* Posts by Voland's right hand

1600 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Confusion reigns as Bundestag malware clean-up staggers on

Voland's right hand
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I'm sick and tired of hearing this excuse!

So am I sick and tired of listening to people shouting know it all rubbish.

An attack in this class (non-script-k1dd10t) can be:

1. Undetected for years. The biggest problem is that the entrance date and attack vector are unknown

2. Designed to aggressively seek back up systems and compromise them.

Your first point of call is figuring out a clean cut off line. However without knowing and understanding the APT in full you do not know where to draw that cut-off line. Drawing it at f.e. 5 years back is not really an option. Drawing it at a year back may actually get you back to square one with the infection rampant in the network.

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Voland's right hand
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Most parliaments do not

I am not aware of a parliament (+ its archive, library and several other key digital assets) having a proper recovery plan after a state actor cyber attack. Care to enlighten us about a country which has it?

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INTERNET of BOOBS: Scorching French lass reveals networked bikini

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Re: The bikini isn't French

Err no - 1946 France, Paris (if wikipedia is to be believed).

What really brought it to the mainstream was Brigitte Bardot 1953 Cannes film festival photoshoot,

Rachel Welch is more than a decade later.

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Re: Pockets?

This, for a 5" phone will no longer be a bikini. Unless it is sized to fit a Kardashian "Imperial Drednought" displacement a**e of course.

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Wrong picture

The picture on the article has nothing French in it

This one is a better match: https://flavorwire.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/brigitte_bardot7.jpg?w=360&h=480

Yeah, I know, "And God Created Woman". The Merylin picture on the article is at least several years later on.

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OpenSSL releases seven patches for seven vulns

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Spec says so

That's what the spec says.

IMHO, it is more of a case of Hanlon's razor than three letter agency involvement (just look at how much errata and "updates" are on the TLS RFCs).

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Google wants you to buy Nest CCTV, turn your home into a Brillo pad

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Re: A glorified webcam...

In order for Google to monetize your morning crawl from the bedroom to the bathroom +/- bathrobe.

The specific trajectory and the direction where your eyeballs are pointing provide countless opportunities to improve targeted advertising ya know...

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Belgium trolls France with bonkers new commemorative coin

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Re: How about more annoying the French!

As for PQ-17, if TIRPITZ had gotten loose it would have wiped out the entire escort. Yes, it was that much superior to anything available.

Cough, cough:

0. Immediate escort: 6 destroyers

1. Close escort: Cruisers HMS London, HMS Norfolk, USS Wichita, USS Tuscalusa and four destroyers

2. Second level escort: Aircraft carrier HMS Victorious, Battleship HMS Duke of York, cruisers HMS Cumberland and HMS Nigeria, Battleship USS Washington, and nine destroyers

Grand total: aircraft carrier, 2 Battleships, 6 cruisers, 19 destroyers with an additional home fleet task force within 300 nautical miles to reinforce if need be.

Against one battleship Tirpitz, one heavy cruiser Admiral Scheer with destroyer escort ~ 8 of them at the time.

Cough, cough, cough.

Yeah, I know, I am coughing just like my mom's adoptive father at the mere mentioning of Lord Dudley and the other "ranks" in the British fleet. Hint - the old man fought the war as a submariner from day one till the 9 of may and in 1942 he was a senior officer on the K21. I tend to believe him that Tirpitz turned back to port for a "technical" reason as a result of meeting them not just because the convoy spread out.

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Re: How about more annoying the French!

To be fair we celebrate Dunkirk as if it was a victory

Indeed.

This is besides the fact of UK history book carefully erased the fact that the Dunkirk evacuation was possible only because one acting Brigadier General named de Gaulle counterattack at Abbeville. So the Germans could not advance on Dunkirk without opening their flanks and inviting themselves into a nice pocket.

