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* Posts by jzlondon

93 posts • joined 20 Sep 2011

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Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?

jzlondon

Software

Looks like a really good piece of kit. As soon as they release the iOS version, I'm in.

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The iPAD launch BEFORE it happened: SPECULATIVE GUFF ahead of actual event

jzlondon

You guys need a "Like" button on the bottom of your articles.

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Sway: Microsoft's new Office app doesn't have an Undo function

jzlondon

Off Topic

When the hell are the Register going to join 2008 and introduce AJAX comments?

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Chap runs Windows 95 on Android Wear

jzlondon

Re: Not what it seems

The real kudos goes to the people developing aDosBox in the first place, but they didn't install Windows 95 on it and attract your Mayfly-like attention :)

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jzlondon

Not what it seems

He says in the captions of the video itself that he's using "... ADosBox which is available on the Play store". So what he's done is load an app onto the watch, then load a Win95 vhd (probably downloaded neat off the internet) onto that, probably using the app's own UI.

Interesting exercise, and points for originality, but hardly the display of virtuoso hacking you're making it out to be. Even for a sixteen year old.

I'm not dissin', just sayin'.

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Take THAT, hated food! It's OVER, tedious chewing! Soylent strikes back with version 1.1

jzlondon

Only in America

The world's first autistic food.

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DARPA joins math-secured microkernel race

jzlondon

Easiest way to compromise a network? Bribe a sysadmin.

Job done.

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jzlondon

Maths. Not math.

<shudder>

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Hate Facebook? Hate it enough to spend $9k fleeing it? Web 'country club' built for the rich

jzlondon

The tagline of the website is "For people with more money than time".

More money than something, that's for sure.

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X-Men boffins demo nanomagnets to replace transistors

jzlondon

Another week, another way to save Moore's law.

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Indian MOM just LOVES it on Mars, tweets fave holiday snap

jzlondon

Re: If I were to congratulate India for their technical achievement

The BBC comments section frightens me, and I'm not easily frightened.

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jzlondon

Re: Do you get what you pay for?

Pretty easy to take good photos from that sort of distance, with that sort of velocity. It's a question of payload weight - bigger lenses are heavier and more precise tracking equipment is also heavier.

The bigger the payload, the higher the costs. The point above stands - India's achievement is outstanding, but other more expensive missions were not a waste of money, they were doing much more.

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Apple iPhone 6 Plus: GORGEOUS FAT pixel density - but it's WASTED

jzlondon

If they were overpriced, they wouldn't sell. That's the thing about pricing.

They're just overpriced *for you*.

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4K-ing excellent TV is on its way ... in its own sweet time, natch

jzlondon

Sounds brilliant. I'll definitely buy one wh en t .... buffering ...

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Quit drooling, fanbois - haven't you SEEN what the iPhone 6 costs?

jzlondon

Travelling and operator lockin is the dealbreaker for me too - I'm writing this right now in Moscow using a cheap Megafon data SIM bought just for this two week business trip.

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jzlondon

Re: @h4m0ny, re Capitalism

I doubt that's true - cross subsidy is difficult to do in a competitive market. If one network was subsidising expensive phones with cheap ones, other networks would be able to easily lower prices and attract those users.

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jzlondon

And the reasons that Apple can continue to command a premium are varied, but not really about the hardware costs.

It's a combination of non-geek design, iOS, and a smidge of the conspicuous consumption factor.

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jzlondon

I have an iPhone which I paid full rate for with no contract. It worked out fractionally cheaper over two years, with the big advantage of no operator lock-in.

But it's amazing how many iPhone owners express shock when they found out how much I paid, even though they paid the same amount themselves. Because the price they paid was hidden and they allowed themselves to be fooled.

Price psychology is such an important part of this market.

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Epiphany hits Raspberry Pi founders, users

jzlondon

If the Raspberry Pi is intended to help children experiment and learn to code, why all the focus on end-user desktop software?

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A-level results: Before you smile at that jump-for-joy snap...

jzlondon

These days going to university is synonymous with taking a three year course in Hair Care (with Powerpoint) at the University of North-West Runcorn. An apprenticeship is definitely better than that.

But is an apprenticeship better than a physics or maths degree at Bristol or Sheffield? No. Not in a month of Sundays.

The problem is that the concept of a degree has been watered down.

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Dolby Atmos is coming home and it sounds amazing

jzlondon

Films are telling a story. Past a certain point, the fidelity of reproduction is unimportant - it's the story that matters.

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Nuts to your poncey hipster coffees, I want a TESLA ELECTRO-CAFE

jzlondon

What happened to a good old cup of tea?

And when did shop assistants start being called "barristas"? What is this, America?

