* Posts by Jamie Jones

1753 posts • joined 14 Jun 2007

Chelsea Manning sets up low-tech Twitter account from prison

Jamie Jones
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Facepalm

Re: health care costs

"Easy, @skeptical i, you're missing the point, and your anti-Americanism isn't doing your mental health any favors."

Did you even read his/her post? He/she *is* American, and never wrote anything that could be considered anti-American.

Anyway, both of you transphobics are missing the point. How about putting the blame on the endless billions spent on your war machine in the first place? Or the corrupt health system that overcharges for everything, and the corrupt insurance companies, and the practice of companies buying politicians.

There are far more deserved cases to critiscise for reducing your social welfare funds.

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Microsoft drops Do Not Track default from Internet Explorer

Jamie Jones
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A company can advertise and receive revenue from impressions and clickthroughs without tracking a user across multiple sites.

DO NOT TRACK != DO NOT ADVERTISE

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Jamie Jones
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Re: No

Ouch! A bit(!) harsh on poor Doug who actually made a good point - without legislation, no company is going to honour a DNT setting if it defaults to on. - it's going to be hard enough as it is when it defaults to unset!

I'm all for privacy, hate tracking, and I'm sure Doug does too - that doesn't mean he's incorrect.

As an aside, I'd trust any server-side DNT as much as I would a Welshman at a sheepfarm - legalized or not.. The worst offenders will be those dodgy ones with no care for the law...

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Silicon Valley gets its first 1Gbps home bro– oh, there's a big catch

Jamie Jones
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WTF?

Cupertino is the real name?

I always thought it was an El-Reg pun

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Bye bye, booth babes. IT security catwalk RSA nixes sexy outfits

Jamie Jones
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Re: Topics like these...

" By all means have attractive women AND men at such events (it's sales after all) but I too agree that woman shouldn't have to dress like strippers/sci-fi hookers/Anime peado fantasy schoolgirls, just to sell tech products."

I think it's depressingly sad that 'Booth Babes' can improve the sales of security tech, and despair at the caveman comments you sometimes hear.

But banning? That's not fixing the problem, just burying it under the carpet.

Wouldn't it be nice to see a successful "babeless" stall where they emphasise their product is so good, it doesn't need marketing gimmicks?

And the people who choose to do these jobs are not forced to - it's ironic how many posters here playing the sexism card are assuming these women are brainless bimbos...

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Jamie Jones
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Happy

Re: Context, context....

" I've met men who wear shorts all year round (and no, they don't live in sun drenched climates)"

I live on the sun drenched coast of errr. South Wales, and the last time I didn't wear shorts was to a funeral 5 years ago.

Mind you, this is a place where in winter, you see queues outside ice-cream shops rather than coffee shops (Joes Icecream FTW! )

You always get some comments in winter, whilst someone wearing an above-knee skirt doesn't.

As for when it's cold (especially windy) , I can be colder on my chest, wearing t-shirt and jumper than my legs.

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BT Home Hub SIP backdoor blunder blamed for VoIP fraud

Jamie Jones
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Re: Whats the point of home SIP anyway?

"

"Which is pretty lame on ElReg, I think you will agree.""

No, I wouldn't actually. Do you buy a car from a garage or build one from a kit each time you get one? Right. Same thing. Different people have different interests. Deal."

His point was that ElReg is a techie site. The analogy regarding a car would apply if the comment was written on a kit-car enthusiasts website, thus showing it's actually not as stupid as you make out.

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Jamie Jones
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Devil

Re: SBC?

"The fact that article indicated that they were running on a telephone system called FreePBX isin't a giveaway that they wanted to do the job on the cheap?"

Those who have ever used FreeBSD would strongly disagree.

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AT&T, Verizon and telco pals file lawsuit to KILL net neutrality FOREVER

Jamie Jones
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Re: In the words of Chris Rock from Lethal Weapon 4

Um... He's dead.

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Jamie Jones
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Unhappy

Re: The GOP has started already

"Matt Wood, policy director at advocacy warrior group Free Press told the Washington Post: "These companies have threatened all along to sue over the FCC's decision, even though that decision is supported by millions of people and absolutely essential for our economy. Apparently some of them couldn't wait to make good on that threat."

A statement like that only make sense in a country where the government is for the corporations, and not for the people.

