* Posts by Voland's right hand

2076 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Slander-as-a-service: Peeple app wants people to rate and review you – whether you like it or not

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

What lawsuits

This is illegal in more than half of the world on basic data protection grounds, defamation law, libel law and god knows what else. It would take less than a day or two to get an injunction and a week to make it permanent to shut down a service like this in Europe on basic data protection grounds. The same goes for at least some USA states which have a basic resemblance of data protection legislation.

It will be interesting which jurisdiction will this operate in. I do not see it working in California and New England states. They all have legislation this runs afoul of.

11
0

Lies from VW: 'Our staff acted criminally but board didn't know'

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Doesn't pass the smell test

Rumour says

Rumor is somewhat correct. US limit for diesel is set to make petrol preferred and the reason for that is not pollution. While the actual lobbying is done by "green facade" shops, the money to do it comes from a surprising source - the same one that bring you intelligent design in the classroom and global warming denial. When you give it a thought it is not so surprising - diesel is 1.5+ times more economical than petrol and cheaper too. If you are making billions selling petrol you will be interested in it not getting anywhere.

The best proof is in the dates - nearly all adoptions of the Californian "clean air" standard which puts this requirement on diesel were done during under surprise, surprise - the republican administration which you will never call "environmentally friendly" (note - adoption dates, not effective enforcement dates - they are 2004-2007).

0
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: but what are they going to do?

I suspect most owners won't want the 'fix'

It is not a question of "want". For recalls of this type, the VINs of the refuseniks are listed in the database for the MOT (or its equivalent in most countries). They do not get the option to "want" if they want their car on the road, without the fix it is not road legal.

There is a precedent - Nissan Almera seatbelts a few years back. They were specifically checking if the cars have the fix on the next MOT.

3
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: no honour in the top knobs club

You are mistaking the captain and the rat. The RAT always leaves first.

36
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Olaf Lies!?

My exact thought. Nominative determinism strikes again.

14
0

Massive global cooling process discovered as Paris climate deal looms

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Interesting

Interesting. If we remove the Lewis angle.

Come on Lewis, give it up, your argument is actually weakened by you not being able to resist the occasional rabid rant.

While at it, VOCs are an interesting issue in itself, because humans have been regulating VOCs in a considerably more aggressive manner than any car or industrial combustion related pollution. VOC emissions from paint, plastic production, fire retardants, etc in Eu and USA have dropped 40+ times in the last 10 years.

The reduction of VOC emission from paint in the Eu alone is in the megaton range compared to 20 years ago. There are like 2-3 paints with VOC solvents left in the shop now compared with 50% 15 years ago and 95% 50 years ago. - everything is emulsions. The same is in the industry - even car bodyshops are switching to low VOC processes.

If VOC was that important we would have been freezing our asses 10-15 years ago instead of boiling in the heatwaves of 2001-2003 because we were emitting them in quantities on an order of magnitude more than the ones quoted in the paper. So while interesting in itself, this does not quite compute. I would say: "More data required" - especially versus the anthropocentric VOC.

14
25

Has the UK Uber crackdown begun? TfL opens consultation on private car biz

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Not quite

For the time being the Uber "Interface" does not include:

1. Extra 5 miles detour around Terminal 5 and Terminal 4 if you take a cab from Heathrow and look like a foreigner. Or any other route for that matter

2. Obstruction of public highways when something is not going the Uber way

3. Spending half a day at a taxi rank at an airport chatting with 50 other lazy sods to skin a single mark 10 times the actual fare

And so on.

As long as cabs continue to charge based on time + distance traveled instead of a fixed cost from A-Z based on GPS the issue will stand. Milking Uber will not change a thing as it has a different charge basis which anyone who has been given the 30 mins extra run-around via the scenic route will definitely prefer going forward.

It is time for the Taxi licensing regs to be shredded and updated to the technical realities of today and the journeys to be charged purely on the basis of GPS distance.

11
9

Herbie goes to a hackathon: Mueller promises cheatware fix

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: So....

Not so hasty. We still do not know if the NOx, the CO2 for UK VED and the bhp for VED in Portugal, Bulgaria, etc were admin-ed separately or at the same time. The real fun will begin if these need to be re-run and vehicles re-banded.

0
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

VW division will be spun out to operate with the same kind of independence as Audi and Porsche

Looking at the mechanical differences between A1, Ibiza, Fabia and VW Polo that is an independence level which is well known as "NONE".

