* Posts by Voland's right hand

2620 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Former Microsoft HoloLens man: It's NOT about gaming

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Re: If that's their use case then its doomed

The whole "not about gaming" thing wasn't Microsoft's tune a few years back

Cleaning the motion sickness vomit from the "holodeck" for a few years fixed that. VR and augmented reality are priceless when working on CAD and construction of any sorts. The actual hardware reqs for that are also low and the customers are well conditioned to pay extortionate amounts of money by AutoDesk and Co.

Games - not so much. On all counts - the money is nowhere near, the rates and reqs are off the scale, etc.

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Russian boffins want to nuke asteroids

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Re: I thought nukes were not a solution ?

Venturing a guess - using a penetrator, instead of a proximity or surface burst. This is feasible for "leaving" rocks - for "incoming" rocks the delta-v for a penetrator to be feasible is off the scale.

If you use a penetrator, the adjacent rock is instantly vaporized providing the necessary impactor so that the energy is not wasted.

There are some tech issues with that though:

1. You need to get the speed just right. So you need a lot of more fuel to drop the delta-v down so that the nuke does not disintegrate on impact.

2. In an ideal world, you will also need a pilot probe(s) to impact the asteroid before the nuke so that you identify it correctly as rock, ice, whatever and get the delta-v down to the correct value for the penetrator reaching optimal depth

3. For a half a ton to a ton worth of nuke (assuming a 10Mt warhead) you now need several tons of armor to form the penetrator and ensure that the nuke arrives to the spec-ed depth intact. That, once again, means a boatload of fuel.

4. It definitely works only on "leaving" rocks as suggested by these guys. An incoming rock has delta-v in the 10s of km/s. We do not possess the technology to reach it in time, drop the speed to a point where the penetrator will not disintegrate and perform an attack run.

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changing non-proliferation treaties in a hurry.

That is exactly how they are going to change them when we get a forecast of an asteroid hitting the Eastern seaboard.

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Aluminum-wrapped robbers fail to foil bank

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Re: Not so stupid

What they missed is that banks and similar outfits in addition to PIR, active IR (your fav stupid spy flick laser sensor) also employ ultrasound ones (similar to the ones used by car alarms). In fact, these are cheaper when covering large spaces like open plan offices.

While it is theoretically (and sometimes practically) possible to cheat any one of these sensors on its own, it is practically impossible to do this when they are used at the same time. A perfect PIR defence will trigger active IR or ultrasound or vice versa.

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Cyber-underworld price list revealed: $500 for company email inbox, $1,200 passports, etc

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Re: Corporate Mailboxes

Those are used for something else - source address and target info collection for a spear-phish.

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Nothing

That hack was done elsewhere.

No Russian hacker would have risked to hack anything which is even circumstantially related to someone who is related to Putin (that is the actual level of revelations in question) in the run-up to the Russian elections. "Mr Chrisoprase is not happy" is usually what you hear last. Before they fish your body out of the "river" Ankh (in this case Москва река or Фонтанка).

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Daily! Mail! eyes! up! Yahoo!'s news! arm!

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Best commentar is as usually from the Mash

http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/media/yahoo-feeling-a-bit-like-poland-in-1939-20160411107915

Well... having a couple of ex-daily mailers come up with the best commentary was not unexpected.

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BlackBerry boss mulls mid-range Androids

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Re: Just can't make it work?

What is it with big *tech* companies and OS software and not being able to make it all work?

Product management. And agile.

Seriously, small companies and startups are engineering driven, they by their own nature have a significant resource percentage dedicated to perfecting the core. The core is not a concept which product management understands. They understand the visible outer shell - the customer facing part.

As a result, in a bigger company, any work on core gradually takes a back seat or goes completely out of the window to be driven using an agile board from one demo of a gold plated turd to another. First and foremost - the core remains a turd. No new core will be introduced as this is not a customer facing activity. The layers of gold plating on top will grow until they pressurize the inside under their sheer weight to a point where the company will look to buy a startup to supply another core and the cycle will repeat once more.

