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* Posts by mathew42

147 posts • joined 29 Sep 2011

Page:

Indie ISP to Netflix: Give it a rest about 'net neutrality' – and get your checkbook out

mathew42

Re: ...

The solution is metered pricing, because like other utilities it charges people for what they use. Can you image the waste if people paid a fixed charge for water, electricity & gas regardless of consumption? I find running water makes a nice background noise, but I don't leave a tap on because water is precious and it is costs per litre used.

Metered pricing will encourage ISPs to build faster networks, because you can download more data meaning that they can charge more.

Speed tier pricing makes each jump more expensive. A 10Mbps connection is about 3.24TB/month, 100Mbps is 32.4 TB/month, 1Gbps is 324TB/month. I shouldn't be expected to pay for someone else's 24/7 4HD netflix streaming habit, when I only want my fast connection to video conference for a couple of hours each month.

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ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION

mathew42

Re: Ball Ox

It may have been reasonable for Moylan to assume that his hoax would be quickly uncovered (within an hour) and that at best the hoax would have rated an item on the evening news.

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mathew42
Meh

Re: What losses?

Here are three examples of where investors may have lost out without making a conscious decision:

* Investors operating with a margin trading account may have been forced to sell by their bank if certain thresholds were reached.

* Investors using stop-losses to manage their risk (especially with options trading)

* Funds with rules covering the composition of their portfolio.

However, the point is very valid. The shares opened at $3.55, plunged from $3.52 to $3.21 shortly after noon, but recovered to $3.53 so it is likely that only those investors with stop-losses would have been impacted and options trading has a higher risk associated with it.

What the above reasons do highlight is the risks inherent in the market can accelerate movements in share prices, especially with automated trading.

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Lower prices are BAD FOR CONSUMERS, says Turnbull

mathew42

Re: There's your problem

Conroy's model was far worse in that NBNCo became a monolith with zero competition and a Corporate Plan that relied in significant revenue growth (ARPU > $100/month)

The last significant change in Australia was the installation of ADSL2+ DSLAMs by Internode followed by others where speeds became uncapped. This was only possible because Internode could connect directly the copper and avoid Telstra's wholesale charges. NBNCo have returned Australia to paying a premium faster speeds and also data charges.

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Government won't name expert reviewers of Australia's national curriculum

mathew42
Linux

I was chatting with my kids primary school teacher yesterday about the curriculum and robotics. He is actually having several robots delivered so he can test them for applicability. I lent him a sparki (http://http://arcbotics.com/products/sparki/) and I'm waiting for Kano (http://www.kano.me) to turn up so I can lend that to him. I'd much prefer the school to go with these technologies as they provide opportunities for kids to really extend themselves, whereas the other options he was discussing were more like limited toys.

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Windows XP fixes flaws for free if you turn PCs into CASH REGISTERS

mathew42

Re: Even better idea

The only feature of Windows 7 that I miss in XP is being able to search for items on the start menu.

Apart from that I much prefer XP when running VMs because of the lower overhead.

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NBN Co is a big turn-off … for copper

mathew42

Percentage still on copper?

Are there any numbers around the percentage still on copper, percentage connected to NBN & those who've abandoned the fixed line?

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Zuck: Web drones, not balloons (cough, cough Google) are way forward

mathew42

Information is an advantage.

- If a farmer knows the price of their crop in the market, then they can receive a fairer deal from the middle man.

- If the community "nurse" can search online and receive training the quality of care improves.

The problem I see is that both projects require external antennas. How many of the areas are outside of existing mobile phone coverage?

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Turnbull to add speed test app to MyBroadband web site

mathew42

I think this is a stupid idea. NBN fanbois will simply run the app while also downloading other files or the more technical minded will rate limit traffic from the application.

ISPs know the line speed that customers are connecting to DSLAMs. Internode & iiNet put together a heat map of Sydney about 6 years ago. I think this would be the most reliable source of information.

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Fibre fanaticism overrode proper NBN planning says report

mathew42

Re: >lessening its focus on addressing black spots.

> A problem with black spots for both sides of government is that they usually cover a small population in rural Australia

Depending on what you define as a blackspot, there are plenty of metro areas (suburbs developed post 1970) where speeds are very poor.

The biggest issue with broadband in rural areas is the cost of backhaul where Telstra is the only supplier. OPEL would have fixed this, but Labor cancelled it and then ended up building similar backhaul. Between Adelaide & Darwin many DSLAMs were installed in rural communities once backhaul was available.

