* Posts by Voland's right hand

3084 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

China gets mad at Donald Trump, threatens to ruin Apple

Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: Thin Skin

An interesting conspiracy theory is that the GOP expect to be able to impeach Trump

A very plausible theory I must say. But very very very risky.

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Pay up or your data gets it. Ransomware highwaymen's attacks on small biz octuple

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Re: You can reduce/eliminate the risk yourself

In addition to hourly/incremental you need a daily or less frequent backup which becomes inaccessible for a reasonable amount of time until media reuse.

This way, even if ransomware wipes your online/connected backup media you can still recover after that.

All of this stops working after 20+ clients though. When you have 20+ clients you can miss a single Typhoid Mary reconnecting them after a quarantine and you are back to square one. There you definitely need some fine grained control over your network and ability to quarantine clients until you have dealt with them.

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Bollocks

businesses need to implement reliable, up-to-date information security solutions

No security solution will prevent a previously unknown threat hitting a new zero day. No security solution will prevent you from an idiot with permissions (which unfortunately is a standard SMB use case where director level people have access to everything and insist on it).

Backups, however, especially backups "in-depth" going back a few months will. A ransomware attack on SMB is no different from a catastrophic failure of a hard disk and/or data corruption failure from let's say bad RAM. You can recover from both if you pull a backup. You cannot recover from a catastrophic failure using a "security solution".

This is different from large buisiness/organization - there ransomware hits 100s of machines and backups alone do not cut it as a protective measure.

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WileyFox Swift 2: A new champ of the 'for around £150' market

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Those pics look distorted.

It is fairly trivial nowdays to do some photo rework to sort out fish eye distortion. I am surprised it does not have that at least as an option.

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GitLab to dump cloud for its own bare metal Ceph boxen

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Re: Cloud

A server is always going to be cheaper to buy

If and only if you are loading it above a certain break even point.

Cloud is cheap when you have a trickle of requests. It is also cheap when scaling your system initially before you understand the user demands and scaling requirements.

Once you know your load and if it is high enough to justify a dedicated server you are likely to find a dedicated server more cost effective. The same goes for various use cases requiring Nx servers.

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The sharks of AI will attack expensive and scarce workers faster than they eat drivers

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Re: Basic misunderstanding how law firm works

Basic misunderstanding of how AI works.

Basic misunderstanding of how the legal system works, especially in countries which do not have a deterministic law system (aka Napoleonic law) - USA, UK and most of Commonwealth.

You have on average at least 5 possible ways to argue a point in court. Some of them are contradictory too. The AI can dig up the points of law and precedents, prepare you the alternative arguments and do all the preparatory work. This is what paralegals, clerks, trainees and junior partners do in a law firm.

You still need a human to chose out of these 5 strategies which one to apply as this depends on jury, judge and god knows what else. This is what determines a good experienced lawyer - he does not just argue the points of law (a graduate can do it). He also determines which ones to raise and which ones to skim over for this particular court - it is not just "law" - it is also strategy in a "game" which involves dealing with humans based on a guesswork assumption of the way they will perceive an argument.

We are still decades away from an AI being able to do that as this means AI being able to assess human emotions and predict them (something tough even for humans).

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Basic misunderstanding how law firm works

The AI is not going to kill the real lawyer jobs (the ones which have passed the bar exam and are allowed to argue a case in court).

Now paralegals, filing clerks, etc - all the small cogs which make a legal shop work are a different story. They do have something to worry about.

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Your body reveals your password by interfering with Wi-Fi

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Devil

Re: I'm not saying this is BS...

800 packets per second - that is fairly high pps. It looks like flooding the channel (more or less).

1. I do not see why they are using ICMP - that is daft - the target may notice. They just need to flood the airwaves with something - if they are in control of the AP they can encode it to another client key (even a non-existent one) and just shovel it out to get the relevant flood rate.

2. 800pps depending on packet sizes (what are they trying does not become clear from the article) looks like flooding the channel.

The attack looks plausible though - a MIMO with some good software is almost like a phased array radar :)

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Russia shoves antitrust probe into Microsoft after Kaspersky gripes about Windows 10

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Devil

"What an odd game, the only way to win is not to play"

Wrong quote:

RIP Leonard Cohen:

Everybody knows that the dice are loaded

Everybody rolls with their fingers crossed

Everybody knows the war is over

Everybody knows the good guys lost

Everybody knows the fight was fixed

The poor stay poor, the rich get rich

That's how it goes

Everybody knows

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Red squirrels! Adorable, right? Wrong – they're riddled with leprosy

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Devil

Squirrels? No. Even the grey ones taste vile unless you are cousin Eddie from American Lampoon Christmas Vacation.

You are thinking of European, aka edible doormouse. Glis Glis.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edible_dormouse

It is genetically closer to squirrels then other doormice. Behaviourally - it is a climbing rat. The pest from hell. Can walk on ceilings and walls, can dig, chews its way even through hardwood and is not afraid of anything either. While other rodents will try to scurry away, this one will try to stare you down and can even jump back and bite.

