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* Posts by Voland's right hand

991 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Dead Kim Jong-il's OS makeover takes a page from Dead Steve Jobs

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Re: Not like they're going to respect western IP anyway

It is not like there is a significant contribution to the code anyway.

It has been skinned to look like Mac which is trivial. Several Linux GUIs can do that and in fact used to do that in pre-OSX days. The only reason they do not do it today is in order to avoid a subpoena from Cupertino. However, if you want to do it yourself, you can get to the required look-n-feel in one afternoon (or less).

The "look" says nothing about the code. The code may or may not be modified. My guess is that the only modifications are likely to be in the mandatory security agency data collection part. I do not think we need that code anyway, the NKs can keep their branch separate. We use a "different" (and more reliable) technology to achieve the same level of reporting to the comrades in Комитет Государственной Безопасности. Couhg... Cough...

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EVE Online erects mashed-up memorial to biggest space fight in history

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Re: False sense of achievement maxed out...

Actually, no. There is achievement here - by the game design team.

While I am not an EVE player, I tend to follow how rules change in major online games out of "scientific interest". If memory serves me right initially in EVE, the Titan class of warship was predominantly a logistics choice. It could warp in, create a gate and allow you to warp in your fleet. The necessity to protect your "gate builders" used to force a rather conservative strategy onto major fleet engagements making long term players and alliances accumulate massive amounts of inactive assets.

That is bad for a game (even as addictive as EVE). Sooner or later people get bored.

So the developer tweaked the rules. However, IMHO, they overtweaked them too much in the opposite direction to a point where a conflict between major powers is guaranteed to degenerate into a mutual self-assured destruction with no winner (also bad for the game in the long term).

In EVE today Titans can go into battle and can carry a nearly impossible to deflect weapon (one that can fire only once every 10 minutes). This has changed the doctrine and strategy and stats quite clearly show it. The losses of Titans vs other capital ships in this engagement is vastly disproportionate 7:1. One can think of this as "nuclear" vs "pre-nuclear" conflict. Both sides now have a doomsday device and are lobbing it at each other at the maximum rate they can.

In any case, the ones who win here are the games developers - several major powers with a large number of assets which were dormant for a while now need to rebuild. That means a lot more time clocked on EVE as well as money flowing into EVE's coffers.

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Lenovo reveals convertible Chromebook

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Re: Yoga chromebook

We are yet to see a locked Chromebook (it will come one day, let's have no doubts about it - do no evil, some other time). All of them so far have developer mode.

While I do not have a pending laptop replacement problem, this one is tempting me. It would make a stellar Debian typewriter. On the other side, I already have a Samsung Arm based one (Samsung chromebook with Debian and set to boot to Debian by default).

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Cameron: UK public is fine with domestic spying

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Re: Look you have all taken this the wrong way.

My dad (and granuncle who worked for the "company" in his country) used to say the same.

However, there is a minor and insignificant difference between then and now. Then, they wanted to spy on YOU. YES YOU. YOU were selected as a target for whatever reason.

What is going on today is spying on everyone. Indiscriminately. At a level which puts Stazi, Securitate or Шесто управление to shame.

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And the winner of the most reliable disk drive award is ...

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Re: Misuse of Drives

No it is not. As someone who has been (ab)using desktop drives in a 24/7 configuration both at home and in business for 17y now, I can say that most of them are perfectly fine if:

1. You cool them properly

2. Your case does not rattle them to death - suspension mounts, etc are recommended.

1 is what makes the difference between enterprise and consumer. Most enterprise are more resistant. 2 is really common across both types.

I have some MAIDs which have started their life as RAIDs (I usually retire disks from RAID into media MAIDs after 3 years) that are 7 old now, alive and kicking (Hitatchi DST and Maxtor all of them by the way). Notable exemption - the damn "duff cirrus logic" maxtor batch about 10 years ago. That was a total disaster regardless of Enterprise vs Consumer.

Ever since I started putting proper cooling on my hard drive cages I have had only one drive degrade (not even fail). It was surprise, surprise a WD EADS. 24x7 abuse of Samsung, Maxtor (exempting the duff cyrrus logic), Seagate, Hitachi - never had a problem with any of them (provided that they were cooled properly). Granted - as I do not do "IT proper" any more, my sample sizes are no longer big enough to yield proper statistical results. However, for whatever its worth it - those 30£ spent on a Silverstone cooled drive cage (or Icy dock) are money well spent.