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mathew42

Re: How do you predict the benefits?

> The problem with doing a cost-benefit analysis of major infrastructure projects is that their very existence transforms the environment around them.

Except that Labor's NBN Plan wouldn't have delivered that in the way that you imagine. The fact remains that Labor predicted that 50% of fibre connections would be 12Mbps and in April 2013 the NBNCo Corporate Plan confirmed that 47% of installed connections were 12Mbps.

> A project like the NBN has the potential to completely transform almost every aspect of daily life with enormous benefits for transport, housing, energy use, education, health etc, etc.

A cost benefit analysis should show that as speed increases, what benefits are available. The 2010 edition of the NBNCo Corporate Plan even provided a nice chart of application throughput requirements showing that the real benefits only come when speeds are 100Mbps or higher.

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Is the government's NBN policy changing your vote? Greens Senator Scott Ludlam thinks so

mathew42

Re: Is the government's NBN policy changing your vote? Greens Senator Scott Ludlam thinks so

Labor's didn't even survey the current state of the network or prioritise areas that were in the greatest need. Most people know that infrastructure is worse in suburbs built after 1970 and that HFC is better than ADSL.

The minimal savings is very debatable.

The substantial decrease in capability is also debatable when you consider that in April 2013, 47% of fibre connections were 12Mbps and Labor predicted that 12Mbps connections would remain at the level through to 2028. Assuming that the Liberals fulfil their fibre-on-demand promise at a reasonable price (under $3000 install) then the decrease in capability at the high end is also likely to be untrue.

"full of unintended consequences and implemented appallingly" sounds like the Labor effort, since it is too early to judge the Liberal implementation. Unintended consequences like half the population connected to fibre on speeds slower than HFC, 4G, FTTN and approaching half of ADSL2+ connections. Although to be fair that was an intended consequence since it was in the Corporate Plan. Further unintended consequences and appalling implementation are to be expected when you start with a FTTN plan, upgrade it to FTTH because Telstra won't help, then upgrade it to 1Gbps because Google Fibre was announced prior to the 2010 election.

Labor also had the wrong focus on price rather than network performance and usefulness. If you read the 2010 NBNCo Corporate Plan it has a chart showing throughput requirements of greater than 100Mbps which very few people would have had.

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mathew42

Re: Is the government's NBN policy changing your vote? Greens Senator Scott Ludlam thinks so

> Is Ludlam right? Are you, as an IT pro, more likely to vote for someone other than The Greens? And have you switched because of the NBN?

Labor's NBN was very typical of their time in government - great sounding ideas but hollow, full of unintended consequences and implemented appallingly.

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mathew42

Re: You get what you vote for

> Labor - Superfast internet but the country is bankrupt and nobody can afford it

You missed the bit that only a privileged few would be running at 1Gbps. Labor predicted in the Corporate Plan that less than 5% in 2028, meanwhile 50% would be connecting at 12Mbps. Hardly fast by today's standards let alone in 15 years time. In the last NBNCo Corporate Plan (April 2013) 47% of fibre connections were 12Mbps, so at least Labor achieved one NBN target ... just not the one most people expected or wanted!

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Cherry-pick undermines NBN business case: Switkowski

mathew42

Re: LNP - fail train

Why will Rupert be happy? 25Mbps still provides adequate bandwidth for 2 HDTV streams.

Under Labor's NBN plan 50% of fibre connections are 12Mbps and predicted to remain that way well into the foreseeable future. I would have to suggest a higher percentage of the population on slower populations would make Rupert happier.

Telstra limiting ADSL to 1.5Mbps is the prime example of a company deliberately protecting FoxTel from streaming media competition.

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mathew42

The ACCC provided a neat solution to the overbuild problem by determining that 121 PoIs would exist, they effectively created 121 networks. The government should respond by setting minimum service standards and calling for tenders to install the network in each of the 121 locations to provide wholesale network access at agreed (or cheaper) prices. Infrastructure companies would then bid for the concessions either requesting a government subsidy or paying a fee.

With appropriate KPIs companies could be rewarded for providing a faster network or penalised for failing to meet deadlines. Instead of a bureaucratic monolith we would have at least 4 companies competing to provide innovative services.

