* Posts by Marshalltown

455 posts • joined 30 Sep 2011

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BOFH: Free as in free beer or... Oh. 'Free Upgrade'

Marshalltown

Re: I wonder

Hmmm, at a local hospital a staff member received a call from a citizen living some 30 miles away - (50 km to those who don't travel in miles). It seemed that the said citizen's fax machine had begun spewing out the medical records of a patient at the hospital. The staff member receiving the call inquired and was interested to learn that the patient's records were *supposed* to have been printed out for a "hand carry" to a consulting doctor. The paper had never emerged from the printer.

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Marshalltown

There you go

That is real trouble shooting, though long range with an Springfield '03 is fun too.

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Martha Lane Fox: YEUCH! The Internet is MADE by MEN?!?

Marshalltown

Re: er

As regards a "point" - well, no. No, she doesn't. The evidence available, which is very limited thanks to the use of proprietary software and hardware _suggests_ that electronic voting is far easier to spoof than the normal voting booth, graveyard rousing approach. It is highly probable that backers of good 'ol dubbya highjacked the 2004 election in the US - at least, based on exit polls it is. The exit polls had Kerry win handily, yet strangely in many of those very same precincts where the electronic systems were used the machines told an entirely different story. So, did the voters lie to the pollsters, or did someone hack the machines? But that's now all litter under the Bush so to speak.

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Curiosity find Mars' icecaps suck up its atmosphere

Marshalltown

Meh - Fairbanks AK

A Mars year at the equator looks like winter in Fairbanks Alaska. There are worse places in the Siberian arctic.

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Lightning strikes: Britain's first F-35B supersonic fighter lands

Marshalltown

Re: Curious minds want to know

The last time Burlington faced a military threat it was from the British Army and the soldiers were not equipped with jet fighters, or even multishot weapons. All an airbase would protect anyone from is Canada. Now Canada is not to sneered at. They built one of the very early hi-tech fighters ever built, though the soviets stole the plans, and the PM had every hull scrapped. But, still, as useful as those fighters might one day be, claiming to have freedoms left after the Patriot Act is perhaps a little rose colored in the lens department.

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Man killed in gruesome Tesla autopilot crash was saved by his car's software weeks earlier

Marshalltown

The facts - just the facts

Looking at the other stories covering this, the "white side" of the truck is irrelevant. It looks as if the truck driver might be found to be partially at fault (in my state he definitely would be). He could see oncoming traffic that clearly was moving fast enough to be a hazard and decided to make the turn or pull across the road anyway. The turn is evidently not a signaled intersection so the rules of the road require the truck driver to make a "safe" turn, which means he can't rely on the kindness and alertness of strangers to handle safety for him. Getting hit by oncoming traffic, even traffic on autopilot shows that he failed to judge the time it would take to cross the road, or failed to wait until the turn was truly "clear." You see behaviour like that often, where one driver gets impatient or simply is impatient and grabs the intersection regardless of safety.

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Medicos could be world's best security bypassers, study finds

Marshalltown

Re: For Pete's sake @Charles 9

Triggerfish - Hospitals do not make money, but they are generally owned by companies that are only putatively non-profit. So, for parent companies hospitals are cost centers that lower the bottom line. So, reduce staffing. Staff for minimum occupancy, reduce support staff or eliminate it altogether, hire one guy to handle IT or better yet outsource it to India and don't provide any documentation to the IT people anyway. Written originally for a mainframe in the '80s, not even for a hospital. Well - you're IT. We have confidence in you. What's source code? Why do you need it?

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Marshalltown

Re: For Pete's sake

You are talking about hospitals, staff are reduced because, well hospitals never make money anyway, so companies hire "hospitality management" administrators with a mission direction to reduce costs at all costs. Their understanding of medicine is limited to patients are frequently unhappy and so are their families. "Why did my dad have to wait so long for someone to help him with the bed pan?" What do?