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Crippling server 'leccy bill risks sinking OpenBSD Foundation

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Re: Apple and BSD

While BSDs may look similar to the user and offer similar APIs, they are not that similar on code level. Ever tried to port a driver from NetBSD to FreeBSD?

In any case each and every linux distribution uses the following bits of code from OpenBSD foundation: openssh, a number of foundation internet services - telnet, tftp, etc, the internet services control subsystem - inetd. 20k is pocket change for RedHat or Ubuntu. As they use this code extensively, they probably should shell out a few quid.

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Google Glass driver told she CAN wear techno-specs while on the road

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Re: What bollocks

This is bad... the police won't know it is on until they stop someone, and then they will just turn it off. Police will get charged and just worn't stop anyone..

Subpoena to mobile phone company, did Glass have a data context active at the time of stopping. Yes it did. Did the driver turn it off. Yes he/she did - when a phone battery is embedded there is no way to "abruptly" take it off the network. It will actually perform sign-off so this has to be deliberate action by the user.

So, right my dear, here is your driving ban, 6 points on the licence and a year in chokey for "perverting the course of justice".

By the way, this is being done regularly for any case where there is a reasonable suspicion that the phone may have been a cause of an accident today. Mobile networks handle thousands of these requests a week nowdays. There are police forces that do it "by default" for every accident just in case.

Alternatively - subpoena to Google. They are obliged to cooperate in this case. If they have to provide police with full information with regards to anything where a glasshole has been involved they may end up actually rethinking the product... (yeah, I know - two teaspoons of wishful thinking).

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Let Google's tentacles fondle your mobile's web downloads and Chrome will put the data on a diet

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Re: It's a nice idea, but...

Quote: "Who cares for almost everyone..."

Quite clearly you have yet to be hit by someone stealing your identity or spear-fish you.

Are you confident in Google's controls on the data it collects from you?

Are you confident in whom it will be sold to?

Are you confident that Google will not be hacked and the data will not be lifted out of it along with those credit card details and personal data (sufficient for a credit application) you have registred on Google play?

Are you confident that you can distinguish between a genuine offer and a perfectly designed scam that has been fully personalized to you based on an analysis of your lifestyle, habits and your personal date?

Dunno about you, I am not...

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Top patent troll sues US regulators for interfering with its business

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Re: Free Speech?

It may be free to use, but it will also get you a default judgement in court against you for no show.

In fact the easiest way to deal with patent trolls which will exterminate them once and for all is to exempt the patent law cases from the default no-show clause. If you are suing someone for infringing and he does not show you still have to defend your case and _ONLY_ if you win you get the fees and damages assigned to you by default.

This will terminate 99% of trolling outright.

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Oh those crazy Frenchies! Parisian cabbies smash up Uber-booked rival ride

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Re: circumventing the heavily regulated systems

Which particular standard of service are you referring to?

London cabbies clocking extra 5 miles on any route around LHR by giving you the "scenic route" around Terminal 5 instead of driving you directly where they are supposed to? Add to that the vehicle being the shttiest possible ride quality on the planet? Prague cabbies having a special "foreigners tariff" hacked into their systems and clocking it when they hear foreign speach (immortalized in half of their comedies)? Sofia cabbies trying to exchange 1 £ for 1 lev (when the exchange rate is 2.4) and throwing toddler tantrums if you hire them for any route less than 2 miles out of the airport? Israeli cabbies not knowing the names of major towns (3rd and 4th in size after Tel Aviv and Jerusalem) - we had that one a few times. Canary island cabbies giving you a ride which you will never forget (after you finish shaking from seeing the bumper of the car in front of you at 30cm while at 130km/h)? Madrid cabbies doing the scenic route around the city center at any possible occasion? Athens cabbies charging you extra for the aircon? Shall I continue? I would not even mention cabbies in Bangalore, Moscow and a few other places. The regulated taxi industry cannot be described in a way that will pass by the moderator. It should have a good shakeup.

If I can take a private hire company instead I always do or just book a car rental. It is usually 2x cheaper, 10x more comfortable, you are not fleeced as much as the traffic can bare (and cheated on top) and is subject to the same regs. The difference is that they are enforced by the insurance companies, not the regulator. The only thing which needs to happen to Uber is that all of its vehicles get a full Taxi insurance same as the private hire guys. That will deal with it.

