* Posts by Voland's right hand

2801 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Brexit: UK gov would probably lay out tax plans in post-'leave' vote emergency budget

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Why not

This idea is only slightly less delusional than the idea that Berlin and Paris will allow Europe financial affairs to be run from outside the Eu.

If we for one second assume that delusion to be in the realm of reality (very far fetched), yeah, sure, UK will be able to negotiate good terms with anyone. In fact, it can, in theory, negotiate better therms as the Eu cannot keep it on a short leash while it runs a "good terms or your assets get it" gambit.

The issue is that the idea of the London City after a Leave to be anything more than a glorified version of Virgin Islands corporate registry is exactly that - in the realm of "WTF are these guys smoking". Paris and Berlin will not allow that for a split second. That automatically removes any UK negotiating leverage in any trade negotiations.

When the City gets "nuked", some smaller hedge funds may survive (for a short time, then move). All larger financial entities including 99% of stock trade activity will move to Frankfurt within less than 2 years. With the relevant consequences for everything else (thank you Maggie for making the whole UK economy being wholly dependent on the City fortunes).

15
5

Wi-Fi hack disables Mitsubishi Outlander's theft alarm – white hats

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: It seems

Giving people who have spent their career working in closed protected environments related mostly to system and process control (ECUs, controllers, etc) the task to write something which is exposed to the outer world and can be attacked at the protocol/message level.

The end results is that 99% of IoT and I-connected gadgets there are hackable with ease. Cars, smart meters, internet connected alarms and cctv - you name it.

15
2

UK Home Office is creating mega database by stitching together ALL its gov records

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Close

Now you know why Theresa May agreed to A review,

Fixed that for ya - that is her standard Harkonnen modus operandi. Plan within plan within plan.

2
0

Tech titans demand free speech law to head off President Trump

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Southpark

One more option.

A man with some issues in the "fingers" department: http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/may/07/donald-trump-penis-painting-ilma-gore

I am surprised Ilma Gore is not the first person on the list. Out of all Trump lawsuit threats, the threat to sue her and any auction selling her painting is possibly the most ridiculous.

1
0

Systemd kills Deb processes

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Broken expectations

This means you never had to work on an "adult" unix.

Unless your friendly local sysadmin turned job control off, SCO, AIX and other full spec Sys V + Posix implementations would all kill your processes on logout.

2
3

200TB proof cracks puzzler

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Not enough room in comment

Concur. Not a proof as such.

Proof of something in math should hold to rules of formal logic and be specified as a logical sequence.

What is being waved about is a dataset, not a proof.

0
3

HR botches redundancy so chap scores year-long paid holiday

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

it seems bofh.ntk.net no longer resolves

Indeed - as a result we do not have access to some of the best (actually better than BOFH) Simon's early rants like "Departmental Scapegoat Required" and the spoofs on Startrek Enterprise, etc.

5
0

$10bn Oracle v Google copyright jury verdict: Google wins, Java APIs in Android are Fair Use

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Oracle should be grateful

Dead no. Become a niche language - yes, definitely.

4
2

Bank in the UK? Plans afoot to make YOU liable for bank fraud

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Happy to be held accountable once...

The reality is that:

Bank will specify hardware: PC

Bank will specify software: Windows with bank sponsored malware (sorry, security software) installed via a bank affiliated download so that the bank gets its marketing cut. The favorite is some crapware named after some mutt variety.

Bank will specify development methods: Bangalore

Bank will specify location of operations: Bangalore

And you will have the responsibility. HSBC already tried that. More than once.

I tried to raise with them the fact that the way the have redirected to the co-sponsored download was open to cross-site scripting so _ANYONE_ could shovel a download to a customer PC through that hole and the customer would have accepted it as verified by the bank. This gives you the idea of the competence involved.

After spending 10 minutes trying to parse Bangalorian into English I gave up, close the account and moved to Nationwide.

22
0

Dropbox gets all up in your kernel with Project Infinite. Cue uproar

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Why kernel driver?

What's wrong with fuse?