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NBN to be built even if cost-benefit analysis shows no ROI

mathew42

Re: Beside the Point

Do you have any example of eHealth being delivered to private residential addresses that requires 25Mbps. The examples that Labor offered for eHealth were focused around patients video conferencing with a doctor in the city from a country hospital assisted by a nurse or GP.

I'm aware of one where eHealth delivery has been shown to be beneficial - mental health consultations. However most people struggling with mental health issues also tend to struggle financially which means they are unlikely to be able to afford a fast connection.

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mathew42

Re: Cost analysis not feasable

> It's the implementation of existing technology by a company (NBN Co) and its partners with the intention of making money. In that case, wouldn't it be a good idea to find out whether you can make money out of it BEFORE you start digging the trenches?

I don't think it is essential that NBNCo make money. This is another of Labor's mistakes. It is sufficient to show that building the NBN will deliver sufficient benefits to society to justify the expense.

For example HD video conferencing with multiple parties for mobility challenged people to socialise is unlikely to be viable option under Labor's plan because such people are unlikely to be able to afford the 1Gbps connection costs, but the benefits are clear and could lead to cost savings in transport costs.

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mathew42

Re: Beside the Point

> Highways, bridges, sewerage, hospitals and other services including a decent communications network all require a coordinated effort, which is what government should be providing.

All of these services need to demonstrate that they are delivering a benefit for the investment

* highways need to demonstrate that investment will improve travel time, reduce congestion, improve safety, etc.

* sewerage works need to demonstrate that investment will reduce costs, pollution, etc.

* hospitals need to demonstrate that investment will improve patient care, reduce costs, etc.

A CBA for the NBN should deliver similar answers. Labor's policy contradictions are a clear example of why an CBA is needed, because it would have revealed:

- areas of greatest need (e.g. suburbs established post 1970s without HFC)

- speeds that are required to deliver expected benefits

- eHealth is pure spin because most hospitals are very close to exchanges

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mathew42

Re: Labor's plan for 50% at 12Mbps

> The prediction of 50% at 12mbps was a conservative estimate

Rubbish. Nothing about the NBNCo Corporate Plan has been shown to be conservative. Most parts have been shown to be extraordinarily optimistic.

> Actual uptake figures showed that 44% were opting for 100mbps plans.

Do you have a reference for that, the NBNCo Corporate Plan (2013) contains this statement:

"As at 30 April 2013, 26% of NBN Co’s FTTP End-Users were on the highest available wholesale speed tier (100/40 Mbps), whilst 47% were on the entry-level wholesale speed tier (12/1 Mbps). These compare with 18% and 49% respectively forecast for FY2013 in the 2012-15 Corporate Plan."

Essentially what has happened is that as expected early adopters selected 100Mbps in greater numbers, but as more people connect, the percentage of 12Mbps is matching Labor's NBNCo plan. What is more telling is that the long term estimates have barely changed.

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mathew42

Re: Labor's plan for 50% at 12Mbps

> That argument doesn't take into account the fact the state of the copper that would be used FttN may not be up to snuff

Fair point, but the only analysis I've seen is from iiNet / Internode where they mapped ADSL speeds in Sydney. The average was close to 12Mbps.

> HFC is owned by private enterprise and would need to be leased or purchased

Telstra & Optus were being paid very generous amounts per customer to migrate customers to NBN infrastructure.

> It already cost NBNCo $11 billion (with a b) and that didn't include owning the copper in the ground - which is what the Liberals are proposing

Telstra definitely out negotiated the Labor government (no surprises there considering the track record with mining companies) so I would suggest there is plenty of room for movement.

> It's also my opinion that a CBA is too limited a study for such a large and lost-lasting infrastructure project, even more-so because it's government driven and therefore if it's deemed a long term benefit to the country, then a CBA doesn't do it justice.

The problem I have is I don't think a study exists which shows the benefits from increasing speeds. Labor promised 1Gbps speed only because Google launched 1Gbps fibre, yet they expected 50% to connect at 12Mbps and very few to connect at 1Gbps. The NBNCo Corporate Plan (2010 edition) included a list of applications and essentially almost all the applications needed 100Mbps or faster.

A CBA should explain the benefits and summarise the cost for each level of speed.

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mathew42

Labor's plan for 50% at 12Mbps

Th reality is that Labor didn't want to run a cost-benefit analysis because the reality that their NBNCo Corporate Plan predicted that 50% would be connecting at 12Mbps and in 2028 less than 5% connected at 1Gbps would have exposed the reality that HFC and/or FTTN could meet the requirements of the majority of fixed line customers.