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Iceotope sounds like a kids' superhero – but it's a UK server-cooler maker that just bagged £6.1m

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Time to by SAN stock

This is a lovely concept. However - it is compute only. Hard disks really dislike oil getting inside their spinning bits through the breather holes. In fact, some have so low design tolerances that they cannot even take running at 3000 m above sea level because the air is rarified. Granted, this is supposed to change once we have sealed cartridges full of He, however we are not there yet.

So you either need an all-solid state drive setup or external arrays with good oldfashioned spinning rust which is still air cooled.

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Samsung Nexus S beats Galaxy S III – at detecting GAMMA RAYS

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So how long it will survive around a gamma source

So how long before Android coredumps next to a gamma source? The same thing you see on the sensor is also happening on your RAM and flash :)

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Top Microsoft bod: ARM servers right now smell like Intel's (doomed) Itanic

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It is "outside mobile"

Quote "outside your mobile" - it is actually used more outside the mobile. It is nearly everywhere around us. Arm MCs are now so cheap that nobody bothers with the "smaller, more embdded and more efficient" varieties as they are more expensive. Your hard disk is ARM, your car ECU if it is made in the last 5 years is probably arm too (it used to be PPC). Your fridge MC, your washing machine, your dishwasher controller - you name it. The bloody thing is everywhere. The only place where it is still not dominant is home routers and wifi APs - that is the sole MIPS holdout.

It is a proven architecture provided that you are happy to move your workload around as _SOURCE_. That is what Microsoft does not like here - you cannot move a binary workload efficiently from Arm to Arm. You either need an optimised runtime per hardware version (as in Android) or you need to recompile it. While the basic instruction may be the same (or may be not - Razzie being an example of a violation - its fpu aspects), all offloads and all accelerations are very hardware specific. Just look at the various /proc files and the irq list on an arm device on linux and weep (I do it regularly when my Debianized chromebook pisses me off and I need to debug something on it).

As far as arm 32 vs 64 the difference is not that staggering - it is an evolutionary step - same as amd64 vs i386. Considering that 64 is already going into high volume devices I would not expect that to be an issue with regards to arm acceptance and overall architecture stability anyway.

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Cygnus cargo truck on its way, and funding to 2024: Space Station is back in the game

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Re: Wot?

B52? I always thought that the Pegasus was launched off a Lockheed L1011.

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Re: Well done Orbital Sciences!

You are a bit too quick to cheer up here. The rocket uses a finite engine supply that is no loger manufactured - refurbished and retrofitted with modern US electronics russian 1960-es (yes, 60-es) rocket engines. If memory serves me right these were preserved in a warehouse somewhere in the middle of nowhere as a result of sheer luck (someone lost the order for their scrapping many years ago).

You can still see the original russian markings on the engine on the pic: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ad/Aerojet_AJ26_Rocket_Engine_Arrives_at_Stennis.jpg (HK is NK in cyrillic, rest is model code and serial number).

I have yet to see Orbital sciences answer the fairly obvious question - what are they going to do after the supply runs out.

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Optical Express 'ruined my life' attack site wins Nominet takedown battle

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The whole industry is ripe for investigation

It passes my personal "byer beware" - use of professional criminal spammers to do advertising mailshots by at least some of the players.

By the way - I am not talking some lousy amateurs like Wallace. Real, proper professionals which register one-shot domains to fire off a mailshot, then dispose of it. The domains have valid certs, mail has dkim signatures, the mailshots are fired from proper valid servers in real hosting (and disposed off after that). The lists and mails have correct geographies too as they have been sourced from real companies (I know who sold my addresses by the way). So no address based block can nail them. In fact, the mailshots are so well done that no antispam system I am aware of can nail the f***...

I have a couple of mail addresses which I had to abandon over the years due to them getting on these mailing lists. I could have /dev/null-ed them. Instead, I train my spam filters on it (the bayes is now selecting these with good enough confidence) and automatically report anything that hits them into every single anti-spam with a reporting function that I know.

I also keep an eye on what goes into that bucket to see who gets in there.

Laser eye surgery is not the most common entrant, it is however present and persistent - not a one-off (a mail or two a month). It is probably on par with the more dubious solar panel schemes and double glazing. Nowhere near various "fraud of the year" "experience" tours, but not that far off either.

All in all - if an industry needs criminals to advertise their services it is ripe for the fraud squad.

