* Posts by Marshalltown

498 posts • joined 30 Sep 2011

Page:

Fleeing Aussie burglar shot in arse with bow and arrow

Marshalltown

Specious argument

A "fleeing" burglar is not by any visible evidence a "discouraged" burglar. Fleeing as an act exhibits no indication that he would not come back, either when confident you are not home, or better equipped to deal with you as an armed occupant. So, there is absolutely no reason to argue that planting a barb, or shooting a fleeing burglar or car thief in the ass is anything but reasonable self defense. The only person who would disagree is the thief and his personal injury attorney who hopes to profit from the non-pc approach to criminal justice. A jury of potential or active criminals might, and so might a jury narrowly instructed by the judge to consider only the immediate events. Frankly, I would argue that anyone injured while committing a crime should be held to have forfeited the protection of the law during that act. And, since the police regard fleeing a crime scene as a criminal act in itself, fleeing is not an automatic justification for arguing an injury acquired when fleeing TO AVOID THE CONSEQUENCES OF AN ATTEMPTED crime was not acquired in the course of committing the same crime.

0
0
Marshalltown

Re: "Personally I would have notched another arrow."

Well, perhaps he retains a special arrow just for notches. Gun fighters in the "old west" used to notch the grip of the revolver for each opponent removed from the planet.

0
0
Marshalltown
Mushroom

Re: Standing naked trying to defend ones property.

Not just Australia. The trend in the "civilized" parts of the world is to encourage one to share one's property and health with those less advantaged. Thieves and burglars, serial killers and such are all clearly less advantaged.

0
0
Marshalltown

Re: Bloke was lucky

There is something wrong about being told by the police to be a compliant victim. Compliance means that you cede situational control to someone you absolutely know you can't trust. They are after all trying to rob you - at a minimum. If the fellow was unlucky, he'll show up with a serious soil-born bacterial infection in a few days. One can only hope.

7
0
Marshalltown

Re: He should be lucky

It was probably just a target bow - ca. 30-40 lbs. Any hunting weight bow would have brought him down and a war bow would have probably driven the arrow through him and into the car door. Compound bows simply add leisure time for aiming.

7
0

NASA's free research trove may have broken arms trafficking rules

Marshalltown

Re: NASA: past its sell-by date

Here in the US, in most places, school-age kids are not supposed to carry pocket knives ever while at school. One Christmas gift exchange (Second Grade - so I would have been about six) I received pocket knife, a genuine "Davy Crockett," Barlow style, single bladed, pocket knife. The teacher did not immediately confiscate it. She told me I was not to carry it at school. I then carried it home. My dad taught me how to sharpen it on an oil stone and I thence forth completely ignored any injunctions about when and where I could carry it.

I never spent a day without a knife in my pocket until after 9/11 lead to the stupid, idiotic restrictions we now see these days. In fact, most of my teachers must have been aware I had one on me - the shape in my pocket was a dead give-away - and more than once over the years a teacher asked to use it, and I let them without loss of my knife. Thinking about it, the teachers borrowing it usually happened in class, and despite a fair number of brown-nosing tattle tales, I never got in trouble about it.

These days I carry a three-bladed "stockman" style and use it as a marking knife in the wood shop.

0
0
Marshalltown
WTF?

Re: NASA: past its sell-by date

Heh.

My son and I sat down when he was in high school here in the US and went over things I could do that he couldn't, things my dad could do that I could not, and then looked through books my dad grew up reading whose characters were doing things HE couldn't - children's books always lag the present by at least a generation. Basically, doing things that my grandfather - in Canada - could get away with would have gotten me in serious trouble with my parents, and my son a term in juvenile jail, even if I and my wife thought it was not that big a deal.

The acts themselves weren't any worse, but the social environment is far more restricted.

Chemistry at home? Heaven forfend, you could accidentally make something hazardous, toxic, or explosive through an error in mixing. Even BUYING chemistry lab supplies like glassware gets you on DHS and DEA lists these days. My dad actually kept black powder around the ranch for stump and boulder removal and my brother and I were instructed in its use for those various other purposes that did not include muzzle loaders - though we did that too.

Shooting? Well, that's generally a little less restricted in parts the US, but there are lots of citizens desperately anxious to catch up with the <irony on> progressive </irony off> UK. I used to go out hunting spring jackrabbits - good eating prepared properly - but these days, development has foreclosed on that - too many neighbors, dogs, livestock - three horses on half an acre looks cruel to me, and the same for cattle. The local vegetarians an vegans will actually try to educate me on the evolution of the human species. I have a degree in that, and they are more ignorant about the topic than a day in the arctic summer is long but they really don't want to hear it.