I am going to leave the fact that allies (including British 1st armoured division) actually _WON_ the battle of Abbevile, however, instead of using their first win in WW2 (by breaking out of the Dunkirk pocket and counterattacking) the British retreated across the channel.

The Dunkirk "great military achievement" should share the same "wall of shame" with the whole home fleet chasing one pocket battleship (and losing a capital ship in the process), allowing the channel run and withdrawing a whole fleet group including multiple heavy cruisers, ship of the line and an aircraft carrier and running away as fast as their engines can deliver after deciphering an Enigma order for the other pocket battleship to attack the PQ17.

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Re: Rewriting history yet again

We should have refurbished Waterloo as a termination point for Eurostar instead of St Pancras.

As a case in point.

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Future Range Rovers will report pot-holes directly to councils

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Re: Signal to noise ratio

It'll probably have to suffer that indignity for a while, but even range-rovers sometimes get to enjoy themselves when they reach retirement age

That is not a RangeRover.

That is a DeRangeRover. I regularly see one in my local supermarket parking lot with mud up to the roof and exactly that spelling on the badge (with all the letters at different angles). An original MK1 if memory serves me right too.

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Duqu 2.0: 'Terminator' malware that pwned Kaspersky could have come from Israel

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Re: Not a game changer, this was never a game

Nobody in this game is bound to any rules.

In fact, the normal rules of engagement regarding collateral damage, etc do not apply. After all, after you let a worm loose there is bugger all control exactly where it will get into.

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Russia's to blame for pro-ISIS megahack on French TV network

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Re: That was believeable until the "grammatical mistakes"

Hanlon's razor.

For every 1 jihadi from Western Europe there are 2+ from ex-Soviet Union. What keyboard they are likely to be using is left as an exercise to the reader (hint - it is not going to be Arabic). That and Damascus being the same timezone as St Petersburg.

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Gonna RUB MYSELF against the WALL: Microsoft's Surface Hub 84" monster-slab

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Not really

it will be a rarified audience that latches onto Surface Hub

I am afraid to disappoint you but that price bracket is the price of a run off the mill HD teleconferencing suite which can do much less than this.

The more interesting part here is software. The teleconferencing part I can see MSFT handling - they already have Skype (for business and normal) and Lync so they can handle that. Whiteboarding and integration of whiteboarding to teleconference they have been able to handle for ages so that is a given. The most interesting part however is on the second promotional photo - 3D modelling. If they can handle that _REMOTELY_ and provide effective collaboration around that with integration to well known CAD and visualization packages they will have full order book at this price and then some.

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TERROR in ORBIT: Dodgy rocket burp biffs International Space Station off track

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Re: WTF

You missed the more obvious explanation.

This picture looks like standard "product transition" scenario you can see in nearly any big shop.

Under the current diplomatic conditions the contract with NASA is now assigned to the B team. The same is valid for a list of programs considered as legacy and not in need of A team.

In the meantime, the A team is working on something else. It will be interesting to see what rolls off the assembly line in Plisetsk (or somewhere else where the press does not have access on a nearly 24x7 basis) within the next few years.

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Spanish TV journo leaves subordinates cowering after verbal shoeings

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Re: I'm learning Spanish at the moment...

Watching Home Alone 1 and 2 too much?

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Paper driving licence death day: DVLA website is still TITSUP

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Re: Not fit for purpose

It seems that now that the ID card system is has gone the way of the dodo, that HMG have decided to use your NI number as a super-key to tie all their disparate databases together, adding it to databases that had previously never needed it.

Err... That is not copying USA. USA does not index _EVERYTHING_ by your NI.

That is copying Bulgaria which indexes everything (even your parking tickets) by your NI and it is even present in your passport and ID and has been doing it since the early 70-es. You cannot buy or sell a house, you cannot even buy or sell a car there without a check vs the indexed database showing that you are all in the clear with regards to your obligations to the state (I was trying to buy a summer house in 2005 and the sale fell through because the cretin selling it had 500+ worth of unpaid parking and speeding tickets).

