* Posts by Marshalltown

364 posts • joined 30 Sep 2011

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Trade body, universities row over US patent troll act proposals

Marshalltown

Re: wait wat @YAAC and Gary Cheapiro

A good many of the complaining unies are not public and are not funded through taxes.

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Marshalltown

Re: wait wat

"- No. When Universities own patents, that's because they did the bloody research. Big difference between them and patent trolls..."

Universities are fictive entities. They don't do creative work. At best they help fund it. So, no there is a "difference" between universities and patent trolls, but not a "big" one.

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Marshalltown

Re: Inventor based system

Another idea would be to simply ban the sale of patents or copyrights outright. The originator can license reproduction or use, but cannot sell or exclusively license a patent. Corporations funding original work become partially credited with a minority right in patents and copyrights but cannot claim any IP exclusively, because a corporation (a fictive entity) cannot do creative work, since they are fictions. The members of the team creating a patentable development are credited evenly and any licensing fees must be shared between all developing members with any funding entity receving a share of less than - say - 30% of the license fee. Claims by third parties without a documented development role of either creative or funding character are voided. Thus inventors and funders do get a share in any creative work and can never lose their rights, patent trolls are out of business and with an appropriate term limit for both patents and copyrights, creative work is also encouraged.

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SPY FRY: Smart meters EXPLODE in Californian power surge

Marshalltown
Headmaster

"Receptacles"

" 'Receptacle' is Americanese for electrical wall sockets. ..."

I don't where that fellow is really from, but "receptacle" is not "Americanese" in California. We call them "outlet" or "socket" if we're being formal and confound them with "the plug" on the end of the electrical cord in daily use - "put the plug in the plug" is occasionally heard. I don't recall ever hearing anyone - except my Canadian grandparents - call a wall socket a "receptacle." The US is big enough that there are regional usages, but still, "Americanese"?

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Sony tells hacked gamer to pay for crooks' abuse of PlayStation account

Marshalltown
Thumb Down

"So Sony haven't taken anything from you... ???"

They have denied you access to "services" that they agree you DID pay for - since you don't have a copy of your games in your own hot little hands they are storing your specific copy for you, and for which you have agreed tom pay them. Since they DID agree to that, and both you and they agree that you DID pay for those, blocking your account is essentially theft. Neither they nor you are disputing whether you had an account, just a specific purchase. If you consider a utility comparison, which in many ways is what on-line gaming is similar to, suppose you have a gas heater and gas stove (and for whatever luddite reason you chose) you don't have electricity laid in. Your itemized bill one month includes charges for electricity you could not possibly have used.

You contact the utility and they tell you, "well all you say is true, but you still owe us for the electricity. Until you pay us, we are turning off your gas service as well as your electricity."

You respond, "but I don't use electricity. Just gas. Go ahead and turn the electricity off, leave the gas alone."

They, "sorry, until you pay for the electricity, no gas."

That is not capitalism, that is robbery.

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Nuclear waste spill: How a pro-organic push sparked $240m blunder

Marshalltown

Re: Why not organic kitty litter?

"...If one is covering cat litter with radioactive waste, then, probably, the ecological aspects are less relevant...."

Ah, that would actually be "different" ecological aspects BECOME relevant.

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GitHub jammed by injected JavaScript, servers whacked by DDoS

Marshalltown

Re: Losing face

"Do you really consider your government an open one who works for the well being of all its citizens ?"

Not hardly. However, ours apparently suffers less from feelings of insecurity or at the very least, hides them better.

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Scientists splice mammoth genes into unsuspecting elephant

Marshalltown

Re: Animal made from ancient degraded DNA released into the wild

" 'one sequoia generation'

whats that roughly....3,500 years?"

Considerably less. Sequoias are like guinea pigs and can reproduce long before they mature.

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Ford: Our latest car gizmo will CHOKE OFF your FUEL if you're speeding

Marshalltown

Well there's a relief

At least it can be temporarily overridden. I've been in about three accidents over the course 4 decades of driving and none were due to excess speed. I've dodge a good many potential accidents by hitting the accelerator instead of the brake though. More importantly, it is far less likely to result in a bashed in rear bumper when the person behind you misses your brake lights.

