* Posts by Kiwi

370 posts • joined 26 Sep 2011

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2015 was the Year of the Linux Phone ... Nah, we're messing with you

Kiwi
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Linux

Re: 2016 really could be the year of the linux desktop..

After running XP for over 10 years, I can't remember a single time I had this kind of problem with updates.

Last week I built a machine using a spare W7 license and an SSD that'd been donated by a customer. Beaut boot speeds and the like but.. After more than 48 hours of "checking updates" and another 16 or so "downloading updates" it hasn't managed to download anything other than the one "update to update update". There's 140 or so there but not much use if they can't be downloaded.

Have seen similar quite a bit on 7 of late with fresh installs. Almost like something with the update to update updates has something in it to make your experience with 7 a little more hellish, like they want you to use something else... Which I would do on this machine if I didn't want to see how 7 handles installing a ton of updates on an SSD, and how the Aegis W10 killer works on one. (So probably get sick of 7 next week and chuck something fun on there)

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Kiwi
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Re: Ian and Murdock?

... combination of Ian and Murdock's girlfriend ...

Just a little confused, that's all.

Deborah (or something like that) - Ian Murdock's girlfriend at the time Ian Murdock created DebIan

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No escape: Microsoft injects 'Get Windows 10' nagware into biz PCs

Kiwi
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Thanks to UEFI it's very difficult to boot linux these days,

I must say that I have not truly experienced this. We use Linux tools to repair or recover data from borked windows machines (at least until full disk encryption makes that impossible), so we're net booting usually some variant of Mint/Ubuntu - and I still haven't sorted out a UEFI system for that.

But having said that, I do find it to be "an interesting coincidence" that not long before all this mess began, we had the whole UEFI mess as well with the concerns related to that (yes yes I know current standards say alternatives must be able to boot with very few exceptions - problem with standards and exceptions is they creep, since (especially in MS's case) such things are often made by creeps).

Anyway, just strikes me as maybe a little too coincidental that there was a way to potentially lock you into MS's choice of OS on the hardware, and then all this with W10....

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Kiwi
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Pint

Re: I am not a fucking product.

Hope you have a ruinous 2016

Beautifully said sir! 'ave one on me.

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Kiwi
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Linux

Probaby been said but..

Does MS need reminding?

#1 Our work machines are our business critical machines - it's what we make a living from. I see a lot of borked W10 updates now, with machines that cannot function as purchased by the user for the jobs they're doing. When your business cannot receive emails and emails are a significant part of how you communicate with you clients.. Also W10 is well known to delete "incompatible" software including purchased AV, competing office software, various business-critical programs that MS doesn't even know of (and that don't compete with MS products). Law suits will hopefully be coming.

#2 Many small businesses around the world are on low but expensive bandwidth. You will be causing them extra and unnecessary expense.

#3 Your telemetry will put any business who uses W10 in breach of any national privacy laws, and will also put them in breach of any thing like "non-disclosure agreements". I seriously hope you are sued into non-existance this year, and the people behind this rubbish spend the rest of their lives paying towards the problems this will cause. Although that said, the way you screw up network drivers in 10 does quite limit the ability of your spyware to steal the data of your remaining loyal/uninformed users. Hmm. Once people used to believe smoking was good, but now we know how bad it is.. We live in hope...

#4 I am glad I moved on elsewhere. I am glad I have the knowledge to teach others to move on. Any chance there was of me ever recommending anyone use any MS product is gone. You have breached trust in a manner which should never be regained. I'd rather stick Michael Jackson's ghost in an unmonitored room full of unconscious kids than ever let MS products near a customer's machine again.

Icon - the cure to your security and malware woes!

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Hacks rebel after bosses secretly install motion sensors under desks

Kiwi
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Re: Moral police

I doubt the GPS puts you there.

By "GPS" I do mean the in car unit - like most people I know (not necessarily most people, just most people I know)

A cheap one that surprisingly does better at picking up the satellite signal than any Garmin and most Tomtom's I've seen.. (But they have the huge advantage in getting updated maps!)

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Kiwi
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Re: Moral police @LDS

Background checks are performed for many jobs - sometimes you can't really afford to wait for someone to prove you wrong, because it would be too late - and it may also mean the end of your business. When you're responsible for a business and many people working for it, you don't want a single moron destroy it all.

I've known a few cases, one where the business was destroyed. The person passed clearances etc when she started. She had the documents to say she was good. The documents had been prepared properly, with proper legal checks by properly qualified people. She saw the money, saw her chance, and took the money.

I would like to know how many who are against this kind of "discriminations" are ready to put their money, properties or close people in the hands of those people... would you hire a baby sitter who drinks heavily? Hire a cashier with betting issues?

Yes and yes. Known quantities can be accounted for and dealt with. I have personally known someone who passed some very high-level clearances, and built a hell of a lot of trust before he started wanting more money than he was being paid (which was an almost obscene amount given the nature of the work - people will pay a ton for someone with good clearances when even the cleaner almost needs "top secret" clearance levels!). I'd hire him now - I know what he's done, I know what to look for, and I know to make damn sure he can't get his hands on the company money because he probably knows more tricks than I do.

