* Posts by Voland's right hand

2355 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

TalkTalk outage: Dial M for Major cockup

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Re: Bad TalkTalk

I'm surprised. I've always assumed TalkTalk had offshored dialtones to the cheapest,

You sir, should be punished. I am now trying to get out of my head the mental image of a gigantic barn callcenter somewhere North East of Timbuktu full of drones whistling dialtones for a living.

The real problem is - that image may not be far from the truth. After all, their CEO was pictured on the Beeb replying questions out of their "innovation center" with a VHS and Windows 95 behind her.

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Optimus Prime goes under the hammer

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Ugh...

Teenager blue go faster LED lights... Yuck...

Now the corvette pretending to be a beetle. That would have been interesting. If it was a stick shift :)

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Server retired after 18 years and ten months – beat that, readers!

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Re: I recently retired a couple of Vias

Care to explain?

Concur with Calleb III. Please care to explain.

I actually wrote a significant portion of the hypervisor in question network IO at the time. It was a part of "EAT YER OWN DOGFOOD".

So as someone who used to do that for a living, I would be extremely interested in hearing the enlightened commentard explanation.

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Re: I recently retired a couple of Vias

Where they VIA C3s

One C3 (fanless M600) and one C7 (fanless S1000). 15W-22W and 20-27W measured at the wall respectively. Nowhere near what you get from an early vintage P3 (100W or thereabouts). If you are still running one of those, that is like burning money and enjoying the glow for its geekiness.

I still miss the integrated crypto in the C7. The new crypto instructions in AMD64 set are yet to make it into stable openssl so openvpn, encrypted backupts, etc continue to be run via "brute force". The C7 could swallow hundreds of MBit of AES in its stride and not even notice. Not something I would say about any of the Intel or AMD CPUs till this day.

However for what I used them, the case of moving to a virtualized environment was fairly clear cut (even without accounting for the fact that I worked on network virtualization at the time and it was "eat yer own dogfood").

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I recently retired a couple of Vias

The power cost of running this is more than the cost of replacing it.

A Katmai at 450MHz will consume ~ 90W of power. That at UK retail prices is 90£ per year.

This is the exact reason why I retired my old Via based firewalls despite them being considerably more economical (~ 24W) and moved them onto my main server to run under virtualization. They were about 12 years old (across several reincarnations from case to case) at that point. I could have left them to run and they would have clocked 15 years in a couple of years time, but it was clearly not worth it financially.

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I find this one a bit difficult to believe

1988 means an original AT PSU with those lovely two plugs instead of the ATX 20 pin block connector which superseded it. Your chances of finding a working one in the last 10 years are hovering just about zero. While not completely impossible, whatever you find is not likely to be in a good working order.

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Not surprising

If you are not constrained on space a custom job is guaranteed to have a higher MTBF than an off-the-shelf server. Nearly all off-the-shelf systems are too dense and too hot to deliver anything like these numbers.

While I am not surprised about the electronics and the disk I am still surprised about the fan MTBF. So the 64000$ question is who made the fans - I cannot think of a single fan vendor from ~ 1997 which would deliver a fan with MTBF of > 5 years (even with a "speed reduction" resistor).

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Nest thermostat owners out in the cold after software update cockup

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Re: IofT

Connected to the web - definitely not.

Connected and interfaced to the house alarm, presence detectors, people schedule and secure remote control via smartphone - definitely yes. You are looking at a couple of hundred quid saving on average for a 3-5 bedroom house where there is nobody 8:00 to 15:00 and has reduced occupancy 15:00 - 18:00.

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Australia considers mass herpes release for population control

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Trollface

Re: Carp tastes awful?

It is the Aussies being utterly incompetent in cooking them.

Carp, stuffed with ground walnut (or pecans), sultanas, sliced quince and bramleys and baked slowly for about 1h - 1h 30 mins (time depends on size) is one of the most delicious meals on the planet

The bramleys and quince kill all the smell - if it is stinky just shovel more of that. I have cooked carp taken out of a swamp next to a petrol refinery a few times. Even _THAT_ comes out OK using that technology. Though in that case you have to stuff it just with quince + bramleys and discard all of the stuffing (if you want to live after eating the meal).

There are also plenty of means to cook non-stinky farmed carp, but they are not applicable to this particular use case :)

The same applies to estuary grey mullet - something which in Australia is eaten only by the crocodiles.

