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* Posts by Voland's right hand

794 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

SpaceX confirms Falcon rocket suffered engine flame-out

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Devil

Re: Though

The "early" days did not have today's engine control and management systems. So a design which was not feasible in the "early" days may be the right way of doing it today.

In any case - the most long lived and successful launcher - the Soyuz is a multi-engine/multi-nozzle design.

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eBay frets as right to resell comes under scrutiny

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Devil

Devil's advocate mode

This precedent goes both ways. If it is not overthrown it will be only a matter of time until it is enforced in the other direction - for export.

All of those foreign students which study in the USA will be automatically criminals if they decide to take their old textbooks back home overseas and sell/lend/give them as a present to someone. The same applies to a lot of the peace corps and other charity programmes who trawl college and school bookshops and libraries for out-of-use textbooks for use in their 3rd world education drives.

If you look at the bigger picture this is beyond counterproductive. Textbooks are recurring purchases with regular reprints and regular printing of new editions. For each copy which is "illegaly" resold you get tens if not hundreds of copies which are bought via the regular channels.

It is in the publisher interest to get the biggest possible audience for a textbook to ensure that the the reprints and future editions are ordered by as many schools and students as possible. Artificially limiting textbooks by territory means losing mindshare and giving it away to other publishers.

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Massive strike at Foxconn's iPhone 5 factory

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Re: I love Luddites!

You are closer to the truth then you think.

Luddites (and their bretheren from the continent) were one of the first forms of labor revolt against using slavery practices on the modern industrialized ship floor. Their only problem was that they blamed the wrong reason - they blamed the machines instead of the owner and threw a "sabot" in its workings whenever they could. Hence the word "Sabotage".

In any case, China is another bit of history repeating. They are now about to learn what the west learned the hard way for several centuries: having proper unions, and proper labor code is an essential consequence of high tech manufacturing. As a factory owner you have to be a complete idiot to take the risk of employees throwing the proverbial "Ludd" SABOT into the proverbial workings of a multi-million dollar machine. It is better to haggle with the union once in a while and even have it strike once in a while, because a union organized strike under the auspices of the labor relations law is a predictable event. You can safely shut down the plant and restart it again (in fact the union may do it for you). Compare that to someone "dropping" the wrench into the workings of a million+ semiautomated electronics assembly line.

In any case, can someone pass me the popcorn please. China is utterly unprepared for what is to come next - having the "Luddite" movement and the worker revolts the West had in the 18th and 19th century. Neither are we (as we have moved all of our manufacturing there without a plan B).

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LOHAN plugs into some hot LiPo treatment

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Devil

Re: LiPo at altitude

Not just that.

LiPo capacity drops nearly exponentially with temperature.

I suspect it needs to keep itself warm as much as it needs to keep warm the motor. That will add some more weight and logistics around insulation.

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Archaeologists resume Antikythera Mechanism hunt

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Devil

Re: There aren't any

There would not be any for another reason - making one would have been very expensive by those days standards I would expect a ship to carry one (at most).

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Svalbard overtakes medieval summers

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Devil

Err... Isn't that from the dept of bleeding obvious?

Svalbard is at the end of the Gulfstream which according to all models during the medieval "warm" period was weaker than now. The medieval "warm" period had considerably more continental climate across Europe. So it was "warm" like the last ~ 18 moths +40C in summer, but -20C in winter too. For example, the Bay of Venice, Bosphorus, the Bay of Marseilles as well as the Black Sea had multiple recorded freezings in the 10th, 11th and 12th century.

They have not had one during this "global warming" bout. Yet. For that you need the temperature at Spitzbergen (whatever, I like the old name better) to drop further indicating an even weaker Gulfstream and not to rize.