Hopefully the cost-benefit analysis will consider the additional benefits for increasing speeds and the applications that are enabled at each speed tier. A sensible result of this investigation would show that Labor's touted benefits only occur at speeds faster than 100Mbps and that speed tiers do more harm than good hopefully leading to their abolishment.

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Google promises 10Gps fiber network to blast 4K into living rooms

mathew42

Re: Meanwhile, in Australia...

For most people 25Mbps is actually an improvement compared with the idiots who preceded them. How a government could possibly attempt to build a FTTP network and at the same time plan for 50% of connections to be 12Mbps and in 2028 hope that 1Gbps connections would be approaching 5%.

For those who can justify faster speeds, fibre on demand will be available and that should be significantly cheaper than Labor's 1Gbps plans.

The reality is our best hope in Australia would be for the government to get out of the way and invite Google to build the network.

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'We don't use UPS. If we did we'd have huge UPSs and tiny computers'

mathew42

Re: Piggybacking on the hospitals supply doesn't sound a very moral position

Electricity suppliers build networks with multiple redundant connections to hospitals so that if a localised fault occurs the power remains on. So yes if you want stable power, locate yourself close to a hospital (or other critical infrastructure).

Basing yourself in a rural village with a single cable to the outside world is asking for trouble.

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Oi, bank manager. Only you've got my email address - where're these TROJANS coming from?

mathew42

Re: Not surprising really

From past experience, I've found that complaining to the who ever is responsible for data protection tends to solve the home address problem reasonably quickly.

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Turnbull's NBN is startup-land's litmus test

mathew42

Under Labor's plan the figures for actual connection speeds selected for fibre are 49% @ 12Mbps, 23% @ 25Mbps. FTTP is still going to be available to ~25% of the population (mainly greenfields) and some business districts where sufficient demand is shown to exist.

This might explain why concern is not as high in the electorate as the screaming hordes have suggested.

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mathew42

Re: Nice pulled out of your butt figures there

> So let me get this right. You believe those nice labour people and their stooges in the xxxx press with their financial promises. This is the same mob that stood up on TV and promised us all the budget would "only" be $30B in the red.

The $30bn figure was only released prior to election because of the figure was going to be released by Treasury prior to the election as required by Law. Labor announced it first because they percieved it as better politically.

Which brings me to my main point, 3 months prior in the budget statement, Labor announced that the deficit announced the deficit would be $18bn.

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Calling Doctor Caroline Langensiepen of Nottingham Trent uni

mathew42
Joke

Re: But was there an assignment in the first place?

Suprisingly it is possible to have an excessive amount of alcoholic beverages if we assume that the alcoholic beverage requires consumption within a certain time frame (e.g. bar closing) and consumption leaves you with insufficient hand eye co-ordination skills to raise beverage to mouth.

Fortunately in most cases this can be solved by the help of (temporary) friends. However application of the solution careful judgement to be excercised to prevent the abundance from rapidly becoming a drought. Unfortunately experience suggests that the majority of people in this situation find the excercing of careful judgement challenging.

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Amazon floats 'Prime Air' drone delivery plan

mathew42

Re: When I "floated" this as a use of technology...

> Consider in a population dense city there are likely couriers and delivery vehicles every few blocks. In an urban environment there might be 'hot drop' zones where a drone would drop a set of packages in front of the roving delivery vehicle which then goes the last mile.

Actually I think the other alternative is more realistic in suburbia. A delivery van parks in the middle of the suburb with a dozen drones, slides back the roof and launch the drones. While the drones are delivering parcels the delivery driver prepares the next set.

When I've considered driverless vans in the past, I've wondered how the parcel would be taken from the van to the door. A drone is a good solution because it doesn't have to worry about gates and uneven paths.

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Elon Musk scrubs lucrative MONEY RING debut again on Thanksgiving

mathew42

Re: return trips

The Chinese also have a man rated capsule. I suspect it could dock at ISS with a few changes.

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NBN day of action fizzles as just 20 show at Turnbull's office

mathew42

Re: NBN a fizzle

> t's hard to get Australians to get excited about the NBN, when millions of us already have access to 100 megabit cable from competing telcos, but 87% of those passed by the cable choose not to access it at all.

Even harder when NBNCo reported that 47% of premises connected to fibre opted for the 12Mbps plan. These people won't notice a difference with FTTN.