On the lighter side, this would put a whole new - ah - skid(?) on high speed car chases.

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IS 'hackers' urge US-based jihadis: 'Wipe yourselves out trying to kill 0.00005 of US forces'

Marshalltown
Pint

Re: Actually I think el-reg have the point entirely.

"... agreed. I would think Responsible news media would ignore this crap completely. ..."

Which would then leave the story to the Irresponsible media, as it were. There are only so many ways to treat this kind of thing. Terrorists by and large have only one point, and that is located in the bull's eye on the top of their pointy little skulls. They are miserable people who wish to spread their misery and to display for all their monumental ignorance of the history of their own civilization's past. Laughing at them might aggravate them, but what are they going to do, scare us?

Western science, mathematics and chemistry as we know it would not exist without the contributions of medieval Muslim scholars. The reality is that the "past" they hark back to was not ruled by what they think of as Sharia at present. It was instead quite enlightened. Europe was the backwater dominated by religious fanatics. So, these "Muslim" terrorists really want to be more like medieval Christians than like medieval Muslims. How embarrassing is that?

Beer because, for the terrorist, there never is a Miller time. Gitmo awaits.

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Nesting falcons interrupt £200m Vodafone 4G mast upgrades

Marshalltown

Re: dual purpose

It has been dual purpose ever since the falcons nested there. The problem is changing out antennae to upgrade the hardware. You climb the tower and if the birds fly away, you have "disturbed" them, which violates the law, meaning jail and or a fine for bird bothering. If they get pissed and go after you, you want a good safety net, or a parachute, and health insurance, and since they were pissed at you, you have disturbed them, again violating the law, meaning jail or a fine, after you get out of the hospital.

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BOFH: Mmm, gotta love me some fresh BYOD dog roll

Marshalltown
Pint

Re: Ah, Newcastle Brown

The variety sold in the US has gone downhill to the point that it is nearly indistinguishable in a blind taste test from Budweiser or some of the other fizzy crud passed off as beer by the big brewers.

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: 1.5 MILLION SCOVILLE masala omelette

Marshalltown

Re: Sympathy...

Heh, the oil DOES help, until later.

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ACLU files new lawsuits in hunt for police 'Stingray' mobe-trackers

Marshalltown

Re: ACLU = AssCLowns Unlimited

Lots of folks say this until they need the ACLU behind them. The concept of civil liberty is something lots of folks don't get. They don't seem to understand that the fact that YOU claim a liberty means that YOU are supporting the same rights for others. If you don't admit to that, you are nothing better than a would-be tyrant, since the implicit reasoning is a form of "what's mine is mine, and what's yours is mine as well." You don't have to agree with someone to insist they have the same liberty as you. In fact, if you really want security, then allowing the nut jobs, fundamentalists, and would be oligarchs talking openly provides you with the best early warning system there is. It is one reason that forbidding "hate speech" is stupid. Let a person open their mouth in public and they are publicly known as a jerk. Tell them their right to expression is limited and all they do is hide it where it is more difficult to trace and attribute.

One of the profound misunderstandings that even many law enforcement officers labor under is the idea that they exist to "prevent" crime. They don't. They exist to bring rule breakers to justice. Because of that they often feel entitled to ignore the very rules thy are supposed to be enforcing.

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LOHAN test flight: Results in from Oz jury

Marshalltown

Re: Units

Mmmmh, no. US units and Imperial units are not the same. An Imperial gallon is about 1/5 larger than a US gallon for instance. Then there is the Iiternational Mile which is .0006 of a foot shorter than the US Statute mile, and (according to Glover's Pocket Reference) the nautical mile and the British mile are the same length, and about 0.15 US Statute miles longer than a US Statute mile. Of course a US fluid ounce is slightly larger than the British fluid ounce. But that potential conversion problem sounds like a good idea. Unit conversion, it is never pretty.

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We have no self-control: America's most powerful men explain why they're scared of email

Marshalltown
Devil

Re: snail mail

Snail mail takes time and thought to compose on paper. Even so, plenty of stupid stuff has been set down on paper, vellum, papyrus, clay and even on rocks, but proportionately speaking, far less than gushes forth from the general snarl of internet users out there now. In the US the existence of the First Amendment seems to make a good many folk think that since they have a right to an opinion, their opinion must be worth holding, rather than the ignorant drivel it is statistically. McCain at least suspects that not every random neuron firing is worth documenting.