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McFlurry McMisdemeanour costs Welsh lass McJob

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Devil

Re: Never mind the McFluffys

I suggest you watch "Falling Down": http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0106856/

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Devil

Re: "Mounsey may have a point" ho ho ho

I suggest you take a kitchen scale and see _EXACTLY_ how much 1g worth of chocolate sprinkling (which is made of porous chocolate) is. Note - sprinkling, not chocolate shavings (which are not porous).

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: Extras

Actually, all she needed to do for an appeal was to bring said chocolate pieces and a set of kitchen scales and demonstrate the difference between "normal", "stingy" and "lots". The chocolate used for such sprinklings is porous so the difference is not in "grams" as suggested by the register in the bootnote. It is in tens of milligrams (at best). If she puts a whole extra gram of sprinkling on top it form a layer.

Frankly, sacking someone for 50-100mg of chocolate is beyond grossly disproportional.

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Most biofuels fail green test: study

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Devil

So where does dual fuel - Ethanol + Oil production stand here

My french is very rusty, but if I understand it right the study assumes that oil/ethanol is a mutually exclusive choice. This is not so. Nearly all oil producing plants also have a significant plant mass byproduct. This can be converted to ethanol.

Example - sunflower = oil from the seeds, ethanol from the rather hefty plant mass.

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Scientists: 'Castration is the key to a longer life'

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Re: 'Castration is the key to a longer life' You first.

Quote from Wall-E:

I do not want to survive, I _WANT_ _TO_ _LIVE_ !!!

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Apple begs ex-Google bods to fix crap maps app

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Devil

Re: Open Street Map

Not really.

Other people have managed to achieve high quality navigation on mobile using Tom Tom licensed maps.

Sygic - it is the best cross platform Sat Nav and probably best offline sat nav for Adroid. I have not tried the iOS version, but I would expect it to be as good.

Apple should have bought it instead of this farce.

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Inphi: Don't skimp on memory for those virty servers

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Devil

Re: But what about clustered systems?

Seconded,

I would like to see the same benchmark run versus a microserver tray (something like Dell C5220).

The base price of a 12 microserver chassis with 32G RAM per node is way less than the cost of a 4 socket box spec-ed to the max RAM capacity.

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Made for each other: liquid nitrogen and 1,500 ping-pong balls

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Devil

Re: Amazing

More. Look carefully at the audience. Zoom into fullscreen if you have to. You will see that these are not the 9k paying students you are looking for.

This looks like a circus run for the entertainment of candidate foreign students during an open day tour. If memory serves me right you are allowed to charge these more than the base 9k fee which locals have to pay.

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Swiss railways ticked off at iOS clock knock-off

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Looks like average 50+ year old swiss clock

If you take a swiss clock from 50+ years back second hand is nearly always red and blobbed at the end. Even Omega used to do them this way.

These are the sole distinctive features - the rest is bog standard. So even if they had a trademark on it then, they have failed to defend it (as per trademark law) by chasing everyone and their dog in their _OWN_ country who did clocks to the same design.

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Did GM food cause GIANT TUMOURS IN RATS?

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Devil

Re: Need to independently study GM vs. "Roundup"

So was agent Orange. Originally...

With similar results. Apparently...

Frankly, as far as someone discovering statistically significant correlation between a weedkiller and cancer - I am not surprised. We have seen that movie before.

Same for the GM crops. I can bet a case of beer that they did not grow them in a lab environment free of weedkiller and bought them off the open market. If so, they are guaranteed to be contaminated with similar doses of weedkiller as to their "control" experiment. So that is not surprising either if you think of it - just an unclean negative control.

What is really bad news here is that if proven correct, it writes off the last "safe" weedkiller out there. Come to think about it - even if I do not use every second neighbor around me pours liters of that sh*t annually on their lawn to keep it clover-free, on their driveway to keep it weed-free and so on.

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Ten backpacks for tech-heads

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Devil

Too low rating for swissgear

I have a Hudson (slightly bigger version). However, if the pictures are correct this one has them too:

1. Passport/document pocket on top. Perfect for traveling - you do not spill your overflowing gadget store on the front every time you need to show an ID at an airport check-in.