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Back to the future: Optus to trial wireless last mile again

mathew42

The draft NBNCo Corporate Plan (2013) contains this statement:

"As at 30 April 2013, 26% of NBN Co’s FTTP End-Users were on the highest available wholesale speed tier (100/40 Mbps), whilst 47% were on the entry-level wholesale speed tier (12/1 Mbps). These compare with 18% and 49% respectively forecast for FY2013 in the 2012-15 Corporate Plan."

Many Australians have voted with their wallets and decided that 12Mbps is adequate. Optus have identified this and I would suggest their financial modelling suggests that they can deliver a 12Mbps wireless service for less than $25/month of NBNCo wholesale charges.

When NBNCo's take-up rates fall, it's costs barely change because the fibre has already been laid, but revenue falls which will drive up wholesale charges.

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Malcolm Turnbull's website makes funny Facebook fan numbers

mathew42

Re: The Liberals Just Don't Get It

If the ~$3000 install cost for fibre on demand is correct then this is less than 0.5% of the value of the average property in many areas. Landlords will also be entitled to claim the cost as a tax deduction.

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Yet another business advisor told Labor NBN was a dud: reports

mathew42

Re: A rational explanation

> First of all, this means that 53% chose a higher speed - I'll point that out since it always seem to escape those who plug that "47%" number.

My expectation is that the 47% will rise (NBNCo shows it on a steep upslope) because we are still in the early adopter phase and I would expect those to connecting later to connect at slower speeds. It is the bottom half of society that governments should be responsible for, not entrenching discrimination. Secondly many of the remainder will either be able to move to an area with fibre (e.g. new estates), choose fibre on demand or will find FTTN adequate.

> So the answer to your question "why do 47% choose the lower, cheaper option" is: because they don't know better and the companies currently in control don't want them to learn.

I'm not sure I agree with your conspiracy theory, but your point neatly sums up why speed tiers are so very bad. If speed was uncapped then peope could experience the benefits of fibre and increase their data allowance. With 12Mbps, streaming will always be poor.

It was only after Telstra refused to tender for FTTN, that Labor chose FTTP and though poor judgement in writing the "Statement of Expectations" meant that NBNCo constructed an artificial financial model which would have delivered very little benefit to Australia.

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mathew42
WTF?

A rational explanation

1. That Telstra would have the “option to compete with the NBN” while receiving funds from it.

The NBNCo Corporate Plan (2013) states that in April 2013, 47% of fibre connections were 12Mbps. The fact it costs only $5 extra a month for 25Mbps, suggests to me that the 47% either don't care about their network or want the cheapest connection possible. If we assume that the vast majority of these people have a smartphone or will within the next five years, then I would argue that a reasonable number of these customers could be poached by the mobile network operators on the basis of price, especially when for a reaonable number 4G will be faster.

2. That “projected customer take-up and average return per user were likely to be proven optimistic in such a competitive industry”.

NBNCo is based on the assumption that they can drive ARPU from just over $20 to well over $100/month as demand rises. This may prove challenging. The high connection charges (AVC) will present a barrier.

3. “Lazard … pointed to anecdotal evidence that 20 per cent of premises could ultimately be wireless-only.”

The NBNCo Corporate Plan estimates 16% of premises will be wireless only because it is cheaper, so 20% is not unrealistic. NBNCo are estimating that only 70% of premises will connect for a variety of reasons.

If you are considering replying that mobile wireless is not adequate for internet, please note that I agree with you, but then I would select the 100Mbps plan not the 12Mbps plan. To understand if wireless is adequate or not you first need to explain why 47% would select 12Mbps when for $5 extra they could have 25Mbps.

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Turnbull appoints Simon Hackett, Justin Milne and Patrick Flannigan to NBN Co board

mathew42
Thumb Up

Re: Simon Hackett?

I'm pleasantly surprised Turnbull had the courage to appoint Simon to the board. He won't hesitate to put his views forward and in past two decades, Simon's opinions and actions have been in the best interests of all Australian Internet users.

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Microsoft Australia calls fibre-to-the-premises 'best outcome' for NBN

mathew42

Re: Save me from kitchen table budget thinking.

In April 2013, 47% of people chose to pay for slower speeds. It is likely that this number will increase as a reasonable person would expect people wanting 100Mbps to be the first to connect. The sites connected are predominately new estates which tend to include a larger proportion of families with kids. One would expect a higher demand for internet in these areas.