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Re: Are they supposed to get a new code every few days?

What information does the hire car company want? Basically, endorsements.

They should be able to query it on-hire without the customer being involved at all. The whole idea of getting code/using code is idiotic (at best).

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Obama issues HTTPS-only order to US Federal sysadmins

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Re: For the want of another IP ...

What does HTTPS have to do with IPv6?

There is no named virtual host support in https 1.1 So you pretty much have to have website == IP.

As result as quite rightly noted by the GP you run out of v4 addresses very fast and you have to start deploying v6 or consolidating websites.

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Everything Apple touted at WWDC – step inside our no-hype-zone™

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Re: Probably mistranslated

being unable send an email when speaking HTTPS over port 25

There are people who keep trying (according to my mail server logs).

In any case - it is all moves in the right direction. Quite like to annoy non-USA governments which do not have the power to subpoena Apple account data quite a bit. It will be interesting to see on how this will work in countries with "Great Firewalls".

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Russia copies EU commissars with own right to be forgotten law

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Re: Calling George Santayana

This has little to do with Santayana.

Russian data protection legislation as well as quite a few regs are verbatim translations of the relevant Eu directive. They just translated another one. Same as they did with Data protection, etc.

Nothing new under the sun - business as usual on the coast of Moskva River - if it makes sense and if it is not crossing one of "red lines" it is copied and re-used. That has been the modus operandi since the 1990-es and personally I do not see anything wrong with this modus operandi.

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Remake, remodel: Toshiba Chromebook 2

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Re: Your wish is granted.

Err.. Crouton stinks.

I fought hard to get proper Debian on my Samsung (Arm) Chromebook and it was worth every second of the time spent. Now I have a machine that easily lasts 5h+, weights virtually nothing and cost ~ 200 quid out of the box. The performance is perfectly fine for an an conference/airport/in-flight typewriter and even for some light coding from time to time.

The only downside is the rather limited disk space. The SD card slot is specifically designed to ensure that you cannot use it as a primary storage so a normal SD card will stick out. You have to use half-depth or an adapter instead.

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Chips can kill: Official

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Re: Acrylamide toxicity is nothing new

Replying to my own post (yes I know - very bad sport):

WAAAAIT a minute. Acrylamide should be soluble in cooking oil. Vegetable oil is reasonably polar and during cooking will also have non-zero water content. So while acrylamide dissolves better in polar solvents (water, methanol, etc) it should still dissolve in cooking oil as well. So, as the chemical reaction in question occurs on the _SURFACE_ of the exposed starchy material it should extract significant quantities of acrylamide and retain it for a while.

This also means that there is a hell of a difference between cooking something in a frying pan and dumping the oil, cooking in a frier (same oil over multiple cookings) and an industrial install which pretends to extract stuff from the oil and keeps on using it until it is gutter level.

What exactly did these guys test (I bet they tested a standard Fast Food frier used to Gutter Oil level). That has many things in it which are way worse than acrylamide anyway.

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Re: Acrylamide toxicity is nothing new

So, is it analogous to methanol, Analogous to toxicity in general.

The notable exception are heavy metals (stuff that accumulates), some neurotoxic chemicals (stuff that destroys nerve cells which do not regenerate).

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Acrylamide toxicity is nothing new

Acrylamide forms in _ANY_ frying or baking of any vegetables. Nothing new here.

I used to work with AA in the lab 25 years ago and there were quite a few warnings on the material sheet even then.

Question as usually is quantity and how much did they stuff the rats with. We eat various toxic chemicals every day and we are species are still alive because there is a variety of compensation and repair mechanisms. A lot of the toxicity studies feed experimental animals an excessive amount of the target chemical which overwhelms the existing defences. That as an experiment is bogus - you are testing under conditions which are vastly different from the normal methabolism so your results are way off (just like in those studies that were used to convince us to replace Saccharine with Aspartam a couple of decades ago).