2. The "document/spare clothes" stores is not big. It is enormous compared to any similar laptop-size/overall size backpack. I used to have a similar size Dicota which could barely fit a few folders there. Here you can fit the spare clothes for a 3 day trip. In fact, there is enough space for documents in the laptop compartment so this one is clearly designed with the techie day trip in mind.

3. Very nice sturdy handle on top - once again, helpful when getting it into and out of luggage racks when traveling.

Downsides: the side braces are a bit fiddly (elastics) and the combination of brace + pocket does not hold a flask very well. That is probably the only area where my old Dicota was better (it had classic belts instead of elastics).

It is definitely the "original" swiss army knife of techie backpacks. You may pay for it, but it works.

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Microsoft, RIM ink new licensing agreement

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Devil

Re: $300K, idiots

QNX already has reasonable filesystem support including the ext2(and later) filesystem family so it is not that. http://www.qnx.com/developers/docs/6.4.0/neutrino/sys_arch/fsys.html

Nothing to investigate by the way.

1. Your average SD card usually has a simplistic wear leveling algo which is designed to work with FAT. To be more exact it is designed to compensate for FAT constantly scribbling onto the file allocation bitmaps in the beginning of the disk. While most of them will work fine with other fs that is not guaranteed by the manufacturer so as a device manufacturer you prefer not to try. One more thing to go wrong :(

2. As a device manufacturer your assumption is that Joe Average Luser will pass family photos between the device and a Windows machine. If you do not interop for that you do not sell. The easiest way to interop nowdays is USB storage. The days of sync software are so passe that it is not worth it to discuss it.

3. If you have to interop with Windows you have to license patents for that which Microsoft holds. C'est la vie. The only leeway you can get here is if these patents are covered by one of the covenants from court orders for anticompetitive behavior. By the way, FAT is the de-facto standard for consumer device interop so I am really surprised that the EU commission has not looked into MSFT licensing practices for this.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: Lipstick on a pig

FAT - yes. exFAT? Not so much.

The only use case I can see here is so that the phone can read cards that have been vandalized by the Windows 8 family of products into this "new FAT" format prior to that.

I am not convinced that this is a usecase which is worth paying for.

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Smartmobe Wi-Fi blabs FAR TOO MUCH about us, warn experts

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Devil

You do not need to stick a CA

Just ask for WiFi sign-up with certs pretending to be a particular high-profile site - amazon, yahoo, paypal, when the user asks to connect to that site.

Broken AP sign-up certificates and broken AP sign-up screens are endemic and most users accept them without thinking and without _LOOKING_ at what the cert pretends to be. You can even pretend to offer "free" for giving a mail or answering a questionnaire so it looks realistic.

After that transparently proxy with a MIM any connections to that site. Capture credentials. No need to stick a CA at all.

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Prof casts doubt on Stuxnet's accidental 'great escape' theory

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Devil

Prof does not know what he is talking about

LAN extension is quite common method of delivering Internet in the 3rd world and ex-Soviet block.

Plug a cheap switch in the basement of the apartment block, everyone gets a Cat5, all flat, virus paradise (most people do not run CPEs either).

Cheap as chips too - costs per sub is a few $.

So if the virus was designed to stick to LAN and an infected machine was connected to one of these Internet networks it would have escaped same as on LAN.

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Apple Lightning adaptors reveal limitations

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Devil

Re: Yikes!

That depends on what are the license conditions and the royalties. The new connector will surely have a few patents slapped on it (this is Apple we are talking about after all).

Apple effectively killed the 3rd party power adapter market for the Macs a few years back. I would not be surprised if they refuse to issue licenses for power-only accessories for the new one (they definitely will not kill the home/car electronics interface golden goose).

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iPhone 5: skinny li'l fella with better display, camera, software

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Devil

Re: And?

