* Posts by Larry F54

697 posts • joined 13 Sep 2011

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New Forum Wishlist - but read roadmap first

Larry F54

Will "delete account" delete all my posts?

Will the "delete account" function delete all my posts? If not, how can I get them deleted?

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PETA monkey selfie lawsuit threatens wildlife photography, warns snapper at heart of row

Larry F54
Meh

Re: not a pro/anti-copyright issue

Rule 14 of the official guidelines says "You may end up getting flagged if you continually file unwarranted reports." --- note "continually". I can't remember the last time I clicked "report abuse". I might use it as often as once a year.

And again, I ask for an honest answer as to whether a user would be allowed to make that insult to a staff member.

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Larry F54
Unhappy

Re: not a pro/anti-copyright issue

"In which case, we cannot report an abusive post from a staffer. Whilst such posts are rare, to make such a change would be a significantly retrograde step."

If you click it on a staffer's post, you get punished for it. So I think it's a trap.

(Mods, I do not understand why my previous post to this effect was rejected. It's only fair for users to know that they are not allowed to click that!)

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Larry F54
Meh

Re: not a pro/anti-copyright issue

In what world did you think using the "report comment" button in the middle of a reasoned discussion with a Reg staffer was an intelligent idea?

A mostly reasoned discussion --- if I wrote "the whacky version of reality that exists inside your head" to him, would it pass moderation?

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Larry F54
Meh

Re: not a pro/anti-copyright issue

Could you update no.14 of the rules to reflect this policy?

In the long term, a technical solution would be best: modify the code that generates the forum pages so that when it includes the "vulture badge", it doesn't put the "report abuse" trap button in!

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Larry F54
Meh

But couldn't PETA cite pet inheritances as a counterargument for making it relevant? If an animal can own property by contract law, why not a copyright?

Can animals own property? I'm under the impression that if you want to "leave your estate to your cat", you actually have to leave it to a trust whose purpose is to take care of your cat.

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Larry F54
Meh

Re: Oh yes it is

PETA are not arguing against copyright --- they are claiming the monkey should be treated as the author and therefore own the copyright, as the article clearly states:

"Slater and Wildlife Personalities have, in this judicial district and elsewhere, repeatedly infringed on Naruto's copyright in the Monkey Selfies by falsely claiming to be the photographs' authors and by selling copies of the images for their profit," claims the filing.

Some of the other parties jumping on the bandwagon may have different motives, of course.

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Larry F54
Meh

not a pro/anti-copyright issue

This isn't a pro/anti-copyright matter, or even a pro/anti-Big-Copyright issue --- it's an animal rights issue. No-one is trying to invalidate the copyright; PETA are trying (wrongly IMO) to assert that animals can own copyrights.

The question of who pushed the button is interesting, though. If I leave my camera on the table and another person takes a photo with it, who gets the copyright?

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Apple fixes iOS 9.0.2 passcode loophole, kills 101 OS X security bugs

Larry F54
Meh

Is that making a point about a release of ios fixing a load of bugs one week after fixing a load of bugs?

Despite Apple's flaws, at least with an iPhone you get OS updates. With an Android, you have to root it and void the warranty to keep up to date (and to get proper, granular control over app permissions).

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Shoe stores top US credit card EMV-ready leaderboard of fail

Larry F54
Meh

Re: Behind the times

"You would've thought the costs of fraud would be a good incentive to speed up the process."

I've always been skeptical about the benefits to the consumer of chip&PIN, as opposed to the benefits to the banks. I haven't been a victim of fraud myself, but I've read numerous accounts where banks claim that if the PIN was used, it must be the consumer's fault.

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Twitter signs Edward Snowden to write for them for free

Larry F54
Meh

to supply free content

"to supply free content to microblurt advertising platform Twitter"

Isn't that what everyone who tweets is doing? (Well, except for the "sponsored content", where the tweeter pays for wide broadcasting.)

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Adblock farms out acceptable ad policy to independent reviewer

Larry F54
Meh

90%?

So 90% of those on the whitelist are on it free of charge? How does AdBlock decide whether to give someone a free whitelisting or to charge for it?

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You want a 6% Google Tax? Get lost, German copyright bods told

Larry F54
Mushroom

Re: intellectual property...

It was mainly the Axel Springer group.

"Should the description of certain journalistic practices bear any resemblance to the practices of the Bild-Zeitung, this is neither intentional, nor accidental, but unavoidable." ---Böll, The Lost Honour of Katharina Blum

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Why does it take 8 hours for my posts to be approved?