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A Brit in California moves to the Lone Star State – just swerve the TexMex grub

Marshalltown

Cowboys

There are two major and quite distinct traditions in "cowboying" in the US. Texas and the midwest is one. The other comes from California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington often known as the "buckaroo" tradition. The word is a rough literal Anglicization of "vaquerro." The two tradtions are distinct to the degree that hats, clothes, roping styles, and saddles are different. Texan saddles are equipped with a cinch and a "safety belt." "Real" western saddles are single cinched (Texas is after all far east of the far west; it's on the Mississippi after all, and any real westerner knows you can't much farther east than that without being in Europe, or worse in Washington. D.C. ;-)). One fascinating point for an English reader is that Richard Francis Burton (later knighted) discussed this dichotomy briefly in his book about the Mormons and the overland trip California in 1860.

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Marshalltown
Devil

Re: Friend of mine

Religion is something of an American disease. Even us USians tend to be extra careful around strangers. You can never tell just how odd their thought patterns may be.

However, you want to recall that a survey in Britain in the '70s found that while less than half the UK population believed in a deity, over 70 percent believed in the devil.

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Boffins say Mars had ocean covering 20 per cent of planet

Marshalltown

Re: @Ian Michael Gumby

"So why has Earth's magnetosphere lasted 4GY longer than Mars?"

Short answer, because of the size difference. Mars masses about 1/6 as much as the earth. The active field like the eath has chilled down. Longer answer is, it's still there. Mars occasionally has auroras which don't occur without a magnetic field. Even longer answer is that most of Mars' water may still be there, trap in glaciers covered by dust and at the south pole. Mars has quite a few sinkholes and they can't be due to the same kinds of action that cause sinkholes in Florida and Central America. The best bet is subliming ice (either water or methane).

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: El Reg eggs Benedict

Marshalltown
Pint

Re: Don't think so

A big bag should be the "germ-free" variety. Otherwise the corn meal will turn rancid over time.

Eggs Benedict - bah. Another good use for corn meal is as a finish to chile. The basic chile pepper (this is southwest US cowboy style) consists of pulverized chile peppers (ideally a mix of poblano and some serious chili like tepines or scotch bonnets for heat, the jalapeno can be sliced or diced and used raw for garnish), oregano and cumin (ideally toasted or better added to oil) before browning the meat and onion in a dutch oven. Add a very healthy dose of mixed chile pepper, oregano and cumin to the pot with the browned meat and onion. Deglaze with a decent beer (use a lager, don't waste the ale). Add tomatoes crushed (canned or fresh) simmer until really tasty. Add a handful of corn meal and stir it in, then simmer until thickened. Stash some fresh chopped onion in a bowl in the refer. AFTER that go to the pub. Return with your hang over, reheat the chile now well rested and better tasting than it was when you left, top it with onions and jalapeno and extra sharp cheddar, and pour a beer to wash it down.

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SCIENTIFIC CONSENSUS that 2014 was record HOTTEST year? NO

Marshalltown

Re: Well

Why do you persist in this without actually reading up on the methods and debates regarding the adjustments applied to the raw data. The idea of filtering for long term, stable stations like houses and developing an independent data set is a brilliant one and could be done far more easily than the incredibly clumsy methods used by GISS, NOAA and HADCRUT now.

Right now, given the available information supplied by the agencies that generate the major data sets, we *know* that that there will be a trend that pushes each succeeding year upward. The adjustments will not swamp the general pattern of any given year, but over the data span the adjustments force trends even on trendless data.

The replacement of standard thermometers by electronic systems is also KNOW to impose a +1.5 C bias on the measurement. This increase does not seem to be removed from the adjusted data. It might be, but finding documented adjustment methods is far more difficult than it should be.

