office suites rather than one. However, if either can be used to fix issues with documents, wouldn't the combination work correctly more often and result in *less* overall problems?

It's like Web browsers - one browser doesn't work with *all* sites...you usually have to have one or two backup browsers (plus it's nice for multiple sessions to the same site to run 2 or 3 different browsers at once).

I think one problem LO has is that it existed in many old versions (both OO and LO) that were not stellar at handling the common MS file formats. It's only since LibreOffice has picked up the dev pace and improved compatibility in the last 1-2 years that you can now be reasonably confident (not 100% yet sadly) that you can load in an MS Office document and it'll pretty true to the original.

Sadly, there's massive resistance from MS Office "lovers" until LO is 100% compatible with every MS Office document format produced from any version of MS Office since it existed. The likelihood of that being the case is very slim even 5 years from now - of course, such MS Office fans won't even acknowledge that compatibility between MS Office releases themselves falls short of 100% in quite a few cases, so any pleases to install LO alongside MS Office tend to fall on deaf ears :-(

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Support for RHEL 3 ends one year from … now!

Richard Lloyd

Re: Idiots who pay for RHEL

It should be noted here that you don't need an RHEL subscription to lodge bug reports with RHEL. Just register on bugzilla.redhat.com and post up your bug. I've done it a few times myself, even though I run CentOS. Obviously, if it's not an RHEL issue but a CentOS one, you should post up to bugs.centos.org instead. And, yes, you can use the same Red Hat Bugzilla system to report bugs in Fedora too.

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The Spherical Cow lands, spits out Anaconda

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

Well, that's Anaconda worse then

Just put F18 in a VirtualBox VM to try it out and it's still seems a bit half-baked to me.

Anaconda is *terrible* now. I mean seriously bad. It was buggy in F18 Alpha and those issues seemed to have been ironed out, but none of the usability problems have:

* EVERYTHING IS IN CAPITALS FOR NO GOOD REASON. As the El Reg screenshot shows, they title everything in shouty capitals rather than bolding it or something not so horrible.

* The review mentions MATE and Cinnamon, yet neither of these are offered as desktop options in Anaconda at all. Considering MATE is officially supported and installable via yum, this is quite a poor move.

* Talking of customising the package installs, any chance to refine it above some broad categories doesn't exist (probably hasn't for several Fedora releases anyway).

* The disk partitioning section is now actually far worse than the old (and not very good) Disk Druid-type section we've seen in earlier Fedoras. I always do custom partitioning and can't say I like the default of LVM, but at least I worked out how to change that to a standard partition. Units are mixed with abandon (XX.YY GB and XXX.YY Kbytes right next to each other!), it took me an age to work out how to add swap space and also how to allocate the rest of the remaining space on the device to a partition (answer: leave the size field blank).

* You start the installation only to be told you haven't set the root password (shouldn't that have been asked for *before* you clicked "start install"?).

* No ETA for installation completion during install and don't believe it displayed either the version numbers or sizes of the packages it was installing either.

After installation (I chose GNOME), you're presented with a blank desktop, an Activities menu, a few icons in the top right and that's it. Quite a poor first impression from GNOME 3 immediately there - having to click on Activities to make icons visible is simply a ludicrous default. The thing is, at this point, you have been given no alternative clues about MATE or Cinnamon - neither are offered to you either before login or afterwards.

Every release of Fedora seems to make it harder and harder to bring up a terminal window, which isn't good considering that people think of it as one of the better distros for developers. It's Activities -> Some non-obvious dotted grid (hover to find it's "show all apps" apparently) -> System Tools -> Terminal. Yes, that's two clicks on the left, two on the right - *4* clicks to bring up a terminal window :-( Yes, I know there are other ways, but they involve keyboard *and* mouse, which is even worse.

So I get the terminal up, complete with stupidly tall title bar/menu (no divider between the title bar and menu doesn't help!) and a yum grouplist as root finally shows what was stupidly hidden by Anaconda - all the alternative desktops! So it's time for yum groupinstall "MATE Desktop" and 108 (!) package downloads/installs later, I have MATE installed (it installed Thunderbird which surprisingly doesn't seem to be in the default GNOME install!). It's here I see something that I raised a feature request about - it looks like RPMs are downloaded in parallel, which is nice. It does lead to a bit of confusing cycling of the parallel download names as they are in progress though.

I might be too frustrated at this point, because I can't find the logout option in the menus (only restart/shutdown), so it's a restart then. A new "Session..." option appears pre-login and I can choose MATE now. Still the stupid 2-panel that later GNOME 2 desktops have (you only need one panel otherwise you are mousing up and down like a mad person), but it does look like MATE is customisable in a very similar manner to GNOME 2 e.g. the right button is used, there's a panel and desktop icons, all of which are improvements on GNOME 3 :-)

Conclusion - if you can struggle past the awfulness of Anaconda and install MATE using yum, this might be a half-decent environment - the first Fedora since F14 that hasn't massively disappointed me.

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Review: Google Nexus 4

Richard Lloyd
Go

Try this Nexus availability checker app

Yes, Google Play is almost permanently out of stock, but for the few hours it isn't, may I recommend this checker app:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=fr.julienvermet.nexusavailability

Yes, a bit chicken and egg, but you've surely got another Android device somewhere? :-)

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USB 3.0 speed to DOUBLE in 2013

Richard Lloyd

Decaspeed?

Don't see the point of naming USB 3.1 as anything, but since it can go 10 Gigabit/sec, "Decaspeed" might be one possibility.

Of more importance though: having started to shift USB 3.0 in decent numbers at long last, will existing USB 3.0 setups see any speed improvement anywhere in the chain (assuming drivers have been updated to 3.1)? Or will everything (motherboard included) have to be replaced with 3.1 equivalents?

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Microsoft: We're SO SORRY for Media Center TV guide titsup

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

Tried WMC, really didn't like the startup time or UI

I did try WMC a while back (yes, on WIndows 7) and thought it took a long time to start up and seemed to have a UI that favoured looking pretty whilst taking an actual age to navigate around.

As I said in the previous WMC article about their EPG cockup, WMC is by no means the best media centre platform, even on WIndows itself.

The best combo for ease of setup and flexibility is Linux+tvheadend+XBMC. I'm using TBS PCIe cards for my sat and terrestrial digital viewing and their Linux support is very good. tvheadend is such a good and easy to use Web-based backend that I don't know people put up with anything else :-) And as for XBMC, well it just is super-configurable too (a dozen or more skins if you don't like the very pretty default Confluence skin) and has virtually every feature you'll need under the sun.