They only hire minimum staff based on an assumption of minimum bed occupancy. Population rises, call in temps - but, temps and security badges - hmmm, maybe some sort of temporary badge, disposable perhaps? Temps need to complete (electronic) charting, meaning they need access to confidential patient records, but aren't issued passwords - "use mine" says the one full-time nurse. But that's bad practice!! Well yes, but there are now two nurses on the floor with 30 patients, and the full time nurse doesn't have time to access records for her patients AND the temp's.

I have never met a computer security staffer dealing with medical records in a hospital that understood that the issue is patients - they need to be cared for and the floor is, except for the odd blue moon day, always understaffed. Their directions on implementing security come from a management that is a complete stranger to actual health care, except occasionally for the one token doctor on the board who might not be, and would be outvoted if it comes down to bonuses or patient well being.

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Marshalltown

Re: For Pete's sake

More to the point the key can be stolen. And, I have seen a key card snagged in an elevator door, ripped off the lanyard and fall down into the crack between the elevator and the shaft. Now there is a security issue, a legitimate card at the bottom of the elevator shaft - where it might be stolen by some nefarious and underpaid mechanic and sold to some no-good-nik. The "security" response was to close down both the elevators sharing that shaft to recover the card. That created a traffic jam at the next elevator down the hall, blocked responses to codes and created a gruesome tangle of visitors, patients, and staff, and likely lead to who knows how many unnecessary resistant staph infections. Medical people are often trained to think in terms of triage. In that approach, "security" will inevitably be last.

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Marshalltown

Re: Probably worse than you can imagine

The fact that a photo-id is a "legal requirement" doesn't make it a smart policy that does anything beneficial. It simply makes it a policy. Besides which, anyone with a decent image editor can counterfit the badges adequately to fool the Mk 1 eyeball. Ah - you say - but the card has to be passed through a reader and that can't be fooled. True, but seven people at a door, one passes their legitimate card and all seven including the ringer pass the door. Maybe we need embedded chips? No sweat. The code can be grabbed by several different kinds of skimmers and added to a card. Does the chip have to match the image? Not really if it is all machine checked. Is that really better security, or merely an illusion that some bean-counting "security" type ignorant of the actual demands in a hospital finds comforting? The only way to clue someone in to hospital security needs and true weaknesses is to get them out in the floor answering calls, changing bed pans, and watching sheet covered forms being moved down the hall to the elevator - destined for the morgue.

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Marshalltown

Re: So a dilemma.

"It's not. Really it isn't. Almost never. ..."

Clearly you've never been at the sharp end. There are several problems that all intersect and collectively they can kill patients that aren't even critical. First and foremost, staffing is inevitably affected adversely by computerization - ward clerks? Licensed vocational nurses? Who needs them, we have computers now! The typical hospital administration loves "paperless," low staff, nursing and doctoring. I know of one "healthcare" provider whose administrative board includes ONE doctor, who has no veto just because chairman - well trained in ***Hospitality (Hotel) Management*** (really) wants to hire - this a true story - people with a Disneyland staff attitude. Skill is not important. Really, its not. SMILE WIDELY and get out the iPad - "Oh, I am SO sorry. You are going to die??? I hope you had a nice stay!!! Can you fill out a customer satisfaction survey before you die???" - CONTINUE SMILING. The food was what??? I can't write that down!!!! What's that? you have resistant staph and that's what's killing you? You don't think much of the isolation practices??? What are those??? I am only trying to find out if you liked your stay ma'am. So you didn't?"