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UK NHS-backed health apps 'riddled with security flaws'

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Official approvals are given by marketing and PR

Official approvals have nothing to do with any and all of the following nowdays:

1. Legal and specifically data protection and consumer protection

2. Security

3. Technical merit.

It is just marketing and PR.

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Europe, China line up their best bureaucrats for epic 5G battle

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Chinese will rig it again

Same as they did with 3G/LTE and using Time Division multiplex instead of Frequency Division. It is "nothing personal, just business" - anything and everything to ensure that their market is protected while they can still push their tat at the rest of the world.

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Sigh ... c'est la vie: France mulls mandatory encryption backdoors

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Re: Clouseau?

No he does not.

Inspector Ludovic Cruchot is one you need to familiarize yourself with (it is a pity he is not particularly popular in English speaking countries - this is French comedy at its best).

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058135/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_27

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060450/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_23

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063005/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_14

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065769/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_11

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0079200/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_4

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083996/?ref_=ttrel_rel_tt

This is definitely Chrushot all right.

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Ansible dumps Van Halen product names for Led Zeppelin references

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Well,"The Immigrant Song" looks most appropriate

In the Shrek 3 rendition.

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Hacks rebel after bosses secretly install motion sensors under desks

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Yes seriously, if used properly

If you are not getting your arse off your chair at least once in an hour you are a candidate for any or all of the following - heart disease, back problems and stomach/intestinal problems (both lack of motion and you are most likely snacking at your desk). On top of that, if you want to produce really high quality code, art, writing, etc taking a short break once in a while, putting that keyboard down and thinking is a good idea. If you do not, you produce "binge code" - just ask those of us who have debugged it.

If your company _REALLY_ values you, it should use these stats and have in first instance the health and safety guy have a chat with you. In some instances, where "binge work" is observed and has to be cleaned up by other people after you there is nothing wrong to use these for enforcement too.

In the days when I ran IT/Build and DevQA in an SME, I used to get the same info out of surveys + machine activity reports DIY-ed using perl and fed off the mouse + kbd interrupt stats + X idle. Anyone who was glued to his desk ended up having a conversation with one of the people who did the H&S rota.

I would have shelled for this gadget without a second thought if it was available. Exactly because we tried to value our developers (at least until the VCs came in and told us to fire half of them and hire an Indian contractor).

So instrumenting a desk like this has its uses and tweaking AC, heat, light, etc are actually secondary - the primary is workforce health.

If the company used those for "hours enforcement" and/or "hot-desk occupancy stats" instead, I agree - that is someone being an idiot. Plenty of those in management around this part of the world unfortunately. Their slave trading Georgian ancestors would have been proud.

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Beware the terrorist drones! For they are coming! Pass new laws!

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Re: Drones...

My exact thought. And that Lancaster is on the safe side compared to this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=potAETW-VG8

Considering that you do not need radio control after take off any more as you can build an autopilot using Arduino and/or Raspberry Pi and any of the available auto-pilot stacks...

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David Bowie: Musician, actor... tech admirer

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RIP Goblin King

RIP Goblin King

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VW floats catalytic converter as fix for fibbing diesels

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Which cave did they dig you out from?

1. In order to comply with most recent raft of fuel efficiency regs 50%+ petrol cars in Eu are getting a Turbo on their 2017 models. There are probably 25%+ already in 2016 as the transition has already started. So "TDI Pooooooooower bruv" is coming to a Petrol near you. It is already there for Ford, Hyundai and a few others, the laggards (ones waving French banners and trying to negotiate at CEO level with the Eu commission) will join do they like it or not.

2. It is the car job to be "grey" and "boring" for most of us. It is a vehicle. It gets you from point A to point B and it should do it within a reasonable cost envelope. If you need it for flash purposes, erectile dysfunction compensation meds are cheaper.

3. As far as flithy disease spewing heap - there is no practical difference in exhaust between a modern Euro 5 or higher diesel and petrol in particulates. The difference in NO2 is also dropping, but for another reason. The more efficient a Petrol engine, the higher NO2 output. In fact the leanest possible burn in an ignition unit - Petrol converted to LPG + Turbo will spew as much NO2 as a diesel. Sure pre-Euro-4 diesels with non-functional particulate filters should be taken off the road. However so should be all the oil burning prehistoric Petrols (especially the "non-boring" erectile dysfunction compensator variety).