NBNCo's prediction is that only a few of the 12Mbps customers would upgrade to faster speeds. One reason for this is that it is difficult to try the revolutionary services that the NBN could provide if your connectoin doesn't support the speed.

FTTN brings sufficient speed based on Labor's own predictions for ~50% of the population for the next 15 years. It is reasonable to argue that those who want faster speeds should pay for the priviledge. Of course the amusing fact is when you compare ~$300 for direct fibre with $150/month in AVC for 1Gbps it doesn't sound that expensive.

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mathew42

Re: Save me from kitchen table budget thinking.

> What the hell do you think will happen when we increase broadband infrastructure in a way that it increases the access speeds, capabilities and service delivery capabilities of companies?

The problem is Labor's NBN wasn't going to deliver super fast broadband to many people. In the NBNCo Corporate Plan (2013) draft is this statement:

"As at 30 April 2013, 26% of NBN Co’s FTTP End-Users were on the highest available wholesale speed tier (100/40 Mbps), whilst 47% were on the entry-level wholesale speed tier (12/1 Mbps). These compare with 18% and 49% respectively forecast for FY2013 in the 2012-15 Corporate Plan."

Only a truly incompetent government could succeed in building a FTTP network where 50% of connections are slower than HFC, FTTN, 4G and approaching half of ADSL2+ connections.

> MORE TAXES, less spending for gvmt and greater business productivity. IT IS AN END RUN!

Most services on the internet are provided from overseas, which means much of that revenue would flow straight offshore and never be taxed a cent.

> THIS IS A SIMPLE EQUATION for anyone who has ever had to make an investment decision. up front cost now, much more monies later.

FTTN with fibre on demand is the up front cost now model. Labor's FTTP plan was the borrow heavily now and hope that ARPU can rise steeply enough to enable the interest and payment to be paid back.

The problem is that the evidence shows that demand simply isn't there for super fast broadband (100Mbps+) to justify rolling it out to to all premises at the current cost structures. Labor's artificial pricing model and borrowings meant that people would have been paying significantly more for 1Gbps than the cost of installing direct fibre.

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mathew42

I'd prefer Google

If anyone was to build a FTTP network in Australia, I would prefer it was Google.

If the US costings and pricing for Google Fibre can be realised in Australia with even a 50% mark up in costs and quotas it would be significantly cheaper than Labor's NBN.

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Turnbull touts construction resumption in YouTube vid

mathew42

Re: If the man had a backbone and fibre, he'd see the light...

> ...and admit the original NBN is the only sensible long-term outcome.

The FTTP part of the plan is okay, but Google Fibre is a technically a better solution.

The pricing model of Labor's NBN would have turned the country into an internet backwater. 50% at 12Mbps and in 2028 still less than 5% connected at 1Gbps.

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Construction industry outlook is bad news for Turnbull's alt.NBN plan

mathew42

Telecommunication bills have definitely gone down as the influence of Telstra has decreased.

A large part of electricity and water bills have come from gold plated infrastructure projects.

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Turnbull to NBN contractors: Dance, baby, dance!

mathew42
FAIL

Who remembers Conroy delaying the start of the NBN construction because he thought the contractors were asking for too much money? It might just be that thecontractors were closer to the mark.

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Malcolm Turnbull throws a bone to FTTP boosters

mathew42
Alert

Labor FTTP fanbois are the problem

The biggest risk to FTTP in Australia are Labor FTTP fanbois who refuse to acknowledge that the plan has faults:

- How many people will really connect to more than one RSP?

- How do you justify building a FTTP network when in April 2013, 47% of fibre connections were 12Mbps (NBNCo Corporate Plan 2013) and the prediction is that in 2028 less than 5% of connections will be 1Gbps?

- Is FTTB reasonable for multi-dwelling buildings?

- Should the rollout focus on areas of need first (e.g. areas with the lowest average speed)

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BOFH: Is WHAT 'running slow'!? GOD

mathew42

Re: Installers

Great advice for large corporates with SOEs that take years to update. For the rest of us, cycling through Windows Update umpteen dozen times after installing Windows just to install the updates is annoying.

Compare this with linux ... as part of the installation it updates to the latest versions!