8
0

Two weeks ago Salesforce had an outage. Now it's outsourced to AWS

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: the endless blame-game opportunities

Amazon, who outsources

Dude, what are you smoking?

It is the real success secret in cloud. It is called DIY and Eat Your Own DogFood. Down to the last nut and bolt in the power distribution unit of the bitbarn and last line of software. Even if it looks more expensive at one particular level it cost saves elsewhere.

That is why Google, Amazon and Facebook (with Azure catching up) have been so ridiculously successful from an infrastructure perspective. This is also why all vendor w*nkfests like HPs and Dell's miserable attempts at cloud have been miserable failures. When you outsource a blame game you also outsource the margin with it. You also now pay for the vendor ensuring that the blame is least likely. Example - do you see a vendor slotting a MB on a pizza tray without an enclosure in your bitbarn? F*** no - their own risk control will not allow it. And the cost adds up. At every level. So when Uncle Jeff comes around for your bacon you suddenly realize - your "cloud" built out of boxes which you outsourced to Quanta, Foxconn and Asus running software which you outsourced god knows where else, connected via routers and switches you bought from Cisco and built inside barns you hired and leased instead of owning (and so on) cannot compete.

Outsourcing for a customer works only at _SMALL_ scales. The moment you get into the Amazon and Co territory the economies come from in-sourcing the whole stack. And owning it - all the way to the land under it (inclusive of the f*** mineral rights).

4
0

Seattle Suehawks: Smart meter hush-up launched because, er ... terrorism

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Check this out:-)

How the f*** did this get granted in the first place?

This is just a boilerplate design for a generic gateway which has been produced by various manufacturers for years. Sagem was shipping such a device 7+ years ago (with a slightly different protocol set, but pretty much identical designwise).

There is absolutely _NOTHING_ inventive here. It fails the novelty test, it fails the prior art test, which f**** cretin has granted this and why are our fees (and for USAisians - taxes) being used to pay his salary.

Oh... I geddit... Search and replace with software defined - same as it was done by plugging mobile everywhere 5 years ago and Internet everywhere 10 years ago. In any case - a Eu patent examiner will laugh his arse off if you submit this as an application and slap you on the head with it.

2
0

Hardware sizzles for HPE – and brings home the bacon

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Very interesting

Doubly interesting considering that most computer and network hardware shops have posted a fairly soft quarter.

0
0

US nuke arsenal runs on 1970s IBM 'puter waving 8-inch floppies

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Programming skills .NE. programming languages

Exhibit A.

You got the wrong reference. Should have pointed here. Syntax is about the same, so is readability.

2
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Programming skills .NE. programming languages

"NAG Fortran Library. E02 - Curve and Surface Fitting" and have to select which of the 26 methods is most appropriate

That is in the realm of math now. That is a different story - 40 years ago, math was taught to CS undergrads almost on par with the people who studied just math. That is no longer the case as classes on the magnificence of Java w*nking have to be fitted in the program. That is why someone who has graduated with CS 40 years ago probably will smile and grab the correct subroutine out the library before even finishing his coffee. One of today CS products - I doubt it.

16
0

Microsoft's Windows Phone folly costs it another billion dollars

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Nominative determinism

Oy, in several languages neighboring the location of Microsoft Mobile Oy is used to signify pain being inflicted on the subject.

Classic case of nominative determinism.

8
1

ISS 'nauts to inflate pump-up space podule

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

It is either that or going in an origami.

When you compare origami and balloon in terms of technical complexity, the origami definitely looks like something more likely to go wrong.

2
0

Former Sun CEO Scott McNealy has data on 1/14th of humanity

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: I buy golf clubs all the time because I think they will improve my game

Typical Silicon Valley CEO - total inability to measure ROI.

That is normal, your stock or unicorn horn value in the valley is not proportional to ROI or any of your financials for that matter. For that you have to STOP being a Silicon valley company and become a global company. Sun never made that transition - it was born as a silicon valley company, it grew as a valley company and it died as a valley company somewhere inside the bowels of Oracle. While it sold stuff around the globe, its mentality never grew beyond the valley borders.