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US BACKDOORED our satellites, claim UAE

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Re: My question:

Yes, the Sopwith Camel.

The Tiger Moth and the Gypsy Moth are currently being investigated on suspicion of being backdoored.

Any other questions?

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Coca Cola slurps millions of MAC addresses

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Re: Thirsty!

Quote: Yes but it is still one of a number of sugary drinks that has no real food value..

This offtopic anyway, but I will bite:

There is Coke and Coke. Same as there is Fanta and Fanta, Tonic and Tonic and so on. The contents differ largely by region. The primary difference is sugar vs glucose/fructose srup. The former is something humanity has lived with for thousands of years (in one form or another). The appearance of the latter on the market correlates with the beginning of the obesity pandemic. In fact, according to a lot of scientists (despite the best efforts of the food industry and various farmer associations) it is the primary cause of the obesity pandemic.

For example - Schweppes Tonic water in Western Europe is sugar based, as you go towards Eastern Europe and Middle East it is replaced by the glucose/fructose mix. Even the "iconic" Coca Cola drink differs by region becoming more obesity-friendly as you move outwards from the developed part of the world. By the way, when we travel my kids are OK to drink the sugary versions of Tonic, Bitter Lemon, etc and spit out the glucose/fructose crap straight away. They think it tastes disgusting.

In any case, as far as Coke reserving MACs - it may not necessarily be Ethernet. In fact it is less likely to be Ethernet as there it means that coke will be doing quite a bit of the engineering (unlikely). My guess will be bluetooth or wifi and some harebrained marketing idea like locating your closest coke machine in a mall :)

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Google BLASTS BACK at Apple, Microsoft, Sony in Android patent WAR

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Re: is Sony the height of absurdity

At that point Sony was not yet shipping all of their high end stereos including car units running android and Sony phones were still Sony-Ericsson - not directly managed by Sony. I do not see them doing it today.

As far as what is in a normal world and what not, calling the world today normal is probably an oxymoron...

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Snowden: I'll swap you my anti-NSA knowhow for asylum ... Brazil says: Não

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Re: Can't really blame him for trying.

The man from mars account has been hijacked. A post that actually makes sense on first read? You are not amanfromMars 1, you are an impostor.

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James Bond's 'shaken not stirred': Down to trembling boozer's hands, claim boffins

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Re: I'm waiting for a character update ....

After a short mental calculation - they have a point. 92 units a week is about a bottle and a half of wine (or corresponding amount of concentrate) every day. That is alcoholism level consumption by any standard.

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Legal bruiser Reback joins Google battle in Europe

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That distribution looks all right to me

I have long stopped using any of the "competition" listed on that slide. While this may be specific to the goods I search for, their search result used to yield 90%+ duds (stuff that is no longer in stock or at same price) and/or false positives. Compared to that, Google usually hits the >50% range.

On top of that they used link spam to fill the first 2-3 pages of any search result term (regardless of how irrelevant).

They definitely will not be missed, even if all of them go under.

By the way, this does not mean that Google should not be subjected to antitrust controls - that is a given and mandated by Eu law after you gain "significant market power". Google has had that for a while now and has managed to get away with it for too long.

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Munich signs off on Open Source project

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Re: And then

When you have a budget the size of the city of Munich and you ask Accenture/KPMG/Whoever to jump the answer is immediately "How High".

They all have their own IT shops so they will solve that problem if needed to keep the contract. They will probably re-sell the know-how against IBM in other tenders after that too.

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Congratulations

When they started it was brave to the point of recklessness (for a large business environment with a number of windows-only legacy apps).

In this day and age it is not particularly difficult. In fact, there are lots of places where linux has displaced windows. For example are quite as likely to find xfce4 on a trading desk as windows nowdays - it is stable, requires little or no support, it is easier to comply with the farious mandates on it being patched up-to-date. Key apps are bespoke anyway and written in house so no difference in terms of app investment either.

Trading aside (as it has always been a special case), bespoke apps for anything above an SME are either written in java or in-browser as web apps and operate versus a specific backend environment like SAP. So they can run on Linux with no problem. In fact, they probably run better on Linux. This leaves only documents. While import/export from libreoffice leaves a lot to be desired (it has gone worse lately), if you stick to its native formats it is fit for most purposes. It is probably easier to use compared to MS Office as well (give the idiotic ribbon UI to someone who has been using legacy for 10+ years and watch the fireworks).

