* Posts by Voland's right hand

2532 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Blocking ads? Smaller digital publishers are smacked the hardest

Voland's right hand
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My heart bleeds

1. Stop tracking me. The content I am looking at is the only thing you need to know in relations to what ads you to serve me.

2. Stop serving anything but small text-only ads.

3. Stop any flash, popover, popunders or video ads.

Then I may consider removing ad-block and slightly loosening my default noscript settings. Until then - block 'em all. God will recognize his own.

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Google asks Unicode to look over 13 new emoji showing professional women

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High Tech worker is mislabeled

Looking at the depiction of said worker its label should be "Foxconn Assembly Line Worker".

I like the "KISS"/Bowie series of Icons though. It is Rock and old git like me can understand (pity the meaning of that lightning across the face is lost to the predominant emojii audience).

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Russia poised to unleash 'Son of Satan' ICBM

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Re: Two steps forward...

If you can catch it on the way up

That is what the Shrub and his advisors thought. That Russians will try to do exactly that and will just put more missiles, more expenses, etc - the whole Reagan age race scenario.

They smiled and changed to suborbital trajectories - Iskander, Bulava and most likely the Son of Satan go on a much lower trajectory than USSR ICBMs. As a result USA wasted an ungodly amount of money on interceptor stations which was countered by one battery of Iskanders in Kaliningrad at something like 1% of the cost. Similarly, Bulava and its associated supersonic glider warhead prototypes cost a couple of percent of what USA invested in the reinstatement of Star Wars.

We are now in a reversal of the 80-s scenario. The ones wasting a ridiculous amount of money and not delivering are not the Russians.

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Re: Two steps forward...

What has changed to make the outcome different?

No more tit-for-tat competition. Old USSR bankrupted itself trying to do what USA did - Shuttle program (Buran), gas turbine driven main battle tank (T82), etc - all these projects were a disaster financially and technically.

Putin's Russia has no such intention. It has concentrated on what Russians do best - simple engineering and evolutionary changes instead of gigantic technological step changes.

Examples: T-92 (and the new tank prototype shown 9th of May last year), a full range of new fighting infantry vehicles designed mostly for warfare against militants and based on observing the NATO clusterf*** in Afganistan and Iraq, AA missiles, sub-orbital trajectory ballistic missiles (Bulava), upgrades to the avionics and weapons of anything and everything - Su-24, Su-25, evolutionary (instead of a Raptor/F35 like big bang) step changes from Su-27 to PAKFA, etc.

All of these programs are relatively cheap. They are pocket change compared to some of the money floating around Russia nowdays (even with all the embargos and downturn).

They also have reduced the size of their active "combat deployable in a few hours" army and nuclear deterrent. It is much smaller than it was, but it is now really deployable and it got fangs and claws (that is not my personal opinion by the way - it is Jane's Defense analysis of Syria's "holiday"). It is also still more than sufficient to wipe out half of the planet so why really bother for more?.

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China says yes to SanDisk

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They are made for each other

Based on dealing with fallouts from disks and flash deciding to just stop working wholesale with no prior warning and no SMART indication that it's going to fail... Well... All I can say - they are made for each other.

I'd rather stay with HDS, Samsung and the occasional Seagate (after I have followed complains and blames for a particular series/model for a while and it does not show as problematic). Tosh has also been generally OK lately.

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Investigatory Powers Bill: As supported by world's most controlling men

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Which one?

The ECHR or the IPB?

That... one... applies to both if memory serves right...

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Prince of pop trash PerezHilton pwned, visitors hit with cryptxxx

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Re: The website owner is responsible

That is yet to be proven in a court of law.

When this happens it will be quite entertaining - especially the bribes and "friend of course" pushing which will be deployed by the usual suspects for the decision not to go against the site.

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Spaniard live streams 195km/h burn-up

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Re: Meanwhile in Germany...

Sorry, I NEARLY did 195km/h

It did not take off? I am surprised.

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Re: Meanwhile in Germany...

You missed the point.

The perp did it in a city. Germans actually have some serious speed restrictions in residential areas. They are:

1. Quite vicious - actually lower speed limits then the same type of road inside city limits elsewhere in Europe. F.e. - places where for example Czechs ask you to drop to 70km/h, in Germany you get 50. Where Czechs or Hungarians ask you for 50, you get 40 and so on.

