* Posts by Voland's right hand

1401 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Ex-Soviet engines fingered after Antares ROCKET launch BLAST

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No need to do that

Not like this particular engine has a stellar track record. It _NEVER_ flew and for a reason too - it never passed the end-to-end tests.

Now, if this was one of the newer Russian engines (the ones Boeing buys for the Atlas), then some extra intervention to rekindle the dispute about sanction applicability would have been needed.

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Meet Mr Gamification: He's got a NUDGE or two for you

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Does that look like science to you?

Yes Andrew, it does. That science is called anatomy. That picture does resemble something... Considering its close resemblance to that particular organ the products it produces are rather to be expected too.

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COMET 67P is basically TRAILING a HORRIFIC STENCH through space

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Missed Cyanide?

That should be "hydrogen cyanide", not hydrogen. Hydrogen itself does not smell.

This has the stench of a chemical lab after forgetting some secondary schoolers in it with the reagent cubbard unlocked.

Otherwise, this so far fits most life formation hypothesis. If you take this mixture and autoclave it for a while you will get some of the basic aminoacids (in a L-R mix) as a result.

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MAVEN snaps eight-bit SPACE INVADER

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Re: Here's hoping...

They are not exactly photoshopped :) They are however subject to very heavy processing and composition out of tens if not 100s of images. In this case you are looking at a more raw input for two reasons:

1. It was a relatively short lived event. The usual "technique" of sitting with the cameras trained on the same object and streaming pictures to be combined into a final image ad-naseum was not applicable.

2. It was moving. None of the instruments used to snap the pic were designed to be a telescope (with servo stabilization and tracking), so they had to use significantly shorter exposure.

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Jeff Bezos rolls up another $437m, lights Amazon's cigar with it

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Re: How much did they blow on Fire phone?

Phone is not capital infrastructure.

Some of that 1.3 Bn on capital went into stocking up the German datacenter with kit as it had to be seeded to be a full region in AWS from day one. However that does not explain all of it. My guess is that they acquired one more location for a datacenter this year somewhere outside USA.

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Vulture trails claw across Lenovo's touchy N20p Chromebook

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Re: The SD card design is deliberate

Surely the issue is the lack of correctly functioning drivers for the hardware, not the hardware itself?

Hardware design is "interesting". Instead of a normal unified power management controller the LID is on a separate IRQ which is not something which is handled by the normal IO. However, lid open/lid close is still presented on the input subsystem so the power manager detects a lid close from there, suspends the beast only to be immediately awaken by the lid IRQ which is in the list of IRQs allowed to wake it up.

So a "driver" is not enough. The drivers function correctly and the events are correct. The problem is the underlying design which supplies more than one event source in a manner which nobody else understands and is inherently susceptible to race conditions. As this is an arm soc which has the "design feature" of a dedicated lid IRQ (it is not even a GPIO pin), getting that folded into the normal input driver is actually non-trivial.

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The SD card design is deliberate

The SD design is mandated by the Chocolate Factory, so that you do not use this as a permanent storage expansion and keep all of your goodies in the cloud for monetization. This is on purpose, same as crippling the kernel and exterminating with extreme prejudice all of traces of network filesystems. Though shalt consume and by consuming though shalt be monetized.

Otherwise it looks like a good choice for a travel laptop once the default firmware has been wiped and replaced by Ubuntu. It probably will not require the level of surgery I had to do on the Samsung arm chromebook (I even had to write my own power manager to suspend it correctly on lid close, none of the stock ones work on that abomination).

If I was not quite happy with the HP TouchSmart which has an identical spec, replaceable drive (replaced with 500G hybird already), replaceable RAM (8G in) and better GPU (radeon), runs under Debian (or Winhoze) with no objections, I would have considered it for a Christmas stocking filler.

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Pay a tax on every gigabyte you download? Haha, that's too funny. But not to Hungarians

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Could you imagine the government pulling this in the UK?Could you imagine the government pulling this in the UK?