Knives,? Arguably, from what I hear and read, the UK might be rather aichmophobic and even more reactionary to knives and things that can cut than to firearms. Is it really true a carpet layer did a prison term for leaving a carpet knife - a tool of his trade - visible in his vehicle?

0
0
Marshalltown
FAIL

' "Indeed. Almost as though American security services are full of paranoid twats."

Way to be even more of a dick than usual, guys.'

But true none the less. It is what they are paid to be. So, they are also paid to leave the "feelings" at home. Quit the trembling lip bit.

0
0

BOFH: The Hypochondriac Boss and the non-random sample

Marshalltown
Coat

Re: Experience...

You worked for a bigger company than I did. Mine owned the place and tended to do what ever he pleased. "It's my hardware."

0
0
Marshalltown
Pint

Ah - that brings back nightmarish times

I had a boss who went on a trip to - mmmh - let us just say an Eastern European country. He took his lap top along - this back in the day of three-and-a-half-inch stiffies. So, he returns, with his lap top and his stiffies, and a newfound sense of maintaining computer "security." The Monday after his return my antivirus lights up like Christmas. What's this" Infected by virus, but how? Well let us purge the hard drive, restore from my back up, and to work. Strangely, several other office systems have the same problem, but never fear, we have backups. Next Monday - omigish! Same tale! In fact very same virus. And the same machines are infected. Scan network logs - no sign of intrusions. Hmmm. Read up on virus. Interestingly the virus is believed to have originated in a certain Eastern European country to which the boss recently traveled. Coincidence? He's out of the office so can't be buttonholed.

I really need that beer just thinking about it.

Week three, same story, except my system is healthy. I had changed passwords - against company policy. There is a sticky on my screen advising of this breach of protocol and inviting me to the boss's office for an official ass chewing. My system was inaccessible for his new, weekly "security scan" using "free software" from Eastern Europe!!! He was quite taken aback when I marched directly into his office demanding he hand over the offending software for disposal with prejudice.

After explaining that the disk he was using was apparently infected with the EE virus, I cut it up in the paper cutter and recycled the remains. I blush to admit that - as a "good" employee - after ascertaining that the floppy disk was the immediate source of the contamination I asked no further questions, and handed the boss my new password. Next week - arrgh! Same story. This time I scanned all floppies he had with him during the trip and - to his inexpressible grief - destroyed several disks of porn all infected with the very same EE virus. Then I scanned his desk top. Same problem - but worse, his recent backups had overwritten clean copies with virus laden ones. Bad. Then - OK, where's the lap top? Wide eyes - WHAT? The laptop - come on. Scanned that - holy cow!! Not just the EE virus but an entire culture dish of nasties. Reformatted and reinstalled the operating system after a thorough session with fdisk deleting all partions, after scrubbing the drive. The problem never recurred, and after that I never again heard about changing my passwords.

0
0

Why I just bought a MacBook Air instead of the new Pro

Marshalltown

"In addition the need for a replaceable battery is much less than years ago ..."

Really? Consider how non-replaceable batteries recently affected Samsung. Think back to the trouble they have repeatedly caused other makers in the past - including Apple. Non-replaceablle batteries consumerize the electronics and maximize cash flow. Battery bad - you need a whole new phone/lap/tablet. Had stuff stored on there? Sorry, it's gone. You should have come in and bought a new one when you first saw signs or trouble. They don't benefit anyone but the maker - unless of course they are designed so they catch fire.

14
0

DRAMA ON MARS: Curiosity bot fires laser at alien metal object

Marshalltown

The white mineral veins in the stone

... beneath are interesting. They look like white quartz. But, white quartz is a a low-temperature hydrothermal mineral. The white color is commonly attributed to minute inclusions of fluid, gas or both.

1
0

America has one month to stop the FBI getting its global license to hack

Marshalltown

Clinton is pretty bad, but look at the other candidates. Johnson (the best of the bad) ignorant as the day is long. Stein, ick, really, really ick. Watch John Oliver's segment on them . Trump, far, far bigger crook than Clinton, a narcissist sociopath (at best) and a far worse history than Clinton, "admires" Putin, talks (and even sounds) like the Penguin in the second Batman movie, hated in Scotland, Mexico and wherever he decides he wants your land for his purposes. I hate to say it but for years now it has seemed like the US elections were a race to see just how egregious a candidate could get elected. I suspect given some of the parallels with classical Athens that it may be an endemic flaw in aging democracies. Jefferson plainly suspected it.

