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* Posts by Spoddyhalfwit

161 posts • joined 16 Sep 2011

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WORLD CUP SHOCK: England declared winner in 2-1 defeat to Italy

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: No matter how hard you try

Football may be dull, but at least its only 90 minutes of dull rather than 5 days.

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Samsung in a TIZZY: OH PLEASE make apps for our Tizen Z mobe

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: BadaOS all over again.

"Without apps, Tizen,(and BadaOS before it), Windows Phone all just stack up in the queue of failed mobile operating systems."

Bit silly to include windows phone in that list... Might have been true a year or two back but now there are loads, and just like android and iOS it's all the major ones people actually use and then hundreds of thousands of fart machines and the like.

Will be interesting to see if Samsung can do what MS did and get devs to fill their AppStore. I'm not too sure they can... All the time android is so massive for them I don't see them pushing Tizen hard enough.

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Chap rebuilds BBC Micro in JavaScript

Spoddyhalfwit

Fanboy Alert

I wonder if I could kick off a fanboy war for the over 40s by mentioning that the BBC was shite/superior (delete as appropriate) when compared to the Commodore 64.

Recalling some of the playground arguments of my childhood years, and some of the fanboy wars that go on here on the reg to this day its amazing that the technology has moved on leaps and bounds, but people really aren't that different.

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Larry Ellison looks out from his island paradise and thinks: I wanna buy the LA Clippers

Spoddyhalfwit

How to make basketball interesting

Watching abnormally tall men drop a ball through a hoop isn't really very interesting.

Keep the hoop the same but limit the game to players under 5 foot in height.

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Anatomy of OpenSSL's Heartbleed: Just four bytes trigger horror bug

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: OpenSSL is open source, most financial institutions don't use open source encryption.

If you think those bugs are on a par with heartbleed, you don't understand its seriousness.

see eg

http://threatpost.com/difficulty-of-detecting-openssl-heartbleed-attacks-adds-to-problem/105354

It might mean revoking your SSL certificates and getting new ones. Pricey if you have a lot, and time consuming.

Why heartbleed is the most dangerous security threat on the web (curiously it doesn't list any of those ones that you thought was as serious)

http://www.theverge.com/2014/4/8/5594266/how-heartbleed-broke-the-internet

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Spoddyhalfwit

Re: OpenSSL is open source, most financial institutions don't use open source encryption.

IIS is immune to this attack, as its not using Open SSL. Its often criticized, but I don't remember any of our IIS servers ever having any vulnerability on this scale. I know I'm going to get downvoted for saying that by the fanatics, but its true.

Now I just have to worry about all the services I'm using that do use OpenSSL - my bank, my ISP, etc.

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I QUIT: Mozilla's anti-gay-marriage Brendan Eich leaps out of door

Spoddyhalfwit

From another angle

I really can't understand what kind of person spends 1000 bucks of their own money trying to implement a law to stop others doing something they themselves can do. If two people want to get married to each other what the hell do I care? It's none of my business. I think you've got to be a bit creepy to want to spend 1000 bucks of your own money on that... Surely there are more pressing causes?

In the end he has every right to do that of course, and those he sought to legislate against have every right to hound him out of his job. So neither side has committed a crime.

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'Arrogant' Snowden putting lives at risk, says NSA's deputy spyboss

Spoddyhalfwit

Won't believe him

Until he explains what Angela Merkel and the Brazilian state oil company have to do with terrorism, drug smuggling and child abuse, and why Clapper lied in public to congress then I imagine most people aren't going to swallow his bullshit, and will view Snowden as a (rather brave) whistleblower.

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Syrian Electronic Army slurps a MILLION reader passwords from Forbes

Spoddyhalfwit

As well as having a salt value for each record they should be aware that these will be stolen in any db compromise. They should in addition have a long random salt that is appended to every password that is within the code and so not viewable via a db attack. eg if they appended

Dhgnd87€QAa!Po89'rndns

To each password plus record salt before hashing, it would make a brute force attack much harder assuming this string wasn't known by the attacker as it wasn't in the db.