1
0

Gillian Anderson: The next James Jane Bond?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: " will have to to beat off stiff competition"

Pierce Brosnan's "I thought Christmas

That was quite tame compared to Roger Moore's "Miss Godnight is coming up" and Q's comment in Moonraker "He is attempting reentry".

3
0

Snowden: NBN leaker raids a 'misuse' of Australian Federal Police

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: @Voland

Err what???

Exactly that. It was a more than once a month flight for several years by the way.

After the incident at which she called them c*nts and refused to provide said c*nts with low altitude forecast for Air America style weapon smuggling in the North Caucasus, the airport authorities had a more "compliant" met officer given the task to supply those flights with forecasts and NOTAMs and she was re-assigned to back-office duties until retirement.

In any case, based on this (and other) first hand documentary evidence, we have to thank the Russians for their patience.

If someone shipped 100+ transport aircraft flights of heavy weapons as a "donation" to IRA UK would have probably used Trident on them 10 times by now. USA under similar circumstances - not probably, definitely.

1
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Russia, who is now being blamed

You unintentionally used the correct language. For the purposes of our own sabre rattling idiots it is essential to blame them so that more money can be apportioned to the war cause.

To put it bluntly, there is 20 years of intentional escalation at work here and it is not Russia who started it.

My mother has a framed copy of a service reprimand on display in her living room for calling a Lithuanian pilot a c*nt in the course of her duties as a senior met officer. The Lithuanians were running cargo flight was supposedly carrying "cucumbers" (that definitely needs quotes) from a civilian airport in a NATO country to Dnepropetrovsk (you can have a look where is that on the map). The Lithuanian asked for a low altitude wind shear and visibility forecast for Hankala (that is on the outskirts of Grozny - you can also see where it is relative on the map). He was unlucky - that is where my mother served for several years before retiring on medical grounds so she explained him exactly what he is (Пиздюк) and now proudly keeps the reprimand on her wall.

That was right around this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_of_Dagestan and you know "cucumbers" are essential for supplying the necessary "vitamins" for such benevolent excursions to your neighbors.

So sure, we can and should blame them for quite a few things. After all - they have done them. However, we should also assigned the blame to everyone in NATO who has shipped ex-Warsaw pact surplus weapons to terrorists around their borders for 20 years (with active support of 3 letter agencies throughout).

7
2

Norton bans kernel.org

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

It is a threat

You are about to download software that will make our bugware unnecessary and you will stop paying us protection racket subscription. You think we will not flag THAT as a threat. It is a threat of course. To us, not you.

3
0

Google security man reveals Allo will encrypt chats - sometimes.

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Yeah, and I am the tooth fairy

Google deliberately sabotaged end-to-end IM encryption for years.

It continues to ship google talk aka hangouts clients on Android and in their Chrome browser that are not just "not enabled", they are outright hostile to OTR2 forcing people to turn it off or make it not enabled by default. It has been doing this for 5+ years now too.

2
0

Troll seeks toll because iPhones work

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Apt name for a bottom feeder

Corydoras is a genus of catfish*. Bottom feeder. Very fitting name.

Got two of them. Cute buggers when little, not so cute when they grow up (will eat on the QT anything that does not swim out of the way).

23
0

Coders crack Oculus DRM in 24 hours, open door to mass piracy

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Why would they?

Why would they?

The whole DRM on oculus has nothing to do with games. Oculus is being bolted down so it cannot be used for porn. From that perspective, they do not care a lot if their DRM was broken so that their content is played on another device. Now playing non-DRM-ed content on their device - different story.

This is not something Oculus originally intended by the way. It came after they were Tzukerborged. I guess that the droid boy is more prudish than we thought.

10
0

Malaysians using South African cards pinch US$12.7m in Japan

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Disaster Waiting to happen

Maybe this will (at long last) kick the japanese bankers...

This is still small change

It will take this happening on a daily basis for them to fix it.

In addition to that, reporting such losses up the command chain and reflecting them on the accounting sheet in that particular location can be career detrimental. Cough, Cough... Olympus... Cough, Cough... Toshiba... Cough... Cough...