The only thing I agree with you is on hanging VW dry for all that we care. However it is not for making "cars for boring people" (drive a Seat Leon or one of the high spec Ibizas on a mountain road on one of the outer Canaries or in the Alps to see why). It is for giving their Brand Development marketing filth chief head honcho a position equivalent or higher to director of engineering on their board of directors and for replacing engineering with fraud (aka marketing).

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Nvidia GPUs give smut viewed incognito a second coming

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Now I'm kinda wondering if there ever was a video driver from any manufacturer who went to the trouble of actually cleaning memory

This is more of a bug in Diablo - not initializing memory correctly before enabling display.

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How hard can it be to kick terrorists off the web? Tech bosses, US govt bods thrash it out

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Re: I'm starting to worry...

All the politicians ever seem to think about are the children

Of course they do. This is exactly why I do not let my children out of my sight anywhere near them.

I am happy to let my kids roam free with no supervision anywhere they like (and they do) when we are on holidays. Only condition is that they stick together and take a phone with them.

Near politicos? No way. They definitely think about the children. Waaaay too much in fact.

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It's replicant Roy Batty's birthday – but hey, where's my killer robot?

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You cannot have all SciFi universes succeed

At the very least Terminator is on target (as far as having the linux version it is supposed to run). Skynet is also proceeding to plan and producing Nexuses (albeit phablet ones).

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Cocky SpaceX will try another sea landing with next rocket launch

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They land back to earh requires an ungodly amount of fuel

Returning back to launch point requires an ungodly amount of fuel. Just have a look at the launch and landing curves on the photos from the last launch and give a thought on how much delta-V did the rocket have to counter to come back.

That amount of fuel may not be available for a lot of launches. For high orbit or large payload launches the first stage will have just the fuel to maneuver and land. So in that case they need the sea landing. It is not a "show off", it is a necessity.

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Call of Duty terror jabber just mindless banter

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Yes indeed

Signed,

A chemistry major gone to the dark side of IT.

P.S. Just the stuff I learned at Uni should be enough for 50 life sentences for "thought crime". At least (if we keep IT and electronics out of the equation).

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Re: Yes, but....

For that you might as well use SMS. In clear text.

As used by... ooops... the Paris lot.

So much for all the conspiracy theories - they are "Designs on Jerry".

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Lovelace at 200: Celebrating the High Priestess to Babbage's machines

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She is an icon all right

Very nice write-up.

She is an icon all right, but she is reinstated to that status by us. Today. In reality she did _NOT_ leave a trail in science or technology. She was promptly forgotten for 100 years. We have recovered her "trail" after we rediscovered most of what she did once more in the 20th century. However, for most of that it was recovered after we rediscovered it and was of little use to advance science and technology to rediscover it.

I know I will get modded down by zealots, but for me Sophie Kovalevskaya and Marie Curie are way ahead of her in the icon list.

They did not just drive battering rams through what is mostly male professions till this day (math and physics), they also left a trail. What they did was followed immediately and used for advancement of technology, including computers - we would not have semiconductors if we did not understand the structure of the atom and we would not have been able to do that if we did not do partial diff equations.

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Did North Korea really just detonate a hydrogen bomb? Probably not

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Missed a few

Republic of Korea Air Force, Japan Air Self-Defense Force, People's Liberation Army Air Force.

You forgot Russian Pacific fleet and Voiska PVO - they are next door in Vladivostok/Nahodka. Less than 300km from the test site. They were probably the first ones to have a bird in the air downwind too.

There is at least one USA carrier group in the region and quite a few USA land-based assets as well.

So in fact, we should know already if it was a nuke or a sloika (simple 2-stage low yield thermo-nuke) or a true Theller-Ulman/Third Idea thermonuclear device (least likely - yield is too low).

The fact that all media outlets have suddenly started to lie about the size makes me assume the worst (sloika - simple thermonuke). Anyone and their dog can lookup 5.1 in the table - it is ~ 40Ktn +/- 10 which fits a sloika cranked to minimum yield (purely to verify that the fusion has occurred). Suddenly, all media outlets start blabbering about 9Ktn. Well - that does not compute. There is no way in hell you can get 5.1 Richter with only 9Ktn charge on the surface.

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You can sniff that on the ground

The low level wind forecast puts the cloud above the Nagoya/Tokyo/Osaka metropolitan area over the next days. That also answers the question of "why now" - if they did it next week it would have gone into China.

You can sniff it any way you like there. Even on the ground.