Larry F54
Black Helicopters

"report abuse" button

It turns out you get punished if you click this button on a comment by a staff member (even if the comment contains insults). Is there a rule somewhere that says you're not allowed to do that? Why is the button even there for staff comments if we're not allowed to push it?

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US watchdog POKES STICK at Google's Android over rival-blocking allegations

Larry F54
Alert

Re: How dare you!

Comparing the lovely Google with those bastards at Micro$haft!!!!

Upvote because I'm pretty sure you're being sarcastic; I wonder if the 2 downvotes didn't think so.

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So how do Google's super-smart security folk protect their data?

Larry F54
Mushroom

I wanted to know what head of Android security Andrew Ludwig does,...besides lying to us about how secure these operating systems really are!

He probably rooted his phone and keeps the OS up to date, unlike 99% of Android users who are at the mercy of the lazy deadbeat handset suppliers and telcos.

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Holy litigation, Batman! Custom Batmobile cars nixed by copyright

Larry F54
Happy

Re: It might because because its early so I apologise

Don't see DC going after the guy who dressed up as batman visiting sick kids in hospital in a "BATMOBILE", Wonder where he got that from?

Was he doing it for profit?

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Larry F54
Meh

here's a better response to fans who "infringe rights to characters":

If I'm interpreting your link correctly, that's a very different case. (I'm open to correction.) The R2-D2 builders were doing it for fun; the Batmobile builders were doing it for profit.

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SIX MILLION fingerprints of US govt workers nicked in cyber-heist

Larry F54
Alert

but they said

But they said we could trust the gov't with all our data!

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It's alive! Farmer hides neglected, dust-clogged server between walls

Larry F54
Thumb Up

Re: "The farm decided to go with a more modern, off-the-shelf software solution."

An RPi or such depends on SD Card storage and I would never recommend that.

You could run the OS itself off an SD card and mount a USB SSD for the /home, /var, and /tmp directories.

Actually you can have only '/boot' on the SD card, and everything else (including '/'!) on a USB drive:

Raspberry Pi Home Server: Part 6, Adding a hard drive

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Apple cleans up iOS App Store after first big malware attack

Larry F54
Black Helicopters

gov't interference with the internet contributed to this problem

I'll repeat my comment from the other article about this. The Guardian's article said:

The infected version of Xcode achieved its spread due to a quirk of Chinese internet filtering. Due to the country’s widespread censorship of the web, connections to servers located internationally are significantly slower than those situated within China. That leads to Chinese internet users frequently seeking an alternative domestic source for large downloads.

The latest version of Apple’s developer tools, Xcode 7.1, is more than 4GB in size, leading to many Chinese developers downloading versions hosted elsewhere.

So gov't interference and snooping (Chinese, in this case, but who's next?) are partly to blame for this.

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iCloud phishing attack hooks 39 iOS apps and WeChat

Larry F54
Unhappy

if 'professional' devs are downloading materials for their jobs from unknown and untrusted sources!

From The Guardian's article on this:

The infected version of Xcode achieved its spread due to a quirk of Chinese internet filtering. Due to the country’s widespread censorship of the web, connections to servers located internationally are significantly slower than those situated within China. That leads to Chinese internet users frequently seeking an alternative domestic source for large downloads.

The latest version of Apple’s developer tools, Xcode 7.1, is more than 4GB in size, leading to many Chinese developers downloading versions hosted elsewhere.

So gov't interference and snooping are partly to blame for this.

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Ad-blocking super-weapon axed by maker for being TOO effective

Larry F54
Alert

Harangue a billion people, and SOME of them will eventually bite (Law of Averages), making the whole business worthwhile...

It works for spammers!

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Larry F54
Thumb Down

Re: Sorry el-reg

When a page has 3 or 4 targeted and quiet ads on it, thats fine, when a page has 10-20 that takes the piss, then when I read a multi-page articles, which has 10-15 ads on each page, then also have the audacity to have a huge ad between pages, my browser could have downloaded 50-60 different ads. By the time you tie in all the pictures, cookies, JavaScript, tracking pixels, ajax callbacks.. actually ads now constitute 60-70% of the payload and page loading time.

You can also use these filter rules to block the big bloated photos that waste screen space:

http://regmedia.co.uk/*.jpg?x=648&y=429&crop=1

http://regmedia.co.uk/*.png?x=648&y=429&crop=1

https://regmedia.co.uk/*.jpg?x=648&y=429&crop=1

https://regmedia.co.uk/*.png?x=648&y=429&crop=1

And don't forget that scripted ads have been proven to deploy malware---will the site accept liability for cleaning your computer? Ha!