Then there are interfaces. I know of one "healthcare system" that bought accounting software which some idiot convinced the administration could be "retasked easily" to handle health care records. (Why do these lab values have dollar signs?) The "ease" was a dillusion and the end result is an on-going catastrophe. Then of course there is the Windows problem - hospital staff do not have TIME to waste learning new interfaces every time some knuckle head thinks they can make the screen look "better." There are many horror stories about computers in hospitals and very few good ones. Every second staff spend doing computer work (or paper work to be fair) is time the patient doesn't benefit from. Every time a staff member accidentally clicks the wrong square in some "form" and doesn't catch it because they are also being paged overhead and via the phone for a code [whatever] is a time some coder's poor understanding of how things work in a hospital could kill someone, even someone who shouldn't have a problem. And, very much more to the point, healthy people don't go to the hospital! The case are OFTEN "odd ball."

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BOFH: Follow the paper trail

Marshalltown

+1 - Ah yes. I was once described as lacking a "diplomacy gene" after informing a Navy person that the "official US Navy spelling" of a certain word "looked illiterate." I had said that it looked illiterate before he informed me that HE PERSONALLY had been the advocate of the change and was proud of it. When I did not moderate my stance at all - simply adding the word "still" to my previous opinion, he apparently complained to my employer who then offered the genetic analysis.

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A Logic Named Joe: The 1946 sci-fi short that nailed modern tech

Marshalltown

Re: *Remarkably* sharp prediction? Yes remarkably

Heinlein, while a great writer, never came so close to an accurate description of a significant social and technological development as this story does. And Leinster wrote this before 1950. Heck, he died in 1975. Read it closely and you will sea the shadows of the cloud, Office 365, Netflix, the use of a CRT (missed out on calling for light-weight screens), Skype, net stalking and the like, and even keyboards.

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Oooooklahoma! Where the cops can stop and empty your bank cards – on just a hunch

Marshalltown

Re: America?

"North America is the US and Canada. And what exactly are Canadians? Pseudo Americans in denial."

Ah - and Mexico to, down to Central America. Canadians, USians, and Mexicans are all from North America. Some are just from farther north than others.

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Marshalltown

Re: Graft

You pay protection, they DON'T burn down the house. In OK you get stuck unable to pay for gas to drive home.

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Why does an Android keyboard need to see your camera and log files – and why does it phone home to China?

Marshalltown

Re: Complicated permissions system + humans != security

"Close," as the saying goes, "only counts in Horseshoes and hand grenades."

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One espresso is not theft, Oz judge rules, it's part of civilization

Marshalltown

Then she should ...

... have taken it up with the other managers who had already let him do just what had gotten her knickers so absolutely twisted she squeaked when they pinched. The "correct response" of the manager is to have a sense of perspective and scale. If she lacks that, she is and will continue to be an abject failure as a manager. The fact is that the principle of not being a tight-assed twit with the people (and animals) who work for you is enshrined in ethics globally and extends in written forms back into the late Bronze Age at least. As it is, she has cost her employed a bundle because there were certainly lawyers involved and probably ought to be fired for incompetence.

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BOFH: What's your point, caller?

Marshalltown

Re: Most fun I ever had on the phone

"Oh if you work for an ISP ..." you get every kind of screwball call that can be imagined.

"Hello? [I am in Hell] here."

"Ever since I got my computer, my toaster doesn't work."

"Your toaster????"

"Yes, I think my computer is interfering with it."

"[??????????] Ah - is the toaster plugged in?"

"Mmmmh, no."

"[!@#!#@!] Ah - perhaps it would work IF you plugged it in?"

"Oh, OK, but now the computer doesn't work."

"R-e-a-l-l-y? Maybe you could make your toast and then plug the computer back in?'

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UK eyes frikkin' Laser Directed Energy Weapon

Marshalltown

Re: World of Warships

That's what the Vulcan is for.

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'Acts of war in a combat zone are not covered by your laptop warranty'

Marshalltown

Mail from the "E" - spam today, spam tomorrow, please sir, some spam?

Long ago now, but unfortunately not long enough or far enough, I worked at a perfectly interesting job that involved lots of sun, dirt, rocks and hiking - great stuff. Then the "boss" decided that, in addition to the perfectly interesting and enjoyable work we were doing, he wanted to start an ISP. Since we had already wired up the office, he thought that under the "guidance" of a professional IT person, his skilled, professional staff would don a second hat at no additional pay and staff the help desk for his ISP as well.