26
1
Marshalltown

Re: US LAW

What WOULD be a just sentence for a murderer? I agree that extending "jurisdiction" is questionable at best, but seriously, using a murder sentence as an example of injustice?

4
0

BOFH: The Idiot-ware Project and the Meaningless Acronym

Marshalltown
Headmaster

Yolo

There is in fact a Yolo County in California. That particular version of the word refers to a marsh (a good deal of the lower Sacramento Valley once upon a time).

0
0
Marshalltown
FAIL

Re: LOL...

I came within a shirt button of letting one of my former PHBs back over a forty-foot (ca. 12 meter) cliff. But I did reach out and grab that button. Oddly, he never noticed. I had just demonstrated to him that despite his life-long conviction that he lacked depth perception, he actually did have it.

0
0
Marshalltown
Pint

Re: C. An anal-gazing "Look-to-the-future" exercise,

AH - but even PHBs underestimate their personal flexibility in that regard. Were they capable of showing similar flexibility at parties they would crowned "limbo King" every time. But, sadly, that is never the case. The PHB flexibility is highly specialized, but quite undeniably extraordinary .in that small - ah - field of endeavour.

Mine's the one - mmm, never mind.

0
0

SpaceX searches for its 'grassy knoll' of possible Falcon rocket sabotage

Marshalltown

Re: do worry chaps 5 years we all be on mars

You probably think Bill Gates is a great programmer too. Musk doesn't need to know jack about space operations. All he needs is a staff that does, and that he has. So, why so bitter? He didn't hire you?

1
0
Marshalltown

Re: Pathetic attempt at diversion

"Don't care, I still want to see him fail."

So, do you work for Lockheed Martin or Boeing?

2
0

'Geek gene' denied: If you find computer science hard, it's your fault (or your teacher's)

Marshalltown

Re: Nonsense.

... It's a spectrum.

I believe that was actually their conclusion. The distribution is a Normal one and all other things being equal, your position on that curve is proportional to the effort you put into it. There is no bimodal curve, all the really gifted and the sadly lacking do is create the tails on the bell's skirt.

2
1

Render crashing PCs back to their component silicon: They deserve it

Marshalltown

Electrons

I used to get a complaint every morning from the office manager. Some wasn't working, would mnot access, would not .... Of course, I would ask her to move out her chair, sit down and have her explain to me what she was doing, and things would be shiny. That would drive her bats ... screaming rage. She would ask what I did "different." I would tell her, 1) I had a cup of coffee before entering the office and 2) I was always polite and said "good morning" to the electrons. It was obvious that it paid off, since they never gave me trouble. She never did have a coronary, but some of the facial hues ... bright pink to deep blueish purple... wow!

0
0

UK copyright troll weeps, starts 20-week stretch in the cooler for beating up Uber driver

Marshalltown

Re: I have one reservation

Go through it again, slowly. The light may yet dawn. All the magistrate really said, the sentence was already handed down, was, in effect, "tough." She might very well have been pissed off, but all she told the whining little *&^% was that she was not going to change her mind. He clearly had not learned to grovel properly. If he is equally stupid inside, he may have a really different life when he leaves.

16
1
Marshalltown

Once

... I would have automatically assumed the reporter was the lkutz, but, these days...

4
0

BOFH: The case of the suspicious red icon

Marshalltown

Re: 1bs

"1bs"

You do realize that back in the days of Courier and maybe san serif, people would be asking, "lbs? Do you mean avoir dupois, Imperial or Sterling?"

1
0
Marshalltown
Alert

Creating monsters

"...persistent non-sense callers would be sent to IT training...."

Unless the training room was on a high floor (30th or higher for preference) with faulty fenestration or a hermetically sealed basement room, we have a problem.

0
0

Linus Torvalds won't apply 'sh*t-for-brains stupid patch'

Marshalltown

Re: He's right. Again.

"No rest until the domain admin account has a picture of my cat on every machine!"

You would have a point if Windows didn't work this way in general. Linux has had good support for some classes of hardware for years. USB thumb drives are an example, in contrast with Windows where each and every drive has its own little bit of software on the drive and Windows still announces it is "looking" for a driver. Trying to access the more useful capacities of a USB digital microscope on the other hand, or of Canon printers or scanners in linux has always been a painful process. But that is simply because they won't properly document the HW interface for fear that someone will start making hardware knock-offs that work nearly as well or better.