Someone starting such a project today will have a much easier time - it should be doable in a few months, not years.

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'Disruptive, irritating' in-flight cellphone call ban mulled by US Senate

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Re: So are they going to outlaw the screaming kids on the plane?

Paraphrasing the old adage: "Behind every great man is a great woman" - behind every screaming kid kicking the seat in front of it is an idiot parent. This "parent" (quotes intended) is usually of the kind that makes you start considering that the right to parenting should be subject to a license.

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Cassini spots MEGA-METHANE SEAS on the north pole of Titan

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Re: we'd use far more energy getting there and back

Not necessarily. Even if it travels 10 years on solar sail or a couple of years on ion drive so what?

Provided that you find a way to mine it and lift it off the surface it may indeed be economically feasible in theory.

In practice, if we have the technology to mine it, lift it off the surface, accelerate to escape velocity and solar sail it to Earth we are least likely to need it for something like patio heaters.

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Grace Hopper gave us COBOL, 'debugging' and inspiration. So Google gave her a Doodle

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+1

The article however misses one of her most important quotes and motos:

You manage things, you lead people. We went overboard on management and forgot about leadership.

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IBM turns plastic bottles into life-saving 'ninja' MRSA, fungus fighters

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Cheap 3D printer works with steel

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Re: Now this is more like it.

Not really. The cutlery set is only a part of the equation.

The difference between this uni project and a real 3D metal printer (one which you can actually use to print a gun barrel) is that you enclose the whole rig in an inert atmosphere. As anyone who has done some welding can testifiy a weld (regardless how good it is) always absorbs oxygen making its mechanical quality nowhere near that of solid metal. In other words - while it may "print" a sprocket, I am not putting that sprocket in my car any time soon as it will last only a couple of miles :)

So you need to add to it the argon bottles, pressurisation equipment, etc. You also need to make the whole rig tunable to accommodate for the infinite variety of "cutlery" sets you chuck into as well as detect what cutlery set was chucked in in the first place. That is rather difficult so you are likely to end up using pre-mixed pellets with appropriate flux and other additives mixed in too. That will not be 99p any time soon.

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Sceptic-bait E-Cat COLD FUSION generator goes on sale for $US1.5m

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Three word answer

Three word answer to your question: English Libel Law.

It does not matter what they are, unless you are the Sun or the Daily Beobachter you cannot afford being right in the UK about things like that. Uri Geller taught the press that one well.

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Swollen Reg reader recounts FALSE WIDOW spider HORROR

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That looks like multiple bites

While the false widow is an obvious candidate, you can get a similar ugly picture from a centipede.

A centipede is more likely to bite several times in close vicinity (you usually get just one nip from a spider). The bites can be quite nasty too because the venom causes local tissue necrosis around the bite. The last time I got bitten by one it took more than a month to heal properly.

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Thai man reportedly dies clutching his scorched iPhone 4S

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The wonders of having a metal phone body

If the phone has a plastic body (like my Xperia Arc S) a deffective charger leaking 220V onto it will kill the phone and do nothing to the user.

If, however, it has a nice shiny and conductive metal rim... If the user is holding it tightly by same said rim (I know - holding it wrong)... If the rim is connected directly to bits of the circuitry because it is serving as an antenna... If these connections have no means of limiting the current to a sub-letal < 200mA by design...

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VIOLENT video games make KIDS SMARTER – more violent the BETTER

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FInally... Some sanity into the discussion

This fits my rather non-scientific observations.

15 yeras ago I used to run a PC repair shop (in fact co-own it) with a couple which were fighting like cat and a dog. All the time. I moved onto other things for a year and came back to get some parts from them. I expected to find the usual constant bickering, grumbles and cold war atmosphere. Well, none of that - they were an exemplary couple. The secret - once a day half an hour therapeautic session of Doom2, deathmatch. They were discharging all of the aggression in virtual reality instead of doing so in the office.

The rest is also spot on.

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Revealed: How Microsoft DNS went titsup globally on Xbox One launch day

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Re: Learning from mistakes

No they have not.

DNS is one of those infrastructural technologies that should not have dependencies on other stuff because other stuff (like Active Directory) actually depends on it for its discovery. Having active directory control on an SME DNS server is an acceptable risk.

Having active directory to do anything with the production systems of a multi-billion corporation providing online services is a stark raving lunacy.