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Voyager 2 'stopped' last week, and not just for maintenance

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Re: Kids of today...

Stylus? What is this stylus thingie? Waddayamean it is not 8 tentacle multitouch?

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Jurassic Part: Vertu announces lizard-skin phones

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Not just any dead animal

Monitor lizards have the intelligence of a reasonably smart dog (if not higher). They can be tamed, trained, can obey commands and you can even walk them on a leash.

This includes this particular species. Dunno, I personally think that having the skin of creature with some level of intelligence (albeit primitive) wrapped around my phone is disgusting.

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Caterham 270S: The automotive equivalent of crack

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Re: It's good to see Caterham thinks of the passenger...

Depends on the weight. 80kW can make even 800kg go pretty good (especially with a suitable gearbox). I drive that regularly (got 2 of these - my old car, now SWMBOs, and a car we have abroad) and it rarely feels underpowered even when lugging 2 adults, 2 kids, 3 suitcases and a filler of bags, coolbox odds and sods up a 10 degree gradient.

100Kw in 500kg is manic driving territory.

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Elon Musk: How the Billionaire CEO of SpaceX and Tesla is Shaping our Future

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Jeff Bezos actually has something to show for his efforts

Do not underestimate Bezos. Blue Origin may still be in the POC phase, but technologically it has achieved a hell of a lot - to the point where it is already contracted to deliver engines to other launch franchises.

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Google: Our self-driving cars would be tip-top if you meatheads didn’t crash into them

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Re: New driver

Pretty bloody good.

If memory serves me right, the probability of a new driver to have an accident in the first year in a metropolitan area is > 50%. This is for London which is of course infinitely worse than mountain view.

As far as Two more were down to other cars not obeying stop signs, my late dad used to have a couple of sayings: "There is a special alley in the graveyard for those that thought they have priority" and "I have priority, but does the moron on the other side of the intersection know that".

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HMRC ditches Microsoft for Google, sends data offshore

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Mamba?

Mamba is a cutie.

What we have here ladies and gentlemen, is more like a golden lancehead viper

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Wikileaks publishes TiSA: A secret trade pact between US, Europe and others for big biz pals

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There is no way in hell to reconcile this with Eu Data protection

There is simply no way in hell to reconcile this odious requirement with Eu Data protection. I do not see the German Parliament (and most other continental Eu legislatations in this form). In fact, I cannot see USA congress legislating it if someone explains to them what this really means from a reciprocal perspective. There will be a riot.

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Your servers are underwater? Chill OUT, baby – liquid's cool

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Minor problem

Capacitors :(

Most capacitor designs are intended for operation in air at ambient pressure. Dipping capacitors into liquid coolant really screws that up.

So you either need a very special design where you pull the voltage regulators and power supplies outside the main coolant dip or you have to throw out your mainboard and power supply every 6 months.

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Holy SSH-it! Microsoft promises secure logins for Windows PowerShell

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Re: In remission?

Not the other way round though

My exact point. Your preliminary condition for interoperability is to throw out everything and put your network 100% under Windows control the windows way or the highway.

That proposition would have had some extremely dubious merit if Microsoft was properly investing into the full compatibility suite for Windows including emulating and mapping to/from NIS, providing NFS to SMB mapping, etc and was honest about it. That never happened - these were always second fiddle, crippled and with one or more caveats deliberately designed to push people from their existing platforms onto Windows.

As a result most people stay away from it. ALL large organizations I know with mixed environments do not use the compatibility services at all. They export AD instead and build NIS maps and various password backends using custom scripting or 3rd party products. The only place where the Microsoft compatibility tools and Kerberos "The Microsoft Way" on Unix/Linux are in use are clueless medium enterprises. Usually not for long too - people get fed up with the limitations and give up.

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Re: In remission?

Err... I will bite.