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Windows Media Center EPG has SWITCHED OFF, wail Euro users

Richard Lloyd
Meh

Re: XBMC

I'm not sure how else XBMC could work to avoid this "nightmare" you mentioned. Remember, that's it's purely a client that doesn't do any recording or EPG downloads or TV tuner config itself. That way, it can work on many, many different platforms, including Android. Want Windows Media Center on your phone or tablet - sorry, no can do. XBMC 12 is due out shortly and it runs virtually identically on Android as it does on Windows, Mac and Linux. Oh yeah, want WMC on Mac or Linux too? Sorry, no can do.

The backend and client *can* be run on the same machine if you only have one computing device and only one TV in the house and WMC does score on initial configuration if that's you're tech-poor setup. For all other situations, XBMC plus your favourite backend (yes, you choose between half a dozen - amazing...you've got a *choice*) is far more flexible and convenient. Whilst Windows remains popular on desktops/laptops, media centre client-side it doesn't (think watching on phones and tablets that aren't running Windows), which is what lets WMC down.

For backends, I personally think a good Web interface to set up your TV tuners, auto-downloading your EPG data and schedule/check recordings is the way to go. That means *any* device can access it and you can even (carefully!) open it up to the outside world so you can view it whilst out of the house, again on any device.

This is why I prefer tvheadend on Linux - it really is a very easy to use (but still very configurable) Web interface that beats stuff like MythTV's equivalent. Yes, I tried MythTV as a backend and being a tech person, I still really did not like MythTV's interface at all. I also was surprised that MythTV's developers don't think you'd ever want to record more than 5 channels on a single TV tuner (yes, that's a hard-coded limit in their backend that I tried to get them to increase, but they refused).

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Richard Lloyd
Stop

Does anyone use Windows Media Center any more?

I'm surprising anyone's using WMC when there are better alternatives if you really must use Windows for TV recording e.g. Mediaportal for one.

The best setup is surely a Linux nettop (e.g. Acer Revo) or even a Raspberry Pi plus tvheadend (the best media centre Web configuration interface bar none, IMHO) and XBMC as a front-end (possibly on the same device as the tvheadend server if you only have one box).

With XBMC available on far more platforms than WMC (including Android now), it's a no-brainer to ditch WMC completely.

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Victory on mobile belongs to Google in 2013

Richard Lloyd
Meh

Customisation is the key

For me, the ability to customise the look and feel of the way my phone or tablet operates is key. I don't even feel that stock Android 4.2.1 has quite enough config options (even though it still has far more than iOS *ever* will). My particular customisation needs are:

* If I want pattern locking, maximise the number of dots in the grid to make the pattern more complex.

* Battery percentage remaining figure - i.e. as an actual number - in the status bar (crucial IMHO - I will reject any custom ROM that doesn't allow this and it really should be an option in stock Android)

* Two home screens with the ability to maximise the number of home screen grid icons (hence the need for only 2 screens). I have 49 icons per home screen on my Nexus 7 for instance.

* Possibility to change the DPI either globally or per-app basis (this isn't crucial - the media's claim that many Android apps aren't "tablet-optimised" is utter guff because of the way Android scales its layout)

* Root-style apps (e.g. sshdroid can then run on port 22, Goomanager to put new ROMs on etc.).

* Ability to change scheduler performance (e.g. ondemand vs. powersave vs. performance vs. interactive) and the scheduler too.

* Soft keyboard with long hold for numbers on the top row (which is infinitely easier/quicker than faffing with the awkward ?123 key then the number then the ABC key). I haven't run stock Android 4 for so long that maybe Google make this the default now?

I've settled on "stock" CyanogenMod 10.1 nightlies for the moment and they give me pretty well all the configuration options I'll regularly use. Oh, I turn off all keyboard sounds, vibrations, auto-correct (or any spelling suggestions) and never use Google Now at all myself (yes, that annoying Google bar was removed as fast as I could manage when I first got my Nexus 7 :-) ).

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The year GNOMES, Ubuntu sufferers forked off to Mint Linux

Richard Lloyd
Linux

Fedora 14, then CentOS 6

After trying out Gnome 3 in both Fedora and Ubuntu, I came to the conclusion that their default interfaces were just plain awful compared to Gnome 2 equivalents. Hence, I stuck with Fedora 14 for quite a while and then jumped to the "obvious" long-term haven for Gnome 2 users - one sadly not mentioned in the article or comments - namely CentOS 6.

For those not in the know, CentOS is a free clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and, like its RHEL parent, has 10 years of free updates! Yep, that means GNOME 2 (and the OS itself) will be supported until an astonishing 30th Nov 2020, which for unheard of for any free OS.

CentOS 6.3 gives you a mature Gnome 2.28 experience, Grub 1 (far easier to use then Grub 2, IMHO), good old System 5 init scripts (which are being phased out in Fedora) and a rock solid kernel that has had a lot of Red Hat testing. As a "serious" free desktop, it's easily the best out there.

Yes, I've installed Firefox beta (that can be updated within the browser's About box) and also occasionally download an update to LibreOffice (I hate their packaging - over 50 RPMs and you often have to uninstall the old version first manually because of stupid package naming!), but there's very little maintenance otherwise (a yum update from time to time, but even that can be automated). It is literally a desktop that "just works".

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Cheaper, slimmer Google Nexus 7 rumored for Q1 2013

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

Would be nice if the Nexus 10 was actually purchasable

I have a Nexus 7 already and am quite happy with it - this rumour of a new one isn't the end of the world and will be 9-12 months after the original one, which is the sort of time period you expect a successor model to come out in.

What is upsetting though, is the complete balls-up Google have done with the Nexus 10 launch. Unlike the Nexus 7 (which was available from many online retailers - I got mine from Tesco Direct in the first week of its launch), Google are *only* selling the Nexus 10 on their Play store (and throwing in a dubious 10 quid delivery charge to boot).

Now this would be OK if you could order or pre-order but you can't - the Nexus 10 is almost permanently sold out with tiny periods (less than a few hours) where it re-emerges on sale, only for the Play store to be crushed by the wait of people ordering it.

I can't understand why IT sites aren't screaming blue murder about this every day - the most desirable Android tablet on the market has been basically unorderable since its launch over a month ago. It's a sorry state of affairs and one Google should hang their heads in shame about.

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Review: Kingston Hyper-X 3K 240GB SSD

Richard Lloyd
Happy

RAID and TRIM?

When I was doing a bit of research earlier this year on SSDs, I noted that you could RAID them, you could have TRIM on them (which is important to stop performance falling off over time), but you couldn't have both RAID and TRIM. Has this situation finally been fixed?