Apple user population are on 2 year contracts. This may not be a compelling reason to throw out your shiny No 4. It will however clean up the "upgrade shiny No 3/3GS" market.

By the way - same as you are I am underwhelmed. This does not mean however that it will not be a commercial success.

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Boffin named Jubb to fire whopping hybrid thruster

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Unhappy

Re: Hard as I try

Not even that.

42 years ago the gas marketing association which sponsored the Blue Flame decided to milk its success to the hilt and they refused to finance any further attempts. It was effectively mothballed after its record setting run.

What people forget however is that it was a _TEST_ run for all practical purposes. Due to the engine being worn out during static tests and initial testing it was limited to 50% of its maximum thrust. It achieved 630 _AT_ _HALF_ _ENGINE_ _POWER_...

If it was rebuilt with a new engine and allowed to run full blast... Oh well... if...

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Dutch unleash intelligent robot bins: No ID, no rubbish

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Devil

Re: Right.. / @Some Beggar

Not just less hassle - it can actively contribute to the reduction of your heating bill.

Most wood burning stoves, fireplaces, etc can burn plastic too. Most of the plastic packing in use today burns quite nicely with little or no toxic fumes. Just do not burn electronics or cable insulation :)

The days when you could poison the entire neighborhood with the smoke from PVC packing are long gone. 99% of the packing now is polyethylene and friends. All you need to burn this one is sufficiently warm stove (or fireplace) and good supply of oxygen.

I burn 90%+ of my rubbish when I am at my summer house and it makes a very good contribution to the heating. I wish I could do it at my main one. Much better than burning it in the garden :)

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iPhone 5 to boost US GDP says JP Morgan

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Devil

Just goes to show how flawed this metric is nowdays

Right, so consumer spending on a product where 60% or so of it goes straight to China and Korea raises the GDP of country. Nice economics... When you can have it...

More like raise the trade deficit if you ask me...

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Health minister warns ISPs: Block suicide websites or face regulation

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Devil

Re: Guidance

As someone who has studied toxicology properly (as a part of a Chemistry MSc degree) I am going to disagree.

Past a certain education level in Chemistry, Biology or Pharmacology (~ 2-3rd year in uni) you learn enough to terminate anyone you like with ease - including yourself. So if we go down this route we should also ban access to most Biochemistry, Organic Chemistry and Microbiology sites while we are at it. After all they contain dangerous material ya know. Actually we should ban studying those subjects and replace them with Politology and MBAs.

Though that will not be original. Previous government already tried that including restraining orders on subject so they do not attend chemistry courses (I remember writing a request for Q in the commons to my MP on that one).

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Amazon: Pay more for Kindle Fire, smoke ads from slabs

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Devil

Depends on the advertising

Amazon knows enough of your shopping and "browsing for the next thing to buy" history to be able to nail you with anything from an "offer you cannot refuse" to or a simple reminder "didn't you want to buy this?"

I have noticed Amazon ads on other websites - they are 99% spot on (scary in fact).

So as far as Amazon is concerned their ads work.

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Airbus predicts catapult takeoffs and formation flying by 2050

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Devil

Re: Dirigibles

Why just dirigibles?

A screen effect monster can deliver a nice in-between - slower than turbojet, much faster than dirigible.

Similarly, it is likely to be considerably more energy efficient than a turbojet as well and there are plenty of routes where I would rather travel for 4-5 more hours but in comfort like transatlantics and transpacifics. In fact, anything over the ocean.

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Samsung accused of using child labor in its own factories

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Devil

Re: Child labour

Slightly different cattle of fish.

China is simply (ab)using the old student labor system which kept alive the Soviet block. In that system students either got a small fraction of the money they were supposed to get or did not get any money at all while working 2-3 months a year to fill the labor gaps in agriculture, food processing, etc.

Same story here.