Wanting to pull it - yes.

Pulling it - not a chance. The IT system delivered by Cap Gemini to customs and excise to do this will go belly up taking the country internet with it. Same as with any UK govt IT project.

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RUMPY PUMPY: Bone says humans BONED Neanderthals 50,000 years B.C.

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Re: The Neanderthal must have been really drunk...

The C-M/EMH may have had to beat them off with a stick, but any kids would have been an evolutionary dead end.The C-M/EMH may have had to beat them off with a stick, but any kids would have been an evolutionary dead end.

Excuse me for being thick, as I am posting this before my 3rd quadruple espresso this morning.

If it was an evolutionary dead-end then why the f*** (yes I meant to use the f*** word) does the white Caucasian and most of Asian population have 2.6 % Neandertal DNA? Did this happen as a result of the fairy dust form of genetic transfer?

Out of all theories the "Neandertal as first Garry Glitter" theory is frankly one of the most preposterous pieces of rubbish I have ever heard. If anything, it is the opposite, us modern humans being attracted to atavistic treats. We can stare into a fire for half an hour with our mind blank and I am just going to restrain myself from commenting on the effect that chest hair + muscles + 6 pack have on the prettier part of humanity.

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Trips to Mars may be OFF: The SUN has changed in a way we've NEVER SEEN

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What ISS does to dump heat is not usable for a reactor

Quote: If I'm not mistaken, they already use radiators on the ISS.

Yes they do (ammonia as a working fluid if memory serves me right), but for nothing anywhere near the amount of heat which is dissipated by a nuclear reactor. They also (ab)use the fact that the station is reasonably reflective and heat insulated by orienting it so that the radiator is in the shade thrown by the station.

The surface area of a purely radiation cooling radiator which operates in the "boiling water coolant" temperature ranges typical for modern nuclear reactors will be enormous. You cannot hide that easily in the "spaceship shade". It will be too bloody big.

The only solution is to increase the operating temperature so your heat transfer rate per m^2 is higher and thus decrease the radiator size. Getting that done and combining it successfully with a nuclear power generation cycle is a non-trivial engineering problem.

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Re: Nuclear

Your only means of cooling is radiation which is:

1. Not terribly effective for temperatures under several thousands degrees. You need to make the bloody thing glow to radiate heat.

2. Not something we have invested into over the years. Cooling through heat transfer, evaporation, etc of all shapes and sizes has been polished to near perfection by several millenia of human engineering. Compared to that cooling solely by radiating heat is in its infancy.

Putting the problem of getting a reactor safely into space aside, we need to solve the problem of working with coolants (multi-stage if need be) in the 800+ degrees zone (at least) in order to be able to use radiation cooling. If we do not figure it out the weight of the radiator will outweight any benefits of running propulsion off a nuclear reactor (pun intended).

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It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future

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Re: It was all they could have done*

They already tried Solution 3. If memory served me right, FishKill was one of the sources for AMD and video card manufacturers. That proved insufficient.

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Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill

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It is is still an E.L.E.

It is still an E.L.E. if it whacks us on the head. Thankfully this one should be a miss this time.

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NOT OK GOOGLE: Android images can conceal code

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Are you sure?

Although I have G1

HTC G1 can definitely run at least 2.2 courtesy of Cyanogen. Probably later too (just not an official mainstream cyanogen port any more). Same as my Xperia Arc - it is officially not able to run anything past 4.0 and that was pretty awful, its max stable (and buggy) Cyanogen was 9. It is running at present a reasonably up-to date 4.4.4 courtesy of the Legacy Xperia cyanogen spinoff project which is ahead of what most new phones coming of the factory lines are running. It is also reasonably bug free. Average uptime is weeks of heavy use (mostly as "newspaper" and GPS).

As an added bonus I no longer have the Tw*tter and F***book taking all of the rather scarse application partition space. So something that should have been replaced by now is still perfectly usable and will probably remain "in-service" for a couple of extra years.