You might like to know that I used a (non-RAIDed) Intel 520 and a Corsair Force 3 GT (both 240GB) in separate PCs to record all of the Olympics channels (had 8 sat tuners, 4 terrestrial tuners and 24TB of HDD). At one point, I'd be recording 20+ channels at once on a PC! Almost all the hard drives were Seagate 3TB's, which are still the only brand of HDD worth buying at the moment.

I even had to write my own C software to handle the transfer of completed recordings from SSD to HDD (no, rsync wouldn't be suitable) because I couldn't find something that did exactly what I wanted. I really should release that as open source because it's pretty nfty and worked very well on the multiple parallel recordings I was doing to SSD.

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2012: The year that netbooks DIED

Richard Lloyd
Linux

Mini 9 - one of the best netbooks

I picked up a brand new Dell Mini 9 - with Ubuntu pre-installed no less - for 149 quid a few years ago (not long after their launch in fact). Wireless, wired, touchpad , 3 USB ports (external keyboard and mouse therefore should I want to), VGA, reasonable keyboard, runs any Intel OS (I've ended up with Fedora and Windows dual booting on it) for a pretty cheap price.

Of course, I upped the RAM and swapped out the SSD for a bigger/faster one over time to give it longevity, but it served me well and was probably the best portable device I'd bought over the years. Nowadays, I'm on a Nexus 7 which is great as a media/entertainment device, but nowhere near as productive as the Mini 9 was.

The closest you get to a Mini 9 nowadays are the Transformer series, but they are much more expensive and come with Android as default, which isn't really conducive for productivity/development work.

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Barnes & Noble go up against Amazon in Blighty with Nook apps

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

Nook HD and HD+ already on sale in the UK

It seems stunning that this article almost makes it sound like it could be months or years before we get the Nook e-readers in the UK and yet the IT press (except El Reg who seem to have ignored them completely) was full of the Nook HD(+) launch almost a week ago. Example:

http://www.zdnet.com/uk/nook-hd-and-nook-hd-go-on-sale-in-the-uk-7000007831/

As for the Nook app on Android, here's how to get a list of the free e-books:

1. Download the app (it's free on Google Play).

2. Register a Nook account (doesn't seem to have any e-mail verification).

3. Register a dummy method of payment in the settings (any old info, 4 and then fifteen 1's is a well-known test Visa credit card number (no verification of this)).

4. Go to the store via what looks like a broken padlock (or house?) icon in the top right.

5. Select the search icon and search for "0.00", which will display the free e-books, which you can download (no doubt in DRM-infested form even for a free book, ho hum).

When I did this a day ago, a lot of mummy pr0n e-books turned up, but repeating it today, they seem to have a wider range now (not that any of the free ones are any good of course).

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Samsung Google Nexus 10 tablet review

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

80% for the best 10" tablet on the market?

Let me see:

* It has a better screen than the iPad 4

* It's lighter than the iPad 4

* It has better speakers than the iPad 4

* It is cheaper than the iPad 4

* It has more RAM than the iPad 4

* It has a faster CPU than the iPad 4

* It has a faster GPU than the iPad 4

* It has multiple user accounts (iPad 4 doesn't)

* It has working Maps (iPad 4 doesn't)

* It can sideload apps out of the box not tying you a store (iPad 4 can't)

* It can handle mulitple "official" stores e.g. Amazon + Play and no doubt others (iPad 4 can't)

* It can be rooted and then run unofficial ROMs (iPad 4 can't)

* It can run non-Webkit-based browsers (iPad 4 can't - if Webkit has a bug, you're screwed)

* It can run emulators from official stores (iPad 4 can't)

* It has a GPS on its wi-fi only model (iPad 4 doesn't)

So despite all these obvious advantages, the review decides it's worse than iPad 4 and is only worth 80%? Something wrong surely?!

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Ubuntu gaining ground in website deployments

Richard Lloyd
Meh

Identifying the exact Linux OS isn't that easy

Whilst techniques like TCP fingerprinting can determine, say, a Linux kernel is being run, it only takes "ServerTokens Apache" in the site's Apache config to effectively hide exactly which Linux distro is used.

In fact, typical penetration test software actually recommends that you *do* hide the Apache and OS versions, so it's likely a fair number of sysadmins do this as standard policy (and maybe some distros ship a config with this done too?).

Personally, I'm a fan of CentOS - tools like Open Manage Server Administrator on Dell kit is fully supported (though their dumb DSET tool forces you to fake /etc/issue and /etc/redhat-release with RHEL strings, just like the way Oracle's DB installer has to be fooled), plus you get 10 years of updates (more than any other Linux server distro).

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Windows 8 Euro PC sales SHOCKER: Results actually not bad

Richard Lloyd
Stop

Captive audience

It really doesn't matter how bad or good any particular release of WIndows is because the vice-like grip MS has on OEMs (the threat of losing their volume license discounts) means that MS can release any old rubbish and people are effectively forced to buy PCs with Windows on - the OEMs are just too scared to offer PCs with no OS or any alternative OS on them.

So it's either Windows or the overpriced hardware+software combo that is Mac OS X (or iOS) - not much a choice for the consumer buying off the shelf really!

Hence, it's absolutely no shocker that Windows 8 is selling well - it was always going to, even if people don't like it! The only thing I expect not to sell well is upgrades from pre-Windows 8 - which is why MS is pricing them at rock bottom levels for a short period because once those upgrades go back to full price, they'll not sell at all, IMHO.

The situation has become so bad that my latest two PCs are now custom-built by white box makers (I get to choose the components I want and even bought one with no hard or SSD drivers :-) ) - and no Windows included too! Needless to say, they're dual booting into CentOS 6 for serious stuff and Ubuntu for media duties.

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Apple iPad Mini 8in tablet review

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

Overpriced and why haven't Apple released a widescreen tablet yet?

I think Apple thought "we've overcharged in the 10" tablet arena for years now, let's do the same with a smaller version". The problem is that the 7" tablet market is pretty cut-throat - you've got cheap Chinese imports (some of which are starting get decent specs) and major players like Amazon, Google and B&N spec/price-fighting each other regularly (often subsidising the hardware price to get the money back on content, whereas Apple never do the former!).

Apple walk in with a 4:3 tablet with a relatively low PPI that can't play HD movies and will show big black bars at the top and bottom if you try to do so. So that's HD video struck off the list already (apart from running apps/playing games, this is one of the major reasons to use a tablet over a phone).