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Apple Safari update BORKED private browsing

Jamie Jones
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Re: surprised?

I've got off my arse and done something about it.

Updates for those who are interested are here: http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/containing/2471257

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Jamie Jones
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Re: surprised?

I purposely didn't list them because I haven't reported them yet...

However, whilst I suspect it's an unlucky coincidence, those 2 were the only 2 I've checked, leading me to conclude that 'private browsing' mode isn't really taken seriously as an option, so didn't consider it all that important.

Based on this article, it seems I was wrong...

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Jamie Jones
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Mushroom

surprised?

At least 2 current and popular Android browsers do the same thing.

Never rely on 'private browsing mode'!

If you really need to do something less traceable, use something from a trusted group that specialises in this area, not some browser afterthought written by Johnny 9-5 employee.

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Browsers which leak data in incognito mode.

Jamie Jones
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Browsers which leak data in incognito mode.

In the comment section of article http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/03/18/apple_safari_update_borked_private_browsing/, I mentioned that the Android browsers I've checked store all sorts of stuff whilst in "private/incognito browsing mode", but wouldn't name them, as I hadn't reported it (http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/containing/2467909)

Being downvoted, presumably for not reporting it, or for suspected bull pooh, has prompted me to get off my arse and do it. I'll post updates in this thread.

In the meantime, hss anyone else noticed anything similar? I never saw private browsing mode as more than a gimmick that doesn't do much more than update your viewable history, but apparently it's taken seriously...

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Dear departed Internet Explorer, how I will miss you ... NOT

Jamie Jones
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Re: We at least we had just one MS standard browser

" We at least we had just one MS standard browser"

Hmmmm. MSIE 6, MSIE 8,9, 10 ...

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Jamie Jones
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Happy

Re: surely there was a reason that IE became so popular?

" Wow, didn't mean to start a shit storm. I wasn't looking to offend anyone."

By using the "word" 'sheeple' you instantly made everyone reading your post think of commentard Matt Bryant.

It could only go downhill from there...

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Man hauled before beak for using drone to film Premiership matches

Jamie Jones
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Joke

Re: Not dangerous, Actually need *less* restriction and less paranoia

" My small 250 machine will happily hit around 50 mph and my fat bird is a bit slower (but much heavier)"

Don't let her hear you calling her that!

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Jamie Jones
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Boffin

Re: Not dangerous, Actually need *less* restriction and less paranoia

" I have flown a typical consumer drone into myself at speed to demonstrate how safe they are. The scratches were not any worse than falling into a thorny bush."

You, of course,, repeated this scientific experiment with your 3 year old child / arthritic grandmother / heavily pregnant wife as test subjects?

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Jamie Jones
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Re: cool music - can anyone identify it ??

I don't know, but if you like this sort of stuff, check out the earlier stuff from Mortiis

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Zombie SCO shuffles back into court seeking IBM Linux cash

Jamie Jones
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Dead Vulture

"It's a shame El Reg took away the grave stone icon."

You mean this one? ----------------------------->

*grin*

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We need copyright reform so Belgians can watch cricket, says MEP

Jamie Jones
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Happy

Re: Do not

" do not watch any sport on TV, sport is for doing, not watching)"

"Sport is not a spectator Sport" - Jamie Landeg-Jones, 2007.

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Is the DNS' security protocol a waste of everyone's time and money?

Jamie Jones
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Thumb Up

Re: DNS Sec isn't the problem

" I am not an expert in networking, however as I understand it, unless I set my recursive DNS server to generate my own cache of queries by using the primary authoritative sources for every request, then at some point I have to trust the information coming to me via intermediaries is legitimate."

That's correct, and that's what I meant - priming your server from the root servers rather than forwarding to other recursive nameservers.

You don't then have to care what state your ISPs servers are in.

Also, caching works at all levels of the lookup, so it's not as if you're constantly traversing from root.

(e.g. after the first lookup of blah.co.uk, your local server will remember where to go next time it wants to resolve a .co.uk address.)

[ If you are really anal, you could slave/download the root zone locally anyway! ]

Speedwise? If your ISPs nameserver doesn't already have a cached entry, it has to do the same thing your server would do directly.