It will also be replaced by another Sony for this exact reason - you can get a bootloader unlock from the manufacturer straight away and all top of the line models have excellent Cyanogen/AOSP support.

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Freescale lassos Ethernet cables around car, calls it 'Internet of Things'

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Re: I am surprised

If I understand this correctly this is for infotainment and various cockpit gadgets, not for key functions.

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Ethernet to the rare seats... How modern

Ethernet to the rare seats... How forward looking...

Looks through the window at at the 8 year old truck parked in front of the house. Doesn't it have that already? Yes it does... Same as WiFi, chargers for every seat 3G connectivity and quick release tablet holders (instead of screens) for the pests occupying the back seats.

It is wonderful that the automotive industry has finally reached the point where the more geeky ones between us have gotten to 5 years ago.

I bet they will try to bundle 19" mandatory "Demon" alloy wheels with that Ethernet cable because you know, Ethernet cannot exist in the absence of alloy wheels and leather upholstery. They are just born to be together.

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ARM heads: Our cores still have legs ... as shares tumble amid 'peak smartphone' fears

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Re: Intel threat?

Aside from their 'regular' chips, the place Intel should be doing is between tables and their existing market

That is not a particularly big market. It is a crack between the tables, filling it with some silicon will not take long.

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Marissa! Mayer! ends! 21! month! dry! spell! as! Yahoo! sales! grow!

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Re: Well.. that might a big part of the problem

Quote: Or did I sleep through Business 101 when they were discussing customers, etc.?

No you did not. The paying customer is the marketer. You are the subject being monetized.

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Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'

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Re: What do they care if you run linux?

I would not be so sure.

While there is no substantial difference in terms of clipping the ticket on Linux vs Windows on Azure for the base OS, with Linux they do not get to clip the ticket on infrastructure apps.

Oh well, that is a different BU so the usual depiction of the MSFT org chart comes to mind http://www.globalnerdy.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/microsoft-org-chart.jpg

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Doctor Who and the Dalek: 10-year-old tests BBC programming game

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VB for children? I need to clean my keyboard... coffee all over it...

FFS, even my junior's school got it right - they start with Python at the age of 12 - the age is chosen so that the kids know the idea of a variable.

Myself - I am a recovering perl adict in python & C rehab. As such I can see the rationale and approve of Python as a choice. You need clean, consistent, well defined concepts. No "this thing is an object, but this thing isn't". It is for the same reason Pascal was taught in Uni once upon a time. It is not because it will be useful in your career (it will not be), it is because it allows the professor to illustrate all concepts in a consistent manner.

So from that perspective spaghetty languages (Perl, C++, VB, etc) which carry 15+ years of inheritance dating back to the days when the question "What is this new and shiny object thing?" did not get you fired, are a very bad choice.

By the way, If you want to start earlier, just teach them the idea of a variable. Worst case scenario you will get yourself called to school. My dad got dragged in when I was 7 year old and the teacher found out I know negative numbers. I am expecting myself to be dragged in any day when the teacher loses it with my daughter knowing how to do tall 5-7 digit number subtraction, addition and multiplication at the age of 6.

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Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz

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No magic quadrant?

Where is my magic Ebola magic quadrant... Aaaaa... Aaaa... Continues to throw toys out of the pram.

On a more serious note - this advice is comparable in quality to their usual CIO advice. Nothing to see here, move along.

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Want a more fuel efficient car? Then redesign it – here's how

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DWB - Seconded

2.5 l Isuzu Rodeo Denver.

Binary driving (my wife) - sub-30 mpg

DWB (me) - 37-42 mpg which for a 2 metric ton truck is very reasonable.

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Re: Depends on assumptions

Engine pre-heaters are cheap. If you use the right pre-heater:

http://www.wolverineheater.com/

10 x more economical than a coolant fluid-preheater, you do not need to run it all night to have a usable engine in the morning. An hour or two is enough. Come in both 220V and 120V versions.

I would definitely advise putting a full front underside shield on the car though to avoid stone chip damage to the filter over time.

