* Posts by jzlondon

176 posts • joined 20 Sep 2011

Page:

Mummy, what's the point of Evgeny Morozov's tedious columns?

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: @ DragonLord

Renting is always more expensive than owning in the long term. Otherwise, why would landlords be in business? Most landlords use mortgages to buy their properties.

Renting provides housing for people who can't raise the capital required to buy. It's necessary. But let's not pretend that it's financially as rewarding as ownership in the long term. It isn't.

3
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Happily resorting to dogmatism :-)

I got the joke. It wasn't funny though.

0
1
jzlondon
Bronze badge

You know what else is annoying?

Rambling essays which appear to have started halfway through with no introduction to the subject matter or the background. Who the fuсk is Evgeny Morozov?

16
0

Apple Pay a haven for 'rampant' credit card fraud, say experts

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Bah!

You resigned? That was mature and productive and really showed them how to fix their issues. Well done you.

1
6
jzlondon
Bronze badge

I don't understand why people are so worried about card fraud. When your card gets cloned, the bank is liable, not you. It's alarming to see large lumps of money leaving your account, I agree, but you'll get it back from the bank.

I know, I know, we all pay for it ultimately. But still.

0
0

HTC One M9 hands on: Like a smart M8 in a sharp suit

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Looks very nice, I'm sure. But for the last couple of years, high end phones have been good enough. The reasons for being enthusiastic get less and less compelling.

2
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Sounds good!

You know that you can't be forced into a two year contract by anyone, right? At least not outside somewhere like North Korea.

2
0

Telly behemoths: Does size matter?

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: What's my size?

A TV should fit the room and function well as furniture. Big screens struggle with that even in big rooms.

1
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

In the UK in particular, there's another force at work. Brits - on average - live in ridiculously small houses.

1
0

Jaguar F-Type: A beautiful British thoroughbred

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Petrol engine?

Since Tesla launched the Model S, I struggle to get excited about anything with a petrol or diesel engine. It just seems so ... old fashioned.

0
0

Microsoft man: Internet Explorer had to go because it's garbage

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Not A Competing Product, Really

Safari isn't cross platform.

Well, it runs on iOS and Mac OS, but they're very much part of the same ecosystem. They're also forks of the same OS.

1
3
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: FTFY

Microsoft doesn't write code. People at Microsoft write code. Microsoft is a corporation, not an individual. I doubt that corporate embarassment in front of a small number of non-customer developers is a serious motivating factor for the decision makers at the top of the company.

4
10
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Makes Sense

Two things about ODF:

1. It sucks monkey balls. Really. It's a bad format.

2. Office file formats in general are becoming less and less important.

10
21
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Monoculture

Despite the irony of it being said by Microsoft, the danger of a monoculture is all too real. It's important to have multiple rendering engines out there.

10
0

Hey Apple - what's the $178bn for? Are you down with OTT?

jzlondon
Bronze badge

OTT?

It's annoying when I have to stop reading an article to Google acronyms. Not all of us know as much about the television market as you, so it would be really nice if you could expand the acronym the first time you use it.

6
0

Free WiFi coming to UK trains ... in two years

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: >>Yes, but the train routers have massive aerials.

Trains sets? There's your problem, right there. Try riding on the full size trains instead.

2
1
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Yes, but the train routers have massive aerials.

1
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

And all because the mobile networks are so poor along the train lines that using the internet on a train is like taking a Morris Minor to the Alps.

11
1

Microsoft: Hey, don’t forget Visual Basic! Open source and new features coming

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Dijkstra was talking about early versions of BASIC. You know, the ones with GOTO, line numbers and no support for structuring.

VB, in its modern incarnation, is an utter world away from that. It's almost identical to C# or Java, but more verbose and without the semicolons and curly brackets.

Honestly, if you're going to have an opinion, it's worth having an informed opinion.

0
0

Now Samsung's spying smart TVs insert ADS in YOUR OWN movies

jzlondon
Bronze badge

I'd be selling Samsung stock if I owned any. Which I don't.

1
0

NERDS KICK PUPPY 'bot in brutal attack

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: I love

The body language of those dogs was playful. They were having fun, not attacking. If I was the officer, I'd have got out of the car and calmed them down.

0
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: That...

Re, PetMan.

Fucking hell.

3
0

World's mega-rich tax dodge exposed: Meet the HSBC IT bloke at the heart of damning leak

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Many legitimate reasons to hold a Swiss bank account?

1. You're Swiss.

or 2. You live in Switzerland.

Am I missing any others?

12
2

$10,000 Ethernet cable promises BONKERS MP3 audio experience

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Not the point

This stuff - like all high end "audiophile" stuff - is a veblen good. The only thing that matters is that other people know you can afford it.

0
0

First look: Ordnance Survey lifts kimono on next-gen map app

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Spotted what's missing?

The second screenshot in the article clearly shows contour lines. It would appear that they can be toggled.

0
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

The idea that maps don't cover private property is something that we've learned to accept as a limitation of the Google maps dataset. If you look at paper OS maps, they quite happily show private road layouts.

5
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: What happens to users of the current apps?

You're complaining in the wrong place. Write to the Ordnance Survey.

5
0

Is EU right to expand 'right to be forgotten' to Google.com?

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Taliban

In order for your slippery slope argument to be valid, the Taliban, IS, the Saudis, etc., would have to accept European law as precedent. That doesn't seem likely.

0
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

> "it's likely to have to prepare two different versions of .com as a result of this"

Are you suggesting for a second that there's one single version of Google.com at the moment? There are as many different versions as there are consumers.

0
0

Enough is ENOUGH: It's time to flush Flash back to where it came from – Hell

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Legos going pop in the night

I know this is anal, but the plural of Lego is Lego. Not "Legos".