Disclaimer - in one of my past lives I used to manage DNS deployments bigger than MS so I am probably a bit biased here.

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Yahoo! staff! slapped! for! 'snubbing! own! webmail! and! preferring! Outlook!'

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Re: Perhaps Marissa has an evil Elop-like mission

"Eat your own dogfood". Companies (and teams inside companies) that do not, do not go far.

I for once agree with Marissa on this one. One of the reasons on why Yahoo is in its current appauling state is exactly that - nobody was eating their own dogfood. If she is to fix it (ever) she has to start from this so for the time being there is no reason to consider her to be an Elop.

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NSA-busting secure, open, router seeks cash and code from crowd

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Custom linux distribution - no thanks

Do it with openwrt and I am happy to throw some pennies in that can you are rattling.

Another custom linux distribution? Forget it.

In any case, by today's standards 1GBps is not something to shout about. There is plenty of hardware from that can do this using "stock" openwrt checkout from trunk. Most of them are mips based though. Having a ppc for variety would be nice.

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Undercover BBC man exposes Amazon worker drone's daily 11-mile trek

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Re: Is this a story?

Quote: "Try walking continuously for 8 hours"

In the days when I was supporting an end-user network consisting predominantly of Windows 3.11 (and later Windows 95) I used to do that on a daily basis for a living as an IT job. Mileage was not that far off either. With staircases and lugging PCs to/from the repair shop inclusive.

I used to clock even more as an intern doing molecular biology work - 8+ hours a day, running constantly between 4 different pieces of equipment located in 4 different labs _AND_ washing dishes with nicely grown "molds" on them in the meantime. McDonalds and Amazon are a song compared to some of the lab work out of there. Even the most disgusting customers in a restaurant are nowhere near a petri's that was used to grow Bacillus Subtilis grown on it.

It is not the mileage which is the problem here - it is the Amazonic attitude.

They have a name for this type of services - "The Mechanical Turk". The metrics, work organization, etc are meant to convert you into a machine attachment. It is the idea - you are a service orderable on AWS (Amazon's own storefront orders it along with everyone else). It is this which gets you, not the mileage. You are an automaton, you have been hired as one, you are controlled as one and you shall be one.

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Nvidia reveals CUDA 6, joins CPU-GPU shared memory party

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Re: Unified Memory

Quote: "unless they start building themselves a serious x86 core". That is "Plan A".

Nvidia has also "Plan B" - burry the hatchet into x86 back and start shipping arm on their chips. Even a 64 bit arm core will be only a minor addition to the BOM and heat envelope and it will have synchronized memory and working spinlocks. The underlying x86 will become a mere carrier of Arm blades. One step further and it will disappear altorgether in some setups.

I would not be surprised if we hear from them that they have implemented CUDA 6 properly (not as a steaming pile of hacks and cludges) on such hardware and are shipping it.

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Acer's new Haswell all-flash Chromebooks sip power for less than $200

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You are not getting upscale regardless of what you want

You are not getting much upscale.

The ChromeBook general spec is controlled by Google so it is nailed down to run ChromeOS. Any chromebook you pick on the market will have at least 1366x768 with a decent screen (no 1024x600 market cripplware idiocies from the netbook age), 2 USB ports and at least one of them being v3, SD card slot capable of accepting high capacity cards, 16GB SSD and 2G RAM. Accer may be straying a bit to raise the spec to 4GB but that is as far as its "liberty" will go. Not any further until mothersip says so and mothersip will not say so because this means that you will keep your data locally instead of giving it to Google to monetize (by all means necessary).

In any case - if you need a Debia/Ubuntu in-flight typewriter that lasts across the transatlantic on one charge (sans takeoff, landing and meal times) any chromebook fits the bill. You can shrink the original ChromeOS without wiping it completely to 6GB leaving 10GB or so for an adult OS. Linux, xfce4 and libreoffice take a G more leaving you wih 9G for your mail and documents. For most people that is more than enough.

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'I'm BIG, I'm BALD and I'm LOUD!' Blubbering Ballmer admits HE was Microsoft's problem

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Re: where ballmer succeed and planted seeds and where i think he may have failed...

1. They tried to (almost) give it away. Windows XP embedded licensing cost pennies compared to the "first born" Microsoft charges for desktop. It could not be given out for free because of Microsoft being under "observation" for anticompetitive behaviour.