I worry about the width of the iPad Mini - it could be a bit of a tight fit in some coat pockets (I can just about get my Nexus 7 in my coat pocket). And finally, they launch it a stupendously high price (that gets even more astonishingly wallet-draining as you add 3G or extra storage). Let me see - 32GB Nexus 7 = 199 quid, 32GB iPad Mini = 349 quid (!! And that's with no 3G or GPS either...). Are you *seriously* telling me that an iPad Mini is 75% better than an N7 when it can't even play HD video?!

One mystery that still confuses me - Apple finally realised that widescreen is the way to go with phones (years after all their competitors had released widescreen phones) and they finally got it right with the iPhone 5. So why have we had five 4:3 tablets from Apple - several of them useless for playing HD video - and not one widescreen tablet yet? I guess we'll have to wait until next year to see if Apple "innovate" and go widescreen for tablets at long last.

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Acer Iconia A110 8GB Android tablet review

Richard Lloyd
Stop

Decent specs...except the screen/resolution

When I first saw the cashback deal on this on HotUKDeals, I was quite impressed for 130 quid. Sadly, the OP on the HUKD posting didn't mention the screen resolution, which is really quite poor (especially with a Tegra 3 onboard). As soon as I saw the 1024x600 figure, I realised that in no way is this a Nexus 7 competitor. A pity really because a better screen would indeed have challenged the N7, which still remains clearly the best 7" tablet, especially after the recent price drop.

The 7" tablet market, to be honest, seems oversaturated now - I'm still looking for a 9 or 10" replacement for my HP ToiuchPad (i.e. vanilla Android, decent screen res/CPU/GPU). I thought the Nexus 10 was going to be it until I was gobsmacked by the ludicrous UK pricing of it. Since when does 16GB of flash cost 70 quid and why would Samsung make a tablet that prices far too closely to the iPad 4 (32GB Nexus 10 = 389 quid, 16GB iPad 4 = 399 quid)?

I also thought the Nook HD+ (rooted/ROM'ed of course) might be a contender, until I saw it had a stupid proprietary connector for charging (hence requiring *2* mains adapters - one for home, one for work). No Micro USB charging, which is surely a dealbreaker since every other phone/tablet I have uses Micro USB for charging now (I have no Apple kit, so don't live in the land of 35 quid charging cables).

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Amazon Kindle Fire HD 7in Android tablet review

Richard Lloyd

Fire HD - decent hardware, but really needs to be rooted/ROM'ed...Amazon App Store is awful

I'm sorry, but if you see a colour 7" tablet nowadays (and the Fire HD is exclusively marketed as a tablet by Amazon UK - the word "tablet" is mentioned 7 times in its product description and not once is the word "e-reader" used - so anyone claiming otherwise...as a few have here...is simply wrong), you expect to be able to run a load of apps on it.

Sadly, this is where the Fire HD falls crippingly down - the Amazon App Store is nothing short of a disgusting experience if the Fire HD store experience is anything like the dreadful Amazon App Store app I've run on my Nexus 7. It's got horrible navigation, it's extremely slow to update any pages, on the Nexus 7 it has no soft menu button (bizarrely it does on my HP TouchPad) so I can't actually use the My Apps feature to list the bleeding apps I've installed (or have in the "Cloud") and I probably can't update them on the N7 because of that too.

The App Store also infuriatingly sends me a "purchase" e-mail with every free download I do in the app store - no idea if that stupid e-mail can be disabled (I only need purchase e-mails for downloads that actually cost me money). And of course, don't forget that there's a fraction of the apps compared to the full Google Play store, which further darkens my mood about Amazon's App Store. I only keep the app on for the Free App of the Day stuff, only to find that a) most of them are awful and b) you can't run them without having the Amazon App Store app installed!

So the solution is an obvious one - at the very least root your Fire HD and put the Google Apps on (including Google Play). Personally, I'd go one step further and install CyanogenMod 10 (gets you a better launcher, loads of config options and Jelly Bean smoothness). Without the Google Apps (and preferably CM10), the Fire HD is a total non-starter, IMHO. Heck, I even put CM10 on my N7, I like it that much.

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Asus offers compensation to pre-price drop Nexus 7 buyers

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

No idea why the proof of purchase wasn't an upload to your Asus account

Instead of full mailboxes and the added difficulty of tying in proof of purchases to the registered Nexus 7's in people's Asus accounts, why didn't they just let you upload the proof of purchase from within your Asus account? I guess this would have required some coding/validation, which they decided they couldn't do in a timely manner.

I did eventually send off my proof of purchase this evening (and it didn't bounce - yay!), but I'm not hugely optimistic about the whole thing - it seems to have been a shambles throughout:

* No obvious indication that it's for 16GB Nexus 7 owners only (which happens to also rule out the Google Play 8GB purchasers).

* Incorrect screenshot w.r.t. the serial number - the 16-digit one (that's in the Settings page) is the wrong one. It's the 12-digit one on the cardboard box and it *is* hard to distinguish 0, O and D's before you ask!

* After putting in the serial number, date of purchase and the retailer you got it from, you've still got to e-mail proof of purchase, even though they've probably already got enough info to verify your purchase.

* E-mailing the purchase proof to Asus was bouncing back throughout the weekend, which was simply poor planning on their part.Iit was deadly obvious that you'd have PDF/screenshots/HTML flying into their inbox at a rate of knots, so to not prepare for this was a double facepalm moment.

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Richard Lloyd
FAIL

It can be done, but it's painful

I eventually registered my N7 after about the 10th attempt. You need the 12-digit SSN serial number beginning with a "C" from the N7 cardboard box (the 16-digit hex serial number displayed in the Settings and on the cardbioard box as "SSSN" - which the Asus site stupidly actually tells you use - is *not* the serial number they're after). Folks on the HUKD forum cleverly suggested installing a barcode reader app and using that to scan the barcode below the SSN on the cardboard box.

The latest snag is that I never got the e-mail instructions for sending the proof of purchase, but apparently you send it to shop_tc@asus.com - or, actually, you don't until at least Monday, because the buffoons at Asus now have a full inbox and all e-mails to that address are bouncing!

Looking at the Asus store, you get 19 quid to spend (postage is a minimum of 6 quid), so that rules out getting the charger/cable for free, so I guess it's one of the cases then. The store is so expensive (typically twice the price of anywhere else), that there's very little you can get for 19 quid that's worthwhile and the aggro I've had with this has probably exceeded 19 quid's worth of my time!