8
1

Web ad tried to make my iPhone spaff a premium-rate text, says snapper

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: The best and worst features

Tell this one to "we live in the browser" HTML5 crowd.

Do not understand me wrong - I agree with you. A large portion of the rest of the world does not - including Apple itself.

8
0

Rusky antivirus company FIRE BOMBED for research blogs

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: "the attacks seemed unprofessional" ?

In russia? Yes. You can hire a professional for anything. Just pay the right price.

14
0

Find shaving a chore? Why not BLAST your BEARD off with a RAYGUN

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Companies making money of blades

All razor companies are making money of blade consumables in a HP/Lexmark Inkjet style.

As a result there is absolutely no interest in making a blade last longer. In fact the average "lifetime" of a blade has been slowly creeping downwards instead.

So your ceramic suggestion is an anathema.

24
0

Audi, Seat, Skoda admit they've been fiddling car pollution tests as well

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: More Tax for More Follies and Greasy Palms?

There shouldn't be as far as I can see.

Not necessarily.

There are two tests that apply in the UK. One is Euro compliance which has NOx component and the other one is CO2. I do not know for sure if they are administered _SEPARATELY_ or at the same time.

I suspect they are separate, because the Euro compliance test is admin-ed at VW (and occasionally checked by a couple of labs) and the UK VED test is admin-ed and done in the UK as it is UK specific.

VW software when running in normal mode based on published US data may actually fail Euro5 in some cases. That means that if the UK test does not also check NOx (and other Euro5 compliance) at the same time as CO2, VW may need VED re-banding.

1
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Nope

They will definitely not stink like one.

As far as them being involved it is a natural consequence of VW replacing engineering as a differentiator by brand development and having a brand development director at the level of head of engineering (both presently suspended and under investigation).

VW family tree are all the same. It is the "Failure of Ford" taken to the extreme. There is no engineering difference between the low end (involved in this scandal) Skoda, Audi and Seat mechanically. They use the same chassis, engine, suspension, transmission, electronics, etc and differ only in their outer shell and level of plastic-ness of the interior. VW is also the same. It used to trail Audi/Skoda/Seat technically by a year to allow these to do "advanced development", but even that has been replaced by brand distinction now.

6
0

Spirit of Steve Fosset lives on as glider is poised to soar to 90,000ft

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Which I suppose leads to funny-shaped window

I suspect primary view is a front-facing camera, same as in Virgin galactic and its Scaled Composites predecessor. The windows are more for belt-n-braces, just in case the camera fails and for side view.

2
0

WATER SURPRISE: Liquid found on Mars, says NASA

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Tasty Morsel

"When a hardy Earth bacterium gets to that wet soil

I cannot think of anything on Earth that is hardy enough to survive in perchlorate at -70.

In fact, any(micro)organism capable of living in this will have to have a metabolism different to anything we know of.

Someone pointed to Dechlorosoma as an example of something that can eat this kind of substrate. Sure it can. Not at -70 and not in the concentrations capable of changing the water boiling and melting point.

1
0

NASA announcement of MAJOR MARS DISCOVERY imminent: WHAT can it be?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: A conjoiner drive

That's fine provided that there are no cache weapons. Last thing we want is more doomsday devices.

1
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

I wish it was option one

Most likely it will be the moist option. While we are moving towards the Elon Musk option, we are still not there yet. In any case, knowing him, we are more likely to find his base on an asteroid - something that makes both economical and technical sense. Bases on Mars and Moon are politico's dreams. Any sane engineer will chose something with a shallower gravity well as their first off-Earth base.

5
1

The pachyderm punch: El Reg takes just-over-a-ton Elephone P8000 to tusk

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Bingo

This is why I do not buy anything noname any more. Exactly the same, but charging only from charger and the USB slot busted completely.

No thanks - I got enough paperweights around my desk as it

1
4

German regulator sets VW deadline

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: It'll be expensive...

There's a third option, buy the cars back at top market value and scrap/recycle them

This is USA and maybe Swittherland only solution.

The fines and possible cost of lawsuits elsewhere are unclear and most likely not anywhere near the USA values. I do not recall the legislation in most Eu countries specifying a penalty fine for a defeat device. You fail MOT (or its equivalent) and you are obliged to remove it.

