* Posts by mathew42

218 posts • joined 29 Sep 2011

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DRONE ALONE: US Navy secretary gives up on manned fighters

mathew42

It should be pointed out that the Navy's requirement for VSTOL is a large part of the reason that the F35 has been a problematic project.

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Netflix fail proves copper NBN leaves Australia utterly 4Ked

mathew42

Re: "dangerously behind"

> There's a limit to what Google can determine and I'd be very mindful of using it for medical advice. Doctors train for years for a good reason.

The issue is that with 76% of the population opting for speeds slower than what is required for the bulk of the population electronic consultations are a non-issue.

I think it was best summed by Quigley when he said "You certainly can't do high-definition video service on a 1 megabits per second upstream -- it's impossible," in response to a question by The Australian about high-definition video conferencing when your child is sick.

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mathew42

Re: 38% @ 12Mbps and 38% at 25Mbps

> More broadly, I think your missing the point governments need to be planning for and building for the future, not building an NBN that only provides for the current requirements

Except by introducing speed restrictions it limits what people can do. If every NBNCo fibre connection was 100Mbps or better still 1Gbps it would be barely used most of the time, but it would foster innovation.

Instead what is being built is a network that only the wealthy will benefit from. Labor prediction recorded in the NBNCo Corporate Plan was that in 2026 less that 1% would have 1Gbps connections. If that is what Labor were working on, then my opinion is those that can afford those speeds can also afford direct fibre.

> it will be interesting to see in a few years if property listings start talking about the type of NBN in a property, I for one will only want a property with 'proper' NBN

Assuming that fibre on demand is less than $5,000 that is 0.5% of the average house price so it is hardly going to affect house prices. If it does then it will be part of those quick fixes you perform prior to selling a house.

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mathew42

Re: 38% @ 12Mbps and 38% at 25Mbps

> Now for NBNco on FTTP it cost the same to deliver 12/1 or a 100/40

So the price should be the same. Secondly, the cheaper the connection figure is, the more people will connect.

> NBNco is making a $2 profit on a 12/1 $24 connection a month $4 on 25/5 and $16 on 100/40

Except that NBNCo is not turning a profit and is unlikely to turn a profit for the next decade.

As you've correctly pointed out NBNCo need to increase revenue significantly and that growth in revenue will come largely from CVC (data). If the speed restrictions were removed at zero cost to NBNCo, data usage would jump simply because people could watch 3 netflix streams or video conference in HD.

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mathew42
FAIL

38% @ 12Mbps and 38% at 25Mbps

Before you start complaining about the technology choices, take a look at what the average Australian is choosing. NBNCo published a media release on 26-Feb which contained some interesting facts on take-up:

* Only 50% of premises that can connect to fibre have connected

* 38% on fibre opted for the 12Mbps plan

* A further 38% on fibre opted for the 25Mbps plan

76% of Australians (a figure likely to go higher) has willingly opted for speeds slower than that provided by FTTN, HFC & 4G. Heck the average for ADSL2+ is 11Mbps. Rather than complaining about the technology choice we should be asking ourselves:

1. Why Labor chose to introduce speed tiers when we already have usage based charging

2. Why people are content with such slow speeds

The second issue is that iiNet's network has been struggling over the past month. An article in the Fairfax today suggested that it is unmetered netflix is partially to blame.

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VirtualBox v. 5.0 beta 1 spins up for desktop virty lab chuckles

mathew42

Re: If it really does everything it promises..

> Drag and drop / cut and paste between OSs in VirtualBox can be very hit and miss at present and, while there are workarounds, they take time. Any improvement to this basic process will be very welcome.

What workarounds do you use? The one I commonly use is to kill the VboxTray process and restart it.

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Prostrate yourself before the GNU, commands Indian DEITY

mathew42

Re: Would The Reg please stop

> There are very good reasons why the GNU project has failed. Most of these revolve around the complete lack of commercial support offerings from professional vendors

So Red Hat with revenue of $1.5 billion in 2014 is not a vendor you can turn to for professional support?