0
0

Accelerators tag team in Top500 supercomputer CPU smackdown

Richard Lloyd
Stop

Despite a long analysis, nothing much said about the OS'es running on them

I'm not sure we needed all that stuff carved up every which way when a simple link to the "select your Top 500 filters" form here (where no doubt the author got his stats from) would do:

http://www.top500.org/statistics/sublist/

Also, the lack of discussion of OS'es in the article was surprising - here's some fascinating OS stats left out:

* The top 36 supercomputers in the world all run Linux. The shameful first non-Linux entry at number 37 is from the UK :-( Mind you, it was IBM's AIX, so it's not all so bad.

* Linux has 469 of the top 500 spots - a massive 93.8%!

* Windows has 3 spots (0.6%), which either it can't scale to very high numbers of cores or that the licensing is expensive. Ine of those is Microsoft's Azure so that's free to MS :-) No idea why the article highlighted this one when it's in 165th place. The lowly position - 63 places behind Amazon's rival AWS - bizarrely wasn't mentioned in the article!

* BSD has one solitary entry...so it is dying after all :-)

1
0

Fedora 'Spherical Cow' delayed by bugs, Secure Boot

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

Fedora should go to 9-monthly schedules

Ever since Fedora tried to switch a 6-monthly schedule (either because Ubuntu does or, more likely, they want to release just after each GNOME release - well, the GNOME 3 UI disaster has put paid to that reason, IMHO), they have utterly failed to release *any* alpha, beta, RC or final Fedora on time.

The main schedule pressure for Fedora shouldn't come from Ubuntu or GNOME, but actually from RHEL of course. Considering they release RHEL every 3 years, that would still leave 4 * 9-monthly Fedora releases, so I think Fedora should move to a 9-month release cycle instead of 6.

BTW, am I the only one worried that F18 RC has actually been cancelled?! Cue loads of panicky post-F18 final fixes being released...

1
0

Android games console jumps to Jelly Bean for penultimate test phase

Richard Lloyd
Meh

Costs more than $99

If it's shpping internationally, the Ouya costs $20 shipping, bringing it to $119. If it's being shipped from outside the EU (quite possible - does anyone know where EU orders are shipped from?), then there is the spectre of import duty/VAT being involved as well (could be another $30 or so). So that's basically close to 100 quid, not 64 like the article said.

Still, even at that price, it's cheap enough to do an annual replacement for a hardware upgrade should new games come out that need the updated kit.

0
0

Plextor M5 Pro 256GB SSD review

Richard Lloyd
Stop

Speeds no better than Sandforce

I've got 240GB Corsair and Intel SSDs using Sandforce controllers that actually post slightly higher read speeds and much higher write speeds than this Plextor, so where's the excitement about this release (especially since it's nowhere near the 50p per GB that entry-level SSDs are now at)?

What I'm concerned about is: where is SATA 4? I can't find a word about it on the Web and the SSD speeds are almost at the limits of SATA 3 (a fact that's seemingly lost on all the journos out there). Yes, if they were cheap enough, you'd be RAIDing them for more speed (but you lose TRIM then, hmmmm...), but I want a single decent capacity drive to exceed 600 Mbytes/sec in the next 1-2 years otherwise I won't be buying any more SSDs for quite a while. I guess PCI express cards would be the way to go, but they seem to have a massive price premium over SATA 3 SSDs at the moment.

1
0

The new Mac mini eviscerated with ease

Richard Lloyd
Stop

Mac Mini - what's its main purpose?

I've always wondered exactly what a Mac Mini's target market was. Apple now say it's the only server offering they have, but it's not really up to snuff for that surely (e.g. RAID 5 anyone?). Does it work as a media centre server? Well, yes, that would seem an obvious use, but there are cheaper nettop boxes to do that (you don't need an i5 - you want GPU acceleration primarily plus lots of connectivity/disk space) such as the Acer Revo, Lenovo or Shuttle.

So at its price point, I see it as small form factor desktop PC, but yet again, there are cheaper alternatives (including all-in-ones) at the Mac Mini's price point. I'm completely baffled why you'd buy this rather than a cheaper rival machine + replace its HDD for an SSD for faster boot/app performance + and buy a big NAS for media storage for the same price as just a Mac Mini!

0
2

Windows 8: Is Microsoft's new OS too odd to handle?

Richard Lloyd
Meh

Classic Shell anyone?

I'm surprised that in an article about the "oddness" of Windows 8, no mention was made of things that could make the transition from Windows 7 easier, with Classic Shell - see http://classicshell.sourceforge.net/ - being the most obvious one. I suspect Windows 8+Classic Shell+booting straight into desktop mode could actually be a decently similar experience for ex-Windows 7 users...unless you're running Windows RT, in which case you're royally stuffed.

1
2

Microsoft has no plans for a second Windows 7 Service Pack

Richard Lloyd
Go

Re: Learning from XP

> If there was ever an opportunity for another O/S to find itself a unique selling proposition, long term support for (say) a 10 year lifespan would be a very tempting idea. Presuming the O/S in question wasn't so buggy it needed patching every month.

CentOS 6 anyone? It's free (or you can go the RHEL 6 route for paid support), has updates for 10 years, point releases a few times a year (think service packs) and the occasional updates inbetween for critical security/bug fixes. In other words, much like Windows, except with more regular service packs.

I use the same CentOS 6 ISO on both desktops and servers (no need for the desktop vs. server distinction Windows releases have) and it's a very stable platform to do serious stuff on. GNOME 2, GRUB 1 and Sys V Init make system admin and the desktop experience so much nicer than any other distro, IMHO.

10
1

Tape vendors thrust LTFS tool at punters: Go on, you know you want our tape

Richard Lloyd
Meh

Newer Ultrium versions and autoloaders...

The reasons that tape still dominates most backup scenarios:

* The drives and autoloaders aren't that expensive really - about the cost of a typical low-end server (2-3 grand), despite what one poster said. The cost of tapes is perhaps actually a little high (especially when you have to buy 30+ of them in one go).

* The Ultrium standard has been getting faster and higher capacity with each generation, so we're getting to the point where you can backup quite a lot of servers across the network on just one tape (though you still want an autoloader if you want weekend backups or your backups use 2 tapes a day).

* You can physically take the completed backup tapes to an offsite safe in case disaster recovery is needed (main machine room explodes or whatever).

For me, backups to disks *only* work sensibly if you have a high speed (gigabit preferably) Net link to another location where you actually keep the servers with those disks (i.e. a DR location). You can't just backup to a big-disk server that's in the same machine room as the one the servers are in because your backups will be non-existent if the machine room explodes and there's your business dead in the water.

I think it's the cost for an SME of setting up a DR location with a server and a load of big disks is why tapes still rule the roost. And if you want to be really safe, you'd need at least dual-homing too between your main site and the DR so that you can always get at your backups at the remote location. All of this costs time and money to set up.

