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* Posts by mathew42

167 posts • joined 29 Sep 2011

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NBN 'working' on pay-for-fibre-to-your-premises product

mathew42

Re: A small payment will make it manageable

> Instead of using technology as a means to shift populations and companies into regional areas.

Under Labor's plan many regional areas (population < 1000) were going to have their ADSL connections ripped out and replaced by wireless. Secondly in regional areas you tend to live closer to the exchange so the distances are less and it is often easier to run fibre.

Providing reasonably priced backhaul to country towns should be a higher priority.

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mathew42
FAIL

Labor's NBN - 50% at 12Mbps

> . . . which is one of the problems we have now - a two (or more) tier system - and one of the problems the NBN was originally designed to rectify.

Labor's NBN was designed with speed tiers and Labor's estimates, as documented in each update of the NBNCo Corporate Plan, was that close to 50% on fibre would connect at 12Mbps well into the future, while only a tiny fraction (<5%) would connect at 1Gbps in 2028. To me that defines a two tier system between the poor and rich. Sadly almost 12 months after NBNCo reportedly made 1Gbps plans available to RSPs it is still not possible to order one, because it is simply not economically viable.

The reality is that direct fibre for high speed users (>100Mbps) is likely to be cheaper than Labor's NBN and RSPs (e.g. Optus) have already commented that they would spread connection fees out over a 2 year contract, so the price difference (if any) shouldn't be that high, especially when Labor predicted that 12Mbps would be adequate for half the country.

The second observation I would make is that imposing speed tiers on FTTN is likely to be more challenging because performance is more variable, so for the average person who would have connected at 12Mbps they will likely see a speed increase.

The losers are those seduced by Labor's shiny fibre who didn't realise they wouldn't be able to afford the fast speeds anyway.

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Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know

mathew42
Pirate

Re: Some interesting possibilities here...

I think this has merit in the suburbs when combined with a delivery van. Software plots out where packages require delivery and instructs the driver where to park. The roof opens, a dozen drones take off while the driver (wheeled robot?) delivers a heavy package. The drones return and the van moves to the next spot while the drones recharge or swap batteries.

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mathew42
Facepalm

Re: Ummm, no.

> The draw of automated driving systems for many if not most people is that you won't have to pay attention and can do something else entirely. Take that away and you may have a safer system in which no-one is interested.

I agree I would much prefer to sit in the car and engage with the kids while travelling somewhere rather than concentrating on the traffic, but before we have full automation there is the 'stop stupid mistakes' stage which we have already reached with features like: automatic braking, distance keeping cruise control, lane following, blind spot monitoring, etc. I considered it worth $2500 for some of these features when buying a car earlier this year.

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'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'

mathew42

Try servers + sewerage pipes

> And a general contractor didn’t understand why he couldn’t run a water pipe through the cabinet containing a rack of media servers (the pipe wasn’t on the blueprints).

I worked in a small 2 story office where the toilets were between the ground and first floor. The servers were jammed in a storage room under the stairs with the sewer pipes ran across top of the room.

The other interesting thing was the toilets had louvre windows and it did occasionally snow.

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Turnbull: NBN won't turn your town into Silicon Valley

mathew42
Mushroom

Re: I call Bulls*&$

> I manage a large stable of linux servers that generate an excessive amount of income for my company.

So you are expecting the rest of Australia to reduce the costs of running your business?

> VDSL will do close to bugger all for my situation, yet 1 km away from my house NBN in the correct implementation is working just fine.

I have a suggestion for you: MOVE! If fibre NBN delivers the benefits you claim, then the increase in productivity should easily cover the moving costs.

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mathew42
Facepalm

Bringing a sense of reality to a beautiful dream

> "Bringing a sense of reality to a beautiful dream is never going to invite popularity"

Labor over promised on the NBN, highlighting 1Gbps connections on fibre when the reality is they were planning for 50% of connections on fibre to be 12Mbps (47% in April 2013), meaning that many would have connections slower than HFC, 4G and even a large number of ADSL2+ connections. They oversold the benefits like distance education and medical consultations, when the reality is that these consultations would be conducted in a hospital or clinic and that it would be much cheaper to run fibre from the closest exchange to the hospital. Labor failed to invest in the areas of greatest need first - suburbs established in 1970s and later where Telstra skimped on infrastructure.