This same story however is "bad news" for all those who have bet their companies future on the "super flexible" supply chain starting there (Apple's Mr Cook is a prime example). If China's supply chain flexibility needs gap filling through the forced drafting of students it is:

1. Not flexible at all. In fact, if the student labor goes away the supply chain will probably collapse (same as it did in the ex-Soviet block agriculture in the 90-es).

2. The quality will deteriorate significantly after a time. Students see the slavery obligations as such and start "sabotaging" "work". I remember what we did 30 years ago - as nobody listened to us we got relatives to pull their connections in H&S, Sanitary control or labor authorities, we acknowledged openly that the quotas were rigged and worked towards like 10% of what we were supposed to do, etc.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: Shut these slave camps down

And what exactly are you going to recommend as an alternative?

If you trace the supply chain down to its origin _EVERY_ technical gadget on our shop shelves starts its life in a slave camp. The sole difference between Samsung and let's say Apple is that it outright owns its slave camps as wholly owned subsidiaries instead of outsourcing the blame baton to the likes of Foxconn.

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Intel teaches Xeon Phi x86 coprocessor snappy new tricks

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Devil

Very Intel

Separate VPU and Floating Point Logic?

How quaint... And how very very very Intel.

They still do not get it.

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Global warming GOOD for biodiversity, say boffins

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Devil

Re: As it snows early in Germany...

Global Warming == Europe Freezing or to be more exact more continental climate.

Any climate model out there shows that an _AVERAGE_ 1C up over the northern hemisphere should result in 2-4C down across most of Europe. To make matters even more interesting it will be coupled with increased temperature differential so you should expect 3-4C more in mid summer (which we got) and 6-8C (or worse) less in mid-winter.

The reason is that the first victim of global (or to be more exact northern hemisphere) warning is the Gulfstream.

As a result European climate comes closer to normal for the European lattitudes. As a comparison Germany is at the same lattitude as Hudson Bay in Canada or Kamchatka in Russia. Both are known for their lovely holiday resort climate you know. Similarly, Italy and the Mediteranean is at the lattitude of New England, Washington (not DC, the state) and Oregon . Similarly lovely resort climate.

In any case, if the global warming proponents are right buying a 4x4 and MS/Snowflake tyres for it is advisable. If they are wrong - same story. So you will be freezing in both cases.

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Now Apple wants Samsung S III, Galaxy Notes off the shelves too

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Devil

Re: Apply this logic to cars

ANY modern car pays price tag contains significant amount of IPR royalties either direct or indirect (through royalties on component pricing).

The difference there is that an engineer which has designed something _WITHPOUT_ doing FTO (freedom to operate) and PLA (patent landscape analysis) first is walked off the premises by security straight away with his belongings in a bag.

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Here we go again: Critical flaw found in just-patched Java

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Devil

Re: 2 birds with one stone

"The language(s) used are likely to be choosen to make teaching those fundamentals easier."

Cough, sputter, sputter. Read this: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/ThePerilsofJavaSchools.html

Java is one of the worst languages to teach fundamentals of programming because it has one too many failsafes. In fact in java you cannot teach even the most basic things like reference/dereference and pointer manipulation. It should be taught as an elective after (and on top of) basic CS material which uses something more low-level in which you can teach students basic data handling.

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NASA funds sexy, stealthy, sideways supersonic flying wing

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Devil

Re: Red herring design

First of all, the idea is not as bonkers as it seems. Quite a good one actually.

1. It really needs to be efficient only in hypersonic mode. Subsonic is a matter of "getting there" and "getting back". Symmetric shapes are very reasonable in hypersonic flight.

2. Who said it has to be symmetric in the first place. It has 2 operating orientations, not 4. So it does _NOT_ need to be symmetric at all. It is not that difficult to do an asymmetric shape which flies well. Scaled composites ARES is a good example. It is as asymmetric as assymmetric gets and it flies very well :)

3. Subsonic efficiency especially at low speed can be improved considerably through wing mechanization - slats, etc. That is besides the fact it may not be necessary as the wing shape does not need to be symmetric in the first place.