2
0

Look behind you, WD: Seagate's turned up, and it has 3 biz drives

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

Wake me up when they go below 140 quid

4TB drives are massively overpriced compared to 3TB at the moment. The 3TB Seagate internal drives I have are now 100 quid and yet the cheapest 4TB internal drive anywhere is 185 quid - 85% more expensive for 33% more filestore. In other words, you'll have to wait 12-18 months before 4TB actually becomes the sweet spot that the 3TB currently is.

Also don't forget that 3TB drives have a little further to fall to get to pre-Thailand flood prices, so that sweet spot for 4TB might even be 2 years away.

1
0

Google readying on-device malware scanner for Android

Richard Lloyd
Meh

Anti-malware apps...

Strange that the article made no mention of the anti-malware apps already on Google Play (e.g. AVG, Avast etc.), since aren't they already doing what this new Google feature will do at some undetermined point in the future?

One thing I'd like to see is the ability to individually deny permissions to an app (and hopefully the app will gracefully handle issues arising from not having those permissions, rather than just crash or quit) - ideally both at install time and let them be changed at any time after that. At the moment, we're presented with the list of perms when installing the app with just two choices - install it with all the permissions or don't install it, which isn't granular enough, IMHO.

It surprises me how many apps request needless permissions, though you suspect a lot are for banner ads which may be the reason Google won't let users turn off permissions.

2
0

Oracle Linux honcho 'personally hurt' by Red Hat clone claims

Richard Lloyd
Linux

It's 10 years of updates now, not 4 or 5

Red Hat recently increased the lifespan of both RHEL 5 and 6 updates to 10 years, which is pretty impressive for a Linux distro (not the "4 or 5 years" mentioned in the article).

Oracle Linux to me seems a weird half-way house - it has to follow RHEL updates/releases as a base, so it's already dependent on a rival vendor for its core OS. We then get some extra stuff thrown in on top (some of it paid stuff) which I can't comment on the quality of since I don't run Oracle Linux anywhere. Sprinkle in a lower cost updates/support contract (which Red Hat could kill in one fell swoop if they offered an updates-only contract with no support) and apparently that's attracted a grant total of, er, 10,000 customers in the space of 6 years?

To me, Oracle Linux makes no logical sense. RHEL gets a lot of testing both from within Red Hat, from the CentOS community of millions (who are 100% binary compatible) and from Scientific Linux users (albeit to a lesser extent in terms of users/compatibility). Oracle gets, er, some Oracle devs and 10,000 users to play with Oracle Linux. If you are cash-poor, you run CentOS on most or all of your servers, but if you have money to spare, it makes to throw it RHEL's way rather than the misfit Oracle Linux that I would trust far less than RHEL or CentOS.

9
0

AMD launches Android app store for Windows PCs

Richard Lloyd
Meh

Interesting, but has limitations

Although AMD do indeed sponsor this, it's not made very clear that it runs fine on Intel CPU chips as well. It's quite a clever idea should there be an app on Android that doesn't have a close equivalent on WIndows (for serious stuff, I doubt that, but I bet there's some mobile-exclusive games out there).

I'm probably a little more impressed with the Cloud Connect stuff that lets you sync across (i.e. probably copy the apk) your Android apps from another device into the Bluestack environment - a lot easier that some manual side-loading you'd otherwise do. It should probably also sync your app data too, but I don't know how easy that is to find where it is on Android.

As ever, there are a load of downsides that make it sadly less than useful, such as only running on Windows (c'mon, surely it can be out for Mac OS X and Linux too?), can't emulate a lot of tablet/phone hardware so a large chunk of apps become less than useful, doesn't run Android 4 (which has been out long enough surely for Bluestack to have ported their code to it by now?) and the Settings screen seems woefully short of options.

I might have missed it, but I didn't see a way to rotate the window between landscape and portrait, which seems an obvious piece of functionality to include.

So a B+ for getting the ARM virtualisation and app syncing working, but it needs more improvements to make it behave much closer to a phone/tablet (i.e. like the Android SDK phone emulator),

1
0

Nokia out $99 dual-Sim Asha

Richard Lloyd
Go

There should be more dual sim phones out there

I suspect the Telcos don't like dual sim phones because most of them probably won't have two full-contract SIMs in them (i.e. work sim will be contract, home sim will be PAYG), which might explain why dual SIM phones are pretty thin on the ground. Sadly, this phone is a bit too low spec to be a good all-rounder.

I also wonder how clever dual SIM phones are about separating functionality depending on which SIM is active. Contacts should have the option of being per SIM or combined and it would be nice if other elements of the UI switched depending on the SIM (e.g. separate wallpapers and even app icons).

0
0

Oracle tunes up VirtualBox hypervisor for Windows 8

Richard Lloyd
Meh

VirtualBox is pretty good, but RPM packaging needs a fix

I do quite like VirtualBox (though I think it needs a Web front-end rather than a graphical GUI, because it makes things easier to admin remotely), but I wish they wouldn't do what some Linux RPM-packaged software does (I'm looking at you, LibreOffice) and put the version number in the package field.

For example, the RPM for RHEL/CentOS 6 has a name of "VirtualBox-4.2" and a version number of "4.2.0_80737_el6". This is quite frankly dumb because you have to use "VirtualBox-4.2" as the package name in various RPM commands (e.g. "rpm -qi VirtualBox-4.2"), you can't just do "yum update VirtualBox" or "yum update VirtualBox-4.1" (the previous release) and you can't "rpm -Uvh" to upgrade either.

Nope, you've got to manually remove the old version ("rpm -e" or "yum remove") and then install the new one instead. This is dismal - no-one but a few VirtualBox developers will ever need two versions simultaneously installed (that's the lame excuse LibreOffice gives too and it's wrong because there's a separate LibreOffice dev set of RPMs!). Fix it Oracle - it's not as bad as LibreOffice's dismal packaging (over 50 RPMs, WTFs all that about?) - but it makes updates to VirtualBox a real pain.

0
0

Ten USB 3.0 HDD enclosures

Richard Lloyd
Meh

I'll put in a mention for the Icy Box too

I recently bought an Icy Box (yes, around 24-25 quid from Amazon) and put a 3TB Seagate in it. Got 180 Mbytes/sec read from them (beating all the benchmarks shown here!). It should be noted that although the Icy Box is fanless, it isn't silent because you'll hear the disk itself spinning/working.

Yes, the Icy Box has a bright blue light (cover it with something if it worries you that much!), but it's a good enclosure that does the job well and is half the price of the enclsoures here. So why wasn't it included?!