Even if it is cached, a few extra milliseconds *once* per site won't be noticeable, and even that assumes your ISPs server isn't slightly delayed by all the other people using it.

"After all, the major peering networks need to have this information, and they have lots of people employed to ensure that it is correct. At the end of the day the situation always comes down to the cost/benefits of who should you trust."

I doubt ANY peering uses DNS!

But anyway, for a techie who knows what they are doing (I.e. I wouldn't expect this of grandma), doing this saves time, as you are reducing the number of points of failure, and ensuring your results haven't been altered (of course, this is assuming we are just talking about server operators altering results rather than hacking)

"What I object to in my example above is the unadvertised corruption of the DNS information being passed on to me by sources that are marketed as "trustworthy". My ISP diverting traffic to its own services is one thing - that is expected, and I can bypass it by specifying an external DNS source. Google DNS or OpenDNS diverting my traffic back to my ISP instead of to the public internet or to their own services is quite another. Especially since OpenDNS markets

itself as a trusted independent supplier of DNS information, yet has clearly entered into commercial agreements with ISPs to support their traffic management."

I agree with you in principle, but I fear you may have things a bit confused:

Firstly, 'ISP diverting to it's own service' .... NOOOO! Why would that be OK? Not unless ordered to by a court.

Secondly, 'Google or OpenDNS diverting...' should also be a no-no, but..... :

Basically the resolver shouldn't alter the result at all, but return the same you would get if resolving directly.

However, are you sure this is happening? What you describe is how CDN systems work - if the site concerned has a caching proxy within your ISP, then it's DNS itself will return the address of your local ISPs server - this has nothing to do with third-party manipulation.

(Apologies if I'm not too clear.... It's hard to concentrate as I've finally got fed up of my constantly noisy neighbour, and decided to drown out her shit with very loud bass-heavy happy hardcore.... Passive-agressive? moi?)

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Jamie Jones
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www != internet

" There are better DNS security proposals circulating already," he argued. "They tend to start at the browser and work their way back to the roots. Support those proposals, and keep DNSSEC code off your servers.""

DNS is used for more than web sites.

Also, whilst he makes some valid points (root chain-of-trust and out-of-date crypto), DNSSEC is not fundamentally broken.

The legitimate people who have problems with it are generally trying to do something 'sneaky' that DNSSEC is designed to stop (as it's similar to what the bad player do.) However, people like Google have proved these problems can be resolved.

I don't know.... Calls to 'abandon DNSSEC' remind me of the calls by those that don't understand IPv6 to abandon that too.

And in an age where technological implementations are dictated by bean-counters, and not the techies, speed/success of deployment means bugger-all.... How many times have long resolved security issues raised their ugly head just because 'management' wouldn't budget the fixes?

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Jamie Jones
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Re: DNS Sec isn't the problem

Why not cut out the middleman completely and use your own recursive resolver?

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Google adds evil-code scanning to Play Store

Jamie Jones
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Joke

Re: billions?

I was one of the many who spent a billion last year...

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Well.That.Sucks: New rude dot-word sparks outrage

Jamie Jones
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Re: No-one here is surprised...

No. This isn't about pseudo top level domains, but the way hostnames can be represented dotless within their local domain.

Using the "domain" or "search" commands within /etc/resolv.conf to add the domain name automatically to dotless host names is a well established mechanism, and has been the default on UNIX systems since forever.

From resolv.conf(5):

domain

  • Local domain name. Most queries for names within this domain can use short names relative to the local domain. If no domain entry is present, the domain is determined from the local host name returned by gethostname(3); the domain part is taken to be everything after the first ‘.’. Finally, if the host name does not contain a domain part, the root domain is assumed.

search

  • Search list for host-name lookup. The search list is normally determined from the local domain name; by default, it contains only the local domain name. This may be changed by listing the desired domain search path following the search keyword with spaces or tabs separating the names. Most resolver queries will be attempted using each component of the search path in turn until a match is found. Note that this process may be slow and will generate a lot of network traffic if the servers for the listed domains are not local, and that queries will time out if no server is available for one of the domains.

The issue isn't so much the new domains as such, more the practice of allowing dotless domains (I.e. the top level) resolve A/AAAA/MX records.

A study was done, and it was determined that this shouldn't happen. However, ICANN rejected that proposal.