"Lego bricks" if you really must use an S.

11
2
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Horrifying thought

I really don't want my back account drained outside a qualified medical establishment. What if I was at my desk at work? Think of the mess!

1
0

Facebook's mobile ad bonanza brought it record returns in 2014

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Three billion videos viewed per day? Really?

I'll bet that include all the videos that start playing automatically as you scroll past them.

0
0

What gets the internet REALLY excited? Kittens? No. EXPLODING Kittens

jzlondon
Bronze badge

What is a holiday gift? Is that like a Christmas present?

5
2

Future imperfect: A UK broadband retrospective

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: About time councils put their foot down

Maybe you should consider employing a proofreader before you post comments? I'm not sure what you're trying to say and I don't think I'm alone.

7
0

Google unleashes build-it-yourself 'Ara' SLABLET phones (in Puerto Rico)

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: No way, no how

I want one already.

0
0

This $10 phone charger will wirelessly keylog your boss

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: There is no sensible way to encrypt those on a budget

Microsoft hardware isn't at the low-budget end though and a chip to do basic encrypted key exchange is a few pence.

4
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Information Security Officers...

At most large organisations, information security is an ar$e-covering exercise. They're interested in reducing legal liability by ticking all the appropriate regulatory boxes. They're not interested in actually becoming more secure.

So we get lots of communications on "best practise". Lots of forms to fill in and online training sessions. All this is so that when a breach occurs, the company can say "we gave all the required training".

9
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: There is no sensible way to encrypt those on a budget

If the system has a spare USB socket for a wireless keyboard adapter, it has a spare USB socket for a Bluetooth adapter instead.

4
0

Samsung’s SUPER-speedy SSD is a real power-sipper

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Use of words

They didn't get it right.

A Watt is 1 Joule per second. Your interpretation makes no account of read speed. You say that reading a total of 450mb would consume 1W. What if that read took 10s? Would it stil consume 1W over all those seconds?

You can't actually consume 1W of power. What you can do is draw 1W of power for a certain amount of time.

4
0

Apple's 16GB iPhones are a big fat lie, claims iOS 8 storage hog lawsuit

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: You're GigaByting it wrong

"If you want to have the freedom of buying large storage at reasonable prices or doing what you really want to with your device, you need to be brave enough to break away from Mother Apple."

I bought a 128GB iPhone. The price was reasonable, in the sense that I was happy paying it. Perhaps it was higher than other 128GB phones, but none of them come with iOS.

And as for the freedom to do what I want with my device, well I can. Everything I want to do with it, I can do. I tried an Android once. It was 1000 questions every time I used it, fifteen different apps for each function, no UI consistency. I had less freedom to use it because the damned thing was so fiddly.

Point being, you may not see the point of Apple devices and consider them overpriced, but there are many who disagree with you and are happy to pony up. Not all of us see our phones as pocket computers and toys - some of us want to use them like appliances and are happy to pay a premium for that experience.

2
3

Reg man confesses: I took my wife out to choose a laptop for Xmas. NOOOO

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Look, it's quite simple!

Welcome to 2015. You might find things have changed since you were frozen back in 1954.

2
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: @Dana W

My wife has a PhD from Oxford in aeronautical engineering (well, they call it a DPhil but it's a PhD to me). I have nothing more than a BSc. Her day job is CFD modelling at a nuclear research lab.

I still choose computers for her. It's not so much ability as interest.

0
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

My father-in-law bought a 15" Macbook Pro in October. He's not a techie, but has plenty of money so doesn't really care about cost.

It went wrong last week ("My Safari keeps crashing") so I told him to call Apple, who "fixed" it (trained him how to use it) after an hour of extreme patience on the end of the phone.

But that's the thing - the Mac is perfect for him. It's reliable, easy to use, and when there's a problem Apple are on it with no fuss or drama.

1
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

The thing had a totally different operating system, couldn't run most desktop applications, and what worried you was that it had a slightly slow CPU?

Yeah, that's really the elephant in the room. Sure.

Not that I'm dissing Chromebooks. Far from it, but in this day and age CPU speed is a non-starter for non-gaming home users.

1
0

Renault Captur: Nobody who knows about cars will buy this

jzlondon
Bronze badge

If you can lock the wheels up, the brakes are good enough. Obviously modern cars have ABS to prevent this, but the point stands: brakes can only be *so* good. Unless you start fitting parachutes to the car.

As for handling, the worst situation is that I'm going to need to swerve. Generally, all cars are capable of doing that. And most of the time, safety is about keeping a good distance and not speeding.

Fast cars tempt people into speeding.

2
8
jzlondon
Bronze badge

I don't give a rat's a*se how a car drives and I'm proud of it. How well it functions as transport is key. Does it cost a bomb to run? Is it reliable? Is it safe? Is it big enough?

If cars are your hobby, that's nice for you. But the number of people who need to buy cars is much greater than the number of people who care about the process of driving them.

6
5

Why has the Russian economy plunged SO SUDDENLY into the toilet?

jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Tech Angle

Depends.

A lot of the Register readership works in banking technology - it is one of the biggest employers of technologists in the UK, after all. It's nice to get an angle like this.

Some of us even work for Russian banks - most have London and NYC offices as well as Moscow.

Besides, when did you become editor of the Register?

2
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

Re: Cheap Holiday in Other Peoples' Misery

The collapse of the Russian economy wasn't "orchestrated" by the USA. The Russian economy is a bag of nails and was going to collapse sooner or later regardless.

4
0
jzlondon
Bronze badge

This is a genuinely great article, but it will not be widely read as it sounds like it was written by Al Murray's pub landlord.

0
0

Page:

Forums