2. Policed the way German police polices things.

3. Cameras all over the place. I have been flashed by one of these once. The flashing itself is a penalty - it is bright red, it is right in your face and it blinds you for a split second even in broad daylight. Like someone shooting at you. If you are not shaken after that, you surely will be once you get the "congratulations, you have been framed, now pay". These are also entered into their equivalent of an ANPR database, so even if you are driving a foreign vehicle, you can get pulled over a few months later and on-the-spot fined.

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Can ad biz’s LEAN avert ADPOCALYPSE?

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Re: Block all. Always.

That should be (excluse me for my poor Latin grammar, I am not a liberal arts major):

Obsepio eos. Novit enim Dominus qui sunt eius.

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Voland's right hand
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Internet marketeers

Internet marketeers (aka admen) and honesty in one sentence.

I love the smell of oxymorons early in the morning...

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Experian Audience Engine knows almost as much about you as Google

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Re: so Cash is king then?

Nope.

Amazon and Paypal are king.

Experian and other carder information thieves get info only when you do a direct purchase. If you do a purchase through a marketplace they only get the info: "bought from Amazon" or "paid via PayPal".

So you can (and probably should) chose your poison. Funnily enough Bezos is actually not particularly forthcoming in terms of selling your data to every scumbag marketeer on the planet. Sure, Amazon uses it itself, but that use is relatively harmless compared to carders' data sales. You are not likely to be targeted for mortgage, insurance, double glazing and other typical "legitimate" scams based on that. PayPal is slightly more forthcoming with its data, but once again as both of them are actual payment processors they funnily enough (due to different liabilities) sell less of the data they have on you than Experian.

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Indeed

I had absolutely the same experience.

If their data is as good as the data going into their anti-fraud service... Well... The only thing I can say about companies buying it for "decision making is": Marketeering scumbags feeding off each other. They all should get whatever Christmas they deserve.

Actually, no, there is one more thing to say - their "knowledge" about is worse than what google has proportionally to the difference in their capitalizations.

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Ireland's tax arrangements are as clear as a pint of Guinness

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Re: Just get rid of corporation tax

This does not solve the root of the problem with "offshore money extraction".

A significant part of the offshore tax arrangements of big companies and 100% for the smaller ones which have offshore dealings is exactly for that reason:

To move money into a jurisdiction where paying to a physical individual involves little or no tax. While it is theoretically possible to ambush that money on the way back when it is paid to an individual who is non-resident in the tax-heaven, this is difficult as there is little or no audit trail to prove that the money is from tax fraud. In fact, once it is offshore the horse has bolted, there is bugger all you can do short of blanket taxing 40% any financial transaction coming from Panama, Virgin Islands, etc.

So anything making it more difficult for companies to move their profits offshore into a tax heaven jurisdiction also results in increased personal taxation rates of the highest tax bracket as a direct consequence. As someone who pays highest tax bracket on income tax where I reside and highest tax brackets on local and council taxes in two countries I am all for it.

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IBM's POWER cloud powers up almost a year later than promised

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Re: It is live and being used

That policy obviously is applied in a very "selective" manner. I was getting spam hitting my filters from them as recent as a week or two ago.

As one of the other posters said: Деньги не пахнут (or the Latin equivalent).

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Voland's right hand
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It is live and being used

For SPAM advertising various scams (mostly of UK origin).

I had to blacklist Softlayer blocks on my servers as there is no abuse contact for them either.

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Wasps force two passenger jets into emergency landings

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Re: As a Pest Controller

In Blighty too.

I regularly see wasps patrolling the spiderwebs in late summer and trying to take out the spiders in my garden. They are nowhere near as successful as some of the subtropical and tropical species (these are specialized spider killers), but still give it a go. Rather not surprising too - with all the pesticides being sprayed around, their primary food source (bees) is nearly extinct so they switch to other alternatives.

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Re: Nutters

Your worrying about the wrong bit.

The picture described in the report is as if two airspeed sensors have gone bonkers, not one. That is a fault which should not be "sign-able off" for a take off.

why the plane behaved like it did That is not the only question. The second question is - why did the captain decide on a take off despite it behaving like it did. I also stay by my opinion that they got lucky here. Why did the airspeed sensors not work correctly is unclear. It is a fact that they did not and landing a "heavy" passenger jet without correct airspeed reporting is in the realm of dice rolling.