Like so many of Labor's policies the concept was laudable, but the implementation was incompetent and underfunded.

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Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales

mathew42
Holmes

Re: Political more than commercial

> Abandoning WP is a daft idea from Huawei if on purely commercial grounds, because it gives them less of a stick to wave at Google

It is barely shorter stick considering that Huawei have the option of open source Android (e.g. CyanogenMod) or Tizen platform (supported by Intel) plus the potential of discounts from Google for not selling Windows Phone.

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mathew42

How likely is it that Huawei are worried by Microsoft owning Nokia and being second in line for information and continually squeezed, especially if they have no way to differentiate?

Google enables Huawei to go after the higher volume lower end market by choosing which trade-offs they wish to make to appeal to a particular market segment.

All vendors need to be careful with the preference that many are showing for vanilla Android UI. The open source nature of Android also means that Huawei are not

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'Serious flaws in the Vertigan report' says broadband boffin

mathew42

NBN for average or high end users?

The fundamental question that requires answering is should the government be providing an NBN service that meets the average needs or high end users?

If high end users expect the government to subsidise their connections then they should be advocate for everyone in Australia to receive the same speeds on fibre and usage based charging.

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NBN predicts a million premises next year

mathew42

Re: Major failure

> If I gave somebody a 25Mbps connection and they only downloaded 62GB, I would take it away again. They obviously aren't serious enough.

This comment is the exact reason that the Liberals are able to justify FTTN. If your main usage is a HD video conference twice a month, you need the high speed, but not the data consumption. Fast speeds enable activities that simply aren't possible with slow speeds.

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Government report: average Oz user will want 15 Mbps by 2023

mathew42
FAIL

Quotas are not an artificial constraint

"As a network engineer said to The Register: “With the cap, virtually all of the actual utilisation numbers you can dream up are artificially constrained.”"

Contrary to popular opinion, data is not free. Every other utility service charges based on usage, because if you don't charge based on usage a critical link is broken and this leads to the "Tragedy of the Commons".

Quotas enable ISPs to control network usage. Customers who want to download large amounts of data and are prepared to schedule it can take advantage of off-peak periods. Customers who are light users have reasonably priced connections which are fast.

The problem is speed tiers which limit the benefits of a fast network. If a person's primary requirement is a video conference twice a month why should they be required to spend additional money for a high speed connection with data they are not consuming?

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mathew42
FAIL

Internode / iiNet ADSL heat map in Sydney

"The other howler in this assumption – one that will fuel accusations that the whole Vertigan process represents a political report to serve a political end – is that Australia's average ADSL line speed is above 12 Mbps, citing the government's MyBroadband data cube as its source."

On 25th Feb 2008 Internode & iiNet published a heat map of ADSL2+ speeds in Sydney - http://www.internode.on.net/news/2008/02/76.php. Quoting from the article "Combining the results of these two ADSL2+ surveys indicates that half of all their customers(3) regularly enjoy download speeds of 11.9Mbps. In addition, 80% of customers, today have access to speeds about 6 Megabits per second." Of course some people will be well below, but it does make the 12Mbps speed reasonable.

It is interesting to note that it was in response to Labor's FTTN policy promising 12Mbps. How times change.

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mathew42
FAIL

Data is not directly related to speed

"The ABS records of download volumes show that from 2009 to 2013, CAGR ran at more than 64 per cent."

A 12Mbps connection is capable of almost 4GB month which is well in excess of the current average.

100Mbps is capable of 32GB a month.

Having said that faster connections are important because it enables interactive real-time services (e.g. video conferencing).

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No more turning over a USB thing, then turning it over again to plug it in: Reversible socket ready for lift off

mathew42
Trollface

20V at 5A

"delivers faster data rates of 10Gbps and up to 100W of power – from 5V at 2A for handhelds, to 20V at 5A for workstations and hubs."

Finally USB fridges and coffee warmers might work properly or more likely the escaping magic smoke will be more spectacular.