A heavy drinker could watch my kids with safeguards in place. The sweet neighbours teenager who "just wants a bit of extra holiday cash" may turn out to not be so sweet, and I wouldn't want my kids being the first to discover that.

Known quantities. Safeguards.

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Kiwi
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Re: Moral police

Is it against the law to have your lunch in a strip joint? If he was on his own time and got back to work on time what business is it of theirs?

Had a mate here in NZ who got drunk and did something really stupid (bastard's lucky I still call him "mate" even but anyway...) He wound up on GPS bracelet and bail conditions saying he couldn't be in certain places.

One afternoon he gets a call from his parole officer, asking why he's at a certain bar. He was told he'd be arrested and recalled to prison. He asks that the cops be sent to his home since that's where he is anyway, not at the bar. PO does so, and the cops call her to confirm that yes, the guy is at his hom. The PO says the GPS claims he's at a bar some 5km away from his home.

That was last year. GPS is generally pretty accurate these days, but I wouldn't recommend using data from it to convict someone without other evidence. Hell, I often drive on one road while the GPS puts me on a parallel road a (narrow) block away.

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Confirmed: How to stop Windows 10 forcing itself onto PCs – your essential guide

Kiwi
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Joke

Re: Score one for my pet theory...

MS always understood "the power of stupid"

Sadly they do such a good job of leading by example...

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Tell us what's wrong with the DMCA, says US Copyright office

Kiwi
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I have 100's of DVD's and CD's of stuff that I have purchased because I first viewed a "pirated" copy and decided I wanted a legitimate copy for my library. I would NOT purchase a copy first in many cases because I decided it wasn't worth the "price of admission" and stopped watching after 15 minutes, and then dumped the copy into the bit-bucket.

The sad problem for that argument is that there are so many people who say exactly the same thing publicly, while privately showing off their terrabytes of downloaded movies they've collected.

[For disclosure, I quite openly support some levels of "piracy" (find the term itself appalling) and have myself used it to get full episodes of TV shows eg "Torchwood" where TVNZ refused to play the first ep of S2 and also IIRC chopped significant portions of the rest of the series so they could squeeze another 10 minutes of ads into each showing, same as they did with B5 (which, BTW, I brought the whole lot of on VHS but also got a digital copy so I can enjoy yet protect my investment!) ]

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Kiwi
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Joke

Let's start with the fact that a DMCA notice fired off to an entity means they have to take down the material immediately, regardless of whether or not it's infringing a copyright or if the issuer even owns a copyright on anything at all, or face prosecution.

Crazy thought but... Has anyone considered firing some of these off to various government websites.. Like maybe the copyright office telling them their DCMA pages infringe your IP?

Could be a bit of fun.. Of course, you would need to be ready to bolt to some country that has a sizeable population and no friendly relations with the US, and may spend a while stuck in a backroom in some embassy somewhere.. It would be interesting to see if they follow their own rules!

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Smartphone hard, dudes, like it’s the end of the world!

Kiwi
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Re: Party phone needs a party SIM

What I want is to be able to buy multiple sims for use in multiple devices simultaneously, that share the same number, same minutes and same data.

I would so love that! I have a couple of places I visit regularly where having a smartphone is not a smart idea. Got sick of swapping sim between the "this is shit but could save my life and will survive in this environment" phone and the "this qualifies as a smartphone and lets me use the nice BT feature of my stereo among other things" phone. These days the smart phone barely gets touched while the crap one gets used. I could use call forwarding and an extra account, but why should I pay money twice for what really is one connection?

One of the local telcos was trying to sell my partner and I on us scrapping the landline and having the shop calls routed to our cell phones. Our separate phone #'s would ring simultaneously and whoever answered first got the call. If they can do that, surely they could give us multi device on one account. It doesn't seem that hard (given modern tech and similar product/plan offerings as above), and I can be the first telco to offer that in any country would make a mint.

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How long is your password? HTTPS Bicycle attack reveals that and more

Kiwi
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Re: Optional

Yes - Let's use clientside security. Nothing has ever gone wrong with that mental-fuckery.

Even better.. Lets go to some "trustworthy" source of fancy off-site/3rd party scripts just for this.. Like none of them would ever try to add something to harvest passwords....

Oh that I could upvote twice...

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Longing to bin Photoshop? Rock-solid GIMP a major leap forward

Kiwi
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Re: Multi-channel and deep bit depths is what I need @KeithR

The ONLY thing "cloud" about Adobe's subscription model (and note - it's not "cloud" AT ALL) is that ONCE EVERY 99 DAYS the software has to be able to "phone home" to check that your subscription is still current!

Are you sure about that?

"Annual members can use the apps for up to 99 days in offline mode. Month-to-month members can use the software for up to 30 days in offline mode."

(From the Adobe FAQ, https://helpx.adobe.com/creative-cloud/faq.html )

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Kiwi
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Re: @Toastan Buttar

"As best I can tell the commercial UIs suck on purpose"

What does that even mean? The commercial companies have deliberately set out to make sucky UIs? Why would they do that?