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No sail: NASA spikes Sunjammer

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Re: No propulsion?

Ever sailed a boat?

With a correct sail design or correct payload attachment design you can make it do whatever you like. In fact, in space all you need is a moveable payload attachment design where you move the payload relative to the sail in order to adjust the centre of gravity. Designs like these do not require any thrusters except for emergencies. All they need is an energy source and a couple of rails to move the payload along. The design of solar carrier is de-coupled from the payload so you can carry nearly anything (the solar sail assembly becomes a solar "tugboat").

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Sign off my IT project or I’ll PHONE your MUM

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The right question is not if you should call her mom

The right question is:

I can see that you are resource constrained and do not have enough resources for your current project workload. Would you like me to escalate it so you can get some additional resource?

It sounds polite, it looks innocuous and at the same time it is clear that the escalation may be "she is incapable of doing her job due to overload, remove some of her responsibilities". She also cannot take you to the task for threatening her as it does not look like you are. You can also smile appropriately just to make sure she got your point.

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Re-read the klingon software development guide

I have left the more important points, special attention to: 14, 18 and 19

3. I have challenged the entire ISO-9000 review team to a round of Bat-Leth practice on the holodeck. They will not concern us again.

5. Defensive programming? Never! Klingon programs are always offensive. Yes, offensive programming is what we do best.

6. Klingon programs don't do accountancy. For that, you need a Ferengi programmer.

7. Klingon function calls do not have 'parameters' - they have 'arguments' - and they ALWAYS WIN THEM.

9. By filing this bug you have questioned my family honour. Prepare to die!

10. I am without honour...my children are without honour... My father coded at the Battle of Kittimer...and...and...he... HE ALLOWED HIMSELF TO BE MICROMANAGED. <Shudder>

11. You question the worthiness of my code?! I should kill you where you stand!

13. Specs are for the weak and timid!

14. Klingons do not believe in indentation - except perhaps in the skulls of their project managers.

16. Klingons do not "release" software. Klingon software escapes, leaving a bloody trail of design engineers and quality assurance testers in its wake.

17. Debugging? Klingons do not debug. Bugs are good for building up character in the user!

18. As for project orders (requirements, goals): Klingons do not deliver; we EXECUTE. For the glory of the empire!

19. Perhaps it IS a good day to die! I say we ship it!

And the result is:

Qapla [also Kapla from the Klingon language: meaning "success" (or sometimes "absence of failure")]

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Torvalds CONFESSES: 'I'm pretty good at alienating devs'

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Re: If the tone is wrong the content is lost

Slightly more complicated I am afraid.

There is a fundamental problem in a volunteer project. If someone's contribution is crap and is not improving how to tell them to go away. Even more interesting - if you have told them to go away and they have not, how to get rid of them. 'cause there are some people that consider their ideas to be so good that they will simply never ever let go.

If this is a workplace, you fire them or if you cannot fire them assign them a menial task at the desk next to the door. If this is a volunteer project you sometimes have to use "inappropriate" methods to achieve the equivalent of getting someone fired. C'est la vie.

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I think you are failing to comprehend the definition of cruel and unusal punishment

I think you need to work for a year or two in a place where they use MKS or try to work using Clearcase in a distributed/remote/home worker environment. I will be glad to hear from you after that one.

Git is like democracy. It sucks, but we have been unable to come up with something better (at least as far as distributed development is concerned).

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Down-under record: Australian gets $140k for pussy

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Re: special place in Hell reserved for this guy - NOT!

An elderly cat will be much more upset by being moved than by being provided with new carers in the house it "owns".

Ahem - dogs have owners, cats have staff.

Further to this - Burmese and Siamese (that looked like a Burmese on the video) tend to declare ownership over people. They will adopt one particular person as an owner (or to be more exact, declare that they own that person) and tell everyone else to sod off, even if those are the people are feeding them and changing their litter tray.