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YES, iPhones ARE getting slower with each new release of iOS

jzlondon

Re: New IOS = New IOS Support in Apps = Overhead

App upgrades only hit system performance at the exact time they're upgrading, which is - for most people - overnight when plugged in. Once the app is upgraded it doesn't consume processor cycles until it runs.

The bigger issue here isn't just that the apps have support for the new OS, but also that they have support for new hardware. The app developers are subject to the same drivers as Apple themselves - they are targetting new hardware that can do more without appearing slow, so they are driven to do that. As the population of users migrates to newer hardware, the commercial imperative to support older hardware decreases and the app developers spend less time worrying about performance on older devices and more time competing with other app developers for the best experience for the biggest user groups. Having the best experience often means utilising the hardware to its maximum capabilities.

Tim's absolutely right. It's not so much that anyone's "at fault" as it is about simple economics.

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jzlondon

Re: Bricking Old Hardware

No, they won't be doing that for a number of reasons:

1. Their customer reputation is too important to them and they know it. They make plenty of money from organic sales.

2. The engineers and designers at Apple - and it is a very engineer-led company - wouldn't be happy.

3. The policy would leak to the press, or at least the risk of it leaking would be too high.

But you're right, you're definitely a cynic :)

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jzlondon

Re: Somewhat missing the point

There's a specific thing with the original iPad at work here. They didn't give it enough RAM, even for the time.

It was released with iOS3 which killed processes as soon as you hit the home button and even then it struggled a bit. iOS4 - a genuinely important upgrade - was a very squiffy on the original iPad. I remember Safari crashing fairly regularly on mine.

An iPad 2 will quite happily run iOS7 without crashing.

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Adam Afriyie MP: Smart meters are NOT so smart

jzlondon

It's not all about cost. I'm just about to replace an old inherited freezer with a new model purely on efficiency grounds, but not because of the cost. Because of the CO2 emissions.

Why is it so unpalatable to talk about CO2 savings these days? Why must everything be framed in terms of financial benefits alone?

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jzlondon

MP editorials? Does this mean that the Register has now hit the proper mainstream? Congratulations.

It's about time technology publications were treated seriously outside technology circles.

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Swell. Apple buys 'Pandora-for-talk-radio' app... for $30 meeellion

jzlondon

Re: Talk Radio

iPlayer works well abroad. You just need to use a UK VPN, of which there are many - some free, some paid. Even the best ones cost only a couple of pounds a month and almost all work on Android, iOS and desktops.

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BEST BATTERY EVER: All lithium, all the time, plus a dash of carbon nano-stuff

jzlondon

Nope. Lithium is very common. Are you thinking of the rare earths?

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jzlondon

The real question is, how cheap can they make it?

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Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE

jzlondon

Re: Bandwidth caps?

Because people tend to download a lot more stuff than they actually watch from start to finish.

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jzlondon

The quality of the content matters far more than the quality of the picture. I am still perfectly happy with my standard definition TV, but would like to see more money being invested in high quality programming, particularly the arts and sciences, rather than on glossy pictures full of cheap nonsense.

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Orange spent weekend spamming customers with TXTs

jzlondon

Anyone else remember when Orange first started up in the 90's? They were cutting edge, innovative, different. Wildfire? Inclusive minutes? Two phone lines on the same SIM?

And the same is true of T-Mobile (or One2One as they were known). Completely free calls inside London.

Now they're just sh1te. The MVNOs and Three are where the innovation is happening.

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Windows 7, XP and even Vista GAIN market share again

jzlondon

This stuff is such a crying shame. Why can't Microsoft see what they need to do? It's not hard.

Bring back the Start Menu. Sure, improve it by all means. But it's got to be functionally rich.

Focus on the desktop experience for laptops and desktop and the tablet experience for tablets. Don't try to mix them.

Give the desktop UI a damn good cleanup and overhaul. Declutter it and remove the pointless complexity and fiddliness.

Replace the umpteen control panel(s) with some sort of cohesive, straightforward settings system that doesn't require you to dig five layers down to do simple things.

Replace creaking subsystems such as printing, scanning, sound control, bluetooth management with new up-to-date versions.

Bundle a couple of decent apps for home users

Build a Windows Store for desktop apps.

I could go on. If they did some of these things, people would upgrade.

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We need to talk about SPEAKERS: Sorry, 'audiophiles', only IT will break the sound barrier

jzlondon

Re: Audiophile?

More than that, a perfect square wave would violate the laws of physics as it would require the atoms in the air (or whatever medium) to move faster than the speed of light.

But the idea isn't to reproduce a perfect square wave, simply to do a much better job of it.

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jzlondon

Gosh, what a lot of armchair scientists in the comments section today.

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jzlondon

Dawkins is one of the pre-eminent experts in the field. He may also be a writer, but he's a first rate evolutionary biologist with a large body of highly original and respected work behind him.