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Marshalltown

Re: Well

In fact, the debate continues about the adjustments to the data that modify past temperatures downward without offering any serious kind of ground truthing. The regions showing the "greatest" warming are in fact all in areas lacking any real data: regions like large portions of South America, Africa, Asia, and the Arctic. These "data" are purportedly interpolated, but astonishingly, they seem to have larger "warming trends" than the actual stations used for interpolation do. These imputed "fictional" data are then used to calculate that "warmest year ever" figure. Seriously.

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Marshalltown

Re: Cut the sh*t!

Ah, but which data will you be using to estimate that average. As it is, the estimated temperature change over the last century is pretty weak. When you research the adjustments applied to the raw data, and note among other things that these adjustments ALL BY THEMSELVES would impose a mild warming trend on raw series that is a constant value, then you have a problem. The adjustments are biased and the justifications are mostly either weak, or nonexistent. Only the TOBS seems to make any sort of rational sense. At the same the "adjustment" of historical data downward as you move into the past with an imposed trend is a problem. Some, possibly most, of the methodological decisions that drive these adjustments are clearly "theory" driven rather than developed to address empirical reality. You want to remember Kevin Trenberth's heart-felt complaint in the Climategate emails. He states in the same email where he describes the climate science community's inability to detect ocean warming as a travesty, that the data MUST be wrong. That, my lad, would have set Sir Francis spinning. The entire point of the scientific method as delineated by Bacon was to remove the observer's assumptions as far from the reality of the experiment as possible. To adjust the data prior to analysis based upon the theory being tested is to engage in echo-chamber science. No publication on climate change should report "analytical" results on adjusted data without summarizing the comparable results from the raw data as well. The GISS announcement regarding 2014 as the "hottest" actual assigned a probability of 38% to that assertion if you read the text. That would mean that in all likelihood, 2014 was nothing special with a 62% certainty. BEST's results in any other field using statistical methods would not have been reported, let alone attention drawn to the "rise." It was not significantly different from no change. If you are, as you say, a professional time series analyst, then you know that.

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FERTILISER DOOM warning! PESKY humans set to WIPE selves out AGAIN

Marshalltown

Re: LERN TWO PHUQUEING SPEL!! LOL

You want to recall the remark often attributed to Thomas Jefferson:

"I have nothing but contempt for a man who can spell a word in but one way."

Anyone who was required to read English literature in high school or college in the US actually would know that "civilisation" is a common British spelling. So there is a potential lack of education - or memory failure - showing but just whose?

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American bacon cured with AR-15 assault rifle

Marshalltown

Re: Wacky the lot of 'em

Urrk. Bacon should not be crispy unless you are crumbling on baked or mashed potatos.

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Marshalltown

Re: American bacon... What's wrong with it?

You want to get your bacon some place else. Burger King and Carl's Junior are sources of decent bacon, nor are super markets unless you frequent the butcher's counter.

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Marshalltown

Re: American Bacon

There's good bacon and bad bacon here in the USofA. Good bacon runs leaner, cured with salt and pink salt, and then smoked, though these days you can get "uncured" bacon which apparently isn't just pork belly by another name. You want it thick-cut because the exterior is the only place the smoke settles. US bacon is what the relatives on the far side of the Atlantic call "streaky bacon." You avoid the syrup by asking for it on the side.

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LOHAN's Plucky Playmonaut touches down at Spaceport America

Marshalltown

Re: practically next door

"... unless there's a mountain pass or something in the way."

Even then, the pass would only be a consideration when it snowed.

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Marshalltown

No food or beer comments?

Seriously, New Mexican food is worth a trip there all by itself. Hatch chilis, posole, Navajo mutton stew, locally made beers. Please say you didn't just drive and skip all the best.

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Why has the Russian economy plunged SO SUDDENLY into the toilet?

Marshalltown

Re: So if I have this straight

The US still has law in place that prohibits the export of crude oil. Refined petroleum products can be shipped out of the US but not crude. Many of the multinationals that were once American companies would now like to shipe crude out of country. Skilled refinery help out side the US would increase profit margins when the out put was shipped back.