If you are that lucky person, the cat will stand in-between anything and you (inclusive of lethal poisonous local wildlife). I have seen it and been on the receiving end of it myself. Our old cat which my mom has been feeding and living with for 10 years declared my son an "owner". From there on, you could no longer even consider tucking in his blanket or getting anywhere near him if the cat was in attendance. At 1-2m you got a warning hiss, approach under 1m was dealt with by a set of 20 razor blades attached to a surprisingly agile (for her age) old Siamese.

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Banksy puts down spray can, goes corporate in banksy.com cybersquat brouhaha

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Re: Sad state...

Quote: Totally unoriginal, "intelligent" art for idiots

Care answering which placard are you holding? "Migrants not Welcome", "Go Back to Africa" or "Keep off Our Worms".

Looking at it, it was original, it was intelligent social commentary and it did hit the local xenophobes very hard. Hard enough for them to remove it in less than half a day.

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Citrix: Wearables allow conference calls 'while rocking a baby to sleep'

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Gee... talking of clueless moron...

quote: Have these people ever actually rocked a baby to sleep? Don't they know that a car door closing a mile away can undo an hour of sleep-inducing effort? (Judging from the youthful looks of the writer responsible for the post, no - Ed)

6 months of "community service" trying to do that with an experimental subject suffering from colics will do the trick.

In any case, on the subject trying to do a conference meeting on a wearable while babysitting. Have you tried to overlay those project plan and deliverable slides on top of junior's soiled bottom while changing a nappy? Now, try to discuss them on a conference call.

A video call with the boss would be even more fun... Cough... sputter.. cough...

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Arab States make play for greater government control of the internet

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I wish they could

In order to do that we will have to stop buying oil and gas from them first.

So for the time being we have to pretend to listen. At least those of us who live in places that do not frak.

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Footie fracas: MYSTERY DRONE waves flag, incites Balkan brawl

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So what's next?

So, what's next? Jamming equipment and guided AA missiles at stadiums?

Flags and slogans may be different, but there are plenty of hatchets buried at very shallow depth worldwide. This has shown how easy it is to trigger them. Copycats shall follow, it is not a matter of "if", it is a matter of when.

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Facebook's Zuckerberg in EBOLA VIRUS FIGHT: Billionaire battles bug

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Re: Percentage...

Indeed

When we compare the response now to the investment which the developed countries put into eradicating smallpox the response is laughable.

Frankly, we are lucky that the infection ratio is so low (the "exponent" factor is order of magnitude less than flu, any of the MMR family or varicella) and that it is transmitted only via direct contact, not airborne.

Looking at how we are reacting to it, I really would not like to think what would happen if smallpox returns (with or without some idiot's assistance) or if we get a Spanish Lady mark 2.

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Lights off, nappies on! It's Alien: Isolation and The Evil Within

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As one of my friends used to joke

If they ever remake Alien (the original one) in 3D, Pampers will do a very brisk trade opening a booth in the Cineplex hallway.

Though, looking at the pics, some of the phenomenal scariness of the original H.R. Giger creation has been lost in the game. It just does not look right. Probably for the better. I would not want to wake up screaming in cold sweat for the a week after playing it.

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Rebellion sees Chromium reverse plans to dump EXT filesystem

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Re: Surplus

Quote: Well, that's not their fault. They've designed it to a price and made no promises beyond that design spec

They went a bit beyond that by making a deliberate and concerted effort to disable any possible means of accessing anything locally through any legacy protocol. NFS - boom. NFS4 - boom. SMBFS - boom. All taken behind the cattle truck in the siding and given a bullet in the back of the head. To add insult to injury the kernel in git is 3.4 which is known to have issues with some of these and without any of the later fixes for them.

So, while the drive being abismally small is "design to spec", the rest is not. It is "cripple to marketing goal".

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Re: Surplus

Indeed.

My Samsung Chromebook runs Debian from day one. I had to re-compile the kernel from git, because they had most linux filesystems removed from the original one. While it did have ext2-4, nfs (all versions), autofs, smbfs and in fact all network filesystems were missing.