If you're going to post on things like that, perhaps preface with the disclaimer: "I have no knowledge of the following topic, but this is my opinion"

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jzlondon

Abso-bloody-lutely. It's high time that some properly clever disruptive technology exposed the audio emperor's new clothes.

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We got behind the wheel of a Tesla S electric car. We didn't hate it

jzlondon

Re: There are cheaper, less environmentally harmful options.

The point I'm trying to make isn't that it's super-safe, just that it's clearly not unsafe, which the concern about the screen would imply.

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jzlondon

Re: Wait, the screen is used for what?

I love all these people speculating on humungous, glaring problems that the car doesn't, in fact, have. It's been driven for half a billion miles by tens of thousands of owners over more than a year.

But, hey, maybe they forgot windscreen wiper stalks and some random Register commenter is the first to think of that?

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jzlondon

Re: how are they likely to be in Winter?

It turns out that this question has been asked a lot before, surprisingly. And there are actual, factual answers available.

It also turns out that heating the cabin isn't a major drain compared to moving the car. And Norway is one of Tesla's biggest markets, and much of the northern US, not to mention Canada, has very harsh winters. Etc. Etc.

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jzlondon

Re: Google maps? Really?

The Tesla navigation system has offline map data.

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jzlondon

Re: There are cheaper, less environmentally harmful options.

Your personal opinion is great 'n all, but is refuted by the numbers.

The average road death rate in the US, where almost all Teslas have been delivered to date, is approximately 1.2 per hundred million miles. As of about two weeks ago, Tesla Model S's had been driven 344 million miles with no deaths. And not just that, but no serious, permanent injuries.

Does that sound like a car that is unsafe? Maybe nobody dying is a fluke, due to the relatively low sample size. But no serious permanent injuries either? And on top of that, it achieved the highest safety rating of any car ever tested in the US.

http://insideevs.com/elon-musk-344-million-miles-serious-permanent-injury-death-tesla-model-s/

So while I understand your concern that the screen might be a distraction, it would appear that in practice it's not.

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Official: MoJ IT workers on STRIKE over outsourcing job fears

jzlondon

I don't understand why everyone's accusing the government of underhandedness. There's nothing underhanded here - they're Tories. Selling stuff off, running things on the cheap, valuing the markets and private companies above all else...

That's what they do and we, as a country, elected the bastards. It's not underhanded, it's exactly what we voted for.

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jzlondon

Re: Corrupt troughing bastards

Calling our bunch as corrupt and criminal as Putin's Russia is a gross overstatement which does nothing to help.

First, because it's not fair to our MPs who are not uniformly bad apples, nor even mostly bad apples. Second, because it's an insult to Russians who have to live under a genuinely corrupt system.

Go to Russia and see the difference. I am typing this from Moscow, where I am a regular visitor.

You may be upset with our system and may not like some of the participants, but there's no need to use hyperbole.

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jzlondon

Re: Corrupt troughing bastards

"troughing". Is that your catchphrase? Not a word I've heard before in this context.

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Supercomputing speed growth hits 'historical low' in new TOP500 list

jzlondon

Re: physical reality is tightly coupled..

As an aside, "I expect few reading this to get the jibe".

Not cool. Just sayin'.

Besides, this is the Register and many of the readers and commenters are professionals or academics in the field.

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jzlondon

Re: physical reality is tightly coupled..

I'm not saying that there's no requirement for these machines, just that the bulk of the growth in demand is elsewhere. Increasingly the workloads can either be run effectively on decoupled architecture, or can be run less effectively but much more cheaply on it. It's also interesting, in light of your comment about physical coupling, that two of the machines on the list are virtual and hosted on commercial cloud services. What does that say about the internal consistency of the SC500 list?

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jzlondon

This article says more about the increasing irrelevancy of the Top 500 list and the difficulty in pinning down what actually constitutes a single computer these days than it does about any flattening of the trend in our compute capabilities.

The need for massive compute capacity is greater than ever, but is now being filled by distributed, network based resources. You won't see Google, Amazon, Facebook, Microsoft or Apple on that list*, but I wouldn't be surprised if those companies could all comfortably top it.

* Not quite true: one of the "supercomputers" on the list is actually an Amazon EC2 instance cluster, another is hosted on Microsoft Windows Azure.

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Today's get-rich-quick scheme: Build your own bank

jzlondon

Sounds like a really good pub idea to solve a problem that doesn't exist.

1. From a risk perspective, current account balances are already held with the Bank of England, in that they're directly guaranteed by HM Government.

2. Fractional reserve banking is one of the greatest financial ideas of the modern era. Our economy couldn't function at the pace it does without it - there simply isn't the capital. Why on Earth would you want to get rid of it?

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