* Posts by Wilseus

291 posts • joined 8 Sep 2011

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Vegans furious as Bank of England admits ‘trace’ of animal fat in £5 notes

Wilseus

A trace?

To me, the term "trace" implies that the substance is not needed but just happens to be there for some reason. It's an impurity, if you will.

The sort of outrage I'm seeing over this seems completely illogical to me, it's a bit like kicking off because a knife was used to prepare vegetarian food that had previously been used to cut a meat product. So what? It doesn't make any difference as to whether an animal was killed or not. It doesn't make any difference to anything.

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Reg man 0: Japanese electronic toilet 1

Wilseus

We have a few of these electronic bogs at my work. Everything is written in English, but still I always actively avoid them even to use as a normal toilet? Why? Because of the seat heater. Unless it's your own toilet, there's nothing worse than sitting down on a warm toilet seat!

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Panicked WH Smith kills website to stop sales of how-to terrorism manuals

Wilseus

"If we continue down this route in 10 years time you will need to have a license or video proof that you have a garden in order to buy some fertiliser."

You already can't buy a bottle of Hydrogen Peroxide from Boots. Apparently it's because some people "abuse" it.

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Tesco Bank limits online transactions after fraud hits thousands

Wilseus

Nationwide

Parts of Nationwide's Internet banking website have been down since at least yesterday, I wonder if there's a connection?

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UK prison reform report wants hard-coded no-fly zones in drones to keep them out of jail

Wilseus

Re: Well,

"How about jamming all mobile phone signals in the prison except for some guard areas?" asks Captain Obvious.

The guard areas are a moot point because it's a criminal offence for anyone to take a mobile phone into any part of a prison.

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MacBook headphone hell

Wilseus

Re: There is zero need for a 3.5mm to Lightning converter

"Yeah and, in my experience, the manufacturer of that "decent pair of high end headphones" will be happy to sell you a replacement for that 50 cent cord for about $15 plus shipping.

At least for the next 2 years or so until they've run out of stock and their new models use a different and incompatible connector for the 50 cent cords.

They're all as bad as each other."

No, not really. My old £50 Sennheisers had a detachable lead which had a perfectly standard jack plug on both ends. A quick look on Amazon shows that I can buy a replacement for £2.69 with free UK delivery.

So, as is usual for a hifi-basher on here, you're talking rubbish.

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The web is past peak innovation: It's all negative returns from here

Wilseus

"How do you dial in exactly 1 minute, 20 seconds on a dial?"

On mine, you turn the knob clockwise one click, then push it in and turn it clockwise for 20 clicks. Easy.

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Wilseus

I have a microwave oven with most of the features you are talking about. It must be getting on for 40 years old: my granddad bought it when I was a very small child. My grandmother gave it to me many years ago when she replaced it with a newer (inferior) model. It has two knobs, one to set the time and one to set the power level, and has an electromechanical countdown timer like the ones you used to see on tape recorders. It's only 650W though, as was the norm back then.

The thing weighs an absolute ton and needless to say it's still going strong today.

It's very similar but not identical to this:

http://img.class.posot.es/en_gb/2015/12/02/microwave-oven-20151202174321.jpg

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20 years to get Amiga Workbench 3.1 update, and only a fortnight to get first patch

Wilseus

Re: Vampire 2

I've just been looking on the Vampire website. It says fitting is very simple, but how so, when the A600's 68000 chip appears to be surface mounted?

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Dirty COW explained: Get a moooo-ve on and patch Linux root hole

Wilseus
Headmaster

"How can you get the job done when someone has robbed all your tools?

How exactly do you rob tools? Tools don't have any belongings to steal from.

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‘Alan Turing law’ to give posthumous pardons to 59,000 men for 'gross indecency'

Wilseus

Re: So in a future distopean world

"Children still can't give consent and paedophilia will never be acceptable enough to legalise."

How do you define what is a child though? What would be considered paedophilia in this country is perfectly legal in many jurisdictions, including many EU countries.

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Premier League Sky card crims ordered to cough up nearly £1m

Wilseus

Re: very confused

"Perhaps there is different levels of business\pub sky card price based on the size of the pub."

Yes I think that is how it works. A local private members' club near to me has about 200 members and the chairman told me Sky wanted over £1000 per year for a place that size.

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Linus Torvalds says ARM just doesn't look like beating Intel

Wilseus

Re: I *wanted* an Acorn Archimedes when I was at school...