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Turnbull says NBN 'most reckless commitment of Commonwealth funds in our history'

mathew42
FAIL

Labor's NBN was for the rich

Actually the reality is that Labor's NBN model would have benefited the 1% most. Labor predicted that 50% of connections on fibre would be 12Mbps and in 2028 less than 5% would be 1Gbps. For the 50% on 12Mbps those speeds could be easily achieved on HFC, 4G & FTTN. Heck approaching half of ADSL2+ connections reached that speed 6 years ago.

Labor's NBN policy started as FTTN, switched to FTTP only when Telstra wouldn't concentrate and beyond the headline of 1Gbps FTTP (which RSPs are refusing to sell) has been a total disaster.

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NBN Co pricing under spotlight

mathew42

Re: Where is percentile pricing?

95% percentile doesn't make sense for a wholesaler with only a few customers.

NBNCo is a wholesaler providing last mile connection across the entire country. RSPs connect to NBNCo for the last mile and send the data out to the wider world.

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mathew42

Eliminate the AVC charge

The "Tragedy of the Commons" means that restrictions on network traffic need to be imposed for the pricing to be reasonable.

Abolishing the AVC charge means that people pay only for the data that they use, which is the same model used for other utilities (power, water, etc.). Giving everyone the fastest speed possible will encourage innovation in a way that Labor's NBN failed completely, because people will be able to experience the benefits of FTTP (if only for a limited time).

If you only have a 12Mbps connection on fibre (which in April 2013 was 47% and rising) then the connection is slower than FTTN, 4G, HFC and almost half of ADSL2+ connection which means people aren't able to experience a difference (e.g. HD video conferencing). If you have a 1Gbps connection with 5GB of data you can test the HD video conferencing and if you start to run out of quota move up to the next plan.

NBNCo need to make a fixed amount of money to cover the build costs and maintenance. The costs of sending more data is significantly less than the extra revenue generated, meaning that as average data downloaded per user increases, prices of CVC will fall. If people have faster connections, they will download more data simply because they aren't waiting around. This creates a positive feedback loop: more data is downloaded so it becomes cheaper, quotas rise so people download more.

Pricing purely on CVC also creates positive feedback for NBNCo to upgrade their internal network infrastructure because fixing congestion issues will enable people to download more data increasing revenue significantly more than the cost of the fix.

Currently I can purchase a 30 day unlimited calls plan for $39.95 with 4GB of data. In a 4G area the performance could be close to 12Mbps speeds. For a light user that could easily be more than enough. If extra data is needed a 4G data pack is $29.95, which is less than the cheapest NBNCo plan. However if the speed difference is 4G versus 1Gbps then there is more incentive to connect. Reducing the base connection charge will encourage more people to connect and once connected people are likely to start using the network more.

Sure the heavy downloaders will whine, but with more people connecting on faster plans, CVC prices will start to fall rapidly. Labor's biggest mistake was AVC pricing because it enabled the Liberals to claim that FTTN would be adequate for most people and those who needed a faster connection should pay for it themselves.

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Speak your brains on SIGNAL-FREE mobile comms

mathew42
Pint

Serval Project is much more interesting

I think that the Serval Project is much more interesting and a better approach, because it doesn't need separate hardware.

This is the description from wikipedia: The project aims to provide infrastructure for direct connections between cellular phones through their Wi-Fi interfaces, without the need of a mobile phone operator. The project allows for live voice calls whenever the mesh is able to find a route between the participants. Text messages and other data can be communicated using a store and forward system called Rhizome, allowing communication over unlimited distances and without a stable live mesh connection between all participants.

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China in MONOPOLY PROBE into Microsoft: Do not pass GO, do not collect 200 yuan

mathew42

Re: Just a regular software audit.

Yes, Microsoft do audit customers and IT departments will tell you it is a nightmare unless you have signed up to an all encompassing volume licensing package that covers just about everything.

I know personally of global companies that are trying to move towards open source as quickly as possible because of the cost and business impact of audits.

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Indie ISP to Netflix: Give it a rest about 'net neutrality' – and get your checkbook out

mathew42

Re: ...

The solution is metered pricing, because like other utilities it charges people for what they use. Can you image the waste if people paid a fixed charge for water, electricity & gas regardless of consumption? I find running water makes a nice background noise, but I don't leave a tap on because water is precious and it is costs per litre used.