It's not really deliberate, more a mixture of marketing, arts degrees, incompetent management ("My nephew knows a bit of programming, let him do the website!"), and deliberate corporate sabotage (Look at W8, got to be someone who hates MS behind that mess!)

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Kiwi
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Re: "(UI design is, sadly, something that Open Source projects struggle with)" @PNGuinn

Ribbon anyone?

Mental note. When a couple of days late to a thread, make sure no one else has commented on the obvious...

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Kiwi
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Joke

Re: More than three colour channels? @Kristian Walsh

(UI design is, sadly, something that Open Source projects struggle with)

I'm guessing you've never seen W8 or W10? Or the Office "ribbon"?

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Kiwi
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Re: Does it still hate the user? @Hans 1

With the new save dialog (I think in 2.8+), I have to click through the menu, confirm I want to overwrite a file and when I accidentally hit Ctrl+S, I have native GIMP images lying around, which are utterly useless to me.

I've seen enough cases where someone's spent a bit of time creating a picture and then saved it out to JPG or GIF in a very low resolution, and not saving the the original files means they lose work - on that regard I can understand why the writers of GIMP may've chosen to make such errors harder to make.

But I do agree with your sentiment. Much of my work is for web or non-GIMP users, and I want to choose what things are saved to quickly and easily. Give me a config option to let me choose defaults and let me take the risk - maybe with a warning or something at the time but let me quickly save work to whatever format I wish. Hell, even a dual save would be nice - xcf and jpg/gif/whatever, if I want to save like that.

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Kiwi
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Linux

Re: Does it still hate the user? @BobChip

THE BEST SOFTWARE IN THE WORLD IS THE SOFTWARE YOU KNOW BEST

Not always true! I fix Windows for a living and know a lot of it a hell of a lot better than I know things with Linux. I struggle to fix things with Linux when I do manage to break them because I don't get the practice. I have machines with uptimes measured in hundreds of days1 or longer and time between actual "repairs" is in years (repairs != hardware upgrades).

For learning how to fix broken things, Windows is better. For learning what a truly wonderful computing experience can be, you need *Nix..

1Reboots for kernel updates etc

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Kiwi
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Re: Does it still hate the user? @Andy Non

As much as I'd like to use PHOTOSHOP I find the learning curve too steep to dedicate enough time to learn to use it. Whenever I've tried to use it for something simple it leaves me scratching my head. I wanted to knock up a little map to help someone find our house but couldn't even figure out how to draw a straight line. Gave up in the end and USED GIMP

I have tried to use PS. I've even learned a lot from watching others use PS. But I cannot use PS, without learning a lot and a hell of a lot of unlearning stuff that I find quite natural and intuitive in GIMP.

For those who say "GIMP is too different to PS" I say "That's good, because I cannot for the life of me figure out PS!".

Oh, and there is a slight untruth - I wouldn't actually want to use PS - I've looked at it to please others/see if all the fuss is worth it but I have no desire to use it, GIMP is more than sufficient for my needs... But then, I live by "If you can't do it in the camera you can't do it" for taking pics, and only "edit" for the purposes of combining/cropping/etc)

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Debian Linux founder Ian Murdock dead at 42

Kiwi
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Re: very sad...:-(

'Died of cancer'. Sure, experts are able to cite very rare cases where diagnosis is rapidly followed by death, but two days? Surely, he died by his own hand, not 'of cancer'.

I have known a few cases like that over time. People who were diagnosed and died within a few weeks or days. One lady had an operation to remove the cancer. When she recovered the doctor told her that they'd found some that was inoperable and she would have another 6 months or so. She did not last another 6 hours.

People give up. The stress of knowing they have a short time left, and that the things they've been enjoying are over, it's too much. Some have heart attacks, some strokes, and some just seem as if they willed themselves to die.

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Kiwi
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Linux

1st Lemmy, now...

Two people who helped shape my life (Lemmy was a huge influence on my musical tastes and how I play Bass), one I never realised was in my own age group.

My first taste of Linux was probably Knoppix for a rescue job, but I was soon using Debian when I began to build servers, and in time began using it indirectly when I started with Ubuntu. I also used Debian to bring new life to old hardware, including a machine that'd had an argument with a lightning bolt and would not run XP for more than a few seconds (something I assumed with Debian only using a generic driver whereas Windows used a driver that tried to make full use of the damaged hardware, and crashed as a result)

Like so many others, his actions led to something that changed my life, something that I benefited from in a very significant way.

Ian, sir, you did a great thing for so many. You and your family have a lot to be proud of. Thank you for all you did to make this world a better place.

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Windows 10: What's coming in 2016?

Kiwi
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Linux

Re: Hopefully

...vista...

<channel Mythbusters>Well there's your problem...</channel>

Must admit.. Yesterday I uttered two comments seldom heard from me in our shop.. First was "damn, this machine is really snappy" (it was, things like browsers and MS Word opening damn near instant, certainly less than 2 seconds" Followed soon after by "WTF? This is Vista?"