1
0

Sex is bad for older men, and even worse when it's good

Marshalltown

Re: @Is Just a Bloke ... Correlation does not imply causation

"..I discovered condoms actually have expiry dates.."

And just how much did that discovery cost?

3
0
Marshalltown

Re: I think, on balance,

Thanks for pointing that out. The wording is the precise opposite of the confusion. I conclude based on the wording that not having any sex, they have nothing else to live for. Did they run a cross-correlation with drinking?

1
0

Das ist empörend: Microsoft slams umlaut for email depth charge

Marshalltown
Pint

Two dot ...

umlaut? Is there any other kind?

1
0

Drone bloke cuffed after gizmo stops firemen tackling forest inferno

Marshalltown

Forest Hill

I know Forest Hill. It's the last place out that road where you can grab a sandwich and a beer. When the article says "remote" they are not exaggerating. It also very, very steep, with canyon-ridge systems with two-thousand foot vertical changes. It is no place to crash and not a region to walk out of unless you're desperate and willing to court a broken ankle or two.

0
0
Marshalltown

CCP

Even a lot of folks with Concealed Carry Permits don't actually carry often, if at all. It is more a point of making the local politicians worry about votes, isn't it?

0
0
Marshalltown

Re: Sounds like nonsense to me

"Helicopters generally do not have forward facing turbine air intakes that things can fly into"

You really can't be serious. Please take a moment to look at images of helicopters fighting fires [try Google] and count on one hand the copters that DO NOT have visible turbine intakes with fans facing forward. The filters ideally will stop dust from entering, but consider hard parts of drones instead, interacting with the compressor blades. Even if the copter was safely flown back to an air field, the damage to those blades puts the vehicle out of use for probably days in any forward fire fighting situation. While it certainly would be easier on the pilot, the fire fighting would suffer nearly the same degradation as if the copter crashed. I say "nearly" because only the copter has to be replaced on the line.

0
0
Marshalltown

Re: Sounds like nonsense to me - not

One of those fellows goes into an intake and they do easily as much damage as a bird. Also, unlike a glider, a helicopter without power comes pretty much straight down. Even if it can autorotate to a walk-away landing, you really don't want to do that in a big fire.

0
0

Londoner jailed after refusing to unlock his mobile phones

Marshalltown

Re: Hmm

"The fundamental cognitive dissonance is that Americans have lots of guns, yet still lost literally all their civil rights."

That reflects US views, but they rarely understand just how constrained humanity in the rest of the planet is.. Compared with other parts of the world, including some regarded as highly enlightened parts, the individual US citizen is well off as regards "rights' such as free speech, weapons, access to courts, presumed innocence, etc. The "rights" the US falls short on are more typically health, retirement, and other more "social" "rights." Your typical US citizen is deathly afraid of taxes and envisions themselves as only a tiny distance away from Trump and the Waltons, mistaken as that is, not quite grasping that someone like Trump OWNS the legistlators that pass the laws taxing the little guys and protecting individual people with the wealth of small nations..

8
0
Marshalltown

Re: Hmm

Once upon a time any free, property-owning man - sorry ladies but that was before suffrage - in England was literally required by law to own a weapon. It was considered essential to national defense and public order. As you track the history of British weapons regulations it becomes truly astonishing how ineffective those laws have been at limiting crime. The only weapons-related "crime" that the laws have probably truly reduced is suicide by firearm, which is BTW the commonest cause of firearms related deaths by an order of magnitude in the US. Based on available statistics there are several times as many crimes committed using firearms now than when the major laws were enacted. That is i part due to population changes, but only in part. Trawling through case law reveals that an individual defending themselves - especially with a weapon - is far more likely to receive harsh punishment under the law than an individual injured by a home defender during an actual criminal act.

This leads to the notion that there is "justice" - he was my only son, he was just trying to make a living even if he was a burglar! He was just supporting his poor old mother! Now how can afford my cigs?" As opposed to "justice," "hmmm, you say you are a carpet layer, and that those carpet knives are just the tools of your trade. Yet you left one in plain view to the great distress of all with aichmophobia who viewed it. I find that highly unlikely - five years. I hope you will learn to be more considerate of the feelings of others."