Metered pricing will encourage ISPs to build faster networks, because you can download more data meaning that they can charge more.

Speed tier pricing makes each jump more expensive. A 10Mbps connection is about 3.24TB/month, 100Mbps is 32.4 TB/month, 1Gbps is 324TB/month. I shouldn't be expected to pay for someone else's 24/7 4HD netflix streaming habit, when I only want my fast connection to video conference for a couple of hours each month.

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ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION

mathew42

Re: Ball Ox

It may have been reasonable for Moylan to assume that his hoax would be quickly uncovered (within an hour) and that at best the hoax would have rated an item on the evening news.

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mathew42
Meh

Re: What losses?

Here are three examples of where investors may have lost out without making a conscious decision:

* Investors operating with a margin trading account may have been forced to sell by their bank if certain thresholds were reached.

* Investors using stop-losses to manage their risk (especially with options trading)

* Funds with rules covering the composition of their portfolio.

However, the point is very valid. The shares opened at $3.55, plunged from $3.52 to $3.21 shortly after noon, but recovered to $3.53 so it is likely that only those investors with stop-losses would have been impacted and options trading has a higher risk associated with it.

What the above reasons do highlight is the risks inherent in the market can accelerate movements in share prices, especially with automated trading.

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Lower prices are BAD FOR CONSUMERS, says Turnbull

mathew42

Re: There's your problem

Conroy's model was far worse in that NBNCo became a monolith with zero competition and a Corporate Plan that relied in significant revenue growth (ARPU > $100/month)

The last significant change in Australia was the installation of ADSL2+ DSLAMs by Internode followed by others where speeds became uncapped. This was only possible because Internode could connect directly the copper and avoid Telstra's wholesale charges. NBNCo have returned Australia to paying a premium faster speeds and also data charges.

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Government won't name expert reviewers of Australia's national curriculum

mathew42
Linux

I was chatting with my kids primary school teacher yesterday about the curriculum and robotics. He is actually having several robots delivered so he can test them for applicability. I lent him a sparki (http://http://arcbotics.com/products/sparki/) and I'm waiting for Kano (http://www.kano.me) to turn up so I can lend that to him. I'd much prefer the school to go with these technologies as they provide opportunities for kids to really extend themselves, whereas the other options he was discussing were more like limited toys.

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Windows XP fixes flaws for free if you turn PCs into CASH REGISTERS

mathew42

Re: Even better idea

The only feature of Windows 7 that I miss in XP is being able to search for items on the start menu.

Apart from that I much prefer XP when running VMs because of the lower overhead.

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NBN Co is a big turn-off … for copper

mathew42

Percentage still on copper?

Are there any numbers around the percentage still on copper, percentage connected to NBN & those who've abandoned the fixed line?

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Zuck: Web drones, not balloons (cough, cough Google) are way forward

mathew42

Information is an advantage.

- If a farmer knows the price of their crop in the market, then they can receive a fairer deal from the middle man.

- If the community "nurse" can search online and receive training the quality of care improves.

The problem I see is that both projects require external antennas. How many of the areas are outside of existing mobile phone coverage?

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Turnbull to add speed test app to MyBroadband web site

mathew42

I think this is a stupid idea. NBN fanbois will simply run the app while also downloading other files or the more technical minded will rate limit traffic from the application.

ISPs know the line speed that customers are connecting to DSLAMs. Internode & iiNet put together a heat map of Sydney about 6 years ago. I think this would be the most reliable source of information.

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Fibre fanaticism overrode proper NBN planning says report

mathew42

Re: >lessening its focus on addressing black spots.

> A problem with black spots for both sides of government is that they usually cover a small population in rural Australia

Depending on what you define as a blackspot, there are plenty of metro areas (suburbs developed post 1970) where speeds are very poor.

The biggest issue with broadband in rural areas is the cost of backhaul where Telstra is the only supplier. OPEL would have fixed this, but Labor cancelled it and then ended up building similar backhaul. Between Adelaide & Darwin many DSLAMs were installed in rural communities once backhaul was available.

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mathew42

Re: How do you predict the benefits?

> The problem with doing a cost-benefit analysis of major infrastructure projects is that their very existence transforms the environment around them.