Have you tried to obtain support from large commercial software companies? Unless you are Fortune 500 it is very unlikely they will give you the time of day. If you are a Fortune 500 company then you can afford to have a kernel developer or OpenOffice or ... on staff to resolve issues.

> It is a shame that India has taken this retrograde step

I would suggest it is a very positive step. If Indian companies can become experts in supporting open source software then they have the technical skill to provide consulting to the entire would.

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NBN Co launches fibre-to-the-building product

mathew42

Considering it is now Tuesday evening, have you had the opportunity to enquire more deeply of NBNCo on the questions you raised in the article?

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Facebook to fling open Messenger to third party apps – report

mathew42

libpurple support?

Based on the https://developers.facebook.com/docs/apps/changelog, v1.0 is available until 30-Apr-2015.

I cannot find any indication of the new API being added to libpurple.

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mathew42

Re: Trillian

More likely pidgin. That is what I use to connect to Google's hangouts and Facebook Messenger.

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Australian online voting system may have FREAK bug

mathew42

Corporate firewalls?

When you consider that many corporate networks have firewalls which perform man in the middle "attacks" so that SSL traffic can be inspected, this does offer some interesting possibilities.

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mathew42

One thing I appreciate about voting in Australia is the simplicity. Turn up at any polling booth within your electorate on polling day, grab a sausage or steak sandwich, queue for ~30 minutes take 5 minutes to vote and leave. If you happen to be a reasonable distance from your electorate, then you can cast an absentee vote. If you don't feel like voting on the day, submit a postal vote.

I also like preferential voting, because it makes it easy to cast a protest vote or single issue vote and use your preferences to support the candidates you prefer.

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Botched NBN installs leave folks with no internet, or recourse

mathew42
Facepalm

Re: NBN CO has been set up to sell to the highest bidder.

> I expect they will be selling off NBNco to the highest bidder (amongst a selected range of bidders of course, can't have our infrastructure falling into foreign hands)

You do realise that Labor's stated plan was to sell NBNCo as soon as the network was shown to be viable commercially? I believe the term for this is "socialising the risk, privatising the profits".

It amuses me no end to see people whining about Liberal policy when Labor policy was the same or worse.

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mathew42

Re: Oh dear

Unfortunately very true. Labor created NBNCo as a monopoly provider and there is even less that competitors can do about it, because with FTTN, HFC & FTTP competitors cannot install their own hardware and connect directly to the client.

Australia would have been better serviced by selling concessions to operate each of the 141 POIs. This would mean a company would provide wholesale services for a fixed timespan with maximum pricing and appropriate KPIs.

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NBN Co says 'ante-up' to fibre applicants

mathew42
FAIL

Low income stuffed under Labor's plan

> Meanwhile renters

Renters in the correct areas (e.g. those where people have high disposable income) who want FoD will simply have it on their check list and agents will negotiate with landlords.

> and those with lower disposable incomes are stuffed.

Those on lower disposable incomes are stuffed whatever happens. The result of Labor's plan is that 38% on fibre are connected at 12Mbps and a further 38% connected at 25Mbps. I'll leave it as an exercise for the reader to estimate the proportion of those with low disposable income who are on the cheap plans versus the 24% on faster plans.

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mathew42

Want fibre? Get elected to your local council

The application cost for an area is only $1000. Local councillors can be elected for as little 400 votes, so it isn't that hard to game the system.

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NBN Co to deploy DOCSIS 3.1 from 2017

mathew42
Holmes

Re: NBN speed tiers

> FTTH, it takes just a simple *golden* screwdriver upgrade

I think your choice of the word *golden* conveys the perfect meaning. You will need plenty of spare cash to purchase 1Gbps with the current pricing model.

> And like a parrot, matthew42 trots out the old 12Mb/s line again

Before it was based on Labor's predictions. Now we have the actual numbers and with 38% on fibre choosing to connect at 12Mbps and a further 38% choosing to connect at 25Mbps it is clear that the take-up of speed tiers was probably the most accurate of Labor's predictions in the NBNCo Corporate Plan.

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mathew42
Alert

NBN speed tiers

> If the NBN forks into 100Mbps-capable and 10Gbps-capable branches, what's a developer to do? Develop for the lesser service and the faster offering? Or go for the lowest common denominator?