"If ARM hadn't been spun off as a seperate company Acorn could have used some of its profits to develop and showcase a proper rival to the PC. They might only have ended up with a single digit percentage of the market but thats all Apple ever attained and look at it now."

Yes I concur completely. The whole rise and fall of Acorn is a very sad story really, and one that to this day still tugs on my heartstrings a little, but for better or worse, we are where we are and we have to make the best of it.

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Wilseus

Re: I *wanted* an Acorn Archimedes when I was at school...

"(only the Commodore series attempted a serious effort at making certain system calls portable across their range via their 0xFFxx kernel jump table, but the C128 used a Z80 to boot the system!)"

I think the same is true for all Acorn's pre-Archimedes BBC machines, including those with 16 and 32-bit second processors.

In fact it's the case on the Arc as well: in BASIC type A%=65: CALL &FFEE. It won't try to execute ARM code at 0xFFEE, it'll emulate the BBC's OSWRCH call and print the letter 'A' on the screen.

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My Nest smoke alarm was great … right up to the point it went nuts

Wilseus

Re: Is there so much radioactive material in the detector?

"Nuclear boy scout. He got most of the way to making a breeder reactor in his garden shed. Used thorium from lamp mantles as a starting material and the smoke alarms as a neutron source to breed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Hahn"

Hmm, according to the Wikipedia article, Hahn very recently died (presumably from radiation poisoning) but I can find nothing on any news sites about it. On the other hand there does seem to be an obituary for someone of the correct name and age.

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Blighty's telly, radio watchdog Ofcom does a swear

Wilseus

"Look at the charges of anti-Semitism. A lot of this seems to me to be attempts to stifle criticism of the state of Israel"

A lot of it might be, but certainly not all of it.

Regardless, I agree with your post in general.

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Redback sinks fangs into Aussie's todger AGAIN... second time in five months

Wilseus

Re: Black Widow?

"I don't think the image is a red back."

Looks like one to me.

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'Geek gene' denied: If you find computer science hard, it's your fault (or your teacher's)

Wilseus

The word "pedagogical" always makes me smile nowadays

http://everything2.com/title/Pedagogical

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Shopkeeper installs forecourt khazi to counter mystery Dublin dung dumper

Wilseus

I had a similar problem a few years back with a phantom shitter leaving his doings outside my garage door. I suspect the culprit in both these cases might be a taxi driver. I put a stop to his little game in the end by installing gates at the end of my service road.

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Windows 10 backlash: Which? demands compo for forced upgrades

Wilseus
Headmaster

Re: Am I been too technical, in saying the 3P&3Bs: prepare, prepare, prepare + backup,backup,backup.

"Now, bear with me on this one Wilsus.

Up North we use 'Could've had', but if i lived at Downton Abbey, then a case could be put forward for 'Could of had'. Its a question of grammatical context! If i was a posh twat, i could definitely use ' Could of had' in a sentence.......just try it now in a posh accent, go on..........you see? Now try this sentence, 'He could of had a brand new Rolls Royce, but instead plumped for the Bentley instead'. You see, it works doesn't it?

Now lets try up North: (so with a northern accent in your head)

'He could of have had a plate of fish n chips, but instead he had a plate of black puddings'.

Now try: 'He could've had a plate of fish n chips, but instead he had a plate of black puddings'.

Hope thats cleared up things.....or is that, cleared things up?"

Sorry, I can't say I agree. Surely that's just poor pronunciation? Downton Abbey isn't real, so can hardly be used as evidence in this regard.

P.S. When you say something like, "if I was a posh twat" you should really use the subjunctive, "if I were a posh twat." :)

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Wilseus

Re: Am I been too technical, in saying the 3P&3Bs: prepare, prepare, prepare + backup,backup,backup.

'I think you'll find the accepted modern usage (in the UK at least, not sure about elsewhere) is:

"could of had"'

Oh dear. That usage is certainly not accepted by me.

"Could've" is a contraction of "could have."

"Could of" simply is not valid grammar.

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Ofcom smacks Sky for breaching broadband switching rules

Wilseus

Re: Sky received the fewest complaints compared to our peers

"I thought the biggest complaint about Sky was that they made it very difficult to actually talk/complain to them..."

So people keep telling me. However I've been with them for a number of years for TV, and until very recently phone and broadband. In all that time their customer service has been nothing short of excellent, not that I've had too much to complain to them about because I have had virtually no problems with any of their services.

I can't help thinking that because people don't like the Murdoch empire, they just make any old shit up to make them look bad.