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Indestructible, badass rootkit BadBIOS: Is this tech world's Loch Ness Monster? VOTE NOW

mathew42

Military and other High Security Environments

There are a few places where the potential reward for investment make sense. Most high security environments (e.g. military, foreign embassies, etc) use separate networks to maintain security. Data is transferred from less classified networks to more classified networks via external media frequently, but not the other way. Standard practice is for two (or more) computers to exist on a person's desk with access to networks with a different level of classification. That person may be able to transfer files using a USB key. One of those is most likely a laptop that connects to external networks and which might be possible to compromise, particularly with a targetted attack. If the primary purpose is extraction of data, then a very sensitive listener could be sufficient.

I suspect that if this is at all possible, NSA (and other organisations) would be prepared to spend big on research because jumping an air gap could have huge rewards. It wouldn't surprise me that if this wasn't available now, there would be people from various organisations would have been researching since the story broke.

I think the easiest way to prove / disprove this would be to check the security policies of various organisations. If there are indications in the policies of measures to prevent this kind of attack (e.g. internal speakers removed, headphones only), then I think some credence should be given to the claims.

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Oz Army red-faced after ready ... aim ... FIRE burns suburbs

mathew42

Re: What?

Air Marshal Binskin says there were no fire bans at the time of the blaze, which has so far burnt almost 50,000 hectares and destroyed at least three homes.

"It was about 23 degrees [with] light winds at the time I made the decision to [undertake explosives training]," he said.

source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-24/pilot-killed-in-bushfire-crash/5043838

The problem was that fire wasn't controlled before extreme conditions hit on the following day.

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Telstra plans to keep hands on government BEEELIONS

mathew42
Holmes

In April 2013, 47% of fibre connections were 12Mbps

The draft NBNCo Corporate Plan (2013) has this statement

"As at 30 April 2013, 26% of NBN Co’s FTTP End-Users were on the highest available wholesale speed tier (100/40 Mbps), whilst 47% were on the entry-level wholesale speed tier (12/1 Mbps). These compare with 18% and 49% respectively forecast for FY2013 in the 2012-15 Corporate Plan."

As to cost, ARPU is forecast to rise dramatically from under $30/month to over $100/month.

Fibre on demand is not that expensive when you compare it with Labor's 1Gbps plans - $150/month just in AVC to which you need to add CVC and RSP costs & margins. Compare that with the estimated $3000 for fibre on demand and it is clear why Labor predicted that less than 5% of fibre connections would be 1Gbps in 2028.

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COFFEE AND DANISH HELL: National ID system cockup forces insecure Java on Danes

mathew42

Re: Forward Compatibility

I've been hit by this as well.

The original change was in JDK 7u25 was to add Permissions and Codebase Attributes to the JAR file manifest to defend agains unauthorized code repurposing. I would guess that something has changed in JDK 7u45. More information: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/jweb/no_redeploy.html and http://www.java.com/en/download/help/trusted_expired_variations.xml.

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Crowdsourced campaign scoops $AUD40k for pro-FTTP NBN ads

mathew42

Re: Better speed on FTTP is a myth

> What I meant was that, as a technology, FTTH/P is superior. That people using FTTP only CHOOSE to buy plans at 12Mbps (or 20 or 40, etc...) is hardly relevant.

I don't disagree with you, but there is no point building the gold-plated solution if it isn't going to be used. The people on faster plans have to subsidise those people on slower plans. There comes a point where fibre on demand is a better solution. We are at significant risk of building a white elephant which costs to much to access the speeds which would change how people use the Internet.

> Installing FTTH is future-proofing and are rare example of out government (at any level) thinking ahead rather than taking the easier option.

Except the reality is that FTTN was the previous Labor government's preferred option and if Telstra had submitted a reasonable proposal it is what most of Australia would have by now. FTTP was an attempt to save face by the government.

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mathew42
Unhappy

Better speed on FTTP is a myth

> there can be no doubt that FTTH will provide better speed

Reading this quote from NBNCo's Corporate Plan (2013 draft) brings the above statement into question:

"As at 30 April 2013, 26% of NBN Co’s FTTP End-Users were on the highest available wholesale speed tier (100/40 Mbps), whilst 47% were on the entry-level wholesale speed tier (12/1 Mbps). These compare with 18% and 49% respectively forecast for FY2013 in the 2012-15 Corporate Plan."

Only a truly incompetent Labor government could succeed in proposing to build a FTTP network where 50% of connections are slower than HFC, FTTN, 4G and approaching half of ADSL2+ connections.

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