Alternatively, you can sniff above USA in two-three days. The standard El-Nino Pacific JetStream pattern is to join the polar jetstream coming across Siberia over the Korean peninsula and the Chinese branch over the Korean Sea and proceed straight (no turns, just one straight line) to continental USA hitting the coast around SFO. ~ 6k miles, 80 mph average - 3 days and it will be there to sniff for everyone who can get to ~ 30K feet.

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Re: No reason not to - they already did the hard part (the A bomb)

is a very complex fission-fusion-fission - that is 3 stage. First 4 British thermonuclear tests were TWO STAGE designs and they yielded exactly what you would expect from a weaponized 2 stage design - 100s of Ktns.

THREE stage is from Grapple X onwards

A pure 2 stage H bomb (not a true 3 stage variety) is relatively trivial once you have A bomb and you know to use LiD as an "accelerant". Example - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_4 and the like - all several 100s of Ktn when cranked to full dial. The design is known, the caveats are known, once you have working A and the tech for it you can manufacture one.

The NK explosion when looking at the quake-to-Ktn tables is ~ 30-50Ktns. (4.9 - 5.1 Richter scale, surface blast). That matches this type of device fairly well. It is also likely to be deploy-able as a warhead too. First American efforts were not weaponizable because they did not figure out to use LiD and used liquid D2 instead. The "use LiD" idea (I believe the russians came up with it first) has been non-secret for 50+ years now.

As I said before, they are so close to Vladivostok and Nahodka that if they are stupid enough to test a 3 stage device cranked to full dial they will get whacked by their northern neighbor. So trying a 2 stage device and dialing the yield as far back is all they can do at that site. They will not get multi-Mtn range with this type device, but even the 300-500Ktn design maximum is more than enough and it matches their delivery capabilities as well.

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No reason not to - they already did the hard part (the A bomb)

Making an A bomb is extremely difficult and it is not the physics which is the issue, it is the chemistry part.

An A bomb and especially the Plutonium variety requires the ability to manufacture shaped explosives which detonate simultaneously around the entire fission core and have very clean and well defined shockwave front propagating at several of Mach speed. As a comparison most normal industrial explosives have explosion front propagation speed around 1M. If it does not blow up simultaneously you get a dud (especially with Plutonium).

Once you have made an A bomb, making it into an H bomb is graduate level chemistry and engineering.

You already have heavy water from working on the A bomb, all you need is to make it into D2 and synthesize LiD. It is compact by design and "just works".

Getting from an H bomb (100s of Ktn) to a three stage device (10s of MTn) is village garage engineering. You just pile non-enriched Uranium around the H core.

So frankly, I see no reason not to believe them that they blew an H device and dialed back the yield. Their nuclear test site is only 300 km or thereabouts from one of Russia main naval bases on the Pacific. Blowing up anything above 50Ktn would get them a Xmas present from Putin (they blew it up spot on for Orthodox Xmas).

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ISPs: UK.gov should pay full costs of Snooper's Charter hardware

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Re: Depressing.

And what makes you think that we will be able to elect anyone if the screening is truly successful?

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Fans demand 'Lemmium' periodic table tribute

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Re: And what about

Halfordium seems more appropriate. Though for that it will have to have a half-life at least until after midnight.

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Qualcomm, Nvidia are driving us nuts – with silicon-brains-for-cars

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I guess I am going to budget for a few more years on my current fleet

Any AI can return once in a while a flipping insane "natural stupidity" result. This is inevitable and a normal byproduct of running NN and various statistical algos. At that point I would not like to be in the vehicle.

You give it "weird" input and voila - watch the fireworks. The worst part is that the Natural Stupidity (sorry AI) in control is usually too dumb to realize that it has to relinquish control at that point and "wake" the driver. Not that this would help if the driver doing some recreational activities with the passenger in the backseat.

No thanks, I will wait until this nonsense stops and they finally put some guidance hardware into a couple of dedicated lanes on the highway. This is significantly cheaper (when costed in across all cars using it, more reliable and most importantly allowing for much higher density. By the way, from that perspective, the other Volvo idea (the one they are testing in Europe) where cars self-organize into road trains with a leader make much more sense.

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GCHQ mass spying will 'cost lives in Britain,' warns ex-NSA tech chief

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Re: The man is absolutely right!

While he is right about the approach proposed in the bill, his alternative is something which is available to superpowers only.