There are means to break this cycle.

In pre-agile days tech companies in the valley used to have a set in stone core to polish ratio with the core resource fully in control by a Distinguished Engineer or a Fellow - the tech person in charge of the project. That went away with agilization. You cannot storyboard it for a customer demo. It is core - so it SHALL be replaced by agile driven and demoable polish on a turd. So one way to break it is to reintroduce some elements of waterfall and assign parts of a team on long term "sabbaticals" to work on next gen core. Rotate them, rinse, repeat.

Another option is the Bezos method - make each component of the core a product in its own right.

Both work, but even facing a bankrupcy will not make a big *tech* company look at either one of them.

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Watch: SpaceX finally lands Falcon rocket on robo-barge in one piece

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Re: A rocket for ... coming down!

Err...

First and foremost: Tsiolkovsky - he did the math. The "Tsiolkovski equation" knows no mercy :)

The rest - Goddard, von Braun, Korolev and today Musk is engieneering.

By the way - all of Musk illustrious predecessors thought of this - rocket take off, rocket return. The reason they did not even try is that the control technology for doing that in atmospheric conditions was simply not there till about 20 years ago. The automated glided landing version was tested once for Buran and considered for the Zenit first stage. Glided is slightly easier than vertical as the feedback loops are not so strong and the differential equations describing the process are not so insanely stiff. End of the day it was dropped.

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Nest bricks Revolv home automation hubs, because evolution

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You spoilsport

Your reply shows your age.

You are quite clearly not a "millenial" which has been conditioned from birth not to own anything - even where he lives.

As another grumpy old git, I concur. I'd rather not have it shiny shiny and build it myself out of open source parts and off-the-shelf hardware than sell out to the cloud. Any arguments about cost of ownership and/or ROI are totally moot if there is no guarantee whatsoever for it to exist tomorrow just because its real owner (and that is not you) has decided it likes a different shiny-shiny this week.

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Champagne weekend for Blue Origin with third launch

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Re: Toy rocket....

Not necessarily, Bezos and Musk have very different monetization strategies.

Musk is simple - "the whole package - take it or leave it". It is very conventional - this is how most companies build product.

Bezos so far has managed to sell each of his services as a retail "e2e version" and as "wholesale" - AWS, etc all started as backends for his retail shop. He is already going down that route with Blue Origin. The engine and its higher capacity version are already sold to United Launch Alliance. I would not be surprised if all components are similarly available separately at the end. Building something "the Bezos way" is more difficult, it takes longer, but it is ultimately a massively hedged strategy - he will make money even if he does not succeed in building an orbital launcher of his own.

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Woman scales Ben Nevis wielding selfie stick instead of ice axe

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Re: Fucking moron

So you've never done anything on the spur of the moment

There is a distinct difference between spur of the moment and Darwin award.

She should have been charged for the time and resources of all rescue services involved on a punitive tariff.

Disclaimer - I spent a few years training as a rescue service volunteer (not in the UK) while in high school, I am qualified to do that and still have the old overalls with the edelweiss insignia somewhere. So I am probably a bit biased. Just a bit. Actualy, no, she wielded a self-infatuation "cretin attached" tool. No, not a bit. A lot.

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Microsoft's bigoted teen bot flirts with illegali-Tay in brief comeback

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Re: AS is born

Neah, it is real AI.

I could not stand it and dropped out of a PhD in AI and theory of cognition - too little math (besides reusing stuff from probability and abusing Bayes for all its worth), too much handwaving and way too much smoking weed.

So if it is smoking weed it is definitely achieving some level of AI.

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Surface Hub: A Howard Hughes folly, or a cunning Post It Note killer?

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Re: It's better than you might think.

The Spruce Goose is BIG.

And at 40 years before its time. It was not until the 80-es until the first aircraft of comparable size became a must have for a long haul airline. It will probably take at least 20 more years until the epic congestion above major air traffic hubs will necessitate us returning to the "huge flying boat" concept (modeling by several unis and consultancies all points that way). That makes it 80 years ahead of its time.