Except that Labor's NBN Plan wouldn't have delivered that in the way that you imagine. The fact remains that Labor predicted that 50% of fibre connections would be 12Mbps and in April 2013 the NBNCo Corporate Plan confirmed that 47% of installed connections were 12Mbps.

> A project like the NBN has the potential to completely transform almost every aspect of daily life with enormous benefits for transport, housing, energy use, education, health etc, etc.

A cost benefit analysis should show that as speed increases, what benefits are available. The 2010 edition of the NBNCo Corporate Plan even provided a nice chart of application throughput requirements showing that the real benefits only come when speeds are 100Mbps or higher.

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Is the government's NBN policy changing your vote? Greens Senator Scott Ludlam thinks so

mathew42

Re: Is the government's NBN policy changing your vote? Greens Senator Scott Ludlam thinks so

Labor's didn't even survey the current state of the network or prioritise areas that were in the greatest need. Most people know that infrastructure is worse in suburbs built after 1970 and that HFC is better than ADSL.

The minimal savings is very debatable.

The substantial decrease in capability is also debatable when you consider that in April 2013, 47% of fibre connections were 12Mbps and Labor predicted that 12Mbps connections would remain at the level through to 2028. Assuming that the Liberals fulfil their fibre-on-demand promise at a reasonable price (under $3000 install) then the decrease in capability at the high end is also likely to be untrue.

"full of unintended consequences and implemented appallingly" sounds like the Labor effort, since it is too early to judge the Liberal implementation. Unintended consequences like half the population connected to fibre on speeds slower than HFC, 4G, FTTN and approaching half of ADSL2+ connections. Although to be fair that was an intended consequence since it was in the Corporate Plan. Further unintended consequences and appalling implementation are to be expected when you start with a FTTN plan, upgrade it to FTTH because Telstra won't help, then upgrade it to 1Gbps because Google Fibre was announced prior to the 2010 election.

Labor also had the wrong focus on price rather than network performance and usefulness. If you read the 2010 NBNCo Corporate Plan it has a chart showing throughput requirements of greater than 100Mbps which very few people would have had.

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mathew42

Re: Is the government's NBN policy changing your vote? Greens Senator Scott Ludlam thinks so

> Is Ludlam right? Are you, as an IT pro, more likely to vote for someone other than The Greens? And have you switched because of the NBN?

Labor's NBN was very typical of their time in government - great sounding ideas but hollow, full of unintended consequences and implemented appallingly.

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mathew42

Re: You get what you vote for

> Labor - Superfast internet but the country is bankrupt and nobody can afford it

You missed the bit that only a privileged few would be running at 1Gbps. Labor predicted in the Corporate Plan that less than 5% in 2028, meanwhile 50% would be connecting at 12Mbps. Hardly fast by today's standards let alone in 15 years time. In the last NBNCo Corporate Plan (April 2013) 47% of fibre connections were 12Mbps, so at least Labor achieved one NBN target ... just not the one most people expected or wanted!

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Cherry-pick undermines NBN business case: Switkowski

mathew42

Re: LNP - fail train

Why will Rupert be happy? 25Mbps still provides adequate bandwidth for 2 HDTV streams.

Under Labor's NBN plan 50% of fibre connections are 12Mbps and predicted to remain that way well into the foreseeable future. I would have to suggest a higher percentage of the population on slower populations would make Rupert happier.

Telstra limiting ADSL to 1.5Mbps is the prime example of a company deliberately protecting FoxTel from streaming media competition.

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mathew42

The ACCC provided a neat solution to the overbuild problem by determining that 121 PoIs would exist, they effectively created 121 networks. The government should respond by setting minimum service standards and calling for tenders to install the network in each of the 121 locations to provide wholesale network access at agreed (or cheaper) prices. Infrastructure companies would then bid for the concessions either requesting a government subsidy or paying a fee.

With appropriate KPIs companies could be rewarded for providing a faster network or penalised for failing to meet deadlines. Instead of a bureaucratic monolith we would have at least 4 companies competing to provide innovative services.