So the economics of a Total Recall outside the USA do not quite work out. I suspect in Eu VW will swallow all of the costs, offer some token reimbursement to customers and continue as if nothing has happened.

0
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: It'll be expensive...

Retrofit urea injection ... $1000 a car

You are kidding right? It is:

1) New catalyst and exhaust.

2) Tank, urea pump and piping

3) Connect to power and ECU (granted, considering the level VW CANBUS disease you can grab a CANBUS off the taillights to do that).

4) Costs of testing that for each individual model

I do not see how you can fit that into 1000$ More like 1500-2000.

All in all, I foresee a flowering market for 2009-2015 four cylinder diesel VW cars in Eastern Europe, ex CIS, LatAm, etc combined with a market to flash the ECU with pre-2015 software.

11
0

Will IT support please come to the ward immediately. Weeeee have a tricky problem

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Machine that DID go Ping

As long as the secretary was not killing a computer every 2 months. Static electricity + nylon stockings + polyester in the skirt, jumper and chair cover can do wonders to computer reliability. BZZZZZZZZZZZt...

1
0

Spirit of the Ghost: Taking a Rolls-Royce Wraith around France

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: 21MPG?

This 33mpg at 100mph - is this computer or actual usage?

Long term average since last counter reset reported by computer and verified to be correct multiple times (but not every time) at pump. Verification was not done every time as pumps on different forecourts (especially out in the wild east) will cut out at different times so you can verify it properly only on circular journeys where you refill at the same pump. Secondary verification from fuel bill which I also do as a recap of the expenses after each 1500 miles journey to ensure that this still makes sense compared to giving 1500 quid to ScumBag Air for 5 round-trip tickets in holiday high season.

33MPG in a brick privy shaped vehicle at 95-100mph Autobahn speeds is achievable - if it is a _VERY_ long and relatively narrow brick. The 5m 30cm length and the hard top help here :)

I do it every year during the summer clocking 3000 miles every time so I know the spend fairly well. That is why I am wondering WTF did the engineers from Royce do to get 21MPG in a similar size vehicle (also fairly brick shaped - its aerodynamics are not anything to shout about).

2
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Curious minds want to know

To solve this problem the doors are electric, buttons behind the A-pillar control the doors and boot.

I think I would pass (even if I wanted one). A car where the driver needs to scamper into the rear passenger compartment across the seats after a prang to open the door? No thank you. Whoever designed that was smoking something extremely cool (which may be or may not be a crime) and not sharing (which is definitely criminal).

By the way, I do not believe in the mechanism functioning after someone fishbones you or you flip a couple of times.

1
1
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: 21MPG?

Quoting one of the classic British Sitcoms from the scene where the lady was trying to sell her ancient Rolls Royce: "You are asking about miles per gallon? You are not fit to drive a car like this. Get out of my sight".

Though I agree. 21 MPG in this day and age is indeed a bit atrocious. My Isuzu D-MAX (loving referred to by my colleagues as "the combined harvester") which happens to have exactly the same dimensions (5.30m long, 2m wide) does 33 on the Autobahn at 100mph and 38.5 at UK motorway speeds despite being nearly twice taller and having the aerodynamics of a brick privy. I have no clue what they did to achieve such atrocious mileage, but they clearly f*** something up.

10
6

Bletchley Park remembers 'forgotten genius' Gordon Welchman

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: BBC programme

So why is it vital to keep Bletchley secret from the Germans in 1979?

It is not Germans, it is the Russians which were at issue at that time. You need to understand, in 1979, for USSR the wounds of the war were still raw. The veterans were still gathering in tens of thousands on the 9th of May. People who lost their best friends, husbands and loved ones were still crying when looking at war films. A lot of the middle command from WW2 who has suspected Churchil and Lord Dudley of treason were now high command.

Revelations that their suspicions were right and Churchill back-stabbed and outright betrayed his Russian allies multiple times during the war (allowing the Channel Dash being just one example - all Enigma traffic was decoded and the official historical record is a load of BS) were not going to lead to a fantastic improvement of the trust and relationship between NATO and the Warsaw pact.

2
2

NOxious VW emissions scandal: Car maker warned of cheatware YEARS AGO – reports

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Today VW ...

Seemingly VW are fairly unique in the diesel world in not using urea in the exhaust system to reduce NOx emissions. From what I hear, urea injection definitely works, so if other manufacturers (which I gather is all of them) have used it then they should be in the clear.