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Larry F54
Meh

Re: Why ?

Actually, BOTH sides pay for the Internet connection, and the other end is practically-always metered unlike most home users which are flat-rate.

This article is about ad-blocking on mobile devices, so a lot of the usage is metered or on a limited data plan.

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Larry F54
Flame

Re: nuance

I would suspect their answer would be something to the tune of "we don't have any control over the ads" as they more act as a conduit, but that also illustrates the exact problem with advertising - they don't know what ads will appear where which has already led to some embarrassing juxtapositions that would not have been possible with manual placement.

...and led to malware installation.

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Larry F54
Meh

Re: Well iOS 9 has only been out for two days

Well, I paid for it the day after it came out, so I'm less inclined to "ditch his app and instead use one of his competitors' offerings".

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Why the 'Dancing Baby' copyright case is just hi-tech victim shaming

Larry F54
Alert

Re: You wanna talk about fair?

The whole concept is flawed...

What's really flawed is the notion that IP is a natural right. It's not: it's a privilege that the state can grant, by restricting the public's natural right to copy, in order to promote the public good, i.e., to get more and better work into the public domain in the long run. 100 years ago, copyright was an excellent deal for the public: printing required specialist skills and equipment, so it was a restriction on publishing companies for the authors and (in the long term) the general public. This is no longer the case, because digital publishing equipment is cheap and easy to use, and especially because under new corrupt laws nothing is now going into the public domain. Copyright is now used as a restriction on the rights of the public for the benefit of Big Media.

The world before copyright gave us Shakespeare, Bach, Da Vinci, and the Icelandic sagas, so copyright is not necessary for the arts to flourish.

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Britain's FBI wants 'Five Eyes' cosy hookups with infosec outfits

Larry F54
Black Helicopters

Re: So what would you do to improve matters?

A quick visit to their web site will tell you what they do and who they go after, have a read of the Strategic Assessment for the why.

Compare the FBI: they now admit that they hounded Martin Luther King, Jr, but they didn't admit it at the time. How do we know what "good guys" the FBI and its equivalents in other countries are hounding today?

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Larry F54
Black Helicopters

malware?

Interestingly, he also asked: "Can government take action to systematically remove malware from everybody's computers without them knowing it?"

The bigger problem is the gov't putting malware on everybody's computers.

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'To read this page, please turn off your ad blocker...'

Larry F54
Mushroom

From Wheaton's article:

What would Clear Channel Outdoor and its clients do if someone ripped down all the subway posters or painted over billboards?

I would love to see Saõ Paulo's ban on "visual pollution" adopted here. If you choose to open a magazine or newspaper, or turn on the TV, the advertising comes with it, but you should have the right to go about your daily business outdoors without having it forced on you.

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Larry F54
Alert

Re: And so it begins.

But one of the reasons for ad blockers is to conserve metered bandwidth. The only surefire way to fool the ad-blocker-blocker is to spend the bandwidth to download the ad, which is counterproductive.

Would it work if the filtered browser made the HTTP requests for the ads, but aborted the transfer right after the headers?

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Larry F54
Thumb Down

Meanwhile, in another article...

Meanwhile, in another article:

The tainted ad-slinging scheme affected large and small ad networks alike. What appeared to be legitimate advertisements were used to mask cunning techniques employed by cybercrooks in order to camouflage traffic redirections and evade detection systems. The campaign exposed surfers browsing popular websites to content served up from sites hosting the Angler Exploit Kit, currently the most advanced tool used in download attacks.

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Brown kid with Arab name arrested for bringing home-made clock to school

Larry F54
Unhappy

Re: I'm scared

If the UK authorities adopted the same mindset and paid a visit to my spare room (aka 'workshop'), they'd find several Raspberry Bombs, Arduino-grenades and...

What colour are you, and does your name sound foreign?

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Is John McAfee running for US president? 'My campaign manager told me not to comment'

Larry F54
Meh

Not that Ted Cruz is worried about the "natural born citizen" part, of course.

"Natural born citizen" does not mean "person born in the USA", it means "citizen from birth" and covers people who inherited US citizenship from their parents.

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URRGH! Evil app WATCHES YOU WATCHING PORN, snaps your grimace

Larry F54
Alert

It's the users fault either way. You can run Windows 10 all day long clean and happy without a security suite if you don't install anything ;-)

True, but "drive-by downloads" make it possible to install things by accident and unknowingly.

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Larry F54
Black Helicopters

The source of that little issue is that the majority of those permissions that make you go "WTF does it need that for?" aren't actually required by the app at all.