Sadly the lowest common denominator on FTTP NBN is 12Mbps. NBNCo have a media release on their website (http://www.nbnco.com.au/corporate-information/media-centre/media-releases/nbn-co-tracks-towards-full-year-targets-as-network-transitions-to-new-rollout-model.html) which has an attached presentation with a slide showing that 38% of fibre customers have selected 12Mbps speed and a further 38% selected 25Mbps.

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Turnbull says no need to future-proof NBN

mathew42
Mushroom

Demand for Labor's FTTP network: 38% at 12Mbps, 38% at 25Mbps

The problem is that the Australian public (as Labor predicted in the NBNCo Corporate Plans) doesn't have a desire to pay more for faster speeds. In the latest published documents from NBNCo (sse the media release on their website), 38% are connecting at 12Mbps and a further 38% have chosen to connect at 25Mbps.

Sadly by supporting Labor's speed tiers many whining on this forum and others have put at risk their own high speed connection.

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NBN fibre: activations accelerated as footprint expanded

mathew42
Facepalm

38% at 12Mbps, 38% at 25Mbps

> Users still default to lower speeds on connection, with only 19 per cent taking the 100 / 40 Mbps product compared to 38 per cent on each of 12 / 1 Mbps and 25 / 5 Mbps, but user downloads are growing.

Based on these numbers a minimum 76% of customers won't notice a difference between FTTN & FTTP roll outs. If we assume that the majority of those people keen for faster speeds have connected within weeks of the service being available, then this percentage on slower plans is likely to rise.

Even if Labor had been re-elected, it is clear from these numbers that they would have failed at creating a revolution in internet speeds for all Australians. Possibly this is because Labor's original plan was for FTTN and only changed when Telstra wouldn't negotiate.

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Facebook security chap finds 10 Superfish sub-species

mathew42
Big Brother

Just like the corporate world

If you have a Windows PC on a corporate domain then odds are the IT department is doing exactly the same thing. The firewall is almost certainly decrypting your SSL sessions, checking the content and re-encrypting the content before sending it to the original site.

If you are lucky they might have white listed major financial institutions.

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Facebook bug could have ERASED the ENTIRE WORLD

mathew42

Cheque $12,500 USD

$12,500 as the biggest cheque so far from facebook makes it unlikely that people could make a living from this. However it is a nice bonus.

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NBN Co strangles bird: satellite users limited to 20 GB / month

mathew42

Re: 100GB Down To 20GB

I think this is the most sensible comment so far.

Clearly it is transmitting data that is causing the load on the system, so on a user-pays basis cutting the access fees (AVC) and increasing the data charges (CVC) would encourage people to modify their behaviour. RSPs could moderate this by:

1. peak / off-peak quotas

2. prioritisation based on volume of data transferred in the last 30-90 days

The government could see this delivered as essential service by providing quota free or rebates for traffic to certain government services (e.g. school of the air, medical services, etc.).

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mathew42

> Restrictions put in place by people in the city who have no idea and obviously failed to do their initial usage calculations correctly in the first place.

That would be the responsibility of Labor who over promised, under delivered and over spent.

There was always going to be shortage prior to NBNCo launching their own satellites.

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Hola HoloLens: Reg man gets face time with Microsoft's holographic headset

mathew42

I wonder if this or the google glass approach is better for people wanting to complete a task with instructions also available. I'm thinking particularly of jobs like surgery where a high degree of manual dexterity and accuracy is required.

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NBN migration arrangements favour Telstra, say competitors

mathew42
FAIL

> Under the FTTP NBN, Telstra/Foxtel kept their Pay TV HFC and paid for maintenance and operation.

I wasn't aware of this. Do you have a reference for this?

> Fttn will be only very average for Video streaming

25Mbps should be adequate for video streaming, especially at the quotas currently available.

> The Monopoly is maintained and extended at taxpayer expense

Sport is the #1 reason for PayTV profits and it is unlikely those licensing deals will change in a hurry.

If the amount of criticism levelled at the Coalition NBN was levelled at Labor's disaster then it might not have over promised (1 Gbps for all) and under delivered by millions of connections.