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Nutters

What I find worrying is that they tried to take off with faulty airspeed sensors. As if the Air France 447 accident never happened.

Doing this on a modern fly by wire passenger jet is in the realm of suicidal. Dunno which deity do they have to thank, but thankfully they managed to land it too (that, once again, without working windspeed sensors on a fly-by-wire plane is an interesting exercise).

As far as "trying to kill you", these guys (the wasps) actually try to kill what is trying to kill you. Spiders are one of their favorites and they happily take on spiders several times their size.

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Ford tops up Pivotal's $253m cash slurp, parks CIO on its board

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Do they use this greenery in production?

This level of informative-less distraction is frightening, if not criminal. Shrubs do not belong on a dashboard.

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Steelie Neelie Kroes joins Uber as competition advisor

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Re: Revolving doors are dangerous...

A Eurocrat renouncing their "old French Civil Service" lifetime pension. You gotta be kidding me (you should look up some of the details - they came out in public around Brown bringing back the Dark Lord from Brussels).

IMHO this revolving door direction is all right. I do not see anything wrong in an ex-public servant working in the industry with some reasonable amount of non-compete restrictions.

The other revolving door is the dangerous one - where (especially in the UK), industry execs move into government and/or regulatory quangos without surrendering shares, pension, benefits and any of their vested interest. I can point to actual names here, but why bother - they are all very well known.

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Re: wot???

I would not be so sure.

More like gamekeeper advising poachers how not to get caught. That in turn may be twofold:

A) Hunt where and when it is legal, albeit exploiting the letter of the law (not the spirit) to the last inch in their favor.

B) Poach in a way where they will not to get caught - outright illegal, just leverage the lack of enforcement.

We will see how this works based on what Uber tries to do. In fairness - it is competing in an industry where 90% of the existing regs are in desperate need of rewriting as they are invalid on competition grounds. The reason for this not happening is that nobody tried to look into that. So she may have enough honest work without turning poacher.

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Reduced roaming charges, net neutrality come into force in EU

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Re: Roaming - just don't care

O2 business contract

The exact reason why I am no longer with O2 (taking all 5 accounts in the family with me in the process). Vodafone bills all calls to other UK operators in-bundle.

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How to evade the NSA: OpSec guide for journalists also used by terrorists

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Re: Hmm. If one is an aspiring terrorist......

What was used in Paris. Cheap ancient Symbian 40 Nokia and SMS in clear text. No encryption. No technical countermeasures. Nothing.

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Skygazers: Brace yourselves for a kick in the Aquarids

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Re: 3-5 am wherever you are

Forecast is cloudy for the 6th here in sarf-west Lunnun

You are least likely to see anything because of light pollution. I have seen meteors in the south of England only when driving out on the M25 and/or one of the Ms to/form it. The moment you get anywhere inside the M25 you can no longer see them because of the glare from the lights all over the place.

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Hold on a sec. When did HDDs get SSD-style workload rate limits?

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Re: Why not bigger drives

We were there:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_Bigfoot

The industry decided not to repeat the experiment.

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F-35s failed 'scramble test' because of buggy software

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China and Russian hypersonic gliders

China Successfully Tests Hypersonic Weapon System

Different cattle of fish. That and its Russian Bulava equivalent are the result of George Shrub pulling out USA out of the missile defense treaties as well as deploying anti-ICBM interceptors next to Russian (in Poland) and Chinese borders.

US expected both Russia and China to invest into maneuvering re-entry vehicles resulting in an arms race which USA was projected to win based on improvements to anti-ICBM missiles and control software.

Well, wrong - neither one took the bait. They both invested into hypersonic glider warheads instead which will enter the atmosphere outside the AEGIS and other anti-ICBM system defence perimeter and go for the kill on a glide trajectory.

This nullifies pretty much all investment USA has thrown into this area after Shrub reopened this arms race and in fact puts both of them ahead by 5-10 years.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: We really shouldn't have decommissioned the Harrier and Ark Royal

You have missed the biggest reason.

The software stability is the least of the F35 zingers. The biggest zinger is the fact that its misssion control and planning software is integrated with its spares supply and is a USA only system hosted in the USA. Mil-Cloud based maintenance and mission planning software

Now the really interesting question is - How the hell can this be an export model? How the hell can for example Queen Lizzy enter combat if it does not have parts, logistics and mission planning software for its fighter wing as it sits with someone else?