Yeah, I know - it is on purpose, so I use the Cloud.

In any case, due to the abismally small drive it proved unusable for my needs so I am rebuilding it (with Debian, no f*** ChromeOS) as a travel notebook for one of the kids.

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Return of the Jedi – Apache reclaims web server crown

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This shows something different

These rollercoaster ride statistics show that the manipulation of search results, typosquatting and other similar use by far exceed legitimate domain registrations.

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Jony Ive: Flattered by rivals' designs? Nah, its 'theft'

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Re: Apple invented nothing

A "fake prop from a sci fi show" is admissible prior art. It is sufficient to prove the lack of originality in a patent application. So the law says. End of story.

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Swiss wildlife park serves up furry residents to visitors

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Re: "restrictions should be slapped on the numbers of births in the park."

Why the bears?

Ask her to perform the same operation on a doormouse. The doormouse _MUST_ remain _ALIVE_.

Then ask her to do it repeatedly 200+ times.

Then ask her if that was a good idea.

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Jaguar Sportbrake: The chicken tikka masala of van-sized posh cars

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Re: Nice Review

Move a NAS. In a Jag. Bwahahaha...

If you really need to move IT equipment get a decent truck. Either MItsubishi L series or Isuzu Denver. Do not get Toyota (it is a bouncy castle/roller coster ride on wheels, those drives in the NAS will not like it) and I am going to restrain myself from comments on Ford and Nissan comfort and reliability.

As someone who regularly takes a Denver on 100+ miles business ones (with kit inside) and on 2000 mile recreational ones (with kids inside) I find the idea of using a Jag estate laughable.

First of all - If you are _REALLY_ an IT consultant of the type that _REALLY_ take an occasional NAS to customers (NAS, not suit). If you are and you need it for a job, the truck is VAT Free and is a valid capital asset in the UK. The Jag is not. It is a benefit in kind and when you put it on the accounts it will hurt. The truck also costs 2-3 times less (26K pre-VAT on the road with a 4 cab and every single option known to man vs 50K)

Second, try driving "for a living" 2-4 hours every few days over an extended period of time. Try in a low "sports" position car (especially in something where your butt is far under knee level like an Audi). Try in a decent (not Toyota or Nissan) truck. Your back will explain you the exact difference between the two (with the assistance of a physiotherapist).

Now if you are an IT consluttant (spelling intended) that pretends that he needs to take a NAS to customers but does not know which end of the NAS is which - take the jag. Any day. It will suit you.

Last, but not least. You can actually move a _REAL_ NAS or SAN, one that takes half a rack in a truck. Try that in a Jag. Specifically - try loading it without damaging the loading area. Just try that (I will gladly sell the tickets). Oh, do not forget to fit the trolley and lifting equipment to transport the bugger in the jag too.

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Australia bins standalone school computing curriculum

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Re: Mile wide and inch deep

As my late dad used to say: "Your univesity diploma is a not a statement that you have learned anything. It is a testament that you have the capacity to learn something".

As far as coding for kids is concerned, coding as just coding is a pointless excercise when kids are concerned. You cannot teach something that abstract. You have to make the subject of the coding do something. So you either have to combine that with art (Scratch) or with practical "do this" (Pi). Otherwise kids will see it as the most boring subject in the world. It also has to be done at the right time. My older one did Scratch in school at the age of 11 which is seriously too late for this. By ~ 3 years.

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Flies WANT beer booze and now we know why - yeast

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Microbes in yeast...

Err... Saccharomyces cerevisiae is not a microbe. It is a eucariote.

At least so I remember from the days when I was still undecided if I will go to the darkside and do IT or to the light side and help humanity in their fight against diseases. My first salaried job (while still in high school) was a lab assistant in a mol biol lab and I fondly remember my attempts to dupe that damn "microbe" into producing human gamma interferon. Not an easy task by the way as it is quite fussy to what DNA it will incorproate (not like microbes which you can engineer with plasmids or phages in many weird and wonderful ways).