I do not quite see how this lines up with the aforementioned microsoft product. It is not a miracle of engineering. It is not the first to introduce revolutionary concepts (hydraulic actuators, etc). It does not look well ahead of its time either.

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Oracle fires big red Solaris support sueball at HPE

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Opensolaris AFAIK is abandonware

Oracle took the development of future versions back onto the closed source path. The last official opensolaris was in 2010.

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Re: Handbags at dawn?

Reap what you saw.

HP did the same to people who were offering to support older Proliants several years ago.

I have zero sympathy for them on this one.

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EU ministers to demand more data access after Brussels attacks

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Re: But surely...

Even that will not help now.

When you stick repeatedly your p*n*s into the North Arfrican/Middle East macerator you should not complain that half of it will go missing once the macerator activates.

Democracy works ONLY in places where there is a minimal educational and cultural level of the voters. If you ask a Bedouin tribe to vote, they will vote the local equivalent of Mullah Omar (or whoever their dervish priest points to) and he will declare jihad on all the neighboring tribes. On a good day. On a bad day, both the freshly voted-in democratically elected fanatic and the neighbor will declare jihad on whoever came with the stupid idea of introducing democracy in the first place.

We have attempted forced introduction of democracy in places which are anything between decades (Eastern Iraq, Egypt, etc) and centuries (Lybia) away from being able to survive as stable democratic states. To add insult to injury (as noted by Obama lately) we could not be arsed to even try to follow up after that and support the fledgling democracies. We will now reap what we sow.

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Water treatment plant hacked, chemical mix changed for tap supplies

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Re: The.. just.. I don't even

If you store credentials

Question is what credentials. Some credentials - such as what you need to access CRM have to be stored.

Now the fact that the credentials were such that they allowed to manipulate the actual live industrial control systems is the "criminal negligence" bit. As these control chlorine, cloramine and access to drinking water supply there are quite a few criminal charges applicable for the execs of the water company in question in most legislation. Criminal negligence is just the start. I would slap onto them "being accessory to terrorism" without having a second thought.

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Met plod commissioner: Fraud victims should not be refunded by banks

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Re: prove it

They tried that - by bundling near-obligatory "fraud prevention" windows only software.

HSBC tried that, a few others as well. Forgot what it was called, named after some dog breed.

I tried to point them that they are offering an insecure redirect to an insecure download out of a hijackable non-https page to do that. Not just that, the whole set-up was asking to be abused for phishing or cross-site-scripting attacks. All of these rather simple thoughts could not be parsed by whoever is in charge of that part for them. I also tried to point to them that there is no way in hell you can run that crapware on a Mac or Linux, that did not parse either. Same result - it was like trying to teach a macaque quantum mechanics.

All in all - I did not get very far and after a litany of failures from HSBC security dept I fired them. With great pleasure. Moved my business elsewhere which is marginally better.

The truth is, nearly all management in charge of retail electronic commerce security in a most UK banks is as incompetent as you can find and then some.

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Dodgy software will bork America's F-35 fighters until at least 2019

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Re: only aircraft capable of launching from new carriers will be Russian / Putin's cunning plan

There have been unverified rumours that the Kremlin has been helping fund UKIP, поморщник.

Err, you spelled помощник или поморник (depending on what you wanted to say) wrong. I am neither.

As far as Putin directly or indirectly financing Front Nacionale, Syriza, Golden Down, Ataka, etc - that is well known. Not sure about UKIP but would not be surprised. It is a tit-for-tat for us financing Chechen "freedom fighters", fascists from Azov, UDAR and countless others.