4. Most of hypersonic lift in the more efficient designs is generated by deflecting sonic boom reflections from the engine intakes off the wings and the fuselage. So engines are probably in the wrong place - they need to be on top, not on bottom. However, for subsonic some of the problems may be solved by going Coanda like An-72. Dunno, without running tunnel tests hard to say.

5. Transition is the most difficult part here (not any symmetric/asymmetric arguments). Even if it is 100% done by the computer there will be loss of lift and loss of control during the process. To put it bluntly, to satisfy basic safety requirements the designers will have to design a shape which allows the aircraft to successfully enter and exit what is effectively a flat spin at will. AFAIK that is yet to be accomplished by any aircraft.

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'iPhone 5' released by Chinese Apple copycat

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Devil

Re: Well..

This is released before Shiny No 5. If it's look-n-feel is identical to Shiny No 5 it will get interesting. It is released _BEFORE_ it so these guys can pretend that it was Apple who copied it... Where is the popcorn...

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Leaked Genius Bar manual shows Apple's smooth seductions

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Devil

Re: Impervious

Some intrinsic... Some acquired...

If you grew up on the east side of the iron curtain during the days of the great gerontocracies you are probably immune to any sort of patronization (empathic or not).

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Google gets hands on 'glove-cam' patent

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Devil

Re: And the purpose is...?

IIRC the power glove did not have a camera.

However, if memory serves me right, surgical gloves with a camera on them have been around for a long time. It is just one of the many forms of an endoscope. You do not wave these though - you generally stick 'em in places known as "where sun does not shine".

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Open source author pulls code after GPL abuse

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Devil

He needs to read the GPL

There is no such thing as unauthorized fork under GPL. Any fork is authorized fair and square as long as the original copyright notices are retained and any derivative work is GPL too.

As a matter of fact he is violating the GPL too as there is no such thing as withdraw. Once it is out and once you have distributed it (which he has) you are obliged to supply the source for a reasonable time after that.

The only possibly "unauthorized" bit is the "commercial" distribution. However you are allowed to distribute commercially GPL software too. There is nothing wrong about that (once again, subject to notices, copyright, source, etc).

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XBMC media player now running on Android, Nexus Q

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Devil

More like "I can has a fire extinguisher"

One of the reasons why I do not run XBMC as a media center is that it does not have proper idle handling. It just cycles through pretty UI pictures full blast when in idle. In fact on many platforms it will eat more CPU idle than playing. That may work fine on a console but stinks royally elsewhere.

Coming back to the idea of running it on a mobile device - if it has retained its original boneheaded design and lack of idle handling - no thanks. I do not want my android device to burn my knees or set the table on fire.

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US deploys robot submarine armada against Iranian mines

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Devil

Re: Sea Fox Repurposed

And you think that the support team which has launched said fox will be twiddling their thumbs. On a second thought - yeah, why not, even more stupid things have happened in the military.

In any case, it should be possible to improve this thing so that more of it is reusable (detachable warhead, etc) if it has to be used en-mass. For a limited deployment 100k military list pricing is not that bad - f.e. a modern torpedo costs north of 10k.

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Apple rejoins EPEAT green tech cert program

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Devil

Yep

Their silly rules are quite explicit in specifying that "joe average recyling plant worker" should be able to disassemble the kit for recycling. I do not quite see Apple current generation of kit complying to their "silly rules".

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Devil

Re: Our relationship with EPEAT has become stronger as a result of this experience...

Quote And crank the RDF generators up to 11!

Exactly.

Is it me being particularly thick on a Saturday morning or there is just no way for its gear to stay certified. Key requirement is ease of dissassembly for recycling purposes. Disassemble a new MacBook Pro or Macbook air anyone?

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UK's web super-snoop powers could be extended to councils

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Devil

The problem is not with the councils having access

The problem is with the councils _ALLOWED_ to investigate in the first place.