The so called "Legacy" (quotes intended) OSs have been able to do Kerberos long before Windows and can still do it today. It is not popular in "Legacy OS" land because it is an admin nightmare in a heterogeneous environment. It used to be crippled by massive export issues before Windows adopted it and its unavailability outside USA is exactly what caused the birth of SSH.

While availability problem is no longer an issue all of the admin problems still are.

Back to your flawed reasoning: the reason why "Legacy" (quotes again intended) OSes cannot connect to a Windows system using their own LEGACY protocol (Kerberos) is that Microsoft deliberately made their implementation non-interoperable when baking it into Win2K circa 1999.

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Gamers! Yes, gamers – they'll rescue our streaming Fire TV box, hopes Amazon

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What changed - the network

OnLive was forced to try dedicated deals with ISPs, Amazon is not.

OnLive as an OTT service was too small to get the latency right. Also in those days 5MBit (the OnLive req) to consumer required dedicated arrangements on a lot of SPs.

Amazon is big enough and has sufficient peering presence not to have the first problem. The average access loop bandwidth has also increased to a point where the per sub bandwidth is no longer an issue.

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Elon Musk's $4.9 BEELLLION taxpayer windfall revealed

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At least he has delivered something tangible

Well, he has delivered something tangible.

That makes a welcome difference compared to other companies which rely heavily on the "find the subsidy" model such as Leprechaun Air, etc.

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Couple sues estate agent who sold them her mum's snake-infested house

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Re: Inspections dont work in the UK

Seconded. In UK the inspectors are part of the same real estate mob. If you get a "clean bill of health" from a UK inspection you might as well don an overall and get into the roofspace yourself to see if the guy really did his job. Personally - I doubt it.

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Fibre Channel over Ethernet is dead. Woah, contain yourselves

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Re: What about Blade Servers?

+1

IP based storage (f.e NFS) never had anything to do with FCOE. It was legitimate before, it is legitimate now and it has a different use case.

You use IP based storage when you want fine grained file based access as well as large amounts of data shared as read-write between multiple compute endpoints as files. It can be used in some cases where dedicated per-endpoint storage is needed and can even deliver higher cost efficiency. However, it requires significantly more qualified sysadmin workforce when used this way. In the days when I still ran IT, you used to get < 5% of candidates having a basic understanding of how to use NFS on a Unix system and < 1% knowing advanced stuff like autofs. In any case - FCOE does not apply here. It has nothing to do with the requirements and it does not implement anything from what you would need to deliver this use case.

FCOE (and FC proper for that matter) as well as other block storage use case have little or no sharing between endpoints with VM images being a prime example. When you instantiate a VM image you do not have 20 systems in need of read-write access to it. Even if you use Copy-On-Write you still have a strict read-only master and separate journal for each VM.

The article the way it is written makes conjectures based on failure of protocols and solutions designed for use case A to do use case B and vice versa. Surprise, surprise, a round peg failed to fit in a square hole. Of course it will not. However, based on the fact that it will not you cannot declare the peg dead or the hole dead.

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Case for drone usage now overwhelming as Enrique Iglesias concert almost stopped

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Re: Self-inflicted

Care to explain what happened to Voland's left hand?

Nothing drone related. Just, according to the book, the henchman that can be identified as the "left one" does not have a sense of humour.

I suggest reading Bulgakov for a more detailed explanation.

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Voland's right hand
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Self-inflicted

Quote: "Grabs the drone".

Riiiiight... So... grabbing a contraption with 4 sets of counterrorating blades each of which is capable of removing a finger...

Hmm... I will personally pass on this one...

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Intel gobbles up chipmaker Altera in $16.7 BILLION splurge

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Re: Intel will now look at ARM

From a competition perspective, you are looking at a very slow advance through to the Ninth circle of hell where according to Messir Alighieri there is a large frozen area. Still, even Dante did not foresee Lucifer snowploughing that part.