Also a 6 byte salt per record seems a bit short.

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Russian cybercrooks shun real currencies, develop private altcoins

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: 'criminals don't trust Bitcoin'

Lost track of the number of times I've read bitcoin's obituary from a poster on here. But it keeps bouncing back.

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New password system lets planet Earth do the hard work

Spoddyhalfwit

More detail

How will this work in practice? The world is a big place - so I assume you don't have to zoom in from a world map. I recall frightening statistics about how many Americans can't find the USA on a world map, and I would imagine things aren't that different for some Brits. If they can't find their own country how might they find another one, or find their town, let alone "special place" on a world map.

So perhaps instead I first have to enter "wall street new york" and then click/circle a particular area of that location - probably a little better, but ultimately you're still defining a single bit of data that can be used to login if an attacker gets it.

2 factor authentication must be the way to go - where a memorized password is combined with some kind of physical token.

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WHEW! OpenBSD won't CloseBSD (for now) after $100,000 cash windfall

Spoddyhalfwit

If you read the article you'd see they needed cash for the electricity bill.

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Modern spying 101: How NSA bugs Chinese PCs with tiny USB radios - NYT

Spoddyhalfwit
Terminator

Re: Proving His Enemies Right

@formerkowloontonger

Well you have "loon" in your posting name?

Having read some of your previous posts I see you are one of those American folks who has permanent skid marks in your y-fronts from worrying about Muslim terrorists (while no doubt ignoring the staggering number of Americans shot each year by other Americans exercising their right to bear arms). Hardly surprising then that you soak up whatever Uncle Sam tells you without questioning what involvement Angela merkel or the Brazilian state oil company (or Cletus in the trailer next to you) might have in plotting Jihad.

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Spoddyhalfwit

Re: Proving His Enemies Right

@john savard

The NSA and US govt lost the "right to privacy" when the decided to start spying on allied leaders, foreign businesses, charities, not to mention ordinary people.

To believe they are motivated by some urge to keep us or Taiwan or anywhere else safe is naive at best.

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Mozilla CTO Eich: If your browser isn't open source (ahem, ahem, IE, Chrome, Safari), DON'T TRUST IT

Spoddyhalfwit

Not just back doors

The risk with open source projects isn't so much back doors as insertion of deliberate bugs. Many modern vulnerabilities are buffer over runs and the like... Easily inserted, hard to find, and when found look like an accident rather than deliberate back door.

Open source is certainly better than closed source, but with the NSA with their tentacles everywhere, I imagine open source projects are probably riddled with their handiwork.

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Snowden leak journo leaks next leak: NSA, GCHQ dying to snoop on your gadgets mid-flight

Spoddyhalfwit

Weapons proliferators

Like these?

http://edition.cnn.com/2011/12/29/world/meast/u-s--saudi-fighter-sale/

It's okay for the USA to sell fighter planes to the nut job dictator who runs Saudi, a regime linked to numerous Al Qaeda plots

http://nypost.com/2013/12/15/inside-the-saudi-911-coverup/

The NSA are in the great tradition of the imbeciles who kept us safe by training Bin laden and his buddies in Afghanistan. But they all get to live in nice houses paid for by our taxes, for "keeping us safe"

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Google BLASTS BACK at Apple, Microsoft, Sony in Android patent WAR

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: Rockstar claims to be independent from Apple and Microsoft

Google would never base it's business model on ripping off other peoples intellectual property ;)

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Get lost, fanbois: Nokia pulls HERE Maps from Apple's App Store

Spoddyhalfwit

WP here

I love the Nokia maps software on wp8 and the ability to store maps offline, but there is one annoying thing... I set up saved locations, ie friends houses etc. It stores these but as addresses rather than XY coords... So next time I select that location for the sat nav it wants to got to the web to look up the XY... Not good if I'm travelling and don't have roaming on. Why can't it save the XY coords when I save a location?