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Australia's Akamai ranking has nothing to do with the NBN

mathew42
Facepalm

Re: I just want 5mbs, relaiably

> How many people get < 5mbs reliable. That is the real statistic. And it will not be pretty for Australia. And not just for people in remote places.

One of Labor's numerous mistakes with their NBN plans was not focusing on the areas of greatest need. A quick rule of thumb could be any suburb settled post 1970s when Telstra started installing RIMs and pair gain systems.

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Google's first stab at control-free ROBOT car rolls off the line

mathew42
Coat

Re: I for one.....

Now this takes me back to a story told about my great-grandfather who would stumble out of the pub, climb onto his horse and let it walk him home.

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mathew42
Facepalm

Re: Car Insurance is a scam that can die with this device

How well do you think the scammer's word will be regarded against 360 degree camera vision from the Google car? Verification of what actually occurred is the main reason that every car in Russia has a dash cam. A side-effect is that we can have a good chuckle every month.

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NBN Co, Turnbull, issue contradictory broadband speed promises

mathew42

Re: Labor predicted 50% at 12Mbps

> So what your saying that is NBNco should not have $24 for 12/1 upto a $38 100/40 they should be the same price so everyone pays the same. While we are at it why don't we average the CVC charges to everyone we don't those high end users paying more than there far share.

I suggest a flat $20 for AVC. CVC is where you charge based on usage, because it is usage that puts strain on the network. To fix that NBNCo and RSPs would need to purchase additional infrastructure. Off peak quotas exist to encourage heavy downloaders to schedule their downloads in quieter times.

> While GPON was made with a 1:1 contention.

WRONG. GPON does have contention. Under Labor's plan the worst case scenario was 78Mbps per premises. Not really a problem since it is pretty unlikely that people will be maxing out their connections 24/7.

> Electricity and broadband runs completely differently.

WRONG. You may not have experienced a brown-out but it is what occurs in an electricty grid when too much power is being drawn and is rapidly followed by selective blackouts to prevent damage to electrical devices.

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mathew42

Re: Broken analogy

> Bloke up the road gets ~20 Mb/s on ADSL2. Later this year he'll be restricted to satellite, or mobile wireless because there's no signal at his place from the fixed wireless tower.

This highlights the stupidity of Labor's ideology first approach. Small rural communities would have been better served by FTTN than being pushed onto fixed wireless or worse satellite. HFC will be adequate for most people for a while to come yet. Labor should have focused on those areas of greatest need (e.g. suburbs established post 1970) first to deliver the greatest benefit.

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mathew42

Re: Broken analogy

> That being said, it's a bloody awful purchase. They have bought copper that was originally built for one way communications, namely broadcasting Pay TV. Internet was an afterthought.

Rudd took a FTTN policy to the 2007 election, but changed to FTTP when Telstra wouldn't negotiate. Labor were paying exactly the same just to rent ducting. This way we at least have the copper with an open wholesale market. Telstra was being paid to disconnect customers from the HFC. This way we get the HFC and can deliver faster internet more quickly.

> NBN is becoming a bigger joke the longer the LNP are allowed to be in charge, and will be a farce by the time they are kicked out of office.

Labor's NBN was full of spin:

- 1Gbps only announced prior to the 2010 election because of Google fibre)

- Prices to rise dramatically as demand increased (ARPU need to reach $100/month by 2020 for the numbers to work)

- eMedicine not realistic, because 50% had 12Mbps and those places that really need it would have only had wireless or satellite connections

> All I want is speedy internet for a reasonable price, why is that so freaking hard ??!? !

Because politicians didn't think through the outcomes of their policies. The second problem is thinking about yourself and not the nation as a whole.

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mathew42

Re: Labor predicted 50% at 12Mbps

> Again as I have told you those 50% would not have been paying for the but then you seam to have trouble understanding how economics works and the usage pay model.