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Marshalltown

Re: So if I have this straight

Israel is more tolerant of religious nuts than most of their neighbors, There are huge numbers of fanatically religious Jewish, Christian and Muslims that crowd into the old cities. Mostly they get along better between rather than within religions. The orthodox argue orthdoxy not with Christians or Muslims, but with other orthodox. The flavours and varieties of Islam and Christianity also by and large reserve their special bile for their erring co-religionists. So, in old Jerusalem, the rock throwing riots you run from are not between religious groups but within them. The shopowners will just slam the shutters and share a cup of coffee with shoppers trap inside while the rock-throwing debates are conducted. With a little luck, the trapped shoppers buy something.

In other ways Israel is nearly as cast-ridden as South Africa used to be before Mandela. Israelis of Palestinian-muslim decent are right at the bottom of the heap, competing with out-of-country labor for a very small amount income. There are plenty of patriotic, muslim Israelis of bedouin descent, who can get quite peevish if you mistakenly treat "Israeli" as a synonym for "Jewish." They aren't Jewish, they ARE Israeli, and they have aboslutely no use for Hamas of any other out-of-country bunch that lobs rockets and suicide bombers at Israel, even if some of that OOC group are relatives. They could well be in the house or on the bus that gets hit. I've been there and talked with them and listened to their hopes and wishes.

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Marshalltown

Re: @Mage

The point you seem to have missed is that debt is being "monetized." Banks do not loan "money" per se, that is credit symbolic of existing value. They loan future money - Wimpy's promise to pay tuesday for a hamburger today. They accept your promise to work your butt off so that you can buy a house and they can collect interest which will roughly double or or more the amount you actually need to pay. Banks are allowed under the FRB system to loan a certain amount based upon what they have in reserve. In addition if you were to deposit the loan you received from them back into the same bank, that loan then - at a discounted rate - becomes part of their reserve. That can then also be loaned, and that cycle can be repeated over several iterations: house-car-boat-credit card-... All the bank actually loans is your or someone else's promise to work long enough to create the value, plus interest at a compound rate. Also, if you look closely at your example, the one thing you are not doing is making a living. So, out of that "bit" you set aside, or out of the interest made to repay that loan you are extracting a living yourself, and the "value" you added to the transaction is debatable. Monetizing debt is inherently inflationary and cannot be avoided - and hasn't been during the entire span of western history. The problem with banks is not that they are bad some how. They impede the research into and development of any better methods of reconning values and costs, or where "money" should come from. At present in the US, although the Constitution places the creation of moeny squarely on the shoulders of congress, with the exception of [relatively] tiny amounts of cash printed or coined at government mints, essentially ALL money in circulation is monetized debt issued by private sources (banks - that is).

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BOFH: A miracle on PFY Street

Marshalltown
Pint

Re: Don't turn off the network!!!!

Wow - for a moment there I thought you had types "BUILDING HAVOC CONTROLLS." Those can be tricky to by pass.

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Blind justice: Google lawsuit silences elected state prosecutor

Marshalltown

Re: Aren't there three issues here?

As a Republican myself, I can't really say what I really think should be done with both the MPAA and the Google board. However, the MPAA are not constituents of Hood's. Their attempt to develop and dialog and persuasive raport with Hood muddied waters that Google exploited to the extent that we now have this repulsive result.

The truly creepy aspect of all this is that this kind of politics hearks back to science fiction stories such as Kornbluth and Pohl's Space Merchant and William Gibson's novels. We are in the position of seeing massive corporations demanding citizen's rights under national laws and the same arguing that those same nations and states have no jurisdiction. Think about that a bit. Would it not be poetic justice a judge were to agree that some specific government has no jurisdiction and that because of that the corporation also has no standing to complain? Where would Google and the MPAA really be then?

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I need a password to BRAKE? What? No! STOP! Aaaargh!

Marshalltown

Re: Sorry

Well, yes. But I did wvae politely.