By the way - we started it in the 1990es and Russians stoically tolerated it all the way until he personally raised it with George Bush in the mid-2000s. Bush said during the meeting he will check it. The Russians two weeks later got an answer from the state department which translated into layman English said "we do whatever the f*** we please - it is our sovereign right to finance whoever we like including any political party in your and neighboring countries". Prior to this discussion they took _NO_ countermeasures. You can check it - there are no payments to Eu or USA political entities prior to that. After that they deployed a tit-for-tat reciprocal policy and we have now started to reap the "benefits" of this "mud" (it is neither cold, nor hot) war.

This one is in the public domain now - it is in one of his interviews - he was asked why Russia is doing it and gave exactly that answer. AFAIK the Russians have declassified the answer so you can read the original in their state archives (state dept has not yet).

So for this we have Condoleeza, Cheney and the Dummy in Chief to thank. If it was not for them all of these psychopaths and lunatics which you see in election lists recently would have never had the money to mount a campaign.

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Although these Russian aircraft may well take off from Queen Elizabeth class carrier, they may not be able to land back on due to the lack of arrestor wires!

Mostly correct.

1. When BAE as asked for a quote, it was asked for a quote for _BOTH_ cat and trap, not just trap.

2. Trap only is not such a difficult conversion as this example has proven. There the trap install was "the easiest job from the worklist - took a few months (compared to that the nightmare job of ripping out all asbestous and replacing it with modern materials took years). In fact, if the Queen Lizzy deck has the structural integrity to take the blow-torch from the exhaust, it probably can take a trap retrofit.

So the issue actually that the contract is formulated in such a way that BAE can charge pretty much anything they can wish for including unicorns with rainbow sparkles for any spec change. That, however, can if need be solved by other means. In fact, it will probably need to be solved by other means as operating the intended fighter (F35) will be significantly cheaper if it is used for short-roll landing (with arrest for bells and braces) instead of vertical landing - less thermal load on deck, less engine wear, higher weapons load, longer missions, etc.

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My exact thought - they actually are the only ones producing one model (Mig-29K) and having another, actually IMHO better one frozen, but ready for production (Su-33) which can work off a catapult-less carrier. Other NATO countries fly Mig-29 as primary fighter (*) so it (at least the army version) is actually on the official NATO procurement list.

The French naval fighters need catapults so they are out of the equation and everything else is so out of date, its upgrade will cost more than the carriers. With F-35 out of the equation, all other NATO types are either out of date, out of production or have no naval version.

So if HMS Queen Elizabeth is to carry any planes at all for the best part of a decade after they set sail, the whole rusophobic brigade starting with Cameron will have to put on a brave face and shuffle to Moscow on a shopping trip. When the time comes, I am going to buy a BIG bag of popcorn.

(*) Bulgaria, Poland, Slovakia - all have it as primary fighter. Several others have replaced it with Griphen for operational cost reasons, but still hold it in inventory.

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Re: Can someone please...

but will its southern neighbour 'lean' on it to continue?

I did not know Canada, occupied most of the Southern hemisphere (or Australia extended into the northern one).

Either I need to refresh my geography, or this was displayed on an F35 radar map.

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London's $40m 'flash crash' trader is to face extradition to the US

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Re: Fix

They are deliberately undamped.

The money for nothing extracted from the instabilities by the few big players at the expense of all small investors is so big that it will take a WW3 like event or a complete system collapse (as described by Arhtur Clarke in Rama 2 and 3) for the regulators to try to stabilize it. Until then they listen to "stakeholders" and all of them like it unstable.

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BT: We're killing the dabs brand. Oh and can customers re-register to buy on our site?

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Re: Hell No

Your "hell no" is 5+ years overdue. I stopped buying from dabs the moment they were bought by BT.

Nothing personal, but it took only a few months for the stock levels, availability, etc to go down to a point where going to someone else made more sense.

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Police create mega crime database to rule them all. Is your numberplate in it? Could be

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Re: Show Me My Minority Report

You forgot to put joke tags around this one.

Innocent until proven guilty was removed from the UK law code fully around the time when RIPA and HSA were voted for by the Blair-time parliament. So the day for that should be 2000 if not earlier. Not 2016.