1
0

Your next server will be a box full of connected stuff, not a server

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

They do not

All CPU architectures out there when running flat out (as a well spec-ed server farm generally does) have very little advantages over each other. The rumors of Power being err more powerful (pun intended), arm consuming less power, etc end up being very exaggerated.

Arm's "less power" comes to play when it is idle. Same MIPS at full flat out Intel will use times more power in idle. That is a mode of operation which you will see in consumer equipment, media boxes, house server, etc. You will not see it in most datacenters nowdays. VMs, Cloud and Big Data have changed the way they are run. 10 years ago, servers were run at a fraction of their capacity to ensure they have enough spare grunt to handle incoming requests. Now they are run in an almost mainframe fashion where there is a low priority VM set with a batch processing job always crunching something in the background.

4
1

Ukraine clamps carders

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Small fry did not pay its dues

Small fry which did not pay its dues. In a cleptorcracy you should never forget to finance the benevolent funds of your friendly policemen and politicians.

2
0

Challenge! German drives from South Africa to Norway in nine days

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Turkey, Bulgaria, Serbia,

He either:

1. Had special arrangement to pass borders bypassing the queue as well as special arrangement for all Serbian motorway tolls

2. Could do 4h less on this time.

While it is not as bad now as in mid-summer or during the refugee mayhem, going through Serbia is slower than going through Romania for mere commoners because:

1. Motorway Speed limit is 120km/h and is policed quite strictly. Romanians are at 130 with bugger all policing.

2. There is a 20-40 min queue at each Serbian toll unless you chose some really ridiculous times to travel - like 3 am.

3. There is up to a 7km queue on the Hungarian border where the border control while not kicking you outright (that is a journo prerogative), will try to make sure you regret traveling through there.

Compared to that taking any of the routes through Romania ends up faster despite being 150km longer and with much less motorway.

0
0

If you know what's good for you, your health data belongs in the cloud

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: What an utter load of tripe

So, without 100%, 24/7 connectivity, a notification system has the value of tripe?

You missed one important adjective. REALTIME. So that should be: So, without 100%, 24/7 connectivity, a REALTIME notification system has the value of tripe?. Actually, not even that - tripe makes for a fine soup (works well on hangovers).

Example - I am severely allergic to half of the plants out there including "peanut level" intolerance to wheat, barley, rye and even rice. When I need to whack that epipen needle into my thigh and call an ambulance I on average have less than 5 minutes to do so. If that notification is not there within a minute or two, it arrives to an unconscious body which cannot whack the eipipen. If it arrives past the 5 minutes mark it would arrive to a phone attached onto a dead body.

Thankfully, I do not rely on notifications from the cloud for stuff like that. If I was, my SWMBO would have cached my life insurance already.

3
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: What an utter load of tripe

I am NOT keen on sharing

"Share" in google-talk where the dictionary definition is: "Bend over for inspection and we shall extract whatever we would like out of you to monetize". Definitely. 100% with you.

Feed of medical data into a long term running profile to which _ONLY_ my GP has access on a daily basis - different story. Providing that to a medical professional with whom I have made an appointment based on a referral from my GP conditional on the appointment being setup - different story again. Emergency services getting access in a medical emergency - different story again. I will _PAY_ for that. Directly, indirectly (as a tax or as a part of medical insurance fees). Without thinking for a second.

There is however _ONE_ condition - that CLOUDY marketeers, admen and other slimy scumbags never ever get their hands on it.

7
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

What an utter load of tripe

So, how exactly does this connect to the cloud when I am in any of:

1. London Underground or other sub-way with nearly non-existent mobile coverage.

2. Out in the sticks with no coverage (>10% of Europe is not covered - covering mountains to 100% is nearly impossible).

3. Standing in the middle of a crowd on a London station concourse when the trains are suspended and everyone is yapping on their phone bringing the Liverpool Stret/King's Cross/Insrt Your Name Here net to 100% capacity. Ditto for traffic jams. Ever tried to get data on a motorway in the middle of a 10 mile tailback?