WRONG. The 50% don't want the expense of a fibre upgrade. A similar situation exists in the electricity market. People built poorly designed McMansions in the suburbs and installed massive aircons which required upgrading of the electricity infrastructure which was passed on to everyone as increased service charges. Installing fibre so that less than 5% could have 1Gbps connections in 2028 is the same problem. It would have been much cheaper to install direct fibre just to those properties on demand.

If you argued that everyone was entitled to fast speeds (100Mbps and faster) then you could argue it was a national building project What Labor planned was not what the headlines promised (1Gbps for all) and instead would only have been of benefit to the rich (much like the school building program).

> Would you be happy to move to a house that has higher prices because it has fiber because your poor copper can only deliver you 25Mbps or would you be happy to pay for fiber while your neighbor doesn't have to?

I'm considering both, although I'm yet to see any evidence of higher prices for houses with fibre. If we assume that fibre install is under $5000 then this is less than 1% of the average house price. Optus have already discussed making the installation payments over 24 months when on a plan so that lessens the upfront cost.

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mathew42

Labor predicted 50% at 12Mbps

Where was the outrage when Labor repeatedly released NBNCOo Corporate Plans which clearly stated that 50% of fibre connections would be 12Mbps. The minimum Liberal speed is more than double this.

Sure some people are going to be worse off, but they have the option of moving or installing direct fibre when that becomes available.

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SURPRISE: Oz gov gives itself room to NEVER finish the NBN

mathew42

Re: Well at least now..

> Now, if you want your 100MB, 1GB, etc communications, that's fine. But don't expect other people to pay for it.

Or fight for equality and campaign to have the speed tiers removed. Then I'll support FTTP as it won't be just for the rich.

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mathew42

Re: Fluffie Bunnies are Government Glove Puppets

> while the top users subsidise there connection by paying the maximum dollar for there own connection.

It is the transfer of data that puts load on the network, not the speed so I suggest that usage based pricing would support this and a lower AVC price would drive take up.

> the average connection speed of ADSL2+ is 6mbps

Are you sure about that? The only comprehensive survey I've seen is from Internode / iiNet which was published in 2007 when Rudd first proposed FTTN to show that his plan would offer little benefit over existing ADSL2+. The results were that the average ADSL2+ speed in Sydney was 11Mbps.

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mathew42

Re: Fluffie Bunnies are Government Glove Puppets

> You answered the your self for me. If the bottom 50% of users where subsidizing to users on 100Mbps wouldn't the ARPU but around the 12/1 of $24 not $39 it is now?

But the 50% of users on 12Mbps don't need FTTP, so would have been content with the existing system. You are also ignoring the fact that many of the 12Mbps FTTP customers would be equally fine on a 4G connection. Lets be honest here if they won't pay $5 more a month for double the speed, then using the data on their mobile plan is probably workable for them.

> But it is accurately the other way around. Eg. Google charges a $300 connection for a 5Mbps free for 7 years connection they must subsidies those people on 1Gps.

Different scenario. In this one a private company is paying for the fibre to be installed, not taxpayers. I much prefer the Google model of only one speed 1/1Gbps direct fibre (better than GPON). We could do worse than give Google $40 billion and ask them to build the network.

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mathew42

Re: Well at least now..

> Under FTTP You get your 12mbps at minimal cost I would get my 50/20mbps at my expense per month, and were both still paying an ISP for a service.

You are deluded over the minimal cost if you think building an entire FTTP network so half the population can have 12Mbps is good value.

A survey published by iiNet & Internode in 2007 when Rudd first proposed FTTN showed in Sydney the average ADSL speed was 11Mbps.

> why should others not have the choice of paying for 100mbps just because you dont want to?

I've never said I won't pay for 100Mbps. In fact I'll seriously consider installing direct fibre. What I'm against is the digital divide that is AVC speed tiers will create in this country. For example, an aunt has just cancelled her home phone line because she wasn't using it for phone calls and the extra $70/month (phone + ADSL) meant she could add additional data to her mobile plan and still be in front. For low data usage a 4G connection will often be better value than a 12Mbps FTTP connection.

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mathew42

Re: Fluffie Bunnies are Government Glove Puppets

> For the NBN to make money for the user and to pay back the gov loan its needs 20% of its user base to use its some if its top tier plans.