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WhatsApp, Apple and a hidden source code F-bomb: THE TRUTH

Wilseus

Re: Debug logging

In C, something like this has always been my approach:

#if DEBUG==true

# define DB printf

#else

# define DB

#endif

The use of which generates no code at all unless DEBUG is turned on. It's not rocket science.

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Labour's Jeremy Corbyn wants high speed broadband for all. Wow, original idea there

Wilseus

Re: Promise everything ....

"Between him and Smith they have promised the world in the past few weeks, and I bet none of it ever gets delivered if they get elected."

That's a bit of a moot point, really...

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'Neural network' spotted deep inside Samsung's Galaxy S7 silicon brain

Wilseus

Re: Is it just me...

OK, so as I think someone else said, you deal with it in the compiler or at the ASM level by having branch "hints", e.g. flags saying how likely the branch is, and you use the transistors saved on implementing an extra core or two.

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Wilseus

Is it just me...

...or has this whole thing become stupidly over-complicated?

Back in the 1980s, the RISC chips of the time got around the branching problem with features like branch delay slots (MIPS) and predicated instructions (ARM).

I can't help feeling that perhaps there is a much simpler solution to this than dedicating ever more transistors to hugely complicated algorithms that could instead be used for the operations that the programmer actually intended.

Perhaps some radically new, but elegant type of CPU design is needed.

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'Second Earth' exoplanet found right under our noses – just four light years away

Wilseus

Re: Green? Blue? Brown?

Quite so, but why is it so red on the snaps, then?

Because, like many such astronomical pictures, it uses false or enhanced colour. This picture is more indicative of its actual appearance: Hubble Image of Proxima Centauri

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Wilseus

Re: Green? Blue? Brown?

"Proxima Centauri really only produces red light"

No. I keep hearing this and it is totally incorrect. The light from Proxima has a colour temperature of about 3000K which is rather whiter than a halogen light bulb. The last time I checked, plants in my living room, at night with the light on, still looked green and my white ceiling still looked white. Sure, the light is redder than sunlight, but it's certainly not red light.

On the other hand, a cool brown dwarf with a temperature of a few hundred degrees probably would have these properties, but Proxima is far from being one of those.

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Corbyn lied, Virgin Trains lied, Harambe died

Wilseus

Re: Stop whining...

"They do it better in Europe, with electronic signage over the seats that the more selfish passengers can't tamper with."

I'm puzzled by this because I'm sure that Virgin Pendolino trains do have such electronic signs instead of the little cards. Are the Voyagers different?

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Tech support scammers mess with hacker's mother, so he retaliated with ransomware

Wilseus

"My response is to put the phone down if I hear background call centre noise or an indian accent."

I can almost hear from here the clicking keyboards of all those outraged Guardian readers typing "RACIST!"

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Google's brand new OS could replace Android

Wilseus

Re: Lost my interest and lunch at C++

There's nothing at all wrong with the idea of OOP of course, but the way it's implemented in C++ is one of the things (but not the only thing) that makes it a fucking horrible language. I hate it.

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'Alien megastructure' Tabby's Star: Light is definitely dimming

Wilseus

It's the Quagaars!

Or a garbage pod. A smegging garbage pod!

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Wilseus

"...we have to somehow keep that centered on the star with propulsion as it's effective average gravity towards teh star inside it would be zero."

I think I read somewhere that a Dyson sphere would be orbitally stable, unlike a "more, but still not very feasible Larry Niven-style Ringworld."

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'Daddy, what's a Blu-ray disc?'

Wilseus

Re: quality..

"The best, easiest and cheapest way I improved a good system was to hang some Moroccan rugs on the walls, they were aesthetically pleasing BTW."

Yes, improving the listening room pays dividends. There are also commercial products sold for these purposes. Most are extremely effective but are, IMO overpriced for what they are, and generally have a poor WAF.

*WAF = Wife Acceptance Factor.

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Wilseus

Re: quality..

"... is almost always bollocks. Most of us cannot hear the difference, not when listing in a front room..."

The difference between what and what, exactly? Are you saying all hifi systems sound the same? Or that most people can't tell the difference between a stereo and a live concert?

I agree with you regarding 4K TVs though.

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Linux security backfires: Flaw lets hackers inject malware into downloads, disrupt Tor users, etc

Wilseus

Re: Patch incoming in... 3,2,1

"about device on my Galaxy S5 gives kernel version 3.10.61"

Some Linux-based systems use kernels with newer features backported to them, so the kernel version being reported won't necessarily tell you much. That's definitely the case with ChromeOS, I don't know if it applies to Android as well though.