1
0

Microsoft: 'Update your security certs this month – or else'

Richard Lloyd
Meh

Not sure this will cause too much of an issue

I know that the default for OpenSSL-created self-signed certs has been 1024 bits for years now, though there's always a chance someone created one on an intranet years ago with a 512 bits and a long expiry date I guess, but I suspect that's fairly rare.

As people have been saying, 1024 bits has been the minimum key size for years on paid SSL certs and in the last 1-2 years, there's been a switch to 2048 bits as the minimum for most SSL vendors (I know Symantec/Verisign and RapidSSL have insisted on 2048 bits for at least a year now).

I'm a bit surprised the article made no mention that the default/minimum has been at least 1024 bits for a long time now and 2048 bits recently for paid certs, so the impact of this change shouldn't be too great.

0
0

It's time to burn the schedules and seize control of OUR TVs

Richard Lloyd
Meh

Media centre software is the way to go

I used to believe that dedicated set-top boxes (or built-in recording facilities on recent TVs) were the way to go, but when you look at it, they're quite limited:

* Firmware is often buggy and eventually abandoned not long after a newer model comes out.

* If you don't like the firmware (e.g. the UI is annoying or missing important features), then you're stuffed - there's no way to change it usually.

* If you're on the Freeview HD platform, then good luck trying to export HD recordings unencrypted. Ludicrously, the Freeview HD specs don't allow you to do that (even though Freeview HD channels are actually broadcast unencrypted), yet they do allow SD recordings to be exported unencrypted. 100% inconsistent, IMHO.

* A fair chunk of recorders don't bother allowing you to record multiple channels (e.g. 3 or 4) from the same multiplex/transponder simultaneously - it doesn't help that none of them seem to come with SSDs either to alleviate access times when recording multiple programmes.

* Very few recorders come with a Web interface to mirror what they do on the TV's UI (i.e. a full Web EPG, recordings list etc) - the ability to set recordings, stream them to another machine etc. without turning the TV on is a very useful feature.

Once I realised the above issues, it was a no-brainer for the Olympics to set up media centre software with sat+terrestrial TV tuner cards, SSDs, large hard drives and I got an extremely flexible setup that could do far more than any set-top box currently does (yes, including a full desktop with browser etc. using a wireless keytboard and mouse). For the record, it was Ubuntu+XBMC+tvheadend that did the trick for me - no-cost for the software too! I think tvheadend's backend Web interface is nothing short of super impressive - I doubt any other media centre Web interface comes close (most media centre software seems to think Web access is a minor feature: I think it's massively important myself).

0
0

Crucial v4 256GB budget SSD review

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

Too expensive and too slow

This is an utterly pointless release from Crucial - a relatively slow SATA 2 SSD for a price barely less than SATA 3 SSDs that perform about 50% better. Even if you were going to put it in an old laptop that only had SATA 2, it's still not worth it because SATA 3 SSDs will perform better than this SATA 2 SSD.

Basically, Crucial are fools for releasing this - I can't see anyone with any sense at all buying it instead of a SATA 3 SSD for fractionally more. I'm just surprised El Reg gave it such a high rating of 75% when it's clearly a dead drive on release.

As for Grayrunner, you do know that any 300 Mbytes/sec+ SATA 3 SSD will go faster than this SATA 2 drive in a SATA 2 system? Please do your research first! You do realise that the "3G" users can use "6G" drives on their "3G" systems - you don't seem to have grasped this! It's *not* a "smart move" because the price/performance is hopeless compared to the slightly more expensive SATA 3 SSDs out there.

Having said all that, I have SATA 3 SSDs on a SATA 3 desktop and get 550 Mbytes/sec read and write :-)

0
1

3G Google Nexus 7 inbound

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

Confused why you'd ever want 3G on a tablet

So let me see:

* The 3G version will cost a lot more than the non-3G.

* 3G data limits are chronically low - a typical monthly quota of 1GB can be used in under 2 hours, especially if you stream video. Once you exceed your limit, you'll either get cut off, throttled massively down or have to pay a fortune for exceeding the limits - none of which are desirable.

* If you really must use 3G, it's possible you can tether it to your mobile anyway.

So, really, 3G on a tablet makes no sense especially if you have a mobile phone already (two SIMs, two contracts or PAYGs, two data plans to potentially exceed), so I'll stick with my SIM-less N7 plus an HTC mobile should I need to tether to 3G in emergencies.

0
0

Amazon flings open doors to Android Appstore in Europe

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

Poor app...

I've got the Amazon Appstore app on my UK Nexus 7, but I was unimpressed. Firstly, it doesn't detect which apps are already installed, which is basic functionality surely? So stuff like Temple Run - a free game I installed via Google Play - just appears as a game you can "purchase" for 0.00 quid (since when is a zero-cost item a "purchase"?).

What's also bad is that if you download a free app, it'll not only try to overwrite the already existing (probably identical) one, but also e-mail you a receipt for 0.00 quid by default - how double dumb is that?

I also don't like that any free downloads (including app of the day) insist that you tie a credit/debit card to your Amazon Appstore setup - a sneaky trick to make sure that you go for impulse paid purchases later on and have your card info there ready to be debited.

Still, I've installed a free app of the day notifier free app (confused? :-) ) that whilst US-only at the moment (I've e-mailed the dev cos it needs to support other countries including the UK now), will notify you each day about the US free app, but show the UK one when you click on the notification, which is good enough for now. Won't be using the Amazon appstore for anything other than the free app though, especially since I've still got most of my 15 quid Nexus 7 credit left on Google Play that the Amazon Appstore doesn't accept of course.

0
0

Ten netbooks

Richard Lloyd
Linux

Still using my Dell Mini 9

I still use my Dell Mini 9 - 149 quid, Linux (Fedora 14, not the original Ubuntu), SSD (replaced with a larger/faster one admittedly), 3 USB ports, 2GB RAM, wired and wireless - much of that is beyond the spec of most tablets out there. One of the best portable machines Dell ever made, so they promptly discontinued it and brought out more expensive, bigger and heavier versions (with Windows and a hard disk - big no no on both counts) that didn't float my boat at all.

Yes, I've now got cheap tablets in addition to the Mini 9, but the Dell machine is the only one I do anything "serious" on.

1
0

Ten... all-in-one inkjet photo printers

Richard Lloyd
Unhappy

Would have liked to have seen some 'normal' inkjet all-in-ones as a comparison

Apart from the fancy pop-up LCD displays (are they needed when you've probably previewed the pic on a phone/camera/tablet/desktop already?), what's the difference between an colour inkjet photo printer and a "normal" colour inkjet printer?