The pricing of the plans is all based around spreadsheet models. Cheap AVC access with higher CVC would have cost NBNCo revenue initially, but I think everyone agrees that with faster speeds people download more simply because they can.

> So that 50% on 12Mbps are the one not paying for it its the top 20%.

WRONG. That 50% on 12Mbps are seeing very little benefit over an ADSL connection. Given that the cost to double speed is $5/month it is reasonable to argue that either these people don't care about speed or have very tight budgets. Therefore the NBNCo delivers little benefit to them, meaning that they are subsidising the 100Mbps users. The same principle applies in electricity networks. Electricity companies have increased the supply charge significantly because they've built new infrastructure to service McMansions running aircons all day because of poor design. Pensioners who struggle to pay for electricity pay the increased service charges for zero benefit.

The equitable solution is to charge based on usage.

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mathew42

Re: Fluffie Bunnies are Government Glove Puppets

> ADSL2+ - it nearly gets 1kbps on a very good day

Somehow I seriously doubt this as dialup modems were able to exceed 1kbps in 1984.

> Come to the large corporate office that I work at, based in the Hills, that struggles to get even 3G phone clearly

Since the telcos are owned privately, mobile coverage would be an issue to take up with your provider.

Are you sure you were on Labor's fibre footprint? Being outside of 3G coverage that might be doubtful.

> We can bloody see the Sydney CBD from the roof

Thought about using microwave links then?

> One day it's going to have to crawl into the 20th century, whether your Reverend Tony 'Mad Monk' Abbott likes it or not.

Labor's plan wasn't going to deliver that. Sure they promised 1Gbps, but Labor's published corporate plan predicted less than 5% connecting at this speed in 2028. Ubiquitous 1Gbps now would be considered world leading. In 2028, I suspect our ranking would be lower than what it is now, especially when you consider that Labor predicted 50% on fibre would connect at 12Mbps.

> Funny how the ones who go on about not putting a burden on 'the taxpayer' are the ones usually paying 2c in the $ despite the Eastern Suburbs mansion, garage full of cars and dressed in smarmy $10,000 suits.

Guess what? Because of Labor chose to introduce tiered pricing for speeds, the only people who could have afforded the fast speeds would be the exact people you describe. Have you noticed how NBNCo released 1Gbps plans to wholesalers in December 2013, but retailers aren't offering them? I'd suggest it is because the pricing models simply don't work because of Labor's abhorent pricing model.

Thanks for your rant. I'm saddened that so many people were blinded by the shiny fibre light and failed to read what Labor was actually promising.

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NBN Co makes it official - backhaul charges will fall

mathew42

Re: Cheaper CVC = Higher AVC = Slower Speeds

> The takeup of higher level plans was substantially higher than budgeted.

But the percentage of 12Mbps remained unchanged, exposing the digital divide that AVC pricing creates.

> These differences support the lower CVC charges. These are a clear benefit for endusers, despite the impression you have sought to create to the contrary.

There is a clear benefit in low CVC charges for that category of end users who want unlimited data plans with speeds of 100Mbps or less. Dropping AVC charges would encourage take up and people on faster speeds tend to download more meaning that usage goes up resulting in CVC prices dropping.

Finally, it should be clear to all that it is the data transiting the network which puts load on the system and is therefore what charging should be based on.

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Telstra's NBN boondoggle nearly set in stone: reports

mathew42

Re: Is this now more expensive than the FTTP alternative?

> That aside, you're argument is that only those who can afford it will be early adopters of higher speeds. Ok so you're saying its a bad thing that it costs so much?

Restricting access to high speeds is firstly bad for the country because it limits what people can do with the network. If you only have a 12/1Mbps connection then eHealth, HD video conferencing, etc. are out. Secondly it makes a mockery of what Labor promised, because only a very limited few would ever experience the benefits.

> If I want 1Gbps with FTTN what do I do?

Install direct fibre. At ~$5000 with RSPs already offering to spread payments across a 2 year contract not much of issue when compared with Labor's AVC pricing.

> so to me the NBN isn't expensive

It isn't expensive to me either, but chances are you are earning above average wages which means your connection could be described as middle class welfare.

