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* Posts by Larry F54

429 posts • joined 13 Sep 2011

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Over half of software developers think they'll be millionaires – study

Larry F54
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Re: Ha ha ha ha ha ha

That delusion is dangerous to society --- it's why these otherwise smart people support right-wing quasi-libertarian nuttery.

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Internet is a TOOL OF SATAN that destroys belief, study claims

Larry F54
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Re: Should have used perl

Lisp hacked together with Perl

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Beat it, freetards! Dyn to shut down no-cost dynamic DNS next month

Larry F54
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password issue

I used to use DynDNS (paid), but I wasn't happy about the fact that the client password was the same as my account management password, so that if my computer were stolen, the thief would have access to my account. I complained about this and was told to switch from a $25/year account to a $25/month one if I wanted this feature!

No-IP provides the option of separate passwords with their basic paid account. I'm now a happy customer there instead.

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No, Minister. You CAN'T de-Kindle your eBooks!

Larry F54
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Re: Unacceptable

You seem to have misunderstood. You have not "bought" a book. You have licensed a copy.

Has Big Media bought or licensed the laws?

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Larry F54
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Re: Pointless wrangling

...Calibre, which is available for Apple, Linux, and Windows, and use an unofficial add-in which is available in a set of tools maintained by several people and provided by Apprentice Alf.

Thanks for the useful tip!

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Larry F54
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"forbid contract law from over-riding the new legislation"

"forbid contract law from over-riding the new legislation"

What's wrong with that? It's how the Sale of Goods Act and the Consumer Credit Act protect the public's rights.

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SmartTV, dumb vuln: Philips hard-codes Miracast passwords

Larry F54
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Re: What autoplay video with sound?

"Noted: Have NoScript running to prevent embarrassing autoplaying internet video on a work computer. And also when around other humans."

I have NoScript running and still got the problem.

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Larry F54
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"The DVD encryption was defeated by checking the RAM for the key while a DVD player program was running."

Fortunately for consumers, in that case.

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Larry F54
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Autoplay video with sound? nice.....

Indeed. I heard some crap coming out of my headphones lying on the desk, because I read El Reg by opening a bunch of tabs in the background and working through them.

Please, Reg, do not do that again.

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Research bods told: Try to ID anonymised data subjects? No more CASH for you

Larry F54
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Re: It's a *start*

Financial penalties are a start. How about prison sentences for the directors of any company found doing it? That will keep their minds focused.

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Beastie Boys settle with toy maker over Girls copyright dispute

Larry F54
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Re: "encourages stealing from others."

"I really like the hipocrisy in that statement, since stealing from other works one of the fundaments of rap music."

There's a big difference between using others' work to make derivative works for art's sake and using others' work in (spit) advertising.

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Larry F54
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Re: The hidden beauty of U.S. copyright law.

This is about advertising. I don't think advertising should qualify as protected free speech, never mind as parody.

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GSMA: EU net neutrality reforms are the enemy of business

Larry F54
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oh bull

"[H]inder innovation to the detriment of businesses and consumers", fooey, more like hinder existing business's chances to shaft consumers and innovators.

Why are texts within the EU cheaper now, because of the great telecom businesses? No, because of regulation.

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Dying for an Ubuntu Linux phone? Here's how much it'll cost you

Larry F54
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Will users have proper control of their phones?

Will the Ubuntu phones as shipped give users proper control of their own hardware, or will they have to root/reinstall in order to control apps permissions, ad-blocking, etc.?

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Show more CANADIAN-MADE PORN, insists Canadian government

Larry F54
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Re: Cue cross-dressing lumberjacks

"Oh Bevis! And I thought you were so rugged."

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Triple-headed NHS privacy scare after hospital data reach marketers, Google

Larry F54
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Re: What has it got on its serverses?

In all seriousness, I wonder if they'd be able to get Google to tell them exactly where in the world the data was stored, and where BigTable ran? If the answer to both is "in the UK," then what's the problem?

If Google has the data, the US has the data. And the US will misuse foreign medical data:

U.S. Border and Immigration Officials May Have your Mental Health History

Disabled woman denied entry to U.S. after agent cites supposedly private medical details / A Toronto woman is shocked after she was denied entry into the U.S. because she had been hospitalized for clinical depression.