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Naked cyclists take a hard line on 'aroused' protest participant

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Cough.. cough... cough...

http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/man-had-sevenweek-erection-after-bike-accident-29912910.html

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Amazon reveals KiddieKindle and pocket money scheme

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Do not see the point

For the same amount of money you:

0. Get the normal kindle.

1. Get the kindle cover - it is a must, even if an adult will be using it

2. Talk to your kind not to be stupid and remind him that the email invoice about any of his purchases lands straight into your email account.

Works fine - tested on a 13 (for 3 years now) and a 6 year old (for about a year). The only "downside" is your expense bill. It is surprising how quickly can the numbers rack up (especially if you teach your kinds speed reading). A month with a lot of travel can cost you something in the 90£+ for "book budget".

However, I will take that "downide" any day and double it :)

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Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV: The new common-as-muck hybrid

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Re: "If you make lots of short journeys then it makes sense..."

Surely "if you make lots of short journeys", a smaller car

Bingo. I will definitely consider a smaller car with this exact roadtrain design (provided it is not a BMW).

I was recently discussing with the SWMBO the candidates for a second small family vehicle if and when the Daihatsu Sirion MK3 she uses today will need to be converted into a spare parts bucket for the nearly identical Sirion 4x4 we have abroad. I suggested the electric Soul (she likes the conventional one). Well, her first question was - can it get you to Heathrow? At which point I juggled the 90 odd miles versus its spec-ed range in my head and parked the idea.

If, however, there was something in the Micra/Corsa/Yaris/i20 class which uses electricity as god intended (without a transmission) and has a decent petrol generator backup it would have been a candidate for "cash and carry".

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It's not over 'til Saturn's spongy moon sings: Cassini probe set for final Hyperion fly-by

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Does not seem big enough to accommodate a Shrike

That looks to desolate and small to accommodate a Shrike. But you never know.

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Your CAR is the 'ultimate mobile device', reckons Apple COO

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And how is it different

And how is it different from let's say the wonderful geniuses from VW group which sell 4x4s in the UK and void your warranty if you change the tires with non-homologated ones. Makes owning one and having ideas to take it to the continent in winter quite interesting as the list in the UK is different compared to the continent and does not include a single winter tyre type. So you end up with a 4x4 which is not road legal in half of the Eu half of the year and is not fit for one of the main 4x4 purposes - to take you places where normal cars have a difficult getting to.

Not that BMW are much better either.

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Land Rover's return: Last orders and leather seats for Defender nerds

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Re: Fuel economy requirements

Bollocks

1. Did you inflate your tires to motorway pressure? The "book" pressure is for offroad / mixed driving. F.e. my Isuzu Denver 2007 manual does ~ 32 mpg at its preferred UK speed of 65 (reported by satnav), inflating the tires 20% above that gets this to 38.5. Similarly, 90 mph on the Autobahn 27 mpg with "book" pressure and 32 mpg with 20% above that. This is with Nexen tractor-like tires which have the most atrocious and fuel economy-unfriendly 4x4 thread you can think of. General Grabbers happily get you to 40mpg+ driving like a granny at 65 (the bloody Isuzu dashboard computer decides that its a fault and reports 40 from there onwards).

The new model adds 5mpg to that (6th gear is quite useful)

2. Is your load area covered? If you do not have a solid lid your aerodynamics go to hell. That is 5mpg at motorway speeds right there.

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Fuel economy requirements

The new fuel economy rules cannot be met by something which has the aerodynamics of a shed on wheels. Let's face, cute as it may be the Defender has outlived its time. If you want an agricultural utility 4x4 these days you are better off with an Isuzu or L200.

Not sure if they are compliant to the new rules either, but they at least stand a chance to be (the Isuzu can do 45 mpg+, the L200 is not far behind).

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What are cellphone networks blabbing about you to the Feds? A US senator wants to know

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Re: Faraday cages?

An old microwave will do nicely. Fridges are quite good too.

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