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NBN to be built even if cost-benefit analysis shows no ROI

mathew42

Re: Beside the Point

Do you have any example of eHealth being delivered to private residential addresses that requires 25Mbps. The examples that Labor offered for eHealth were focused around patients video conferencing with a doctor in the city from a country hospital assisted by a nurse or GP.

I'm aware of one where eHealth delivery has been shown to be beneficial - mental health consultations. However most people struggling with mental health issues also tend to struggle financially which means they are unlikely to be able to afford a fast connection.

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mathew42

Re: Cost analysis not feasable

> It's the implementation of existing technology by a company (NBN Co) and its partners with the intention of making money. In that case, wouldn't it be a good idea to find out whether you can make money out of it BEFORE you start digging the trenches?

I don't think it is essential that NBNCo make money. This is another of Labor's mistakes. It is sufficient to show that building the NBN will deliver sufficient benefits to society to justify the expense.

For example HD video conferencing with multiple parties for mobility challenged people to socialise is unlikely to be viable option under Labor's plan because such people are unlikely to be able to afford the 1Gbps connection costs, but the benefits are clear and could lead to cost savings in transport costs.

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mathew42

Re: Beside the Point

> Highways, bridges, sewerage, hospitals and other services including a decent communications network all require a coordinated effort, which is what government should be providing.

All of these services need to demonstrate that they are delivering a benefit for the investment

* highways need to demonstrate that investment will improve travel time, reduce congestion, improve safety, etc.

* sewerage works need to demonstrate that investment will reduce costs, pollution, etc.

* hospitals need to demonstrate that investment will improve patient care, reduce costs, etc.

A CBA for the NBN should deliver similar answers. Labor's policy contradictions are a clear example of why an CBA is needed, because it would have revealed:

- areas of greatest need (e.g. suburbs established post 1970s without HFC)

- speeds that are required to deliver expected benefits

- eHealth is pure spin because most hospitals are very close to exchanges

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mathew42

Re: Labor's plan for 50% at 12Mbps

> The prediction of 50% at 12mbps was a conservative estimate

Rubbish. Nothing about the NBNCo Corporate Plan has been shown to be conservative. Most parts have been shown to be extraordinarily optimistic.

> Actual uptake figures showed that 44% were opting for 100mbps plans.

Do you have a reference for that, the NBNCo Corporate Plan (2013) contains this statement:

"As at 30 April 2013, 26% of NBN Co’s FTTP End-Users were on the highest available wholesale speed tier (100/40 Mbps), whilst 47% were on the entry-level wholesale speed tier (12/1 Mbps). These compare with 18% and 49% respectively forecast for FY2013 in the 2012-15 Corporate Plan."

Essentially what has happened is that as expected early adopters selected 100Mbps in greater numbers, but as more people connect, the percentage of 12Mbps is matching Labor's NBNCo plan. What is more telling is that the long term estimates have barely changed.

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mathew42

Re: Labor's plan for 50% at 12Mbps

> That argument doesn't take into account the fact the state of the copper that would be used FttN may not be up to snuff

Fair point, but the only analysis I've seen is from iiNet / Internode where they mapped ADSL speeds in Sydney. The average was close to 12Mbps.

> HFC is owned by private enterprise and would need to be leased or purchased

Telstra & Optus were being paid very generous amounts per customer to migrate customers to NBN infrastructure.

> It already cost NBNCo $11 billion (with a b) and that didn't include owning the copper in the ground - which is what the Liberals are proposing

Telstra definitely out negotiated the Labor government (no surprises there considering the track record with mining companies) so I would suggest there is plenty of room for movement.

> It's also my opinion that a CBA is too limited a study for such a large and lost-lasting infrastructure project, even more-so because it's government driven and therefore if it's deemed a long term benefit to the country, then a CBA doesn't do it justice.

The problem I have is I don't think a study exists which shows the benefits from increasing speeds. Labor promised 1Gbps speed only because Google launched 1Gbps fibre, yet they expected 50% to connect at 12Mbps and very few to connect at 1Gbps. The NBNCo Corporate Plan (2010 edition) included a list of applications and essentially almost all the applications needed 100Mbps or faster.

A CBA should explain the benefits and summarise the cost for each level of speed.