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Marshalltown
Pint

Re: Sorry

The OP *did* use the word "entitled." True story: Driving along a rural road in California. Rural roads in the Central Valley in California tend to follow Section or Quarter Section lines - a section being nominally one mile on a side. The gotcha is that since the earth's surface is curved, that neat rectilinear projection occasionally has to be as adjusted slightly so the rural road has an occasional right angled zig in it. Unlike mountain roads or some of the roads I've experienced in eastern Europe, California's rural roads, because of the tendency to follow such a nice neat grid, are deceptive to outsiders. I am tooling along at a reasonable pace when a Porsche SUV comes tearing up behind, blowing its horn, the road is two-lane, no passing, and no shoulder, so I can't pullover and let the tailgating knothead by. He doesn't like that. The double line ends. The Porsche driver hits the accelerator and blasts past waving at me with one finger. He's up to 80 MPH before long and dwindling in the distance, when suddenly I see brake lights, some swerving and then a cloud of dust. When I caught up, the Porsche was 100 yards out in a pasture trailing considerable barb wire and a few fence posts. I smiled and waved all my fingers as I negotiated the jog in the road and continued on.

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Marshalltown

Re: Sorry

Heh. I knew that the world had changed when it became clear that the FIRST thought upon seeing an erratic driver was "cell phone" instead of "drunk."

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BOFH: Capo di tutti capi, bah. I'm having CHICKEN JALFREZI

Marshalltown

Re: This is not going well.

Pretty sure that Gina might find "headlights" inappropriate in this context.

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How HAPPY am I on a scale of 1 to 10? Where do I click PISSED OFF?

Marshalltown

Nuts

The sole justification for modern airport "security" is to convince people not to travel. What metric is available that shows that "security" either benefits me or in fact even catches the occasional smuggler? What we do hear about are folks that jump the que, dodged the security bods and disappeared into the mob beyond. We hear about people with health problems arrested, detained, and expiring in TSA custody, of folks with poor fashion sense arrested for trying to meet their significant others wearing t-shirts fitted electronic signs (and that was outside the security perimeter), and more fail after fail. The problem is "security" personnel with their common sense de-installed. "I'm sorry, that is a full liter of water. You can't take it through security." "But, it's just water! And besides, it isn't full. I've been drinking it!" "I'm sorry sir. The container is just too big." Tcha!

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BOFH: Santa, bloody Santa

Marshalltown

Gina

I think you will find that with Gina around, the lifts will actually be more reliable.

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Why did it take antivirus giants YEARS to drill into super-scary Regin? Symantec responds...

Marshalltown

Re: Peculiar targeting...

Actually, the targeting - more than the code quality - suggests a nation origin. Telecom and power dispatch systems in workings, as well as encryption experts, paints a very specific picture. Presumably with adequate knowledge of those areas you can 1) disrupt power distribution over nay geographic scale; 2) disrupt or intercept commuications over any geographic scale, and 3) encrypt securely, or potentially decrypt encrypted information with proper information regarding how the data was encrypted.

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FORGET the CLIMATE: FATTIES are a MUCH BIGGER problem - study

Marshalltown

Re: I'm three terrorists at least!

"It could be worse, you could be an illiterate fat, smoking, drinking terrorist!"

Sounds like someone from Idaho, well, except the Mormons. They mostly don't drink officially.

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Renewable energy 'simply WON'T WORK': Top Google engineers

Marshalltown
Headmaster

Re: reducing energy consumption

You are not reading closely. Both parts ARE considered and the truth is that current "renewable" technologies are too expensive and too inefficient to do the job that those who are afraid of AGW ask for. Not only can these technologies NOT do the job, they never will be able to. You are up against the laws of thermodynamics. That is why these engineers are saying that we need a "disruptive new energy technology." Both solar and wind power are, when applied on an industrial scale, environmental catastrophes. Look up for instance the problems with the Ivanpah solar plant in the Mojave desert. The "development" of that plant destroyed - yes, destroyed - several thousand acres of desert habitat pushing aside desert tortoise and kit fox, and archaeological remains, not to mention the mining, manufacture, and transportation of the materials to construct it, in order to send power to greater Los Angeles. It has never met the production levels that were "expected" because clouds and dust interfere more than expected. The odds are the plant never will meet those levels for any significant span. A couple of new nuclear plants in the LA basin would have done the job vastly more efficiently with far LESS environmental impact, even considering the threat of earthquakes, which is just as high at Ivanpah as it is in LA.