2. It was a failure. They _FAILED_ to strip it down to bare essentials so its "embedded" level ended up being a joke. Many times the footprint of embedded Linux (and Android).

3. They failed to port it in time to the fastest growing platform out there - ARM. Similarly, they let their existing Crippleware OS for embedded (Windows CE) fester, putrify and die.

So Linux and Android on top of it stepped in like the knights in shining armour and slayed the dragon (the dragon being the idea that you need a special hard real time OS for anything embedded). They showed that a general purpose OS with a best effort scheduler can be as good. It may cost more in terms of hardware. It pays back by reducing software development costs.

Microsoft failure in embedded is not due to lack of trying. It is due to an abject failure to execute. That however is something which is definitely a problem that goes all the way to the man in charge.

The end result - my new car stereo runs Android instead of running Windows Embedded. Game over.

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AMD will fling radical 'Kaveri' chips onto streets in January

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Re: data movment?

What movement?

That is the whole idea - synchronized cache. You do not move anything any more and you do not wait for synchronization any more. A trivial barrier instruction of your choice causes a full sync.

AMD has been preparing for this for the last year or so (at least) - if you read the recent OpenCL specs they are written so that a lot of the instructions magically use a move if the underlying hardware does not support this and fall back to a NOP if it does. Previous specs were saying "copy", "synchronize", etc.. Current specs say "if needed".

A whole raft of things in networking and day-to-day OS tasks which was out of bounds for OpenCL because of the initial overhead to load/copy and synchronization overheads has just become feasible.

Hello Intel, Check, Check, Mate.

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Hand over the goodies, Brazil tells Chocolate Factory

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Quote: "That is the wonder of the Internet"

That is also the wonder of national firewalls.

Great Firewall of China, Great Firewall of Britain (sorry, officially it is supposed to be called PervertWall), seisure of DNS assets in USA - you name it

The idea that "you can take your site offshore" is no longer feasible. All the governments that did not implement certain level of national "protection" before are going to do now. Because of you know who... That catch 22 gunner character...

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SEX CRAZED FISH keeping hapless Southamptonites awake

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Not just creepy

Has a very nasty sting too (though not sure about these exact species).

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Surface 2 and iPad Air: Prepare to meet YOUR DOOM under a 'Landfill Android' AVALANCHE

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Re: That headline...

Cyanogen (even unofficial) is not available for most low cost tablets. I have been tempted to build it myself for some of them only to find out that most of the common low end socs (various Exynos, WonderMedia, etc) and their matching GPUs (WonderMedia and Mali) have support ranging from zero to zero.

If you have a phone (even an ancient one like Xperia Mini Pro) or a mid-range tablet you are in luck. Once its factory OS is EOL-ed you can cyanogen it (EOL meaning anything from 15 minutes for Google Nexus 7 Gen 1/2 to a couple of years for Sony Xperia). If you have a real landfill sample like the ones sold by Gotab, Tesco, etc - you are out of luck.

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Surface Pro 2: It's TOOL-PROOF and ultimately destined for LANDFILL

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Re: What decade is this?

They did, and it is for recycling purposes. However, it is not enforced as rigorously as it should. Electronics are not being policed not rigorously as car manufacturers, which have to _PROVE_ that their creations have 90% recyclability score before being allowed on the market.

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Re: Fans?

Quote: I wouldn't want a passively cooled one, they would get too hot.

Well, here is the answer to your question - they probably have the wrong CPU in the first place. Intel may have improved their benchmarks. However, once you build a system with an Intel CPU you realize that they have improved their benchmarks and it is still "Intel Inside".

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It is not a question of repair

It is a question of recycling too. I do not see how a system like this can comply with recycling requirements of the WEE (and its USA equivalents). It is a pity that these are not enforced in electronics as rigorously as they are enforced in other areas like car manufacturing. If you build a car like this, it will not pass CE certification.

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Microsoft boffins test rival 'Google Glass' geek goggles, say insiders

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Re: Another SciFi sighting

Well, as we are descending towards the society described in that book, we might as well wear the same eyeware.

By the way, while Stevenson is a great master of rants, the rant about pizza delivery in that book beats all of them. By far.

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Top architect: The TRUTH about dead Steve Jobs' new spaceship Apple HQ

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Hehe...

Well, the lab gheto is still in the corner of the plot out of sight of dream offices - it did not fit into the new "superbuilding".

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