Now the ISP idea wasn't all that bad. The area where we were headquartered had one of the lowest employment rates in the US at the time, and while people had heard of "the internet," there was very little service available. What was available was expensive, so the ISP idea looked like a great way to print money (and since we could then be our own provider, he could save the cost of the business connection we had, and since the connection to the backbone in the backroom was a T3, we really were very, very happy with it). The downside was that being new to the internet and computers in general, many of our customers were complete rubes and needed a LOT of hand holding. My favorite call was from a fellow who had signed up for our service. He his problem was that he was not "getting any mail from the 'E'." I was initially blindsided when I finally grasped what he expected. He thought his 'mail box' should get all the same kinds of barbecue-starting material that fills your normal mail box. So, after initially trying to explain that this was not the way the internet worked unsuccessfully, I signed him up on some of the more prolific spam sources of the time. A week later he called to thank me. I've actually seen two other calls I took listed as "urban myths." I won't say which ones, but I did take them, and they really were made and are not mythological.

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Paul backs FBI hack law

Marshalltown

Small government

Paul has been a "small government" advocate for a long time. He was also outraged at the revelations of the Snowden files, especially the joint "let's spy on each others citizens, since we can't do it ourselves legally" arrangement.

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SpaceX is go for US military GPS sat launch, smashes ULA monopoly

Marshalltown

Re: Why didn't NASA do themselves?

You aren't really serious asking that are you? NASA has never done "it" themselves. They are a part of the Department of Commerce! DoC has to at least pay lip service to something vaguely related to encouraging business and "capitalism." These easiest way is be seen to spend tax money liberally paying into the hands of the biggest businesses - more or less corporate welfare in reality.

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BOFH: Thermo-electric funeral

Marshalltown

Re: The only tool you'll ever need...

That's in GM shops, in Ford shops they're used on Chevrolets.

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Marshalltown

Ah, yes

The idiot I used to work for decided to start an ISP, despite the fact that his experience with computers was Wordperfect and surfin the early web and usenet for PRON. We, his otherwise skilled staff, were drafted to set up the new business alongside the existing one, which involved the outdoors, dirt, government agencies and such. So, when we had nothing more pressing to complete we had to rewire the office AND build the servers - he had an actual IT guy hired to manage the system once we built the necessary ... but that guy wanted to actually BUY already built SERVERS with WARRANTIES!! Why waste money on that when you already have guys with screwdrivers to assemble parts - actual in house warranty work, come to think of it. Anyway, "cheap" was a magic word. The hammer actually did help straighten cases that were just not fully formed, but with the worst, cheapest cases, the blanks of sheet metal had not been square in the former when the case was stamped. They assumed a vaguely rhomboidal form upon assembly. Tightened up properly, these often would torque frame and thus the mother boards, creating conditions that would pop networking cards, harddrive interfaces and other cards in the extension slots right out the slots over time and multiple heating and cooling cycles. It also created a distinctive rocking effect when you bumped the house built systems. A bigger hammer was employed to scrap them so that they would never, ever, re-emerge as a problem over the help line. Third bright idea of boss was to have same screwdriver-equipped staff build cheap PCs for the hoi poloi so they would remain loyal to the ISP, AND same staff would "support" this debacle despite the non-isp related work that piled up steadily.

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Are bearded blokes more sexist?

Marshalltown

Re: My beard

I had an anthropology professor assert pretty much the same, but who then went ahead and asked why I wore a beard. My list was 1) it grows there, and shaving it off is trouble for no discernible reward, though keeping it clipped keeps it from getting in the way, 2) pain, it's no fun shaving and self-torture is not my bag, and 3) cost and spending options, unless you're a crackerjack with sharpening stone and a strop you buy blades, and not buying a pack means you CAN buy more coffee.