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Microsoft: NSA snooping? Code backdoors? Our hands are clean!

Larry F54
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Re: So what they are saying is

the US government quietly went away deeply apologetic and didn't do anything in revenge?

Qwest.

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Pirate Bay becomes 'Research Bay' for three days

Larry F54
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Re: Eh

Hah and not forgetting the anti piracy speil "You wouldn't steal a car, so why steal a movie?"

But sharing is against the law!

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NHS England tells MPs: 'The state isn't doing dastardly things with GP medical records'

Larry F54
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Pirate

"trust me"

Sure, like we could trust the DVLA to reserve its database for legitimate law-enforcement purposes, and not sell anything to private parking pirates.

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Snowden journo boyf grill under anti-terror law was legal, says UK court

Larry F54
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Not just that, they've been using CCTV and spying to catch people who don't pick up their dog's shite.

So what? Those people deserve it.

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Steelie Neelie 'shocked' that EU tourists turn mobes off when abroad

Larry F54
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Re: Joys of Capitalism

It amuses me that people consistently vote for "business friendly" governments

I don't know anyone who voted for those. There's plenty of evidence that big businesses are buying business-friendly governments, though.

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CCTV warning notices NOT compliant with data protection laws – ICO

Larry F54
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oh boo hoo

In other news, evil shops use cameras and security tags as a money-making exercise!

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JavaScript is everywhere. So are we all OK with that?

Larry F54
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Re: Coudn't agree more

Nothing annoys me more than a site that won't actually operate without me allowing code to be executed on the machine I'm using. A site should be able to offer it's core function without JS and this isn't actually that hard to do.

Any website that requires you to enable javascript should be liable for any damage (e.g., drive-by downloads) caused to your system.

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Blocking BitTorrent search sites 'ineffective': Pirate Bay ban lifted for Dutch ISPs

Larry F54
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quality of legitimate/illegitimate products

From Cory Doctorow:

Buy this because paying money will deliver high quality

Some bootlegs are unreliable or of poor quality. I once had a well meaning friend give me a pirate Rolling Stones cassette for my ninth birthday; the bootlegger saved money, squeezing the 45-minute album onto a 30-minute tape by fading out each song two-thirds of the way through. In some instances, this matters – you want what you acquire to be a faithful copy of the work you're after. But inferior packaging and labels are unlikely to bother most purchasers, who are likely to stick the media on a shelf and forget it, possibly ripping it first if it's especially good.

But this pitch only works to the extent that the paid-for item is indeed of high quality. When anti-copying restrictions are added to media, it actually lowers their quality relative to the illegitimate item. I often hear from parents who download unauthorised cartoons for their kids because the DVDs come with long, unskippable (or difficult-to-skip) adverts, the worst of which deploy "pester power" tactics intended to get kids to nag their parents to buy something. As far as these parents are concerned, spending money gets them a product that much worse than the free version.

...

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/gamesblog/2011/apr/20/digital-free-persuade-pay-cory-doctorow

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GP surgeries MUST DO BETTER on data handling, says ICO

Larry F54
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Re: Everything you need to know ...

The idea that the NHS can make money from selling data to drug companies is ludicrous. The NHS will make a little money in the short term and end up paying it back, along with drug company profits and everything else, later (to buy the drugs). We should consider nationalizing the pharmaceutical industry, or at least regulating its profits tightly.

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Google bus protests are Kristallnacht against the rich – tech VC legend

Larry F54
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Wealth creation bogosity

Consider this quote from Bertrand Russell:

The war showed conclusively that, by the scientific organization of production, it is possible to keep modern populations in fair comfort on a small part of the working capacity of the modern world. If, at the end of the war, the scientific organization, which had been created in order to liberate men for fighting and munition work, had been preserved, and the hours of work had been cut down to four, all would have been well. Instead of that the old chaos was restored, those whose work was demanded were made to work long hours, and the rest were left to starve as unemployed. Why? Because work is a duty, and a man should not receive wages in proportion to what he has produced, but in proportion to his virtue as exemplified by his industry.