No, they are not. At least for Euro 4 and Euro 5 Isuzu has a TDI which is urea-less too. I do not know if their new unit (in the new D-Max) is with or without as mine is the older one. As it is Euro 6 I suspect it needs urea.

The old design with various modifications also shipped in Honda and the same technology was used by Toyota.

3
0

Devious Davros, tricksy Missy and Dalek Clara delight in The Witch's Familiar

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Sonic sunglasses

Come on, it's a gag. What do you expect when both the doctor and his primary antagonist this season are professional comedians. Could be worse - at least there are no "Green Wing" style visual close-ins and music interludes.

1
1
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Close but no cigar

In the classic Beatles photo, the Beatle on the left is parked illegally on top of the sidewalk and is in front of where the lamppost is nowdays:

http://www.pocketfullofliberty.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/beatles-abbey-road.jpg

The one in the Dr Who shot is parked 15m down the street, still illegally too. In fact, even more illegal - it is on top of a double yellow line bang in the middle of the bus stop. I guess there may be something in the VW genes about breaking rules...

2
0

VW’s case of NOxious emissions: a tale of SMOKE and MIRRORS?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: drifting towards political philosophy...

Who told you it is left.

Ever wondered why this is coming now and not any other moment? Ever wondered why it came out only after the oil price tanked under a level at which all the investment into fracking and oil sand extraction became unsustainable? Ever wondered why it came out after the destabilization of the Middle East failed to produce a price increase? And most importantly, why it came out immediately after the congress failed to sink the Iran deal thus proceeding straight to another serious drop in the price of crude from the new year?

I am not. I smell a rat and a very right wing rat too. End of the day this has been going on for 6 years, so there is an obvious case for the question of "Why now" even when correlation does not mean causation.

5
2

US eco watchdog's shock warning: Fresh engine pollution cheatware tests coming

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Suggestion for the 'greater good' approach...

It is not the size of the "exceedance" which is at issue here. It is the fact that it is deliberate and well designed with the sole intention of defrauding the public and the regulator.

Based on the article it looks like NOx and fuel efficiency tests in the USA are separate. I start to wonder does it have a "defeat profile" for those too. Some of the numbers they have been posting are difficult to believe and I never managed to hit anywhere near them when driving VW as a rental.

4
0

KARMA POLICE: GCHQ spooks spied on every web user ever

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Meanwhile, back in the real world....

Well unless you are a crim, what have you got to hide?

You forgot the joke tag.

19
1

VW: Just the tip of the pollution iceberg. Who's to blame? Hippies

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Stop blaming just the hippies

With the current excise rates on fuel, I would like to have my car, boiler, etc as fuel efficient as possible, thank you. So it is not just the hippies, it is the government thirst for funds and aim to get them skimming off the dipping petrol sales which is at play here.

As far as the condensing boilers, Lewis, you are talking total rubbish.

Their increase in efficiency is not caused by having a more efficient burn cycle. Gas in boilers has been burning at "max achieveable temperature" for a very long time. So my 20 years old GlowWarm emits the same amount of NOx at the burn point and per liter gas fuel burned as a condensing boiler. The reason condensing boilers dissolve their guts from their own acid production is the improvement in the heat "extraction" efficiency. The exhaust of my GlowWarm is in the hundred degrees range. The exhaust temperature of a condensing boiler is significantly less (under the boiling point of water) so it can (as per high school thermodynamics) be more efficient (bigger delta T). As a result (as per high school chemistry) the CO2, NOx and SO2 in the exhaust (which are the same in ppm for liter exhaust gas produced/liter gas burned as from normal boiler) react with the condensate water producing a highly acidic solution. That dissolves the guts.

So actually, if you do the proper math, the condensing boilers are an area where the "hippies" have achieved a significant improvement to air quality - they emit less NOx and SO2 because they burn less gas (at the same pollutant production rate at burn) and they also capture most of it into acidic effluent on-the-spot with much less of it going into the air.

54
6

Penny wise and pound foolish: Server hoarders are energy wasters

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Good example to show to management

In more than one way.

The article misses one fairly important root cause for the atrocious power bill: you have significantly higher power costs in a classic VM based virtualized environment compared to bare metal or containers. Older Vmware versions were not particularly good at using the CPU frequency governor. While the newer ones are better, the power cost of using virtualized IO compared to native IO is very significant. You trade DMA which costs virtually nothing to moving data across a VM boundary using the CPU which costs a hell of a lot power-wize. This is the case even in zero-copy scenarios because you still have to update page tables, TLB, etc in the CPU - something that is a very costly operation.