11
8

Being common is tragic, but the tragedy of the commons is still true

Marshalltown

Re: Neighborhoods vs cities

CO2 emitted by the US has reduced steadily as technology addresses efficient energy extraction from hydrocarbons. We aren't really short of hydrocarbon fuels, but the common belief is that we are and that most of our energy derives from overseas sources - it doesn't. In fact, the US continues to produce a large fraction of the energy it needs, and doesn't export oil despite the whinging demands that two-way trade in oil be opened up by the government. US energy is among the cheapest on the planet largely because of the lower need for the US to compete for foreign oil.

Also, when thinking about CO2 consider this. All that green stuff out the window, the chlorophyll-bearing plants are composed primarily of two chemical compounds: water and CO2. There are traces of other elements (nitrogen and a bit of magnesium for instance) many of which remain as ash when you burn a plant, but the immense bulk consists of CO2 and water converted to carbohydrates (e.g. potatoes and wood). Burning them returns the CO2 and water to circulation (you can fry and then metabolize the potato if you like - same difference). When you say "fossil fuel" you are saying that the water and CO2 that composes that fossil fuel has only recently become available once more for use by plants - and thus by other organisms as well. Anyone who has actually studied historical geology in the whole is not worried about CO2, unless perhaps they are concerned that current biologically available supplies are the lowest they have reached since the end of the Permian - 250-million years ago. Plants need CO2 and we need plants.

0
0
Marshalltown

Re: Obvious when explained

The entire discussion has been going on for a long time. In California old-growth timber is in short supply largely because of both government and private mismanagement. Some of that is due to basic ignorance masquerading as knowledge - e.g. replacement of natural forest structures with even-age management, monoculture and the like. Ideas that are formed and guided by a peculiar mix of OCD engineering (people prefer things to be neat or at least simple) and many engineers in forestry are dreadfully bad at forestry, and short term profit maximizing.

Occasionally you have an operation that historically does an excellent job of maintaining their resource, but then gets bought out by a clown in an Armani suit who realizes all that good wood could be cut down and turned into profit in a year. Of course once the wood is gone, for his intentions and purposes the land is now useless. This kind of action is often described as "capitalism," but is in fact not capitalism at all. It is much closer to the free ride syndrome at best. The previous owner (private property right there) managed the forest "sustainably" for over a century, at a steady profit, selectively selecting and felling trees, resisting increasing demand by increasing the cost of first rate wood, and letting new "profit" grow to maturity.

0
0

Cortana expelled from Windows 10's new school editions

Marshalltown
Childcatcher

This is unbelievable

A whole site full of geekish experience and not one snicker at the typical high schooler's response to "I'm Cortana. Ask me anything." Really. I needed to get a new keyboard the first time I saw Cortana boot up.

1
0

Plenty of fish in the C, IEEE finds in language popularity contest

Marshalltown

Re: Haven't heard of R

R is an open source variant of S-Plus. I started using it when I received a negative value for a variance from Excel. That was many moons ago now and Excel and most other spreadsheets have gotten much better at such things, BUT Excel (and SPSS, STATA and the like) still costs infinitely more (divide-by-zero error comparing costs) and has vastly less ready functionality. R is used in medicine, climate models, finance, geology, archaeology, paleontology, GIS mapping applications, and good old fashioned statistics. I've talked to recent grads that studied statistics (usually specialized areas) and the teachers are tending more to employing R because of the cost and because writing codes makes the student actually think about what they are doing. It's also handy for things like scraping tables in web sites. I can't see it competing with a more general purpose language though. Why bother?

0
0

Ex-Citibank IT bloke wiped bank's core routers, will now spend 21 months in the clink

Marshalltown

Re: Everyone seems to have missed the point here......

Given what was possible, it seems unlikely he intended not to damage anything. Then too, Citi, you got remember it was Citi. They were the ones caught pushing "subprimes" and wound up losing three-quarters (or more) of the value of the stock back in the 'oughties. Performance? He might have a point about upper management.

15
0

Crashed and alone in a remote location: When paid help is no help

Marshalltown

Service? What is this - service?

I have only worked for one business where the owner was willing to pay for a service contract. For the rest, we made up a song, "The Electron' Swap" to cover how "service" was done:

"I entered the office late one night,

The hardware systems were a ghastly sight,

Our two 'hardware specialists' had their screwdrivers out,

there were pieces of gear all strewn about.

They did the swap, the electron' swap..."

The nearest Frys was over an hour away.

1
0
Marshalltown

Re: Failed CPU crashing server, not uncommon.

Mmmm, unless the system somehow rolled random numbers during boot up, the odds are that the very same CPU was boss after every boot up simply because of the physical layout of the system. That would mean that one CPU would likely see greater wear and tear so-to-speak than all the others. So those 25% odds were probably weighted toward the house more than you might expect.