This is the morality of the Slave State, applied in circumstances totally unlike those in which it arose. No wonder the result has been disastrous. Let us take an illustration. Suppose that, at a given moment, a certain number of people are engaged in the manufacture of pins. They make as many pins as the world needs, working (say) eight hours a day. Someone makes an invention by which the same number of men can make twice as many pins as before. But the world does not need twice as many pins: pins are already so cheap that hardly any more will be bought at a lower price. In a sensible world, everybody concerned in the manufacture of pins would take to working four hours instead of eight, and everything else would go on as before. But in the actual world this would be thought demoralizing. The men still work eight hours, there are too many pins, some employers go bankrupt, and half the men previously concerned in making pins are thrown out of work. There is, in the end, just as much leisure as on the other plan, but half the men are totally idle while half are still overworked. In this way, it is insured that the unavoidable leisure shall cause misery all round instead of being a universal source of happiness.

Can anything more insane be imagined?

http://www.panarchy.org/russell/idleness.1932.html

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A BBC-by-subscription 'would be richer', MPs told

Larry F54
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Re: SVV

It's fairly predictable that any article here about the BBC will bash either the BBC itself or its funding system. (It's unfortunate, because it's not that way about most topics.)

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Larry F54
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Re: Easy solution...

1) Not a license payer - then Adverts or you pay to access the site.

As soon as you introduce advertising, you corrupt the whole thing. Remember that for commercial TV, the viewers are the product and the advertisers are the customers—this is even true for subscription commercial channels, because they make more from advertising than from subscriptions. A public service TV system is an important antidote to the "race to the bottom" effects that advertising introduces.

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Larry F54
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If it's so great then why are they so afraid of selling their product rather than having the government force people to buy it?

Because if it has to pander to the market, it will no longer function as a public service and quality will drop.

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Larry F54
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Re: Oh?

but I know a lot of people who dont watch BBC and would love to get out of this TV tax

I know a lot of people who are not in school but education is an important public service.

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BT 118 phone number fee howler lands telco giant with £225k fine

Larry F54
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Re: I'm amazed people use premium rate numbers

Rather that why can't those who do just call a friend who has internet access or just plan in advance?

Because it would annoy their friends?

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Campaign to kick NSA man from crypto standards group fails

Larry F54
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Re: Nail, head.

As Mary so rightly points out, the presence of a known NSA stooge doesn't make everyone else clean, they have many employees.

Time for the all the employees' names in the "Snowden files" to published, so we can identify them and give them the distrust --- and total social ostracism --- that they deserve.

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NHS carelessly slings out care.data plans to 26.5 million Brits

Larry F54
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Re: better information - better treatment, yeah right

I'll spare you the details but on that occasion the real problem turned out to be my new bicycle saddle (there's a reason padded is bad - my subsequent diagnosis)

Just curious -- what kind of saddle did you switch to? (I got a Brooks a year ago & it's been great.)

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Larry F54
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Re: GP's Opening Hours

@ Synonymous Howard

Thanks for the useful links.

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Malware! tainted! ads! infect! thousands! of! Yahoo! users!

Larry F54
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security software

Does AdBlockPlus count as security software now?

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Blame Silicon Valley for the NSA's data slurp... and what to do about it

Larry F54
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some good points

There are some good arguments in this editorial, but...

The claim that the NSA is democratically accountable is ludicrous. All their snooping was done secretly, without proper judicial or legislative oversight, and they probably would have terminated Snowden with extreme prejudice if they'd known what he was going to do.

The conflation with copyright and "property rights" at the end is just silly. The whole point of copyright is to encourage dissemination and get more work into the public domain in the long term --- exactly the opposite of privacy.

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Now THAT'S a sunroof: Solar-powered family car emerges from Ford labs

Larry F54
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Stuffed using it where I live in the UK.

Someone mentioned sunshine?

Just park it near that curved skyscraper in London.

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'Disruptive, irritating' in-flight cellphone call ban mulled by US Senate

Larry F54
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Re: Ban them entirely

What would be easier would be to have a law that says it's legal to punch anyone who uses a phone on a plane.