I also use google maps and apple maps on IPad but neither compares to Nokia

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Ross Ulbricht: 'Oi! Give me back my $34m in Silk Road Bitcoin booty'

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: strange...

@pet peeve

"The interesting thing about bitcoin is that a bunch of people have decided that because some computers have spent a lot of time searching for chains of hashes with special attributes, that some bitstreams derived from those hashes have value"

Look through the history of currencies and you will find that this is the very essence of many of them. If something has inherent value, ie is useful for something else it doesn't make a very good currency... It would be bad for the economy to tie up useful things or commodities rather than use them.

Since bitcoin can be used right now today to transfer money, buy things online (including things, often illegal, that can't be readily bought in other ways) and since it's quantity is limited, then it has real value. I'd certainly trust it more than the pound or dollar, as our governments seem to be converts to Mubabeconomics.

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BlackBerry ends write-off of a year with $4.4 BEELLLION write-down

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: Hmm ...

This is where Nokia could have been if they'd stuck with it

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Andrew Fentem: Why I went to an arts quango to fund pre-iPhone multitouch

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: So, Why did he go to an arts quango to fund his pre-iPhone multitouch?

I guess if its called the National Endowment for SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY and the Arts, he might well have believed that it wasn't just an arts quango.

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Spoddyhalfwit

Amen

So much of what he says hits the nail right on the head.

The reason Britain is in such a sorry mess is because people like this are designing touch screens while the country is run by PPE graduates (with whatever coloured rosette on) who've never had a proper job.

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Go on, buy Bitcoin. But DON'T say we didn't WARN YOU

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: banking regulator: Don't come crying to us when someone steals it

The great thing about real banks is you can put your real money in them and be guaranteed to have lost money thanks to inflation. If you're lucky the bank will even charge you for the pleasure of losing money, or spending it.

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HALF of all Bitcoin-investing Winklevoss twins predict $400bn market for the currency

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: Mining Costs and Speed

Tony Rogers

I looked at buying a mining rig too... I don't think the numbers add up... As you mentioned the difficulty of mining coins will rise quickly so your yield will fall rapidly. You said:

"A large hike in the future value of a Bitcoin is required and expected as the alternative is my dangly bits cut off !"

Better to have spent your 160 quid (plus cost of electricity) on bitcoins, and rely on them going up in value, because I doubt you'll ever mine the number of bitcoins you could have bought for 160 quid at time of purchase of your rig.

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Spoddyhalfwit

I first got into bitcoins about 2 years ago. Since then I've lost count of the number of times people have written it off, for the price (and adoption) to continue growing. We have the same old comments here I read 2 years back, but just a bit more bitter that they didn't buy a few hundred back then rather than writing it off.

Back in 1996 when I was working for one of the UKs first internet companies I lost count of the number of times people told me the internet/www was "just another CB radio-type fad".

Just like the internet Bitcoins offer something new... An ability to do things that weren't possible before. Much of the world has no access to banking for example. As bitcoins become more widely accepted I could make payment to someone in Africa direct to his mobile phone, even if he has no credit card, no bank account, no paypal. Virtually zero fees, no currency conversion required.Numerous other opportunities spring to mind.

Some people will alway write off innovations just as they did with the internet.

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Stuxnet 2 in the works, claims Iranian news agency

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: Title is too long

"Yes, because if I was planning to stop someone aquiring nuclear weapons the first thing I'd do is warn them I was coming and how I was planning to stop them."

You're right! If I was going to implement an Orwellian spying operation on everyone including my own population's electronic communications I'd never tell them about it. So Snowden must be a hallucination/imposter. Because security services never leak.

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Spoddyhalfwit

Re: To be fair cable cutters are cheap.

"Is it THAT hard to cut the internet from their facility's " critical " machinery ?"