1
0

Guns don't scare people, hackers do: Americans fear identity theft more than shooting sprees

Marshalltown

Guns just aren't that scary

To be dangerous a gun has to a) be loaded, b) be in the hands (so to speak) of someone capable of discharging it deliberately or by accident, and c) you need to be in range. I say "so to speak" because I do know a truck driver whose "carry" fell out of his waist band (bad idea right there), hit a step on the ladder up to the cab, cocked itself (a revolver), and then flipped over, hit the ground, and discharging, shot said truck-driving owner in the backside. Curiously, while being operated on, it was discovered that due to excess sitting (in the truck, driving) the driver had developed a cist which had gone septic. He was hours away from a serious, potentially lethal case of blood poisoning. So his accident potentially saved his life, not something you commonly hear about gunshot wounds.

Identity theft is far more common, far more inconvenient and difficult and takes longer to recover from in general.

0
0

BOFH: Free as in free beer or... Oh. 'Free Upgrade'

Marshalltown

Re: I wonder

Hmmm, at a local hospital a staff member received a call from a citizen living some 30 miles away - (50 km to those who don't travel in miles). It seemed that the said citizen's fax machine had begun spewing out the medical records of a patient at the hospital. The staff member receiving the call inquired and was interested to learn that the patient's records were *supposed* to have been printed out for a "hand carry" to a consulting doctor. The paper had never emerged from the printer.

2
0
Marshalltown

There you go

That is real trouble shooting, though long range with an Springfield '03 is fun too.

1
0

Martha Lane Fox: YEUCH! The Internet is MADE by MEN?!?

Marshalltown

Re: er

As regards a "point" - well, no. No, she doesn't. The evidence available, which is very limited thanks to the use of proprietary software and hardware _suggests_ that electronic voting is far easier to spoof than the normal voting booth, graveyard rousing approach. It is highly probable that backers of good 'ol dubbya highjacked the 2004 election in the US - at least, based on exit polls it is. The exit polls had Kerry win handily, yet strangely in many of those very same precincts where the electronic systems were used the machines told an entirely different story. So, did the voters lie to the pollsters, or did someone hack the machines? But that's now all litter under the Bush so to speak.

0
0

Curiosity find Mars' icecaps suck up its atmosphere

Marshalltown

Meh - Fairbanks AK

A Mars year at the equator looks like winter in Fairbanks Alaska. There are worse places in the Siberian arctic.

0
0

Lightning strikes: Britain's first F-35B supersonic fighter lands

Marshalltown

Re: Curious minds want to know

The last time Burlington faced a military threat it was from the British Army and the soldiers were not equipped with jet fighters, or even multishot weapons. All an airbase would protect anyone from is Canada. Now Canada is not to sneered at. They built one of the very early hi-tech fighters ever built, though the soviets stole the plans, and the PM had every hull scrapped. But, still, as useful as those fighters might one day be, claiming to have freedoms left after the Patriot Act is perhaps a little rose colored in the lens department.

1
0

Man killed in gruesome Tesla autopilot crash was saved by his car's software weeks earlier

Marshalltown

The facts - just the facts

Looking at the other stories covering this, the "white side" of the truck is irrelevant. It looks as if the truck driver might be found to be partially at fault (in my state he definitely would be). He could see oncoming traffic that clearly was moving fast enough to be a hazard and decided to make the turn or pull across the road anyway. The turn is evidently not a signaled intersection so the rules of the road require the truck driver to make a "safe" turn, which means he can't rely on the kindness and alertness of strangers to handle safety for him. Getting hit by oncoming traffic, even traffic on autopilot shows that he failed to judge the time it would take to cross the road, or failed to wait until the turn was truly "clear." You see behaviour like that often, where one driver gets impatient or simply is impatient and grabs the intersection regardless of safety.

3
0

Medicos could be world's best security bypassers, study finds

Marshalltown

Re: For Pete's sake @Charles 9

Triggerfish - Hospitals do not make money, but they are generally owned by companies that are only putatively non-profit. So, for parent companies hospitals are cost centers that lower the bottom line. So, reduce staffing. Staff for minimum occupancy, reduce support staff or eliminate it altogether, hire one guy to handle IT or better yet outsource it to India and don't provide any documentation to the IT people anyway. Written originally for a mainframe in the '80s, not even for a hospital. Well - you're IT. We have confidence in you. What's source code? Why do you need it?

0
0

Page:

Forums