It might have been nice to incude a few "non-photo" colour inkjets in the review, load them up with photo paper and see what sort of job they do. With the price of photo paper and inkjet cartridges already very high, I've got to question spending anything more than 100 quid on any sort of inkjet printer.

Me? I've got an HP colour all-in-one inkjet printer, but no somewhat pointless colour pop-up LCD on it. Price? 25 quid directly from hp.com - throw in some photo paper and it does a good enough job at printing photos. No printer here costs under 80 quid, the difference of which could go on buying a reasonable number of cartridges and photo paper.

5
0

Ten apps to install on your Nexus 7 first

Richard Lloyd
Meh

First stuff I installed on my Nexus 7

* Flash - had to side-load as an apk, but it's still needed on Android, no matter what Adobe say.

* Firefox Beta + Adblock Plus + Phony - stomps mightily on Chrome on the Nexus 7. Set Phony extension to desktop version to avoid getting those daft mobile versions on a tablet, plus it then lets you go to www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/ and view BBC progs just like you do on the desktop (yes, in HD too).

* Astro File Manager. I've been familiar with this one the longest, but no doubt other FM's mentioned are equally as good.

* MX Player. This is my favourite video player on the HP Touchpad (CM9) and it's just as good on the Nexus 7.

* Winamp. Trhey may have moved some features to the Pro version after offering them in the free version (which I think is a really bad PR move), but even the free version is pretty good.

* Camera Launcher for Nexus 7. In a moment of madness, Asus/Google decided not to present the built-in camera app to the end-user. This app basically makes it "visible" again.

* FBReader. Best Android e-book reader out there (much better than the Kindle app for example).

* Cover Art Downloader. Put in on my Nexus 7 out of habit - nice to have artwork with your MP3s.

* Advanced Task Killer. I put the widget on my home screen and press it when I'm about to play a game.

* Box (or Dropbox etc.). Useful app to mess around with your cloud storage (I've got 50GB, but I don't use it much because I don't have Net access on the move with the Nexus 7 except via expensive/data limited 3G tethering with my Android phone).

Of course, once I'd done the above, the next step was unlocking, rooting and putting on a Modaco ROM (yay for landscape rotation on home screens), but that's a bit off-topic I guess.

1
0

Ten Android games

Richard Lloyd
Go

Some games not mentioned that I have on my Nexus 7

Suprised you missed some of these games - they're all on my Nexus 7:

* Riptide GP. A paid game, but one actually used at Google I/O on a Nexus 7 to show off the Tegra 3 graphics.

* Droidfish. Super strong chess program that can use multiple cores on the Nexus 7 and it's free too.

* Beebdroid. An excellent free BBC Micro emulator with access to dozens of classic BBC games.

* MAME4Droid. Difficult to get the ROMs legally, but a brilliant free arcade machine emulator nevertheless.

* Osmos HD. The classic PC game turns up on Android and it's just as ambient as ever. Paid, but a demo version available too.

* PewPew - vector graphics used to their utmost in a great little free shoot-em-up.

0
0

Humax YouView DTR-T1000 IPTV Freeview PVR review

Richard Lloyd
FAIL

Late, expensive and missing features - YouView flops on day one

After an eternity waiting for this, we get a 300 quid box (50-100 quid too expensive to get mass adoption) that actually seems to have less features than the old 200 quid Technika 8320HD box I retired a few months ago (to be replaced with a PC-based media centre setup, which is way more flexible than any set top box). What seems to be missing from this Humax are:

* Wireless connectivity - not everyone keeps the TV and their router close together (they're often in different rooms). The 8320HD had both wired and wireless in case you're wondering.

* Only a 500GB hard drive on launch - with the ability to record two HD channels simultaneously, that won't last long.

* No way to save streamed recordings, which is utter pants.

* No way to play anything from USB or the network, which is a total joke in this day and age (even smart TVs can do this!). Again, the 8320HD could do both. Any new net-enabled media box like this should really be able to be a DNLA server to stream its content to other devices in the house - not providing this on a 2012-launched box is almost criminal.

I'm sorry, but this is a hugely damp squib of a launch. Maybe in a year or two, there'll be enough well-spec'ed models and firmware updates to make it more atractive, but at the moment, it's a big letdown. It's doing very little new that various PVRs and smart TVs haven't already been doing for years (and does less in some cases).

1
0

Why British TV drama is crap – and why this matters to tech firms

Richard Lloyd

US dramas are better simply because they make more of them

US TV companies make shed-loads of dramas (and comedies in particular) - they even cram in "mid-season replacements" where they can too. And, yes, things seem to be go in 2 extreme directions - either they get yanked off after a handful of episodes (a massive waste - the unaired episodes may appear months later on the Web or DVD, but sometimes don't appear at all!) or they run far too long (The Simpsons is now so poor - it died after about the 8th of its trillion seasons - and has no reason being on air when the same team are still producing the much funnier Futurama).

It was a bit bizarre that "once was the most popular TV show in the world" CSI Miami got killed off after its 10th season (when CSI:NY is kept on despite having lower viewing figures), though you wonder if it was a contract renegotiation year and no-one could agree. Mind you, the original CSI needs desperately to be killed too now the two main leads (Petersen and Helgenberger) have finally left (Petersen years ago and Helgenberger just recently).

As people have said, the more "stuff" you produce, the more likely that something good will emerge, providing you do have an outlet for it (i.e. premium cable channels). Anything edgy in the US (particularly nudity which is pretty well banned on US network channels) is shown on premium cable and we've seen stuff in recent years like Game Of Thrones, Dexter, True Blood (sorry, it's much better than Being Human), The Walking Dead and Sons of Anarchy really leading the way with drama, IMHO. I'm sure for every good UK drama, I could name 5 US dramas equally as good or - often - better.

What we really need is a good "adult" sci-fi drama (the BBC still considers Dr. Who a kids programme, so it doesn't air after the watershed or have any equivalent adult themes). ITV do the dismal Primeval (also not after the watershed) and we have Being Human which I really didn't like, especially since True Blood was waaay better.

I want something like the BSG remake, but the last time we saw sci-fi like that on BBC TV was Blake's 7 (dodgy sets and special effects, but the characters and storylines were often every good) or even Star Cops.

BTW, a recent comment mentioned the 24 Olympics channels - they are paid for by Sky :-) Even the host broadcaster isn't the BBC - it's a Spanish company! That's what you get with the overdone BBC cuts we've had since the licence fee was frozen (shouldn't that mean inflation-sized cuts per year and not the massacre we've seen?).

1
1

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