The idea of "IoT device reported to the cloud and cloud produced an alarm" in a health context is a rank raving lunacy. Real world is not the Silly valley. YOU MAY NOT HAVE A DATA CONNECTION (I am saying that as someone who used to architect cellular equipment for 7 years).

Now long term trends, correlation, prediction, etc - that is a different story. It is indeed in the big data/map reduce/machine learning domains - stuff cloud does best. But definitely not "your blood sugar dropped, you got an alarm". That is idiotic to the extreme. A system trying to do that in real life will kill half of its diabetics under observation even before the first lawyer says the words class action suit.

12
0

Goracle latest: Page testifies, jury goes home

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

The lessons of not doing due diligence in acquisitions

This is a classic tale of not doing proper due diligence in an acquisition. When they acquired Android (and they did - it is not an in-house development) the fact that it violates the Java license (the idiotic mobile clause) should have come up as a gigantic red flag.

However, such things which are _ALWAYS_ considered outside the Silly Valley are usually omitted during the process of Joyous Californication.

They could have fixed it then by ditching java, using the same principles (uid per developer) for app management with a different bytecode language (python, ruby - you name it). They did not. Are they right or wrong legally is a different story. They are definitely wrong from a business and acquisition due diligence and "fix this before we ship" perspective. In fact, wrong is not the word. This is classic M&A incompetence of the Californicating variety. Too late to fix that now though.

1
9

Theranos bins two years of test results

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

That was a company started by a couple of college dropouts.

That works (or used to work) in computer science and computer engineering. You could start that with two blokes in a garage.

As someone who is officially a Molecular Biology dropout (I never completed my second degree in that) and has a SWMBO with 20+ patents in diagnostics using ultra-small samples and at some point held the position of a CSO in a diagnostics company, I can tell you that there is no way in hell, on earth or otherwise it can work out in molecular biology or diagnostics.

You cannot start that with two blokes and a garage - the amount of up-front technological and scientific investment to start a successful biotech startup is of orders of magnitude larger than for CS.

4
0

Russia student coders win

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

You missed MIT in 5th place. US is actually quite well represented (which is not surprising).

The surprise for me was the number of Polish Universities in the top 50 as well as the presence of the two Egyptian and one Syrian university in the top 100.

0
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Makes an enlightening reading...

The first place is not surprising. Neither are the first 30-40 rankings.

The more interesting parts of the ranking are that:

1. No Indian entries before No 57 and the first entries are nowhere near the "technological powerhub" (quotes intended and needed) of Bangalore.

2. Imperial College of London scored worse than The University of Aleppo in the bombed-out part of Syria destroyed by the civil war.

3. The Norh Koreans are at 37th place.

0
0

World goes SIM-free, leaving Sony and HTC trailing behind

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Ugh? What is he talking about?

The only place where you can get the full Sony range is Amazon and it is as SIM Free as it gets.

My household has five active handsets (J, M2, M4, and two SP), and 3-4 more (T, E, M4) in the spare bin which are "dead until I get time to fix 'em and put cyanogen on them". The last time one was obtained in a physical shop was more than 4 years ago.

Sony went online long before the Chinese upstarts. Sure, it continues to sell through operators, but that does not mean that you are not getting a better SIM Free deal online (including models that are not generally available on the high street).

It is often overlooked, but it frankly is better supported, better updated and with better mid-range quality than any of the "cheap SIM Free" new wave Androids. It is also best bought online. Also, nearly all handsets can be given a second life with Cyanogen (if need be).

8
1

Google slaps Siri with Assistant and Amazon with Home device

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Incognito Mode

Surely that's for online banking?

I think you spelled that wrong. One letter difference...

7
0

Now Suzuki admits cheating

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Another car manufacturer cheated

shakedown artists in the EPA.

Who told you it is EPA and EPA protocols? The article does not make it clear where did they cheat - USA, Japan, Eu or somewhere else. According to the BBC it is Japan and not emissions - fuel consumption data. So, while I understand your desire to vent your neo-liberal anti-EPA spleen, it is probably misplaced in this case.