Paul Vixie on the subject: http://www.circleid.com/posts/20110620_domain_names_without_dots/

And here is the SSAC recommendation

Also see: http://www.ipmirror.com/news/updates/icann-new-gtlds-status

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Jamie Jones
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FAIL

No-one here is surprised...

This short of shit is the tip of the iceberg.

What about .reallysuck, .really-sucks .sucks-big-time etc.etc.

Another more important thing....

Type

ping android

at the command line.. Something I noticed when I'd forgotten that I'd changed the name of one of my devices to something less generic...

Lovely

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Jamie Jones
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Someone should register the British version...

.isnotallthatgoodactually

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This ISN'T Net Neutrality. This is Net Google. This is Net Netflix – the FCC's new masters

Jamie Jones
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Re: God help us now...

As f\r as I'm aware, the US government is one of the better ones at pushing IPv6 adoption.

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Jamie Jones
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Re: You are absolute fools!

Ahh yes. Nothing like a return to the good old Dickensian Workhouse days.

You and your fellow "Get your government hands off my medicare" teaparty morons are the unknowing puppets of the Koch brothers et al.

Idiot

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Bulk interception is NOT mass surveillance, says parliamentary committee

Jamie Jones
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Re: What ass clowns...

WELL SAID, anon!

However, the thing is, it's the government not us that don't seem to know the difference, and as they aren't here commenting, I'm puzzled about who you could be referring to.

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Legalising London's bed-hopping economy is POINTLESS

Jamie Jones
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Facepalm

Thanks for the article photo...

... it helped me understand what a bed is, and what it's used for.

The article was enriched tremendously as a result.

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Canadian bloke refuses to hand over phone password, gets cuffed

Jamie Jones
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Dracula?

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Broadband routers: SOHOpeless and vendors don't care

Jamie Jones
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There seems to have been a few obsessive downvoters in this thread...

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El Reg Redesign - leave your comment here.

Jamie Jones
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Meh

Re: Joseph Eoff

Love and marriage,

Love and marriage,

Go together like a horse and carriage....

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Jamie Jones
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Re: Were you so disappointed that the shitstorm had died down...

I read, and enjoyed, the article too.

The annoyance was trying to read other articles, with the thumbnail flashing back and fore amongst the links to other articles over the right of the screen.

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Jamie Jones
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Unhappy

Were you so disappointed that the shitstorm had died down...

... that you had to include *animated* gifs (that stupid one related to the photoshop story)

Seriously guys, I'm sure whoever is driving all these changes secretly works for a competitor...

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Jamie Jones
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Re: Now that I'm somewhat used to the design

"I think I sum sum it up like this: Previously thereg felt like a somewhat professional/technical site that threw in enough silly or trashy content to keep things light. Now it *feels* like a trashy tabloid that might have an occasional good artical, but I can't spot them with a quick glance anymore so I go elsewhere."

Spot on!

That's just how I feel - I couldn't have put it better.

"My visits have reduced hugely and I've realised that 90% of them now consist of me loading the frontpage, then closing the window without reading anything."

Same here. As I said before, I'm not on some campaign to stop reading, but like you, I rarely get much beyond the front page.

It's been a month now, with no significant fixes, so I guess I'll slowly drift away like many others.

Not that it matters - obviously the demographic the Reg wants to reach for it's advertisers like the shiny-shiny fluff. Indeed, I've noticed for a while the adverts are targetted more at management types than techies.

And now they've added a new bit of bling, with the 'expand comment' function.

Ok, this isn't too major to be annoying, but it shows the priorities are in the bling.

Never once have I read comments and thought "this post is so long that I wish it had been truncated". The full comment is still downloaded anyway, so what's the point?

The thing is, the comments page is one in which vertical scrolling is inevitable. Truncating comments doesn't stop that.

But now, instead of being able to simply scroll through the comments - scrolling past those you don't like - you have to interact to expand comments you do want to read, so yeah, another step backwards

Sigh, can El Reg please use someone other than an adhd afflicted PHB to sign off these stupid changes.

AT LEAST let us disable this shite in our profile (along with the stupid blingy date/time changes - code so unthoughtout that the non javascript fallback shows the day-date only without the time)

But yeah, whilst on the subject of that.... "this post posted in the last few minutes" or "...just now".. What the frigging-facebook-fuck is the use of that?