Wasn't the innovative aspect of Stuxnet that it didn't hack centrifuges directly via the net, but was designed to make its way there via USB, boot sectors and other methods, since the centrifuges and the systems that controlled them weren't connected to the net? So there is no internet cable to cut.

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Bitcoin value breaks $1,000 barrier in FRENZIED HYPEGASM

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: Oompa Loompa Dollars!

They aren't totally worthless if I can buy things with them. And I can.

I suspect the current price is a bubble - bitcoin price has been a series of bubbles.

But the system has real merit

- easy to send around the world without relying on third parties (like Paypal who won't deal with some users due to US sanctions, or just decide to put holds on accounts for arbitrary reasons)

- low transaction costs (free in many cases)

- finite - no mass printing by government inflating away your savings

I suspect therefore that over time (perhaps a few years) the price will stabilize somewhat and bitcoins will be ever more widely accepted

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US senator asks: Will Bitcoin replace Swiss bank accounts?

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: Yes, HSBC Bank.................

@Evil Auditor

"Gold is freely tradeable and has, besides jewellery and some industrial niche use, no inherent value."

Worth noting that the US made it illegal for private citizens to hold gold (since repealed)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Order_6102

They can try and take my Bitcoins from my cold dead hands.

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Google bigs up iOS Gmail app, leaves room for fat fingers of iPad-fondlers

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: Regolism too far

I prefer "to ejaculate"

Probably why I get so little work done.

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Pop OS X Mavericks on your Mac for FREE while you have LUNCH

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: And now the world waits...

I'm hearing lots of Mac fans in here today. Aren't they supposed to be in a queue somewhere?

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Wozniak: Please, whatever you do, DON'T buy me an iPad Air

Spoddyhalfwit

Why the obsession with thin?

I don't get why these new products go to so much length to knock a millimetre off the thickness of the device. I'd rather pay less, or have more battery. A slightly thinner iPad in my bag isn't going to be noticed (I have mine in a sleeve anyway).

Its the same with laptops and phones. I have a nice Asus ultrabook... its pretty thin - I have no interest in having a thinner one. Then I have a Lumia 920, I love the wireless charging, but on the 925 they removed that to save a bit of weight and thickness. I don't see the point - I've never once thought "this phone is too heavy".

We seem to be getting to an age where innovation is largely about making something that is already amazingly thin even thinner, yet phones seem to be growing in other dimensions in any case for a larger screen, so whats the point of selling it to me on the basis of how thin it is?

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Shadowy drug fans threaten FBI agents, vow to 'avenge' Silk Road shutdown

Spoddyhalfwit

These guys need to take a chill pill

If they can find somewhere new to buy them.

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Iranian cyberwar chief shot dead. Revolutionary Guard: Assassination? Don't 'speculate'

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: @Destroy All Monsters

You said something against Israel, a state that is based on the racial supremacy of a particular race.

That means you're an anti Semite, a Nazi and probably a paedophile too.

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Germany warns: You just CAN'T TRUST some Windows 8 PCs

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: Just when you thought it couldn't get any worse..

"Ballmer is heavily invested in Metro/Win8, and he's such a major stockholder in Microsoft that he effectively is impossible to dethrone. "

Great day to make that post!

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Report: Secret British spy base in Middle East taps region's internet

Spoddyhalfwit

I wonder if their cable can help them read this story, because on the Daily Mail site its dead.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2270219/U-S-planned-launch-chemical-weapon-attack-Syria-blame-Assad.html

Fortunately its still in the wayback machine

http://web.archive.org/web/20130129213824/http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2270219/U-S-planned-launch-chemical-weapon-attack-Syria-blame-Assad.html

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British spooks seize tech from Snowden journo's boyfriend at airport

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: He was lucky :-(

Fortunately we have the Queen and her quite marvellous son, they are very concerned about the rights of us common folk, and would shoot down any draconian laws like this. Thank god for democracy eh?