As far as the strain of yeast not being important, that is b*llocks. One of the reasons why soviet beer with the exemption of the stuff from the Baltics used to suck rocks is exactly because most factories were mandated to use a mutant strain (so that people do not try to seed their home potato fermenter with it). The mutant was producing excessive stinky bits (ketones) if you did not keep the pH acidic enough so the average Vovka without access to food quality phosphoric acid could not do some DIY brewing.

Granted, that is an extreme example, however as every brewer knows there is yeast that produces nice healthy beer and wine and there is yeast that produces ourtight stinkers (even without the bloody soviet "anti-DIY brewing" mod).

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Bird of HEY.... that's MY DRONE! Hawk attacks geek's quadcopter in nature v machine clash

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Re: ROTM

I hope it did not get its feet cut off by the blades. That was a close call.

In any case, if you want a true Hitchcock, try to approach a roosting colony of rooks. There is one with 5k+ birds inhabiting a row of poplars on the edge of a farmer's field about 1km from where I live. They are available for filming opportunities every morning and evening. The ghastly things wake me up every morning at 5:30 am with their discussion of "news of the day" on their way out to farmer fields.

They have actually managed to chase away any birds of prey from the vicinity over the years. Before they moved in there was a family of Peregrins living in the cliffs of an abandoned chalk pit next, sparrowhawks and even the occasional goshawk coming from the woods nearby. All of these have disappeared. If they as much as show up above tree top level they get mobbed including targeted "droppings" bombing runs from all directions.

If you have a drone to lose and some rooks nearby, try it - I give it ~ 10s from the moment they decide it is a nuisance to their society. Tops.

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ROBOT TROUSER SNAKE stiffens to master slippery mounds

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The sidewinder dune performance is "Meh..". They should try to sticker the reflective material to Macrovipera lebetina. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macrovipera_lebetina aka Gurza.

By the way compared to it the sidewinder (and most rattlesnakes for that matter) are as docile and friendly as the bearded lizzard in the school pet "corner".

It also moves over dunes in a slightly different (and much faster and more efficient) manner.

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UPGRADE your CHILDREN with KANO: All you need in one box

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Re: Got one

I thought that the idea is that you _ALREADY_ _HAVE_ a long term project to use it for. One of those... Lifetime ones.

I am going to read the docs (I somehow missed their campaign) and if it sounds like somthing fit for purpose I am going to get a couple for the "projects" for Xmas (one 6 year old project and one 12 year old project).

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Windows 10 feedback: 'Microsoft, please do a deal with Google to use its browser'

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Re: Chrome is a resource hogging abomination

Yes and no.

Chrome is a resource hogging abomination on a terminal server (regardless of the terminal protocol). The reason for this (and one of the reasons for its perceived "fastness" on normal hardware) is that it does most of the rendering on a canvas internally and updates the whole canvas at a time. Compared to that Firefox uses much more graphic prmitives from the underlying graphic subsystem. This allows remote access protocol implementations to optimize redraw and do a lot of ops locally. They do not get that chance with Chrome.

As a result of this, Chrome when compared to Firefox (or MSFT offering for Windows T Server) sucks royally in a thin client environment.

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Adobe spies on readers: 'EVERY page you turn, EVERY book you own' leaked back to base

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The UK ICO does not

The UK one does not and the politicos will ensure that it never will (even if this means alignment to common goals with Belarus with regards to human rights).

However, I would not be so sure about the German, Austrian and/or Scandinavian equivalents of an ICO... Hmm... Those may be worth writing a letter to (if you can manage the apropriate teutonic or viking speak).

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Estonia to offer 'e-resident' status to world+dog

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Re: Another juicy database

You mean "where it is already in the baltic states".

They have had identity cards with x509 crypto for many years. In fact, they can even vote over the Internet using these. Any government services, the social security system, etc are 100% authenticated (mostly in-browser x509).

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