4
0

Queen's Speech: Ministers, release the spaceplanes!*

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Age Verification

May tomorrow:

Wrong. This is the High Chancellor(ess) Treasonous May tomorrow: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhsvmY3Q9cY

0
0

Catz: Google's Android hurt Oracle's Java business

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

You are thinking it wrong

The correct turn of phrase is: Hurding Catz. It describes Oracle strategy fairly well.

1
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

What a twit

One of the reasons why Java has not become a niche language is exactly Android.

Having it as the only language for a platform this size makes up for a considerable change in economics of Java, its toolchain, educational interest and potential, etc.

In any case, the whole spat is about a massive case of sour grapes: SnOracle tried to artificially restrict and prevent the use of the full Java potential in mobile (retarded idea No 1). SnOracle tried to artificially restrict any security mechanisms on a multi-application java platform to be "internal" and Java only instead of a combination of external (uids + zygote) and internal (retarded idea No 2). Google showed Oracle the middle finger on both and delivered.

In reality, both restrictions should have been subjected to competition law scrutiny wrong ago. Google should have started with that first (it would have succeeded at that point too).

8
2

US power grid still fragile in the face of EMP threat: GAO

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: This nearly happened in 2012

Really? Does a solar flare remove all knowledge of electricity from people's brains then?

True, it does not. However, exercising that knowledge becomes a very interesting proposition when you cannot repair even the most primitive generator without bringing half of it from across the globe (because an MBA in the finances department has been penny pinching and enjoying a slave trader fetish).

The countries to fare best in a Carrington-class event will be the countries under sanctions - Iran, Russia, Cuba, etc - they have no choice but to have a significant local manufacturing base. And China of course as it manufactures nearly anything. USA and Europe... Especially if it happens in mid-winter... That will not be a pretty sight.

3
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Or one good suborbital thermonuclear blast

Frankly, it is no longer necessary to hit a city with a nuke. Or hit a target with a nuke.

Blowing a few 100 Kt up at ~ 80 miles up is enough to knock out the grid in a 500miles+ radius. There is no defense against this either - it is outside the short range interceptor range and it can pretend to be a satellite as far as anyone else is concerned all the way until it needs to execute Boom().

2
0

Girls outpace boys in US IT and engineering test

Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Joke

Re: Easy peasy to change the stats

Is most of your staff year 8?

An el reg commentard specializing in exploitation of child labor.

How quaint...

1
8

IBM invents printer that checks for copyrights

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Won't sell may of these

Don't be so sure.

There is prior art.

Try printing dollar or Euro bills on a high class color laser printer (something that can print a realistic enough replica) or try to copy them on a color copier. They probably no longer do that on the low end SOHO kit, but the high end proper office kit still has it.

8
0

Politician claims porn tabs a malware experiment, then finds God

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: I don't see the problem

I see a problem.

He is a liar which on top of it is breaking one of the ten commandments: "Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain"

Granted, that probably makes him perfect for the position he is running for.

4
0

5% of drivers want Nigel Farage to be their in-car robo butler

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Fry's proper voice over credits

Cheshire Cat.

I definitely would not mind Chesh to be my GPS voice. Anything else aside - he is likely to avoid the more conflict routes.

0
0

Adpocalypse 'will wipe out display ad growth' by 2020

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

The issue is mostly with trust

As any of the el-reg readers who have tried an "ad-free" (quotes intended and quotes needed) experience can testify, it is not ad-free.

It is simply what in the Soviet Union used to be referred as "Queue for the ones do not Queue" or as George Orwell once wrote in the Animal Farm: "Some animals are more equal than the others". This means being served ads by the ones who have paid more.

So until the publishing industry develops some resemblance of honesty and treating the customer differently from the way it is treated by marketeers and admen, any attempts to monetize the "ad-free" experience are likely to be a very challenging proposition.

20
0

Hewlett Packard Enterprise hiring temps to cover for redundancies - sources

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Sort-a

All the company needs to do is hire for a different position (with same job spec). Then you need to prove that the two job specs and positions are equivalent and that is a very tall order and requires a massive amount of resources. Most people who have been made redundant do not have access to such "justice for the rich".

22
1

Forums