With the right hardware/RAM etc I have seen Vista perform really well. Problem is, Vista performed rarely well in general.

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Kiwi
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Re: "Windows 7 diehards"??? @Flatpackhamster

Just had to drop my partner a line and ask if she was using a sneaky nick on El Reg, this sounds so much like it could've come out of our shop!

random internet disconnects from the wireless card, start menu sometimes works and sometimes doesn't. Programs load, or don't. PS2 keyboard and mouse work, but only if you switch the machine off and on a few times.

Yes, it is quite amazing how this "cloud" OS seems to drop internet connections so readily, sometimes completely failing to walk with very common WiFi cards..

Actually I've just had a thought.. Could it be that things are so bad with Slurp's slurping that even the OS itself wants to act to stop them doing it? Is it one of these cases where things get so horrid that even inanimate objects rebel?

That one I have just restored to Win7 factory settings.

That seems to fix most W10 issues!

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Kiwi
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Linux

Re: @AC @RIBrsiq

Well, on my first Linux install I had to rebuild the kernel to get the soundcard to work. And even now I seem to have to manually cleanup the /boot partition if I don't want the damned thing to run itself out of space and panic into a deadlock.

Admittedly I've only been using Linux for my main machines for a few years now, but I've still never had an experience like that. That said, in the very rare few cases where one distro doesn't work I find another does. I've had the odd case with graphics drivers where I've been encourarged to visit the vendor's site to get their driver for better video performance, and I've even seen a model of printer that has absolutely no Linux support. None of the other problems.

I booted this into Windows today so I can't check /boot, but on the machines I own/admin I have never noticed any hint of an issue with it. All Debian or Mint.

And we will just not get into what would be needed to run and manage an actual network of Linux machines populated by real users instead of wizards.

I have an elderly friend who has 3 Mint machines in his home - there's his main desktop, a media machine behind his TV (which he uses mainly to watch horrid old movies on YouTube), and the more recent one during the last winter is a machine in his room which was set up so he could still watch those things without having to get up on the colder days. It also has links to the other content of the media machine. He is computer illiterate and ancient, but manages the onerous task of clicking the "update" icon when needed and running updates (admittedly Mint Update doesn't get everything apt would but it is geared to make sure users such as him don't get into trouble AIUI)

...these are *not* users one'd trust to make rational decisions after fully weighing all the consequences. ... So think of the need to edit the registry, etc. as you proving that you know what you are doing.

I would largely agree with you there - but I would want registry editing to be done to allow 10 to install. I've said before that I am quite happy to do in-place upgrades of OS's rather than reinstall from scratch (depending on users needs, and seeing how much stuff W10 deletes (inc paid-for programs and AV!) you almost might as well go fresh), but to do such a thing without a full backup of the machine is just asking for trouble - and we see a lot of customers who do get into trouble!

Always assume something will go wrong with such a process and make sure you can properly recover - that means a backup that is not on the machine being upgraded!

And FFS MS, I've said I don't want it! I have edited the registry. Stop trying to sneak GWX and other "upgrade tools" into my machine!

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NZ unfurls proposed new flag

Kiwi
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@ AC

Can you burn it without fuss and bother.

I think that there are many here who would burn it regardless of the "fuss and bother". (Not me, my urine is not sufficiently flammable for such a task!)

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Windows for Warships? Not on our new aircraft carriers, says MoD

Kiwi
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Re: basic english comprehension @ X7

Well Kiwi, I am unable to find any support for your contention that most users of MSO are home users.

I know. It's so rare that MS would never even consider having a trial version bundled with new PC's out there these days (and according to Mr Google all of their tablets). Strange that I've seen a number of machines with trial versions of Office from Win7 and on (mainly HP I believe but I could be wrong)

Sarcasm aside.. I see it often. Not on every machine but probably a good 50%. How many are legit versions and are in use rather than the above-mentioned bundled trial-ware.

True, 85% of retail sales of MSO in the US are for the Home and Student Edition, but the majority of these sales are to small business users, a matter of considerable concern to MS.

Do you have any stats or cite or anything for this? I at least supplied one (and changed some of my posts when I couldn't quickly find something to back up what I said)

For the most part, and considering the survey I linked to, the point remains. For most users what is there that cannot be achieved with things like Wordpad (and html for the forms you mentioned)

MS considers business use of this product to be piracy

These days MS seems to consider using legitimate versions of their products to be piracy, or at least dodgy behaviour that has to be monitored closely... (and let's not forget the number of Vista users who had MS revoke their licenses and tell them they had to buy new because, well, stuff happens...)

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Kiwi
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Re: basic english comprehension @ X7

and thats where you're blowing smoke out of your anus, because Office is used in .....wait for it.........OFFICES, mainly.

1) Out of interest, any cites for that? Other than the "MS sells mostly H&S but it's really offices that use that version (I would also be interested in a cite or two for that one).