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Wrong pic

This one is more appropriate.

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Wait! Where did you get that USB? Super-stealthy trojan only drives stick

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Bingo

There were multiple infections at manufacturer premises in the past.

Claiming that any drive source is trustworthy is an oxymoron. Wipe first, ask questions later.

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How one developer just broke Node, Babel and thousands of projects in 11 lines of JavaScript

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Re: Copyright infringement ?

Come on, the code in question is trivial.

As a few people pointed out this is like taken from a 30+ year old basic tutorial. It will probably fail the Lego test of copyright - you cannot copyright the "natural form" of something. You can patent it, but not copyright it.

Granted, javascript is a primitive language, but none the less, even with all of its primitiveness I would have expected it to do this as a part of the base spec (*) in one line. Python and perl certainly do - * and x operators on strings respectively.

(*) I am aware that char repetition was added to the spec last year. That is still not pattern repetition or string repetition, which Perl has been able to do for more than 20 years in a single statement and Python for more than 15.

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True believers mind-meld FreeBSD with Ubuntu to burn systemd

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Re: Interesting...

The down side presumably

There is no downside for normal userspace binaries - you can run them. You could run them for decades. I remember running StarOffice 3.x on FreeBSD circa 4.x or thereabouts more than a decade ago.

In the specific case of Debian or Ubuntu you do not care about binaries anyway as they are all re-built for you. If memory serves me right t ~ 95% of the packages are available for the BSD port and work. That is more than for example most of non-x86 systems like the old mac mini.

As a matter of fact, as BSD does have its advantages especially when it comes to file system stuff, I am seriously tempted to rebuild one of my older NAS-es using Debian-on-BSD.

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Re: Interesting...

A Debian port on top of BSD kernel and libc has been running for a long time. Adding the few Ubuntu tweaks and UI to that is relatively trivial.

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Google's call for cloudier, taller disks is a tall order says analyst

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Electronics vs mechanics and aerodynamics

Apple only changed connectors and electronics (to give direct access to temperature sensor bypassing SMART). That is trivial.

Google is asking for a different casing design to accommodate extra platters. That in turn means different mechanics, possibly different motors and in a worst case scenario re-computing the aerodynamic models of how everything moves inside the casing. That is a tall order.

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Iain Duncan Smith's Universal Credit: A timeline

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Re: Recruiting

You are not familiar with the idea of "departamental scapegoat"

I know a few professional ones. You look at their career and it reads fail, double fail, quadruple fail and you wonder how the f*** could these guys be still employed. Then you realize - they are teflonated and they come and sell that as a service.

You have a project which needs to be failed - you bring them in, they fail. They are sacked (and quite often paid a golden handshake), you have assigned the blame, they go onto their next project.

Lovely job if you can have it.

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Interesting coincidence with him resigning right when the docs were to be published

I will concur with the mash on this one:http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/politics/politics-headlines/i-forgot-to-resign-over-benefit-cuts-last-year-confirms-duncan-smith-20160320107332

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'Hot Tech Talent' IT job board ads caught up in sexism allegations

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Re: and the quote

"will show pictures of them in which they don’t always look cool or gorgeous. They just look like professional women at work"

These are not contradictory. As anyone who has had to work with Eastern Europeans or Russian/ex-USSR will testify.

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Microsoft will rest its jackboot on Windows 7, 8.1's throat on new Intel CPUs in 2018 – not 2017

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Re: "One solution is to boot a Linux USB stick ..."

This is the kind of person that works in a basement.

Nope. In a purpose build loft conversion with windows on all sides. The total ceiling-to-window ratio is ~ 74%. It is often referred by my colleagues as the "Crow's Nest" or the "Superstar Destroyer bridge". Light and air. From all directions.

It is trolls who hide under bridges and in dark moldy basements. Ones like you sir (*)

Disclaimer - the last time I had a Windows machine in the house on real hardware was 1997. The last time I had a VM used in work for purposes different than "customer test" was in 2001.