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Ex-Citibank IT bloke wiped bank's core routers, will now spend 21 months in the clink

Wilseus

Re: AMERICA....FUCK YEAH....

"He probably got chewed out for refusing to work an extra 2 hours each day"

Sounds just like the video games industry...

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Star Trek Beyond: An unwatchable steaming pile of tribble dung

Wilseus

Re: This unwatchable steaming pile of tribble dung...

There always has to be the one dullard who feels they have to downvote solid facts (although admittedly the average has since dropped to a mere 84%)

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Wilseus

Re: This unwatchable steaming pile of tribble dung...

RT's ratings are aggregated from professional reviews.

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Wilseus

This unwatchable steaming pile of tribble dung...

...currently has a 93% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

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Linux letting go: 32-bit builds on the way out

Wilseus

Re: think about tablets

"32bits can not ever use all of 4gigs of memory"

Of course it can; native data word size does not limit maximum memory size. Even a 32-bit address bus can support more than a 32-bit address space with latching.

A data word size able to hold the maximum address is advantageous but not essential.

Of course, that's why we had processors like the 6502 which had an 8-bit word size and a 16-bit address space.

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This local council paid HOW MUCH for an SD card?!

Wilseus

Re: @ Timbo

"Friend of mine has a nearly 10yr old Panasonic surround system that uses a Wireless system to connect the rear speakers. No cabling between the unit and the speakers at all."

I've seen systems like that. I guess a system could also use a digital toslink cable in a similar way. That wouldn't really make it a speaker cable though, in both cases the speaker cable would be the wires connecting the wireless receiver/amplifier electronics to the actual drive units.

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Wilseus

Re: @ Timbo

"Optical fibre "sound cables" are quite common. Not sure about 'speaker cables', though."

It's a physical impossibility. The job of speaker cable is to carry electrical current, quite a lot of it in some cases, in order to energise the speaker's drive unit(s).

It's hard to see how you could achieve that by shining a red LED down a fibre optic cable!

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Winston Churchill glowers from Blighty's plastic fiver

Wilseus
Headmaster

Legal tender?

"Paper fivers will continue to be legal tender until May 2017, after which they'll no longer be accepted in shops and banks."

This makes no sense, the term legal tender has nothing to do with whether it is accepted in shops or banks. Shops in the UK are free to accept or not accept whatever payment they like, whether it's in gold bars, postage stamps or Euros.

Legal tender simply defines what a creditor must accept as payment for an outstanding debt.

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Blighty's Virgin Queen threatened with foreign abduction

Wilseus

Re: Time

The fox has moved on and is now working for the U.N. at the High Commission of International Cunning Planning.

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Chaps make working 6502 CPU by hand. Because why not?

Wilseus

Re: I'll really be impressed when..

"The 6800, 68000, and 6502 were logical orthogonal instruction sets like the IBM 360. The Intel instruction sets always seemed far more arbitrary - so I never learned to program the 8080 etc at assembler level."

The 6502 wasn't that orthogonal, certainly not when compared to the 68000 or the ARM for example (IIRC you had to use different registers, either X or Y, for different addressing modes etc)

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Wilseus
Headmaster

Re: Stupid masochists.

Triple pedant alert: It was his foot that fell off, not just his toes :)

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Apple mulled gobbling its Brit GPU designers – but didn't like the taste

Wilseus

Re: Shame

Whether DAB is dwindling or not is a moot point: many, if not most, of PURE's radios can also play back Internet radio as well as FM. PURE also makes a range of really quite decent wireless speakers, in fact many of their radios have this capability too.

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Bill Gates denies iPhone crack demand would set precedent

Wilseus

This would never work

He said it would be "worth having a debate" as to the extent to which people are comfortable about how information the government has."

This would never work because most members of the public don't really understand the issues. In this particular case they want the government to protect them from the baddies but at the same time they aren't comfortable about the government knowing too much information about people (i.e them.)

People want to have their cake and eat it: they want more money pumped into the NHS but don't want to pay more tax. They want free services from the likes of Google but they don't want their details used for the targeted advertising that pays for it. I'm not sure there's a common ground in any of these areas that most people would be happy with.

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When asked 'What's a .CNT file?' there's a polite way to answer

Wilseus

Re: Stupid customers

I may have got the wrong end of the stick there then. I will only add that the technical support of the company in question is *extremely* well regarded in the industry!

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