2) That still doesn't counter my main point, which I did back up with a citation to the first survey results I saw in an epic 10 second Google session - that Wordpad would do for what most users do with Office. And ok, for those places that use forms, maybe something web-based. Although as far as I recall most workers are employed by small businesses and most small businesses just don't go that far. I am happy to be corrected..

Really, what do most people use office for? What is it that most people use it for that can't be done with wordpad and HTML forms?

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Kiwi
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Re: basic english comprehension @ X7

Kiwi, I'm beginning to suspect you are a crank. Using document templates is a requirement at most businesses because they require consistency. Templates do not exist in Wordpad. Using a template is what the peons do; nobody in their right senses would describe using required corporate templates as "power users".

I think you have missed the point. Badly.

I AM NOT TALKING ABOUT BUSINESSES, I AM TALKING ABOUT THE AVERAGE/MOST COMMON OFFICE USERS, IE HOME USERS

Can it be stated more clearly than that?

Also, in recent times I have had to spend a lot of time watching my Dr write letters. Every one he has written for me has been from scratch. Now, prescriptions and all sorts of other things follow set forms, that's fine.

But he is still not the most common type of office user.

MS Works has not been bundled with home computers for some time, and in 4 years directly working with home comptuers and more than 20 working elsewhere, I am yet to come across even one with Works or a full Office "bundled". I have not seen a bundled trial version of Works ever.

A very quick look over Google will tell you very quickly that MS Works has been discontinued, pre-Win8 (and I do mean quick). So, you cannot buy Works and it does not come pre-bundled. A lot of people are sold on the idea of using Office (why was Office released to home users in the first place? ISTR that it was something to do with people wanting what they had at work on their home machine as well). So there's your why...

As to people using Access, all I can say is that there's a common complaint on El Reg and elsewhere about people using spreadsheets where a database would do a good job. With the business customers I deal with they are using the likes of MYOB (it has been 10 years since I supported that so I cannot recall what the DB backend is, but IIRC it was some sort of proprietary one but ICWBW).

Where I can I try to sell people on LO instead of MSO, simply because it does what most people need, is mostly compatible with MSO for most peoples needs, and is free.

But the point still hasn't been addressed. You've gone on about some business users, you've claimed that home users don't use office (must tell MS that - they could save all sorts of money on their Home & Student etc versions since no one uses them!), you've (rightly) said that LO is great for most people.

But what is it that most office users do that requires anything more than Wordpad?

Oh, and btw.. with your forms and automation etc.. HTML forms are great for that. No need to load up a 200Mb office application when a 10 50 er, 199Mb web browser can do the job! Which, btw, is what my Dr uses when he is filling in forms. I've watched him do it.

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Kiwi
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Re: basic english comprehension @ X7

Well my customers must have been fuckwits then. Mostly small businesses such as law firms, credit unions, trade unions, university departments, real estate firms and so on.

Eh? What the hell is wrong with you?

Are they representative of the most common users of Word etc?

I imagine that you believe that all the purchasers of that book are fuckwits, never mind the law firms that save thousands of man-hours per year using the document creation automation described therein.

What have I said that makes you believe that?

Then there are the documents created by multiple authors. Why would you want to see which revisions were made by which writer while you all work on the same document simultaneously? Instead of six people creating a document in a month you could have them take six months or more!

And again, is that representative of the most common users of Office products? Yes or no, do you believe that most office users (which, as far as I am aware, are home users) use any of those extra features? From your arguments you believe that most users of Office are in law firms with a couple of dozen people simultaneously working on the same document!

Is that really based on reality, and if so what is your basis?

Oh, and a very quick couple of minutes faffing around with Google found this (among maybe many - I'm too busy doing other things like wiping out "Prophets of Zei" and watching "The A-team" (hey, I did say last night I felt IQ points dropping!) to look much further) :

http://www.techworld.com/news/security/microsoft-office-applications-barely-used-by-many-employees-new-study-shows-3514565/

"The firm carried out a 3-month analysis of Office suite use in 51 global firms representing 148,500 employees, revealing that seven out of ten employees weren’t using any single application heavily, launching them only for viewing or light editing.

The average employee spent only 48 minutes per day using Office, largely the Outlook email client, which consumed about 68 percent of that activity. Excel was in second place with 17 percent, or an average of 8 minutes per day, leaving Word and PowerPoint trailing with only 5 minutes and 2 minutes per day each.

And :

"For Word, that sort of rationalisation gets harder to explain. Five minutes a day was a poor showing for an application Microsoft would like enterprises to believe is essential to the work day.

Apple Insider has another article on the same research :

http://appleinsider.com/articles/14/05/03/most-office-workers-arent-actually-using-microsoft-office

This hardly seems like the "power users are normal" point you seem to be arguing. That is my argument, that most users only need basic tools most of the time. Can you give anything to suggest otherwise?

(No, I never heard of "Softwatch" before although TechWorld is one I have seen. They are simply the first link I clicked on in the results page)

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Kiwi
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WTF?

Re: basic english comprehension @ X7

Enjoy blowing smoke, Kiwi? You wouldn't have a clue what you are talking about. A few examples.