Only USA, China, Russia and Japan have native access to social network and search data. To be more exact: F***book, LinkedIn, Tw*tter, picture sharing and dating sites for USA (as well as the zombie corpses of bygones), Baidu + Ali Baba for China and VK + Yandex for Russia. Japan while not a superpower has had the data for most usual suspects locally for a number of historic reasons.

Smaller countries have no access to such data and can only infer social network relationships out of traffic flow metadata.

So, in fact, if UK is to follow his advice to the letter it has to collect all traffic metadata (not the data, it is irrelevant), run it through a number cruncher the size of the one used by NSA and infer and reconstruct these relationships. Note - I am not advocating this, I am simply analyzing what does it take to implement his proposals.

The other alternative is to do a Russian and force data location in-country which is not feasible as long as UK remains in the Eu. Then you can apply his suggested approach "as is". Though that is least likely to work if the suspects will use an off-shore network which could not care less about the local law.

So while his arguments make sense, they will end up being shot down in the hearings. You need to come up with better arguments which besides technical reasoning also rely on law and fundamental rights (not that we have those in the UK anyway - parliament is sovereign and shall not be bound).

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IT bloke: Crooks stole my bikes after cycling app blabbed my address

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Re: Social - adjective used to be associated with diseases

but something seems to have (and despite all my best efforts) found my home location

Most likely Android - Google correlates between your WiFi SSID, your visible IP address and various other (a)GPS data. The WiFi vs location is well known and publicized, the IP to other data not so much. It is there and it is being done even if you did not provide them with exact address by associating a payment method to your google play account. It also works if the payment method is registered to a different address. Long live conditional probability and statistics.

Granted, so far there has been only a couple of cases where a person in the google staff has abused their position to access data inappropriately. As it grows the probability for this increases. It is further increased by adding M2M, IoT, etc. It is only a matter of time until it is compromised for use in burglaries. It is not a question of if, it is a question of when and how many.

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SpaceX makes rocket science look easy: Falcon 9 passes tests

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Re: How many times?

The idea that there is a bell curve in the failurerate/launchcount graph (for any given subset of devices) is an unwarranted assumption

Dunno which moron mod-ed this down. It is spot on. Material fatigue does not follow bell curve. It goes nice and low up to a point, then shoots up. Erosion, corrosion, etc follow similar curves, etc.

Bell curve as a failure distribution is as rare as a white swallow.

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Re: How many times?

The rocket - probably zero times. It is likely to be cheaper to scrap the structural components instead of reusing them. They are not that expensive.

The engine (that is the really expensive bit) - target is 40 times or thereabouts.

This is according to Musk himself from one of his interviews. It will be interesting to see what they do.

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Thinking of buying a Surface? Try a modular OLED Thinkpad first

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Re: nice highlighting of sales speak dross in the review

Or physics - you never know.

Theoretically, you can get "lighter magnesium" by making out of the lower atomic weight isotopes. Practically, I would like to see the salesman trying to sell it to hold it on its knees first. The lighter than normal Mg isotopes have half-life in the ms range and become a choice of Na, F or radioactive Ne after that. Each of these would make a lovely combination when coupled with the person in sales and marketing who came up with the term.

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Surface Pro 4: Will you go the F**K to SLEEP?

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Re: Really?

AND I'M AT A UNIVERSITY.

Exactly because you are at a university. Apple has more or less corralled that audience into a paddock of its own. The same is valid for various Silicon valley companies.

If you stray outside that however you are much more likely to run into Microsoft. Primary and secondary education in the UK, various verticals, incumbent telecoms outside USA/Silicon Valley, health across most of Eu, public sector in most of the world, etc are exclusively Microsoft.

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Hurray, Merry Christmas

Hurray, Andrew is back.

Sod all political correctness, now we have an El-Reg contributor we can violently disagree with.

You missed one more reason to get a Surface - vertical industries and especially development for them. You can immediately test your stuff for real while having a decent environment and a keyboard to debug. This is something you do not get with Android or iThings because they are strictly "build on your desk(top), debug in an emulator, run on your slab". That sort'a works for games and entertainment which you can emulate or debug while tethered and starts to suck royally if you are trying to build something that interfaces to external equipment. That is one application where all the "minuses" of Windows suddenly become pluses.

So while I am (and have been for 20 years) vehemently anti-Windows, I can see why people who try to write a high margin app for ~ 500 customers which talks to obscure external kit will use it instead of Android or iOS.