If you insist on that sort of of code, this is how it should be done:

All date changes made *server side* prior to sending the HTML.

Then, if you have to have the dates changing, have the javascript start up after a timed delay.

That way:

1) It works whether javascript is running or not. Those who have disabled javascript won't expect the date info to auto-update anyway.

2) It still works as intended with javascript enabled, but with the added bonus there's no major date manipulation made to the page on-load.

Oh, and for the 'expand comment' thing, again, if this whole thing really was an issue, the 'fix' would be to have periodic (skip to next post) buttons. That adds the 'feature' without making it more hassle for those who don't care for it.

But I guess that this isn't blingy enough considering it could be achieved with boring old standard 'A' anchors.

Ho hum

EDIT: The top banner ad that is now visibly 'outside' the main page looks like the sort of thing you get on spammy sites which are covered with dodgy ads.

HTH

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Superfish: Lenovo ditches adware, but that doesn't fix SSL megavuln – researcher

Jamie Jones
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Re: About that root certificate...

"I think, and other readers are invited to correct me, that the problem is that all clients have a known, installed, self-signed root CA certificate. If you have an identical copy of the root certificate (something that is normally kept secure, and probably off-line), then you can generate SSL certificates for anything, knowing that they will by accepted by any Lenova client."

My point was that this depends on whether the *superfish* proxy accepts such a certificate as valid - the web clients on the machine are irrelevent if they go through the superfish proxy.

"I think, and other readers are invited to correct me, that the problem is that all clients have a known, installed, self-signed root CA certificate. If you have an identical copy of the root certificate (something that is normally kept secure, and probably off-line), then you can generate SSL certificates for anything, knowing that they will by accepted by any Lenova client."

ummm, well yeah, that's exactly what I wrote (though whilst you got an upvote, 2 moronic plebs downvoted me with no explanation, or mitigation for their lack of brain cells)

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Jamie Jones
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Re: Superfish comes with Lenovo consumer products only

"Because, of course, we wouldn't jeopardize our lucrative SMB and Enterprise business by pulling this shit on them."

Oh, I get it now.

I originally read "Superfish comes with Lenovo consumer products only" to mean that only Lenovo used their software.

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Jamie Jones
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About that root certificate...

This whole thing is disgusting, so please don't think I'm sticking up for Lenovo here, but (not having the equipment to test) I'm puzzled about the issues involving their local root certificate.

Surely it is only accepted by the local browsers when they talk to the superfish program, and NOT the Superfish program as it talks to the outside world, therefore making concerns over thr cerificate key strength/password etc. moot?

Extending on this, interestingly it would become a problem only when the software is removed if the client-installed root certificate is left behind!

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Lenovo shipped lappies with man-in-the-middle ad/mal/bloatware

Jamie Jones
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Re: This is why cert authorities are broken.

Politics.

Too many certificate authorities would lose money, not to mention that NSA/GCHQ probably have some hook into some of them.

I'm sure it will happen, but expect resistance!

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A cookie with a 7,984-year lifespan. Blimey, Roy Batty only got 4!

Jamie Jones
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FAIL

Re: A little tale for you

.... on a simlar vain, many "private browsing" / "incognito mode" equipped browsers (particularly on android) actually are nothing of the sort, as for some reason, they still store stuff in an sqlite db, which remains even after the object is deleted.

Try running "strings" on the ".db" files after a suppposed "private browsing" session!

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HTTP/2 spec gets green light: Faster web or needless complexity?

Jamie Jones
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"They're just so much better than him at everything he's ever wanted to do.)

To wit: https://bjornjohansen.no/caching-varnish-or-nginx

Hmmmm:

502 Bad Gateway

nginx/1.7.9

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$10,000 Ethernet cable promises BONKERS MP3 audio experience

Jamie Jones
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Happy

Re: So Stupid

Even more stupid would be to reply to a comment about not commenting.

I'm certainly not going to do that.

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'Tech' City hasn't got proper broadband and it's like BT doesn't CARE

Jamie Jones
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Happy

Re: Business class...

"500kbps for 9 hours = 15.8Mbits total

15.8Mbits / 150 seconds = 105Mbps "

Of course, where you say "15.8Mbits" you mean 15.8Gbits!

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