You send out a thousand newsletters six times a year.

You missed the point as well. How many people send out thousands of newsletters to Ozzies? How many users of Word etc even read newsletters these days (especially in print form!)?

While you create one invoice manually in Wordpad, an automated invoice created in Word can automatically calculate GST as well as the total of the invoice while you are reaching for the four function calculator. Instead of 10 minutes per invoice, I might spend 10 seconds or so.

Ah, an example close to my heart. Got a friend who tells everyone how great she is at using office and spreadsheets and so on. She still uses the calculator for GST, only it takes her about a minute. Me? I got a spreadsheet in LO that does the job for me - I put in the part name, price, set any GST/markup changes, put a number in the hours field etc, and it spits out the invoice. I know bugger all about spreadsheets but it took me only a few minutes. Spent longer finding out how to remove tax costs.

But what % of the users of Word etc send out invoices?

Rather than most users being able to do their job just as well with Wordpad, most users are actually using automated document creation at work.

Really? So my uncle and aunt, when they write a letter to someone, they're using automated document creation? Even though my aunt still insists on using pen and paper? Most who do flyers for lost pets or local galas or a complaint to the council or letter to their newspaper or message to family/friends on their OE (or home from OE) etc are using "automatic documentation creation"?

Seriously. You really believe that?

Hell, I doubt most office users have even used any part of it outside of Word and Outlook, and then only the most basic functions of each - probably most only click the "new/create", "send" buttons and "close" buttons in Outlook, and "new", "save", "print" and "close" in Word. With the odd bit of changing to bold or italics or size.

My customers are home and small business users, with a few in the offices/admin of larger manufacturing firms. A small few use spreadsheets for data and invoices, and some use templates. Those who do mailouts are doing them to a couple of dozen people, not thousands or even hundreds. And I know enough to know that my users are closer to average then those who are send out 6k newsletters/year, generating invoices or filling in forms.

I know who the "fuckwit" is...

Doubt it's me.. (And a long way from saying it's you as well ;) )

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Kiwi
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Linux

Re: better than 28 backspaces ...

Ran the updater this week and twenty minutes later all done. No reboot needed.

Really want to put it to the test? Get the latest Windows installer and a year old Linux installer. See which is finished doing updates while the other still has "checking for updates" for another 40+ minutes.

Oh, wait.. Maybe you can't. Do you even get to tell 10 to check for updates ahead of time or is it a "You must wait until we say it's time, no matter that there's a whole pile of new patches for serious security flaws, you are not due to update your system until Tuesday after next!"

(Sorry, I just love how Mint does updates in minutes... :) )

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Kiwi
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Anyone who wants people to stop using Windows-based systems needs to deliver applications which will do what people need to do at least as well as the Windows-based systems they are already using.

Slight flaw in your logic. People buy orifice. Wordpad would suit most of them just as well. Even opens office docs.

In addition, the new applications MUST be able to read the existing data; users are not going to re-enter all their data unless they have a very good reason indeed.

And how often has changes to office (etc) broken such things?

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Kids' TV show Rainbow in homosexual agenda shocker

Kiwi
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Angel

While we can all laugh at the absurdity of this, I would hate to be the gay son or lesbian daughter of one of these guys or stuck in a household filled with this poison hatred.

I grew up with a lot of this. It was only in her last months that my mother accepted me. I can say this without a doubt though - she loved me deeply and did the best she could with the tools she had. She made a lot of mistakes, but they weren't out of laziness or abusiveness or power tripping or whatever. She did what she did because she wanted the best for her children.

There are still a lot of people getting a really horrible time over their sexuality. Things have moved on but knuckle dragging, right wing, religious nutters of various flavours seem determined to keep up the homophobia.

Just recently I had the honour of sitting down and chatting with the man I am named after. It was quite an eye-opener for me, when we got on to the subject of my sexuality (we have not spoken for many years - but he had so much of an impact on me I can still remember hearing him speak as a child - and I found out this week that I had yet to reach my 3rd birthday). Anyway, he encouraged me - it's not a problem for him, he has no issue with people being gay. He looks at how they live before he thinks they may have problems with their faith. And he's an Anglican reverend.

There are many of all faiths who do a lot to discredit what they believe in (I do include Atheists here, but I also include Christians, Jews and Muslims and so on). But there are those real gems who are true to their faith. Not all of us are evil!

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Windows' authentication 'flaw' exposed in detail

Kiwi
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Linux

Re: Wut?

Having administrative access precludes the need to use this attack vector in the first place.

This is taken from my early-morning-on-a-bad-day-on-the-road reading of the article...

The way I understood it is that once you have high enough access on one machine within the system, you have the ability to get admin access on any other machine in the network, allowing you to download data, install software and so on..

So I'm an admin on a domain controller or other relevant system on a Windows-based network (sorry if my terminology is off, I do not work on these sorts of things), which happens to also be used by the CEO's machine. This access would allow me to take any data I wish from his machine undetected, even encrypted data that is way beyond my paygrade. I can also install keyloggers so any passphrase or other "access code" is easily retrieved by me.