It is _NONE_ of their f***ing business to investigate. It should be the police (or the taxman) doing it with them being allowed only to provide technical assistance when and where needed. Councils should be allowed to request a matter to be investigated and that is where their powers should end.

Unfortunately this is not the case - councils are allowed by UK law and precedent to pry into what is:

1. Various cases of fraud by misrepresentation - all the "who lives where and is entitled to what" cases.

2. Environmental issues of various sizes starting from minor misdemeanors like fly tipping to things that are criminal and have well defined crimes on the statute book.

3. Fraud of various shapes, colors and sizes related to the building trade and city planning.

4. Tax offenses of various shapes and sizes related to local taxation.

The pretext is that it will be "cheaper" than the police doing this. This pretext is false - each council uses hundreds of people across multiple departments where the police (and HMRC) would have used the part-time of less than 5-10 people to cover the same region. On top of that the councils _FAIL_ to bring most of the cases that should to be prosecuted to prosecution.

One you have fixed the underlying cause there will be no need for the council to look into anything. Until then, they will continue to ask.

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LOHAN to brew thermite for hot ignition action

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Devil

Re: Thermite

Make sure you _DRY_ it very well if you use this approach of building a thermite head.

I am speaking this as a chemist and someone who can now turn the sausages on the BBQ without a fork - I had an unfortunate incident with humid thermite during my first year in a university. It was wet and went into an air-dust cloud which burned instantaneously. I got lucky - 3a degree burns across most of my palms and a few spots of 3b resulting in losing most of the heat and pain sensitivities in them forever.

So based on experience - make sure it is in correct proportions (a bit difficult using the wet dip method) and is dried properly. Otherwise... Things can get funny...

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Google Nexus 7 Android tablet

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Devil

Who cares about the SD slot, can I have a car craddle please

7 inch is exactly 2DIN on a car.

If someone starts printing out simple "amplifier only" units that take this as a screen + controls were are going to see some very interesting jitters in the last place where the AV industry continues to charge insane amounts of money for an abysmal 10+ year old near-obsolete set of features.

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China reveals new strategy of stockpiling rare earths

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Devil

Re: So what if they are stockpiling?

Quote: "The only way to remove the stranglehold on rare minerals that China has would be to open up the Australian mines to run at a loss..."

No. The existence of EXPORT quotas entitles everyone to IMPORT quotas as a retaliatory measure.

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Europe's prang-phone-in-every-car to cost €5m per life saved

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Devil

Re: AirBag activation

1. Women + Fiat. Let me guess - a petite.

Fiat is notorious for not having their airbags activate if the "weight sensor" under the seat decides that you have a kid in it. There was at least one recall on the Stilo and a few on others for the same reason (the limit on the Stilo being set to values where it throws an airbag fault for any smaller size adult).

2. There are _LOTS_ of sensors in a car (including said sensors for weight which are regularly faulty in some Fiats) which override the airbag deployment - belts, door closure, etc. The fact that the car did not deploy the airbag does not mean it did not detect the crash so if the cellular notification takes input from the crash detector _PRIOR_ to any of the specific airbag overrides it may still be useful and reliable.

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Did your iPhone 'just stop working' - or did you drop it in your BEER?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Devil

Re: I'm pretty sure my Nokia 7650 already had something like this.

The earliest piece of tech I can think of to have it were ancient (pre-electronic days) disposable flash lamps. These had a calibrated quantity of Mg, in a mixture of gas with the electric contact serving just for ignition. The unpleasant thing about the setup was that moisture getting into the lamp gave it the tendency to explode instead of producing a nice well-behaved flash. This is why all of these had some _BOG_ standard coloured silicagel spot. If the spot was white the lamp was safe to use. If it was colored - chuck it away (unless you fancy an explosion).

Any _ANCIENT_ photography book contains reference to said device and it used to be in mass production up to a decade or so after WW2.

So some really old prior art here and plenty of newer one.

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