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Greenpeace leaks TTIP texts, reveals strained negotiations

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Re: Asymmetry

We have yet to agree to change our (UK at least)

Indeed. UK wiring standard is quite far off from the Eu. In some areas it is safer. In others it is a right pain in the b*** to work with and a nightmare to augment or change wiring correctly. F.E. Most of the Eu mandates running both phase and neutral to the light switches nowdays which makes installing sensor control and/or smart switches a breeze. UK still mandates running only phase and having those retro 1960-es style ancient patchboards to which you supposedly screw a 1960-es style pendant on the ceiling (first thing to rip out in a new house).

In any case, I suspect this is not so much about wiring code, it is about appliance safety and power efficiency requirements. Eu regularly updates these (every 5 years or thereabouts) tightening up the code further and further. If TTIP was in effect it would have been "arbitrated" not to as that would have prevented a set of usual suspects from ripping off the consumer for more profits.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Looks like trade deals will be much quicker once we're out.

Yep, negotiations with Somalia

You are crediting too much independence to Airstrip One. Airstrips do not negotiate.

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Voland's right hand
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Wrong driver

America also wants Europe to give it input into electrotechnical standards (for example, electrical product safety).

European electrotechnical standards are one of the main drivers for forcing the issue on making tech more green in the later years. The cynical part of me thinks that this not about product safety. It is the same issue all over again - preventing tightening directly or indirectly of environmental protection standards. Because, ya know, environmental regulations should not stay in the way of r*ping the consumer for more profit.

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Who you callin' stoopid? No excuses for biz intelligence's poor stats

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Re: Pearls to swine!

senior accountant where I have shown him how to use Newton-Raphson

Accountant? With knowledge of differential equations and/or optimal control?

Dude, you are smoking something cool which in itself is not a crime, but you are not sharing. That is criminal.

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Chap runs Windows 95 on Apple Watch

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Re: Like the Apple watch...

Not your cup of tea, not my cup of tea either, but we are probably not into the M from BDSM. Though there are probably elements of B and S here too.

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SpaceX adds Mars haulage to its price list

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Hmm... Am I missing something

Most other long range stacks have a fourth/trajectory insertion stage. ULA and Arianne if memory serves me right bespokes that part every time. They standardize at payload fairing level. Russians have it standardized all the way by means of Fregat and Briz. This is one of the reasons most long range missions use them nowdays.

What is Elon going to use here?

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Voland's right hand
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Calm down Donald

Why? There are no waterfront properties to ruin and run down there, so from that perspective, why bother?

Even if they were, how do you define suitably puritan (no t*ts allowed) and suitably misoginistic dress code for the Martian entry into the Miss universe pageant. For sake of argument, let's assume certain movies with Natasha Henstridge to be documentaries. Also, how do you prevent them from eating (or f*** the brains out) of other participants?

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If you work on Seagate's performance drives, time to find another job

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For day to day use - yes. Media - NO

DVDs and Photos rack up capacity at a rate where only spinning rust is financially affordable in consumer space. However, the overall tendency for that is P2P to decline and streaming services to grow. So even that is not a long term growth driver.

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Japan's Hitomi space 'scope bricked, declared lost after software bug

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Re: Someone's not getting a bonus this year....

The telescope did the sepuku that 's for sure. Dunno about anyone else.

In any case, nowdays, the japs move your desk next to the window or the door instead of handing you a wakizashi and calling in the assistant with a katana.

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At last: Ordnance Survey's map wizardry goes live

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Re: Best of British

I am not sure if it was OS or the StreeMap's reuse of their data, but there used to be deliberate occasional mistakes here and there to prove that "data has been copied".

So, what you are saying is correct. Unless the rock in question has been deemed to be the canary for data theft (if they still do it).

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Ireland's tech sector fears fallout of Brexit 'Yes' vote

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Re: Ireland, they know what they're doing

Nice summary.

What you missed however, is that a trade treaty negotiated by UK alone will also be done by close doors (same people essentially), it will be orders of magnitude worse than whatever Eu manages to negotiate and most importantly, there will be no higher court of law to deem the treaty illegal once it is waved through by the staff on Huge Co payroll who "work" (quotes intended) in the building on the bank of the Thames.