If I got out of bed far too early then please excuse my brain for still being in pre-coffee idle!

Icon : Good fix for most of your security and all of your privacy woes!

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Kill Flash Now: 78 bugs patched in latest update

Kiwi
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Re: Sigh...

But for now, people with a serious interest in e-lit pretty much have to keep using Flash,

I was fortunate to inherit some material. I have a rediculously stupidly large collection of ebooks, plus subscriptions to a few libraries. I could finish a couple of novels a day and not need to add to the collection before I die (someone I knew was an obsessive collector).

.lit, pdf, txt, html, doc(x), and a couple of formats I haven't looked at yet. Not one bit of flash. Over 30k files (note the books in html format are often a chapter per file and some have extras like images, so it's not quite 30k titles - then again their's things like Chronicles of Narnia and the Darkwar stuff all in a single file).

Not one bit of flash. Not for the collection I have, and not for the libraries I visit (rarely nowadays)

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Adobe: We locked our customers in the cloud and out poured money

Kiwi
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Boffin

Re: Short view?

Nope, because the newcomers have to associate with the incumbents, and guess who has their nuts.

Not even slightly a problem, except that (last I checked) Gimp doesn't talk CMYK. When I am doing something for someone else (which is rare, I am not a graphics person but I do know how to do some things), where I can I work with more widely acceptable formats if I can, eg if I'm doing website graphics them I'm only going to be saving to png/jpg/gif (depending on requirements).

On the odd occasion I need to pass stuff out to someone who uses photoshop, in which case I export the file to the poorer & sadly deluded format. Not one time (only a handful) has there been issues, in fact often the other people have thought I owned photoshop. Which I think I do actually, but found the learning curve greater than the time taken with Gimp to do what I need, which isn't much.

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Kiwi
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The updates are <sarc>sooo wonderful</sarc>

A friend of mine was an adobe evangelist. She found what I could learn from her and translate to Gimp amazing, but still she swore by Adobe.

These days it's more swear at Adobe. The updates when she is trying to work.. The loss of functionality when a feature she's relied on is wiped (and she says that from the forums many other people get pissed off), the changes to settings and things like her graphics tablet disappearing from Adobe's products or losing some functionality..

Adobe - you could've had more customers but you're actually damaging those who were your biggest advocates. For now you have good momentum and things look rosy. But people are getting pissed off with your antics, are seeing that there are alternatives that may be far from as good as your products but they can work with them.

My friend doesn't move because she is getting on (late 60's), and has invested a lot of time and effort into learning Adobe products. She also has invested a ton of money into Adobe products and hardware to suit. She doesn't want to learn something else.

But.. Every time Adobe changes something, she has to learn things again. How long can this go on before she realises that she can use another product, eg Gimp, to achieve what she does without having her workflow changed every time some twit at Adobe has a brain fart and shits all over the interface?

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Microsoft to OneDrive users: We're sorry, click the magic link to keep your free storage

Kiwi
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Re: Uh...Why? @ Thaumaturge

16GB sticks now under $10

Unfortunately many of them are of the nature of "write once read never". Hardly a good option for backup.

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Kiwi
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Linux

Perhaps it's time to bite the bullet and build myself a low powered linux box, and set a little ftp server up...?

I've done a teency bit of playing with Owncloud. Looks interesting - but for my purposes I need something else (primary and backup web server - would be nice to have Owncloud servers seamlessly sync). That's the only reason we haven't gone in to full deployment yet. Want to keep things nicely synced between 3-5 users (depending on particular directories, eg accounts between management but tools between all of us), both web server sites and also have a backup to the main office server. Clients are Linux and Win7.

BTSync also looks promising for our small shop. I could probably fairly easily set up a front end at each site with OC and use BTSync to keep everything else happy.

Hmm.. El Reg, any chance you guys could do some work on comparing Owncloud, BT Sync and a few other offerings?

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Kiwi
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Re: Fear the clear sky

I can not recommend a service like Slurp's to anyone when I can set them up with 1 or 2 TB drive easily and relatively cheaply.

Tell me.. when their house catches fire, or is robbed, or.... Where is that 1-2T drive going to be?

When they trust your drive as a great backup, and drop it taking it out of whereever they keep it when they need those backups, where's the data?

So far, while I don't trust "cloud" storage and have multi-site backups, I have found some to be reliable (looking at Box and Copy, Mega seems to take forever to sync (some months and one machine I usually only turn on during weekends still hasn't got even half-way through a 15g/30,000 file collection). I do see customers with single-drive backups who find out painfully that those portable drives they keep in their handbags (or briefcases for the menfolk) are one-knock-wonders...

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Kiwi
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I suspect it's already been commented on, but...

"...overusing a separate unlimited storage offer..."

Could that explain their constant idiotic security, UI design and other mindfuckingly ridiculous ideas? They're a bunch of retards who don't understand even simple concepts like the meaning of "unlimited"?

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Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre

Kiwi
Bronze badge

but also made sure there was a shortcut in place after the removed fuses, because there's always an in-house technician wandering around with some spare fuses somewhere in the drawers of his workbench...