This is one part of the VM TCO which everybody keeps forgetting about when they do the "consolidation" math and it is quite significant.

So if you are running a lab, fine - you have no choice and you have to suffer from the power inefficiency of classic VMs. The rollback and "kill and start from scratch" facility you get with VMs justifies the costs.

If you are running a production version of a predominantly non-windows environment using VMs and Vmware in production in this day and age this is a "crime against the environment" offense. Pack all of them as containers (or if you feel fashionable - as Docker instances). If you are IO heavy, your power + cooling bill will drop in half (at least).

3
0

Smartphone passcodes protected by the Fifth Amendment – US court

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Unsolder the flash memory ICs, and then read them

SEC can and should have figured it out. According to their rules the bank should have (by whatever means necessary) kept a copy of all messages and ensured that the messages traverse the bank audit system so they are stored there.

I am surprised that SEC has not nailed Capital bank for violating their rules to the tune of a few million.

10
1

Anthropology boffins solve 9,000-year-old headless body cold case

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Off with his head

I like tadpoles on toast. Almost as much as I like caviar.

0
0

PETA monkey selfie lawsuit threatens wildlife photography, warns snapper at heart of row

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Speed Cameras?

If the judgement does not go the Slater's way that one will be coming very soon courtesy of the next brainless celebrity + his/her lawyer to be snapped. Quite a few of them have tried to enforce copyright on their likeness too so this will not be completely out of wack.

Then it will get interesting...

17
1

Revealed: Why Amazon, Netflix, Tinder, Airbnb and co plunged offline

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: If only there was a way

That is what you actually pay for when buying cloud. You pay for the assumption that you have paid for the mainframe of the 21st century - an infrastructure that does not fail. It walks like mainframe, it talks like a mainframe, it is a mainframe and the IBM CEO of old (Watson) who said "I think there is a world market for about five computers" is having the last belly laugh.

If you are trying to failsafe and failover cloud you have failed to grok what cloud is in the first place.

Now, the fact that the present generation of Mainf^WClouds is pretty far from what being failproof by design is an entirely different story.

15
0

SIX MILLION fingerprints of US govt workers nicked in cyber-heist

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

While an icing on the cake, I fail to see the usefulness

So what? What can an attacker do with them? If a particular level of access requires a biometric in addition to other credentials they have to have the "other" credentials first.

Oh, I get it, considering their success rate so far we can pretty much assume that they have that too.

5
0

11 MILLION VW cars used Dieselgate cheatware – what the clutch, Volkswagen?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: European testing

European testing is not fundamentally different yet, but will _BECOME_ so in 2017 and manufacturers have been given time to prepare.

From 2017 all tests will be performed on-road, not in lab. So cheating will become significantly more difficult.

1
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Surely their competitors knew about this?

It is not just the emissions. What VW does is using EGR differently depending if it is a test or real. This results in a significant difference in fuel consumption. If the engine will have to run in reduced emissions mode all the time, it should have higher fuel consumption. I am starting to wonder, was CO2 (as required by UK tax banding) tested with on-road software or with test software. If it was tested with test software this means re-banding of most small VW group diesel vehicles sold in the UK for the last 5 years. That will be fun.

3
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Well, let's summarise this.

We all know the "quoted" figures are nonsense.

Not necessarily. I hit them 100% of the time across my fleet - I have a 2007 Isuzu D-Max and two Mk3 2003 Daihatsu Sirions (the 107BHP pocket rocket variety). In fact, the Isuzu regularly exceeds its spec-ed mileage by up to 20%. Or used to. I think it has a clogged EGR valve and needs some tender loving care (and chemicals in the fuel tank).

So it depends on the manufacturer.

My non-scientific guess is that the next one to face a scandal will be one of the French manufacturers. Its consumption numbers are traditionally extremely iffy so I would not be surprised if they have "test mode" too. I am not going to point fingers at the exact one (out of two), everyone who has driven them knows that what they deliver is ~15% off from what the spec says.

2
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Vorsprung durch software

Trivial - the steering not active while undergoing a specific sequence of acceleration and deceleration. On 2WD you can probably get extra feed off the ABS to confirm the diagnosis.