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mathew42
Facepalm

Re: In other news...

> The Austfailian Governmunt unveils a new Intertubes-to-the-hovel scheme agreed personally with Fox, the big movie studios and other copyright owners called 'Damper-Net'.

Once you are above 12Mbps streaming works, since the minimum is supposed to be 25Mbps I don't see how the movie studios have anything to benefit from the difference between 25 & 100Mbps, especially when you consider that HFC will offer 100Mbps and that covers the biggest market regions.

Now if you had talked about Telstra imposing speed caps on ADSL1, to prevent VoIP on the slower speeds and video streaming on even the highest 1.5Mbps speed then I would agree.

I refer you back to my previous comment about being distracted by the "shiny light" and ignoring the technical reality.

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mathew42

Re: Is this now more expensive than the FTTP alternative?

> Apologies if I've misunderstood you, but Labor's plan promised everyone the choice of any speed they wanted.

This is the true in the same way that anyone in Australia can buy a Ferrari, yet most people drive something a tenth of the price because it is adequate. So yes a few people would have 1Gbps connections. Labor's predication was less than 5% in 2028. The reality is because of Labor's AVC / CVC pricing model even though NBNCo made 1Gbps plans available at wholesale level in Dec 2013 there are none available at a retail level because the cost would be ridiculous.

I'll also point out that people in small regional towns (<1000 premises) would have been significantly worse off because their ADSL would have been disconnected and replaced with wireless. Most homes in rural townships are very close to the telephone exchange so FTTN speeds would have been good, but Labor's ideological path prevented this option.

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mathew42

Re: Is this now more expensive than the FTTP alternative?

> We could have gotten a full fibre to the premises network for less than we are paying for this MTM turkey.

This assumes you think the estimates from the previous government were correct.

> Hockey doesn't give the Reserve Bank another $10 billion or so to play with

I think you meant repay the money taken from the Reserve Bank in a futile attempt by Labor to balance the budget.

> When it can be done properly, and will become an asset for the nation.

I agree with that, but the reality of Labor's plan was 50% connected at 12Mbps and almost no one on 1Gbps. Too many people have been distracted by the shiny fibre and failed to actually read what Labor were promising.

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mathew42
Meh

it is doubtful that you would recoup the value since there is no evidence of buyers paying a premium to live in suburbs on the fibre map. The reason for this can be found in Labor's old Corporate Plans where they predicted that 50% of people on FTTP would opt for the slowest 12/1Mbps speed tier. The draft of their last plan showed that it was one of their more accurate estimates with 47% on 12/1Mbps.

The good news is that it is likely to be less than 1% of the average home value to install fibre, but probably only worth it if living in a non HFC area and 50Mbps is inadequate.

Consider this: All the Liberals need to do is abolish the 12Mbps speed tier or eliminate speed tiers on FTTN and the average network speed will be faster than Labor's plan.

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Uber? Worth $40 BEEELLION? Hey, actually, hold on ...

mathew42

I suggest that car hire companies, particularly the newer ones with membership where you can book a car online and unlock it electronically from it's parking spot are best placed to take advantage of driverless cars.

In Australia, taxi licenses are around $250,000 - $500,000 and are rarely owned by the driver. Cars are upgraded every 4 years so. Drivers make ~50% of the fare so once driverless cars are available it won't take long for the taxi industry to take advantage.

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Why, hello there, Foxy... BYE GOOGLE! Mozilla's browser is a video star

mathew42

Re: Am I the last one...

You are not the only one. I'd like a browser that doesn't allow any access to my hardware or file system. I really don't want websites able to switch on my webcam.

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systemd row ends with Debian getting forked

mathew42
Linux

Re: Evil FlusterCluck

I'm thankful for Mint & Cinnamon.

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mathew42

Re: What is systemd

> Systemd kills both of these as Debian projects because the Systemd developers insist on inserting their tentacles into nearly everything, and won't accept patches which will make Systemd cross-platform (e.g, make it compatible with a BSD kernel).

For this reason alone, the pitchforks should be raised in anger. Cross platform software is often of a higher quality because corner cases are found.

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