The levels of "logic" of some of these supposedly intelligent people often beggars belief. Fuse is missing. Either it blew with such force that the entire fuse block vapourised (or was ejected from it's holder), or someone removed it for a purpose. You either have an incredibly major fault in your equipment, or someone nearby is expecting to work on disconnected equipment.

(With any work I do in future, I'll use whatever I can fit in the box to make sure someone else doesn't replace a fuse that I've taken out.. What's the fault isolation speed of a fuse-shaped block of C4?)

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Kiwi
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Facepalm

1% chance and no backup?

That boss needs shooting..

Had a job on a customer's business machine. Minor 2 min fix. Probably a 1 in 1,000 chance something would go wrong. I took a full backup just in case, wasting a little over an hour of my time.

I needed the backup. Something a little more broken than I had detected, and a straightforward fix became a slightly different fix. 1st rule of computing, quick and easy jobs always turn into a disaster, especially if it's business critical or nearly home time/weekend etc.

(2nd rule - 1 in a million chances 'n all that..)

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Still running IE10? Not for long, says Microsoft

Kiwi
Bronze badge
Linux

Re: MS stopping support for IE10

If they released an uninstaller for IE now, then it could be argued that they were lying back then.

I am someone who quite hates M$, as a quick look at my posts would show :)

Given the flack they've had in the last 15 years, and given that even they now seem to recognise that IE is a worthless pile of steaming brown stuff, they could simply argue that they improved Windoze to not have that shiteware stuck deeply inside it.

That said, it's probably an indication of how they really want to treat their users.. Some disgusting disease-ridden thing buried deeply inside where it can hurt the most.....

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Rounded corners on Android phones cost Samsung $548m: It will pay up to Apple after all

Kiwi
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@Nosher

the iPhone was a lot like a Visitor data device as seen in 1985 TV sci-fi series "V", in the episode "Reflections in Terror" - same rounded corners and everything.

Blake's 7 S2 episode "Duel", and I believe the screen of the same device is visible in a later episode (1-2 eps after Duel, if not during Duel) where it is sitting near the transporter controls. A device about the size of a larger smartphone, with a screen that appears to largely consist of a grip of icons on it. First viewing I even took it for a smartphone before I remembered I was watching a very old SciFi series, not some modern program.

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Pause Patch Tuesday downloads, buggy code can kill Outlook

Kiwi
Bronze badge

Re: It may just be me--(methinks it is...)

Sorry for the late response - missed this..

However...

Kiwi, sorry, but I think you are generalizing terribly. I personally know of no one whose life has been destroyed by Windows, any version, any time. I guess it could somehow happen (though I've no idea how) but I've never heard of such a thing.

We had a customer who had the update the original article was about hit his work machines. All of them. So for the time they were down (and sadly it took me some time to find the cause since he didn't know which update it was and of course Office updates wouldn't make a machine not boot!) he could not access his data (some special portal software using login data stored only on his work machines, at that time he did not have other backups ("I mean, I have it all on my two office machines and my laptop. Even if the office burnt down I thought I would still be able to get my stuff" - now he has another backup).

He could not work. Therefore he could not earn. Not all of us earn so much that if we are unable to work for a week (not counting the downtime clearing the backlog, and flow-on lost opportunities) we can happily afford to pay the bills and so on. I mean no business and no personal income for a week, still with all the overheads.

I've also seen people who have lost data, and businesses where machines have been totally hosed. Thankfully I am able to fix "clicking" HDD's most of the time.. We had one machine where the drive ceased shortly after first starting 10 (although I have my doubts about that - surely he dropped or spilt or... No signs of damage mind you, machine looks really well cared for...). People have lost data, been taken offline because this MS cloud OS can't handle simple and common network hardware - fracken idjits...

Many people around the world are on borderline earnings. They don't have anything spare to save. Same for most businesses.. A small hiccup can be disaster (yes yes, we should all work harder and save better and bullshitbullshitbullshit - most can't).

MS has created many small disasters. What to you might be "so what, you had no access to your data for a week" to another might be a life-changing job opportunity, or even just an extra job that can put food on their tables for an extra week. It can be even just little unimportant things - a few extra hours at the office stressing over a fucked system when you should be at your son's recital or your daughter's game..

Nothing important.. Maybe no one die.. But a hell of a lot of extra stress and misery, people loosing business opportunities and time with loved ones.. All so they can sell people's private data.

(and to think I normally defend MS update screwups - I understand with the diversity of systems it's pretty hard to cover all possibilities)

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Sneaky Microsoft renamed its data slurper before sticking it back in Windows 10

Kiwi
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Mushroom

Re: System32 CompatTel folder also needs removing

Fuck. Thought I was rid of all of this stuff from my w7 machine.

Thank God for Linux - ignores MS "permissions" issues and happily lets you delete any MS spyware you want to (or move it somewhere safe in case killing it kills windoze and I can be bothered resurrecting/reinstalling it - probably not this time)

Thanks TReko, I had missed that.

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