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UK says wider National Insurance number use no longer a no-no

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Pros and Cons

Most of Europe has a national identifier == national insurance number, has had it for > then 5 decades in some countries and has long figured out what are the auxiliary reqs to prevent fraud.

The NINo itself is not the problem - it is what you can index, what an organization is allowed access to and what you can access if you waltz in through the door and ask for data. That is tightly regulated and usually legislated as well. So the various Identity Fraud scenarios in use in the USA and UK do not apply.

Back to UK - the idea that the NINo can be used as a cross-index identifier by itself is not wrong. The issue is with the common law based precedent hodge-podge which determines what it can be used for. That morass needs to be cleared first so you cannot commit fraud just by figuring out someone's SSN.

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How to log into any backdoored Juniper firewall – hard-coded password published

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Re: I guess this would have shown up with a cursory glance at the code?

Depends how and where.

If this went in as assembler in the first place, I doubt that a cursory code review would have found it out. You can really obscure things if you want to :)

You can also obscure this in C too - use the format string in 4-5 places to print so it is fully legit. Then all you need to sneak in is one comparison which can be done simply by replacing == with = in the right place :) Even better - reuse an existing format string.

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This was not found during brute forcing

It was found via disassembly - just not sure if it was before or after the announcement. What is published is a dissassembly.

It was also not done to be obscure (that would have been a crypted pwd). It was done so it is not seen on code source analysis/strings.

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BlackBerry: Comeback canter should be a trot... yet, weirdly, isn't

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Security is a two-edged sword

On one side you have the customers looking to be secure.

On the other side you are now looking for an ever growing queue of suspects wishing that they become less so. They also have a leverage - do this, or no government or "security clearance required" sales. This very nicely intersects with a large slice of the customer base which may be potentially interested in secure messaging so BB ends up between a hammer and anvil. A very unenviable position.

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UK ISP Sky to make smut an opt-in service from 2016

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walk in to any newsagent and see sexualised images

Why newsagent?

Walk into the child toy isle in Sainsbury/Tesco/Name Your Retailer here. Take a careful look at the "Disney Fairy" line of merchandise. Not that the stick insect with t*ts ones are any different,

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The ball's in your court, Bezos: Falcon 9 lands after launching satellites

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Re: Returned to Earth

It was on land. See the pic in the graunidad - towards bottom of the article:

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/dec/22/welcome-back-baby-elon-musk-celebrates-spacex-rocket-launch-and-landing

From this pic it is also very clear that they could pull this one off because they had a HUGE quantity of excess fuel on this launch. You can see both curves quite clearly there (it is a 5 min "open shutter" pic). The rocket had to compensate for the delta v acquired curving on a ballistic towards the horizon to fly back. You cannot do that if you are short on fuel, so those barges will still see action from time to time for heavy payload and/or high orbit launches.

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Iranian hackers targeted New York dam, had a quick nosy around

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Re: Internet of Things...

This will lead to a lot of people saying things like, "There oughta be a law..." and there already is, even if it is simply that of natural selection

Actually as far as water supply there is in most countries and in the USA there are now a couple of applicable regs. Just nobody enforces them.

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New HTTP error code 451 to signal censorship

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Re: IETF were not persuaded is was a good use of a limited number of status codes

Yeah and "418 - I'm a Teapot" was such a great use

I have used it in a commercial product prototype for the rest interface as a generic error code which means "I have no clue what I should do" (a fairly common situation in a provisioning system - modeling failures, unspecified comms failures across a gateway interface).

The fact that it is not used in browsers is not an indication that it is not used.

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EU reforms could pave way for smells and noises to be trade-mark protected – expert

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Re: Trade marking my farts!

If you are trademarking them, do not add a diagram lighting them up.

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Hillary Clinton says for crypto 'maybe the back door is the wrong door'

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Re: Clueless is an understatement

http://xkcd.com/

What does the disclaimer say? The third part of "Warning..." Nuff said.

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Scandal-hit Toshiba cutting 7,000 jobs, heads for $4.5bn loss

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Bugger

All my recent TV purchases were Tosh - the Cell based tech it uses for image upscaling in its "Smart" TVs is fantastic. It is very difficult to see any differences between HD and normal DVD res.

Pity, this means that we now have to either spend silly money for Sony or having everything pixelated.

Oh well, on the positive side, this means that some can be picked up from post-Xmas bargain bin sales at a really good price.

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