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Clucking hell! Farcical free-range egg standard pecked apart by app

Marshalltown

Free range ...

There's "free range" - e.g. one bird per square meter ore even one per 100 square meters - and then there is free range, where the birds really do roam free and you only round them up at night to keep the coyotes from eating them. I grew up with the latter and the difference in eggs and meat between true free range birds, who only supplement their diet with chicken feed and birds that can go outside if they want but don't because because they have no reason to do so, and have effectively no access to a natural diet (plants, seeds, grubs, bugs, and even mice) is the difference between day and night that vast majority of so-called "free range" eggs I have had don't measure up. One guarantee that a chicken is not "free range" except perhaps in the area it can move in is the assertion that the bird was fed a "pure vegetarian diet." Chickens are not vegetarians, and "range" means much more than available space to move in.

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BOFH: Sure, I could make your cheapo printer perform miracles

Marshalltown

Re: 30 printers

Frankly, "that isn't a company-issued printer" and "please get a work order from your supervisor" always helps. For fun a friend an I used to go war-driving around the state capitol and would discover that apparently many state employees would bring their own wireless routers and printers into work to save the walk to the printer down the hall. Not infrequently this lead to accidental trapdoors into what were supposed to be secure state networks.

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Marshalltown
Trollface

PAs - heh

The PRON spewing out the printer brings back the old days. I was happily at work, having secured my very own private office with a locking door and even a couch! I hadn't even finished my first cup of coffee when I heard a terrific scream from the owner's PA/Office Manager, who was a tallish, nice-looking, blond woman and a rabid fundamentalist who, at that time. was expecting the end of the world - in October I believe. Apparently the owner, after hours, had used her computer and scanner to scan some images (copyrighted at that) and upload them to one of usenet's more notorious groups. Apparently, he never bothered to power down the computer OR remove the magazine from the scanner. When I arrived at the scene she was belaboring him about the head and shoulders with the rolled magazine and explaining she would own him, his wife and children if "this" ever happened again. It never did, on her computer, but several weeks later I found my system on, and upon moving the mouse, received quite an eye full myself. Not being as easily offended, I spent a bit examining the evidence.

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Calm down, dear: Woman claims sexism in tech journalism

Marshalltown

Re: One thing leads to another...or not

Well, but obviously, Kieren assumed that being virulently "pro" something will be accompanied by an equal and opposite "anti" attitude which makes perfect sense, because without that balancing force, she would walking with a list. Of course she COULD just be generally negative about everything else, but a focal negative is probably easier to manage. Personally I've always regarded it as an antimale bias when you can't get secret inside information because there's nothing you can flash them that wouldn't get you punched out. Of course from a geek the punch would not be very impressive, but still that's pretty negative.

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No tit for tat, or should that be tat for tit ... Women selling stuff on eBay get lower bids

Marshalltown

Read, read , read

Please reread the article and note what it actually says. It is sexually biased behaviour patterns that does all the work - that is "women" reveal themselves. So do "men." Women *tend* exhibit *more* of a series of patterns to protect themselves from risk. That behaviour depresses their ability to actually profit. The research also notes biased patterns of ad wording that may reveal gender. I rather doubt that has much significance, since the other behaviours will very simply tend to "force" buyers to not prefer them. eBay is a world where knowing what you are after is key to getting what you really want. And, what you really want is something really good at a really low price.

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You say I mustn’t write down my password? Let me make a note of that

Marshalltown

Re: Clear Desk

Heh - it took a break in, where the baddies attempted to disguise their work with a fire to convince my boss of the usefulness of off-site backups of both hard copies and electronic data. In some instances several years of work on a project were stolen or destroyed by the arson fire.

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Southern biscuits and gravy

Marshalltown

Sugar in biscuits

In fact some recipes toss in a tablespoon's worth in a recipe that makes about a dozen 2 to 2and 1/2 inch biscuits. It helps the biscuit brown a bit, especially buttermilk biscuits, and it adds some savoriness to the biscuit. There is no detectable sweetening.