Can we have this on trains and buses too, please?

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Larry F54
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Re: Mobile Calling Area

What about some soundproof enclosure for each passenger.

Something like a 1950's hairdresser dryer thing on each seat

The "cone of silence" from Get Smart?

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One European copyright law-to-rule-them-all? EU launches review

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opportunity to be squandered

This ought to be an opportunity to enshrine fair use, legalize private copying, and roll copyright terms back to a reasonable 7 or 14 years. But of course, Big Media lobbyists will ensure it's a race to the bottom.

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Women crap at parking: Official

Larry F54
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Re: This proves

A. Because men have worse memory.

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Winamp is still a thing? NOPE: It'll be silenced forever in December

Larry F54
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abandonware

This shows why we shouldn't allow bare binaries to be copyrighted, unless the source code is lodged with a trusted organization that can publish it when support is withdrawn.

Windows 2000 (as well as XP soon) illustrates the point even better. Malware writers are reverse-engineering the security updates for supported systems in order to infect unsupported systems, which people are still running (they shouldn't have to buy a new OS when the one they have still works), so the internet is worse for all of us. If the source code were available, independent developers would be able to produce security updates and the public as a whole would be better off.

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Google's Schmidt predicts end to global censorship in a DECADE

Larry F54
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encryption

Schmidt also had a few words for the NSA, claiming that “with sufficiently long keys and changing the keys all the time”, encryption can be a decent foil to snooping spooks.

Um, not when sleazy companies are slurping up and retaining all the data they can find for marketing purposes, with the side effect that it's then available to the spooks.

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Instagram Act: UK.gov's latest copyright landgrab stymied - for now

Larry F54
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Re: right vs privilege error again

It doesn't really matter what you think IP is, or what I think it is. It's a property right in Berne, in WIPO, in many other treaties and conventions - and in over 100 national statutes.

Best of luck changing all those.

We all know those conventions and statutes contain the results of corruption, which you ought to be criticizing.

You've made the same error the IPO made, in pretending that IP wasn't a property right... and finding the reality whacks you on the head.

You're arguing circularly that whatever the law currently says must be right.

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Larry F54
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Re: right vs privilege error again

It's true that technology (printing, recording and what followed) have provided practical mechanisms by which artists could make independent livings, but the copyright systems that back this up have simply created another class of patrons (publishers/producers).

Copyright used to be a very good deal for the public and the artists: printing required expensive equipment and special skills, so trading away the natural right to copy was a very small loss for the public; in effect, copyright gave a privilege to artists/authors at the expense of publishers.

Now, it's a bad deal, giving privileges to publishers at a great cost to the public's natural right to copy --- and with extensions to terms on existing works, the public is getting absolutely nothing in the public domain in return!

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Larry F54
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right vs privilege error again

That’s because the UK’s IPO doesn’t think intellectual property is any kind of property.

So IP isn’t an absolute right - few things are. But again, the problem is the IPO’s fantasy view of copyright as something that isn’t a property right.

That's because it isn't any kind of property, or any kind of right; "intellectual property" is a totally misleading term. This article makes some valid points, but once again fails to understand that copyright is not a right at all but rather a privilege that the state grants in order to get more into the public domain in the long run.

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Bloke named 'human' demands 'COPSLIE' licence plate

Larry F54
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Meh

suckers

Personalized plates are for suckers. How much would it cost to have a custom bumper sticker made?

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Murdoch stands between your kids and filth with BSkyB network-level SHIELD

Larry F54
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filth?

We should be more concerned about letting our kids read the Dirty Diggers' pseudo-news.

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Google: The Man RUMMAGED all your data (and a load MORE that's SECRET)

Larry F54
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It's interesting that the companies who have complied the most with the NSA requests have seen continued success and growth (Google, Facebook, Amazon, Verizon, AT&T, Yahoo, etc.), yet those that fought back have been decimated. Free enterprise my ass.

Qwest. Enough said.

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Hey, is that CSI: Hackers on TV? Oh, it's Microsoft's Cybercrime Center

Larry F54
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Re: war room

You can't let the commie in here! He'll see the big board!

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