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mathew42

Labor's plan for 50% at 12Mbps

Th reality is that Labor didn't want to run a cost-benefit analysis because the reality that their NBNCo Corporate Plan predicted that 50% would be connecting at 12Mbps and in 2028 less than 5% connected at 1Gbps would have exposed the reality that HFC and/or FTTN could meet the requirements of the majority of fixed line customers.

Hopefully the cost-benefit analysis will consider the additional benefits for increasing speeds and the applications that are enabled at each speed tier. A sensible result of this investigation would show that Labor's touted benefits only occur at speeds faster than 100Mbps and that speed tiers do more harm than good hopefully leading to their abolishment.

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Google promises 10Gps fiber network to blast 4K into living rooms

mathew42

Re: Meanwhile, in Australia...

For most people 25Mbps is actually an improvement compared with the idiots who preceded them. How a government could possibly attempt to build a FTTP network and at the same time plan for 50% of connections to be 12Mbps and in 2028 hope that 1Gbps connections would be approaching 5%.

For those who can justify faster speeds, fibre on demand will be available and that should be significantly cheaper than Labor's 1Gbps plans.

The reality is our best hope in Australia would be for the government to get out of the way and invite Google to build the network.

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'We don't use UPS. If we did we'd have huge UPSs and tiny computers'

mathew42

Re: Piggybacking on the hospitals supply doesn't sound a very moral position

Electricity suppliers build networks with multiple redundant connections to hospitals so that if a localised fault occurs the power remains on. So yes if you want stable power, locate yourself close to a hospital (or other critical infrastructure).

Basing yourself in a rural village with a single cable to the outside world is asking for trouble.

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Oi, bank manager. Only you've got my email address - where're these TROJANS coming from?

mathew42

Re: Not surprising really

From past experience, I've found that complaining to the who ever is responsible for data protection tends to solve the home address problem reasonably quickly.

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Turnbull's NBN is startup-land's litmus test

mathew42

Under Labor's plan the figures for actual connection speeds selected for fibre are 49% @ 12Mbps, 23% @ 25Mbps. FTTP is still going to be available to ~25% of the population (mainly greenfields) and some business districts where sufficient demand is shown to exist.

This might explain why concern is not as high in the electorate as the screaming hordes have suggested.

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mathew42

Re: Nice pulled out of your butt figures there

> So let me get this right. You believe those nice labour people and their stooges in the xxxx press with their financial promises. This is the same mob that stood up on TV and promised us all the budget would "only" be $30B in the red.

The $30bn figure was only released prior to election because of the figure was going to be released by Treasury prior to the election as required by Law. Labor announced it first because they percieved it as better politically.

Which brings me to my main point, 3 months prior in the budget statement, Labor announced that the deficit announced the deficit would be $18bn.

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Calling Doctor Caroline Langensiepen of Nottingham Trent uni

mathew42
Joke

Re: But was there an assignment in the first place?

Suprisingly it is possible to have an excessive amount of alcoholic beverages if we assume that the alcoholic beverage requires consumption within a certain time frame (e.g. bar closing) and consumption leaves you with insufficient hand eye co-ordination skills to raise beverage to mouth.

Fortunately in most cases this can be solved by the help of (temporary) friends. However application of the solution careful judgement to be excercised to prevent the abundance from rapidly becoming a drought. Unfortunately experience suggests that the majority of people in this situation find the excercing of careful judgement challenging.

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Amazon floats 'Prime Air' drone delivery plan

mathew42

Re: When I "floated" this as a use of technology...

> Consider in a population dense city there are likely couriers and delivery vehicles every few blocks. In an urban environment there might be 'hot drop' zones where a drone would drop a set of packages in front of the roving delivery vehicle which then goes the last mile.

Actually I think the other alternative is more realistic in suburbia. A delivery van parks in the middle of the suburb with a dozen drones, slides back the roof and launch the drones. While the drones are delivering parcels the delivery driver prepares the next set.

When I've considered driverless vans in the past, I've wondered how the parcel would be taken from the van to the door. A drone is a good solution because it doesn't have to worry about gates and uneven paths.

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Elon Musk scrubs lucrative MONEY RING debut again on Thanksgiving

mathew42

Re: return trips

The Chinese also have a man rated capsule. I suspect it could dock at ISS with a few changes.

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