There's an ever-growing list that are required by the Google crapware baked into 'em all, which is why you ain't going to see them disappearing or you being allowed to stuff them on any official devices.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. Android could be damned good, if only it were taken away from Google and their cruft was forcibly excised from it.

If you compare the same app for Android and iOS, you often see the Android version taking the P with permissions --- why does a word puzzle game need access to SMS messages? --- well, "because they can", because the Android OS doesn't give granular permissions. The app developers know that iOS users (and, to be fair, users who have installed CyanogenMod or another "proper" Android OS, but voiding their warranties!) will just say no to that crap but be able to install the rest of the app's functionality anyway.

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Larry F54
Black Helicopters

Re: It's not a vulnerabilty...

It would be better if Android would switch to the iOS model where permission is sought when the first access is attempted (nice, properly timed red flag there and then), and where permission can be withdrawn again for each individual resource.

If Google would push that into the next release it would fix quite a few problems in one go.

Google did offer granular permissions in one release of Android, but withdrew it in the next one, claiming it had been "an accident" --- heaven forbid users should have control over their own hardware!

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Larry F54
Alert

Re: It's not a vulnerabilty...

It would be better if Android would switch to the iOS model where permission is sought when the first access is attempted (nice, properly timed red flag there and then), and where permission can be withdrawn again for each individual resource.

That was exactly my point, and I think Graham Marsden was saying more or less the same thing.

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Larry F54
Alert

Re: @ Lost all faith

There is a big difference between a Windows platform and Android - on the Android platform the user is not admin.

On a proper OS, the owner of the hardware runs as a normal user and has the opportunity to use su/sudo/equivalent only when necessary.

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Larry F54
Alert

It's Google's and the manufacturers' fault that app permissions are "take it or leave it" on all (AFAIK) Android devices that haven't been rooted and reinstalled by the users. CyanogenMod and iOS have a proper system that allows you to install apps but disable p***-taking permissions as you wish.

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Lawrence Lessig's White House tilt hits crowdfunding goal

Larry F54
Mushroom

Re: IMHO...

The thing is though, people have long since given up and instead pursue other interests like entertainment and gluttony. I bet if you ran the presidential elections on one channel while simultaneously airing football playoffs on the other, one of them wouldn't get a lot viewers.

bread and circuses

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FORKING BitcoinXT: Is it really a coup or just more crypto-FUD?

Larry F54
Happy

nice work there

I love "craptocurrency" and "Poopcoins".

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Associated Press sues FBI for impersonating its site to install spyware

Larry F54
Meh

Re: It really is unnecessary

On the one hand, they had a warrant to install some spyware on this guys computer, and it was targeted to a single individual, so whatever.

Let's not forget that the FBI targeted Martin Luther King, so whatever.

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German spies sold out citizens to the NSA in exchange for super-snoop-ware XKeyscore

Larry F54
Alert

Re: would this be a good time

You mean the 's' missing from 'https'?

See here, here, here, and here.

Others and I have been asking since 2012 (perhaps earlier) whether El Reg stores passwords correctly (salted then hashed) and why the site isn't using https. You'd think an IT news outlet would want to show off its competence in these easy things.

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Google tells iOS 9 app devs: Switch off HTTPS if you want that sweet sweet ad money from us

Larry F54
Stop

Re: Glass houses

See here, here, here, and here.

Others and I have been asking since 2012 (perhaps earlier) whether El Reg stores passwords correctly (salted then hashed) and why the site isn't using https. You'd think an IT news outlet would want to show off its competence in these easy things.

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Scrapheap challenge: How Amazon and Google are dumbing down the gogglebox

Larry F54
Stop

Re: Now you need a TV license, a SKY sub, Amazon Prime, Netflix, BT, etc ad-bleedin-nauseum

obligatory Oatmeal cartoon

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Activist pens pirate's map to 'liberating' academic journals

Larry F54
Alert

the publishing system makes science less trustworthy

By coincidence I just came across "6 Reasons You Can't Trust Science Anymore" --- yes, I know it's on Cracked, but it makes serious points, mostly to do with the harmful effect of the for-profit academic publishing oligopoly.

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The Ashley Madison files – are people really this stupid?

Larry F54
Mushroom

Re: What is this HTTPS I keep reading about

See here, here, here, and here.

Others and I have been asking since 2012 (perhaps earlier) whether El Reg stores passwords correctly (salted then hashed) and why the site isn't using https. You'd think an IT news outlet would want to show off its competence in these easy things.

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