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The Devils of DevOps stick it to YOU

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Jesus F* Christ

Dear El Reg editor.

Can the implement shown on the picture be stuffed where sun does not shine of the next staffer which posts a Double Glazing Ops article.

I believe I represent the views of El Reg readers - we are frankly sick of the infomercials on the subject.

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Switch survives three hours of beer spray, fails after twelve

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The joys of essential life saving fluids and electronics

It was beer - that is less aggressive than coffee or god forbid Coca Cola.

I was reminded of the interesting properties of coffee this week by spilling it on top of my Roomba.

As a result, it was finally retired. It survived doing full run per floor (two runs per day) when we were doing an extension (sweeping plaster and concrete dust), it survived cleaning the house with two kids for 8 years after that (+ new battery, brush unit and vacuum bin). It did not survive a double espresso hit in the middle of the top lid (right where the CPU board is).

Coke is even worse. Sugar and industrial strength phosphoric acid solution. I do not recall a single case of successfully salvaging something from a coke spill in the days when I ran a computer repair shop (15+ years ago).

Compared to these two, beer is mostly harmless.

By the way - POE switches are obliged to have quite a bit of short-circuit protection by spec, so the fact that it survived for a while is not surprising.

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US govt quietly tweaks rules to let cops, Feds hack computers anywhere, anytime

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Doubly so if it crosses borders

The way this is formulated, it also sets in stone extraterritoriality of the warrant and gives a lowly magistrate court the authority to grant an order for the cops to hack computers located outside the USA territory with no consideration for any bilateral treaties on the subject. So much for Privacy Shield I guess.

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SpaceX is go for US military GPS sat launch, smashes ULA monopoly

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One wonders why it took so long

Pork.

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Reskilling to become a devops dude could net you $105k+

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Re: Can we stop this pyramid scheme nonsense

Dear El Reg, I don't think you're biting the hand that feed IT anymore.

Second that. If I want to enjoy observing how an IT publication is gagging on a marketeer *** I will go and peruse one of IDG group websites. Regardless of is it done in a devopsy sort of way or it is in some other double glazing context.

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Can we stop this pyramid scheme nonsense

I love watching pyramid investment schemes from the sidelines, but the devops one has become even less funny than Ruby-On-Rails boom of circa 2006.

I think it is about time for the editor to step in and start filtering out the endless stream of double glazing style infomercials.

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First rocket finally departs Russia's Vostochny cosmodrome

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Re: Not something America could do

Russia did not do it "just because". There was a point when Kazahstan tried to play hardball.

Playing hardball with Russians is not an activity known for its long term beneficial outcomes. You can bargain with them as much as you like, they get it. Hardball - nope, they will ensure that you are never ever in a position to play hardball ever again out of principle, quite often regardless of the costs involved. They will not make a point out of it either (so do not expect any gloating and mentioning of why they did it). They will just do it. I have yet to see a USA or UK politician grok this very well known part of the Russian national mentality by the way.

The Russians negotiated the agreement for the Soyuz pad at the Guiana Space center, refurbished Plesetsk _AND_ kicked off the build at Vostochny when the Kazahs (the rumor is - upon western consluttants and stink tank "advice") tried to play hardball.

By the time Kazahstan back-pedalled on playing hardball at Baikonur they had to accept much worse conditions than what they would have got by negotiating. They are now in the unenviable position of a grandfathered Plan D (with corresponding investment and perspectives). They are not playing hardball any more either.

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Re: Location?

The area near the Pacific coast where the trajectory will not go over Japan have no infrastructure within 1000+ miles. Even the Death Road is not anywhere near.

The reason for the site choice are railway (it is close to the old transsiberian railway, lack of population nearby and a fairly clean launch trajectory.

If you go further east you start risking the first stage or accidents to end up hitting Japan. You also get way too close to North Korea.

The planned schedule for it is interesting too. After the first launch, there is a planned pause until they finish building the infra and then they move their entire moon program wholesale there.

They are also putting the next generation launchers (Angara class) there, effectively, leaving the old site to deal with legacy launches using nasty toxic fuels for the first and second stage.

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Re: Trees

Same thought... A late summer launch accident in a drought year may end up very very ugly.

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