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Waiting for a Windows Phone update? Let's talk again next year

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: basics

WP8 already supports some of this.

Text or IM use the same sound, but you can separately specify sound for voicemail alert, and new email.

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Spoddyhalfwit

Nokia Lumia 920

I love my Lumia, but MS really needs to be rolling out updates more frequently. Some things are desperately needed

- VPN support (an absolute must for corporate use)

- notification centre

- ability to set speaker volume separate from ringer volume (why on earth wasn't that there out of the box)

On a relatively immature platform where you're playing catchup you've got to be rolling out feature updates as and when they are ready. I'd have expected a new OS release at least every 6 months, and minor releases every 2-3 months.

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The Reg's best-looking reader reveals list of jobs for the beautiful

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: Good looking on Radio

You missed out Alan Partridge! Once voted the second sexiest radio presenter in the whole of Norwich.

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Microsoft and FBI storm ramparts of Citadel botnets

Spoddyhalfwit

What was Eadon's blog running when it got hacked?

Surely not windows?

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Microsoft parades Windows 8.1, the version you may actually want

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: Not really fixing any of the problems

@nigel 11

"Linux solved that problem ages ago. When you log in you select the UI you prefer from a list of those installed on your system. If your UI of preference isn't on the list and you have admin access to your machine, you download and install the one you want. "

In fairness that is the case with windows 8... I didnt like Metro... One classic start menu download later and a little tinkering and I had a fully working desktop with a start menu.

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Phones for the elderly: Testers wanted for senior service

Spoddyhalfwit

My mum and dad both have Doro phones, which they like.

Unfortunately I still can't get ever get through to them because they always have their phones turned off... Only turning them on when they want to make a call. They just cant grasp that you can leave the phone on for hours or indeed days in case someone wants to ring you. So they need to have no Off button on this phone.

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'LulzSec leader's' victim named: tiny Oz council

Spoddyhalfwit

Wasnt Al Capone eventually jailed for tax evasion?

Isn't it conceivable that like Al Capone this guy has indulged in much criminality but this defacement is the only one at present where they have enough evidence for a conviction? Other charges may or may not follow as evidence is developed.

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Bing uncloaks Klingon translator

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: And how many people will use that?

You're forgetting the millions of those on the Klingon home world who have it as their first language.

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New Lumia 925: This, loyalists, is the BIG ONE you've waited for

Spoddyhalfwit

Re: Not what I was waiting for

The 920 doesn't have xenon flash... I think that was only on the new 928.

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Spoddyhalfwit

Personally I've got quite into the wireless charging of the 920... Seems a backwards step to remove that.

Does look beautiful though!

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Marlinspike: Saudi mobe network tried to recruit me to sniff citizens' privates

Spoddyhalfwit

Saudi is a pretty brutal dictatorship, as is the UAE.

But you won't find obama or Cameron talking about that, because they are OUR brutal dictators.

Cameron and Obama are currently helping the Saudis impose their particular brand of "freedom" on Syria... One has to feel sorry for the Syrians... It's out of the frying pan and into the fire, and they won't have us to condemn on their behalf when it's the Saudis bugging the communications and beating the living daylights out of them.

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New Ubuntu for phones due 'by end of May' – usable this time

Spoddyhalfwit

Does Amazon get to listen to all my calls?

They'll have to fight it out with Rupert Murdoch's boys.

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Watchdog: Y'know what Bitcoin really needs? A REGULATOR!

Spoddyhalfwit

The problem is that the US can only regulate transactions that happen in the US.

And with bitcoin, the whole point is that the transactions are virtual, and anonymous. If users choose to make it this way, its not possible to know who is exchanging currency and where they are located.

So the Feds can legislate all they like, its not going to have much effect.

Bitcoin is being driven by the failure of state currencies - the issuers of fiat paper can never resist the temptation to finance their overspending by printing ever more currency, until its worthless. They are the biggest factor driving bitcoin.

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