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Marshalltown

Butter milk

In the US buttermilk is a cultured milk like khefir. Originally it was whey (thus the name) that had soured a bit. The main reason for using it is that if you limit the leavening to baking soda, you need an acid to react with the soda. Otherwise you have hard, crispy little objects that can be substituted for hockey pucks. Thus, the addition of sour milk (buttermilk). Since we often don't have buttermilk on hand - a large minority actually drink it - there are numerous doges. Probably the best, since it adds just a hint of flavor, is sour the milk with a tablespoon or so of lemon juice. Simply add the juice to the milk and let it stand for a few minutes until the milk has begun to thicken. Also, a good many of us biscuit makers toss in a teaspoon of sugar to enhance the flavour a bit (too much makes the biscuits sweet) and to enhance browning. Acidic doughs don't brown well and unbrowned biscuits don't taste as good.

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Free science journal library gains notoriety, lands injunctions

Marshalltown

Governments?

Fund it? The only ones that get funded are Elsevier, and they are arguably a bunch of thieves that provide no discernible service to science - or to anyone else outside Elsevier.

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Patent Troll Unit set up by Virginia government to slay lawsuits

Marshalltown

Patent trolls

Honest, wrongly accused?? Seriously, Virginia did not come out against patents or against patent suits over genuine controversies. Its unit specifically targets companies whose purpose in existence is simply "legal" extortion. They have no "product" that is in any way damaged by their prey's products or activity and they bought the patent simply to collect the royalty. They are simply incorporated hold-up artists that use paper instead of more material weapons.

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Marshalltown

@a_yank_lurker ". . .patent law is feral. . ."

If it is really "feral" then plainly we need an animal control unit to deal with it.

Besides, the unit's purpose is to "file injunctions." That means that the Commonwealth of Virginia has come out explicitly in favor of digging potholes in the previously smooth road the trolls had from filing suit to payout. The state has designated a unit specifically to impede trolls. It can't act directly against them because patents fall under Federal (not "feral") law, but it can certainly make the bridge they dwell under less homey and their suits more expensive. Given the "prefer low hanging fruit, prey on the weakest" character of patent trolls, incorporation in Virginia becomes a desirable state.

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BOFH: I want no memory of this pointless conversation. Alcohol please

Marshalltown

Re: Vision

Heh, the first fellow that hired me out of college told me he "had vision." Never, ever let someone with "vision" but no sense explain things.

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SpaceX: launch, check. Landing? Needs work

Marshalltown

Nah

The landing looked fine. The video shows one of the struts failing. That might be due to the barge motion, but the take away should be that any landing on a floating barge needs to consider a need for reinforced struts and maybe a wider rest stance once landed.

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Hacks rebel after bosses secretly install motion sensors under desks

Marshalltown

Re: Moral police

Well, she would be working in a strip club, and while I've known a couple of co-eds who paid for college working in one, most don't need to actually know the difference between "were" and "we're."

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Marshalltown

Re: Moral police

You are left to wonder about the fate of whoever "caught" them.

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Rejoice, Penguinistas, Linux 4.4 is upon us

Marshalltown

Windows 10 - Linux any day

Having been forced into using it, my impression is that Win10 is flakier than the shoulders of my shirts. The network system is weird occasionally not "seeing" systems on the network, but which, if you know their network name, are accessible. Strictly a Win10 problem too. Win7 has no problem like that. The Win10 interface would be fine on a cell phone, but on a desktop??? Seriously? As Bill the Cat would say, "ack, barf!" Then there's "I'm Cortana. Ask me anything." Heh! But only of you get an MS account. And now the employer who insisted on the transition is discovering that true cost of MS support, especially when, after breaking down and paying for it, the help consists of "we're working on it." I've been using Linux, mostly SUSE with KDE, for years now and have to say that with very, very few exceptions, it is easily as good as MS.