2
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Surely their competitors knew about this?

They are not the only ones.

I drive a vehicle from the _OTHER_ manufacturer claiming that it is capable of achieving it - Isuzu. AFAIK it works, the design is published and has been tested by 3rd parties (it uses a more complex air distribution and EGR than normal). However, so was the VW one, so you never know.

As far as wider industry collusion, several Eu consumer organizations have shown in tests that the official results are completely bonkers and Fiat is already facing a lawsuit. I would not be surprised if the other ones will follow.

By the way, I got voted down into oblivion when I pointed out on the previous el-reg story that this has to be an EGR related stunt as the specific VW models affected are (or at least initially were) AdBlue-less. I guess at the end of the day, I was right :)

24
2

BT boss: If Ofcom backs us, we promise to speed up UK broadband

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

That is not just homes, this is homes and SMBs

So this includes garages, small shops, etc.

Your best approximation for this number is not the "number of residential dwellings", but the "number of electricity meters on non-industrial tariffs" which I believe was ~ 46M 5-6 years ago. It is probably still somewhere in the same ballpark.

So for "homes _AND_ SMB" this makes up for under 25%.

0
0

Things you should know about the hard work of home working

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Some of it rings true, some of it does not

As someone who has quite successfully worked exclusively from home for the last 8 years, here are my 2p:

1. You need a proper office, for work, the family table or any shared room is not an office. If you do not have one, build one (a proper log cabin is ~ 3k so it is not that expensive).

2. You should treat going to your home office same as going to any office. While work casual is fine, PJ definitely are not.

3. You need separate proper comms - there are plenty of VOIP providers, getting any number of numbers for home office use is trivial. Cameras for the video conf rig are also not something to save on. Get a proper high end logitech, even if you always crank it down after that. Separate broadband is stupid and usually is not worth the hassle. Get a QoS capable router and split the network with bandwidth allocations (you need that for VOIP anyway). Anything running OpenWRT can do that with ease. Splitting is a must too - your work stuff does not belong on the same network segment with junior. Similarly, once you are done for the day you should be able to move to a part of the network where you cannot access work without going through a few hoops.

One thing I do not quite agree with the article. It fails to reflect the realities of working for a company outside the UK which is one of the most common work-from-home scenarios. For those you end up taking 2-3 hour team calls while at the dinner table on Friday or more often while at the kitchen table with knife in hand and a pot on the stove. End of the day you are spending 95% of the time listening on those, so you might as well make use of the fact that it is encroaching on your beer hours due to the TZ difference. If something requires you switching your attention to the full you can always go into your home office.

4
0

Shattered Skype slowly staggers to its feet after 15-HOUR outage outrage

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: You don't realise how important Skype is until ....

Skype is a good choice for an IM if you want to have decoupled work and private identities.

Such a separation of work life and private life is practically impossible with GoogleTalk as Google continues to do anything and everything in its power to throw a spanner in the works at any attempt to have multiple per-user accounts or identities.

Other IM systems are nearly extinct or purely internal.

Unfortunately corporate IT is utterly inept at running XMPP (regardless of which software is used). With the exemption of Cisco themselves, most cannot spin up an instance and keep it up and nearly everyone prohibits server-to-server which is the greatest thing about XMPP.

The ones that can, keep it internal blocking s2s, which defeats the purpose of the exercise. Quite funny actually, as any end-user can run a jabber IM (all it takes is a debian box, even a measly RasPi can do it). For example I do and I know quite a few people who do it as well so you can now IM them at TheirName@Theirdoman.com same as you email them.

So this leaves skype as one of the few viable choices if you want to IM to people outside your company.

0
1

For just $400 you can have this Raspberry Pi – and MINE BITCOIN

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Why the fan?

What's the idea of a fan on a RasPi? Not like it generates that much heat.

0
10

Eight things people forget when buying infrastructure

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Racks come in more than one size

More importantly. Racks come in more than one sharpness.

The biggest and most important rack differentiator in a heterogenous install is the amount of meat and blood sacrificed when adding/removing equipment. If you are dealing with a cloud install it does not matter as you just pile them and remove the dead bodies when they kick the bucket.

You do not regularly unplug, service, add hardware, remove hardware, etc. In a mixed install you have to do it, so you learn to value racks without very sharp edges very quickly.

9
0

Forums