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Marshalltown

Re: reducing energy consumption

There is a recognized negative correlation between birth rate and wealth and that correlation has been present since the days of Classical Greece at least. Poor people have strong reasons for many children, not least that child mortality increases as wealth decreases. To have any surviving children and thus a family to care for you in your old age, you need more children in proportion to the incidence of child and infant mortality, and that is the case at present in industrial societies. Drop back a few centuries when the majority were agrarian and not only are you worried about your old age but simply getting the harvest in. More children is more working hands and thus lighter work. Overseas Chinese families often operate this way even at present. Even farther back, hunter-gatherers need large families because individual heads where the culture resided - that's what a "traditional society" is, one that operates in head space alone.

The "replacement levels" for the poor are not the same as for the rich. The point here is that the aggregation of large amounts of wealth in a very few hands may indeed cause overpopulation. Not deliberately but just the same.

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Marshalltown

Re: reducing energy consumption

... is wasteful, shameful, and expensive. -- Fixed it.

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Marshalltown
Coat

Consommation???

What, pray, is "consommation?" If it has anything to do with thin, clear soup, it is off topic. Besides, I doubt that consomme is a genuine environmental problem.

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Martha Lane Fox: YEUCH! The Internet is MADE by MEN?!?

Marshalltown

Re: Political Correctness gone MAD I tell you (@ Arnaut the ignorant)

Palin would be a catastrophe in hip boots. Go to Alaska and you encounter the mystery that no one seems willing to admit having voted for her. However you might be right about Palin vs Biden. Palin's handicaps are blatantly obvious while Biden is likely to be far more plausible.

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BOFH: An UNHOLY MATCH forged amid the sweet smell of bullsh*t

Marshalltown
Pint

Re: Still wrong

Well, at least you have a head start on the loathing this week.

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Marshalltown

Re: "Like money on expensive consultants?" I ask

Heh, there is no company on the planet, for profit or NPO that doesn't want to reduce the staffing levels in hopes of a bigger bottom line. You might think NPOs would be immune but that is not true, and in some instances, like healthcare orgs, not even humourous. The plan is inevitably to be "more efficient," keeping the client/patient happy by smiling more (no joke). My SO works in a hospital where the management thought that a patient's stay should be pleasant (in hotel terms of pleasant) and that less face time with nurses for instance could be repaired by the nurses smiling at the patient.

Nurse rushing in to room to turn off call on for half an hour: "There you are Mrs. *****!"

Smiles broadly.

Patient no response: "How are we today??"

Even broader smile: "I'm so sorry it took so very long to respond. There's only me on the floor at the moment, and I was attending to another patient."

Nurse whispers, "They've let go all the attendants."

Patient: No response.

Nurse: "Mrs. *****? Are you awake? I have to take your vitals while I'm here. Oh my gosh!" Hits emergency button.

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Doctor Who trashing the TARDIS, Clara alone, useless UNIT – Death in Heaven

Marshalltown

I am not entirely a fan of the current (later Doctor) series, but still, that has to be a summary by a viewer expecting and finding the worst - confirmation bias in short. First off, and most glaringly, Gavin Clark seems to have missed points, both in this and other episodes involving cybermen that show they aren't precisely perfect. It is clear for instance that the very LAST cyberman in the episode was the revenant of Lethbridge-Stewart, who saved his daughter or grand daughter - I forget and don't really care which. So it wasn't just Danny who was not fully taken over by the hive mind of the cybermen. L-S finally gets a salute from the Doctor too.

Second, and far more potentially important to the storyline (or tangle) is the fact that we DO NOT KNOW what the doctor saw at the coordinates provided by Missy. The audience sees straight out the door into empty space, the Doc is looking down and to the right at something not shown to the audience. We get to look out the door and see nothing, but never get a glimpse of what the Doctor sees. So, was his rage in that scene because he still doesn't know where Gallifrey is, or because Missy, the reincarnation, more or less of his "childhood friend," actually DID tell the truth. That friend, who clearly expressed the need for HER friend, is now gone and the Doctor failed her again.

Third, it is also clear that we still really have no proper clue as to just who (or what) Clara Oswald really is. She was a Dalek once - more faulty technoology, a Victorian governess come Torchwood associate, and once more a school teacher in 21st C London. She has already been dead twice and yet seems to have the endurance of the Energizer rabbit - or a Time Lord. I vote she's really the Rani.

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