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BOFH: Taking a spin in a decommissioned racer? On your own grill cam be it

Marshalltown

Re: Ferris Bueller!

Grammatically that sentence leaves a good deal to desire, but if the "its" is possessive, as it appears to be, then no, it does not need an apostrophe. The word forms a triumvirate with "his" and "hers."

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GCHQ mass spying will 'cost lives in Britain,' warns ex-NSA tech chief

Marshalltown

Re: The power that mass surveillance gives...

Yet, you have to wonder, just what power that would be. It seems far more likely to result in raised taxes and maybe open a few more government jobs than anything else. Governments consistently tend to regard their own citizens as the biggest threats. The citizenry of course is what the government is exercising power over, the only serious source of funding (and affirmation of status - after all, what goes through a taxman's heart at the end of the day, if he hasn't made someone's life at least a bit more miserable).

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NSA spying on US and Israeli politicians stirs Congress from Christmas slumbers

Marshalltown

Re: Try substituting Putin for Bibi

It really is humourous in a sad way to see Arabs accused of antisemiticism. It reflects monumental educational failures and a steadfast ignorance.

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Marshalltown

Re: Re; YAAC Colour me cynical

Matt, I AM a Republican, and in this case you are wrong. It really IS about national security vs grandstanding jack4zz3z in Congress and the Senate who hope to benefit in the next election. The idea that Israel is any more trustworthy than its neighbors is beyond naieve. IL will certainly not outright cross the US, but where what the conservatives there conceive our interests to be in conflict with their interests, or where they can insure that "my enemy" remains the enemy of my friend (the US), they'll take steps to protect their interests, not ours. There is no reason they should see things differently, but it is not a view that benefits the US. If they see something as not in their best interests, well their interests come first. It is that simple. The US should remember that. Israel is a religious and political battlefield and has been for millennia and it remains so now.

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Marshalltown

Re: If the spy agencies have blackmail material on all the politicians you have a Chekist state

And, if you have your garden variety politician "negotiating" secretly and independently with foreign powers you have a monumental CF AND the added bonus of politicians committing treason.

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There's an epidemic of idiots who can't find power switches

Marshalltown

Husband - heh

There are worse things, like inarticulate IT folks who can't explain a fix. Then you, standing in the middle of no where, not a road in sight, let alone a building or a computer, gets a cell call from said wife asking for translation. Worse, you haven't done tech support in five years and are glad to be doing completely different kinds of work. Even worse, the explanation requested has to do with a custom interface written by a lunatic whose only previous experience programming was modifying Colossal Cave, for hospital personnel to use as a centralised patient-charting system. It is based, strangely enough, on a customizable, accounting and sales package. It retains odd usages like "shopping cart" and "customer ID." The users (nurses) are lost in a maze of twisty passages all alike. Happily, only the jackrabbits can hear you scream.

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PETA monkey selfie lawsuit threatens wildlife photography, warns snapper at heart of row

Marshalltown

Re: when will this madness stop?

The name is clear evidence that the primatologist has been having a clandestine relationship with the ape. Clearly the process included preplanned entrapment of the photographer by PETA, the primatologist, and the ape. All are clearly in a criminal conspiracy.

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Marshalltown

Re: when will this madness stop?

The plaintiff is PETA, well known for members with IQs near room temperature, in British rooms in the winter at night, and thought patterns that rule out words like "logic" and, despite their name, "ethics."

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Marshalltown

Re: Californians are monkeys and I have proof:

Meh, lots of Californians think the only decent "PETA" is stuffed with schwarma. The motive is clear and extortionate. PETA wants to administer any funds accumulated around the image for the ape. They will then charge the ape a fee for that administration. The courts could end this quite simply by finding for the ape and designating the photographer as the administrator in perpetuity. When discussing PETA it is always advisable to remember the only animals whose rights they will not "defend" is human.

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