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Oracle fights Russian software policy with Postgres smear

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Article Picture

That is an American black bear, not a Russian one. Though it is still valid as the the question of "Does Oracle Use FUD" is pretty much equivalent to "Does the bear shit in the woods".

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Microsoft's equality and diversity: Skimpy schoolgirls dancing for nerds at an Xbox party

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Re: And Unicorns too

I don't think DNA can do that.

You obviously have not been to Eastern Europe or ex-USSR.

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Pint

Re: Perfect

Dude, you chose the wrong tags. Should have put joke tags around it for all the humor deprived sad souls who cannot see the funny part of this on a friday evening. Have one on the house.

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Apple engineers rebel, refuse to work on iOS amid FBI iPhone battle

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People? Still having principles?

Wait a minute... First of April is in two weeks time.

Having principles is so... mid-20th century... (or even early 20th century and before that for some countries).

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Labour: We want the Snoopers' Charter because of Snowden

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Re: You can see what they're aiming at

Isn't that even beyond what ECHR ruled illegal for Putin's Russia?

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Re: Totalitarian Twits

The person who personally ordered my great grandfather shot would be proud. I suspect people walking past the Kremlin wall necropolis in the red square are hearing mad giggles coming from his grave.

Disclaimer - that person name happens to be Joseph Vissarionovich Jugashvilli. You can probably guess my opinion regarding the esteemed MP from there onwards.

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Cleggie, where are you? All is forgiven

I think we are now starting to realize that we actually did need them.

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Telling your wife why you were fired is the only punishment

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Maybe they were right

“having to tell his wife he was fired and why would be enough punishment.”

You have not met the wife, so you are a bit quick in your judgement. There are cases when this would indeed be the harsher punishment you know.

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Apps that 'listen in' to your mobile get slapped by US watchdog

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Re: Ah yes. Targetted advertising

Telling me what other people have bought (as if I care). Telling me what is "Trending" (ditto).

You do not - sheeple do. Sheeple mentality says different - "galactic battlecruiser displacement lardearse" has it, I should have it. So for 99% of the population what other people (especially ones with a galactic battlecruiser displacement lardearse) have bought, what is trendy is the key - you do not want to be seen as grumpy square pensioner who buys his jumpers from Edinburgh Woolen Mill once in a decade.

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Top rocket exec quits after telling the truth about SpaceX price war

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Re: Seems a bit ill advised

Overinflated sense of self-importance, not uncommon after your brain has been damaged by low partial oxygen pressure characteristic of the high altitudes on the corporate ladder.

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Re: We've all seen House of Cards

Nope.

There will be an investigation which is not an investigation.

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Brits seek rousing name for polar research vessel

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Re: Great preparation, tragic results

(to quote the Wiki). Is this the different story.

It is - Gjøa was not specifically designed for ice from the ground up as a polar adventure/research vessel.

That honor is carried by Fram (Amundsen + Archer) and Taimyr + Vaygach (Kolchak). They designed and operated the first proper arctic science expeditions using equipment which was built specifically for that purpose and designed for the environment.

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Slack smackback: There's no IRC in team (software), say open-sourcers

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Nice infomercial

With all due respect it is not just developers that have to communicate for a productive workflow.

I would like to have my git-commits, jenkins, bug-tracking, etc chatter to my team chat topic and would like to do that without having to feed a Califonicating Unicorn.

I can do that in about an hour starting from scratch with an XMPP server and sleek-xmpp (if I feel too lazy and with too much money burning my pocket, I can buy it from Atlassian as a bundle too). It is not rocket science. It will also interface cleanly to established systems using XMPP- google talk, jabber, facebook messenger.

Doing the same with "ubiqitously installed" bunch of proprietary clients based on proprietary json streaming protocol which is subject to change at a "ubiquitous" moment notice with no community control over it?

No thank you, the idea which this infomercial tried to brainwash me into does not pass the basic smell test. It smells rotten, I will stick with standards instead.

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