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Devil

Re: Given how easy it is to cure leprosy these days

While it is "easy" to cure, the damage to the nerves from it cannot be repaired.

By the way - I would not call walking around with an antibiotic drip for 3 months "easy".

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Britain must send its F-35s to Italy for heavy overhauls, decrees US

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Coffee/keyboard

For the time being Turkey and Italy are in NATO and so are most countries you need to overfly to get to them.

So this should work... For the time being...

Though to be honest, the spread of the supply chain across such a wide geography does not bring confidence that parts will be available when they are most needed - during wartime.

Also, what do you do if you need to overhaul one stationed at let's say Port Stanley? Haul it all the way around the world to Italy? Or even more likely - disassemble, load it into a container and send to Italy. That would have been funny if it was on a comedy show. When patrolling an actual contested (or god forbid conflict) zone - not so much.

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Re: Turkey is a godforsaken corrupt shithole

Beko stuff that's prone

Yep. A couple of models. Shit happens. So are others manufacturers in any case.

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Re: Turkey is a godforsaken corrupt shithole

Turkey is a major manufacturing site.

It builds anything and everything from plastic food boxes (some of the best ones by the way), trhough white goods (Beko), through power tools (RTR), Ford and Renault vehicles to F16s and long range cruise missiles.

They had some major quality issues with the first manufacturing sites 20 years ago. Renault Clio Mark 2 built by Turks was a complete and unmitigated disaster. That is in the past.

While some of the stuff Turkey builds today (like Beko) is not the latest and greatest it has a better build quality and reliability record than most of what is built and assembled in the UK nowdays.

In any case, a place which builds long range cruise missiles and F16s should not have an issue with taking a contract to overhaul a piece of a modern fighter jet.

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Re: Widow Maker

Given the F16 still holds it's own in anything we've thrown at it recently I suspect the best option would have been to ask MD to build us another 200 F16s.

You do not need to ask anyone. Turkey builds them and exports them under license and the licensed build is fully certified for NATO procurement too. They are the most updated design too (much better than what NL has at present). You also get (potentially) some of their new weapons as options in the process.

A side effect of Erdogan's "Restoration of the Turkish Empire" complex is a set of missiles which vastly exceed in range and operational capability anything USA was willing to export. All of that integrated to the local version of F-16 (they are certifying that one for F35 too by the way): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOM_%28missile%29

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Re: Oooh. Italian maintenance!

Careful with those stereotypes. Italy has produced

Produced versus maintained. Look them up in the dictionary.

I somewhere have an old card on what "What is Europe" card from a late 1990-es holiday in Ibiza.

What was Europe supposed to be - A place where the Mechanics are German, Lovers are Italian, Police are British, Cooks are French and all of it is Organized by the Swiss.

What did we get: A place where the Mechanics are Italian, Lovers are Swiss, Police are German, Cooks are British and all of it is Organized by the French.

I have seen it in two versions by the way: the even more fun is "organized by the Italians"

Alternatively, watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxqwXNfYmOQ

While South European engineering is generally excellent (both Italian and Spanish produce some really cool stuff), South European maintenance...

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Devil

WHAT F*** Economies of F*** Scale

I would understand economies of scale when you are dealing with 10K fighters. That is not the case - for the amount of fighters in Europe and the projected MTBF you are at any given time overhauling 1-2.

Any "Economies of Scale" bullshit blows the bullshitometer off the bullshit scale.

More like "ridiculous cost of the overhaul rig" combined with "ridiculously complicated (ala Boeing Dreamliner) supply chain.

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Panicked WH Smith kills website to stop sales of how-to terrorism manuals

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Re: Growing your own food can

Not only does the bartering of goods (including foodstuffs) and services happen every day in the US

USA HAD laws to prohibit that introduced by FDR during the war for obvious reasons.

Some of these were repealed by court cases in the 70-es. I am not sure if this is valid of all of them.

As far as rainwater collection, etc - all of these everywhere in the world need appropriate planning permission and legalization. This is not US specific. I cannot just hook up my rainwater to my water supply, I need to put certain things in place (non-return valves, etc).

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Voland's right hand
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Re: TNT

My daughter's school chemistry book has revision on the nitrification of benzene. It warns to keep the temperature low otherwise it makes TNT! Obvious terrorist training!

That reads like multiple of bollocks.

As some others have noted benzene nitrates to 1, 2 or 3 nitrobenzene. Nothing to do with TNT.

If you are nitrating toluene you need to keep it cool because of the bit that they do not teach you in the school chemistry course - that most reactions are imperfect.

This is covered in most university chemical synthesis courses: Instead of taking the nitro groups at "perfect" 2, 4 and 6, nitration of tolene results significant contamination of isomers which are nitrated at 5 and 3. Especially at increased temperatures. These are unstable and can cause spontaneous combustion in the end product.

This is also the reason why you will never find TNT in a DIY explosive "bible" - if you try to produce it outside an industrial environment (and subject to appropriate purification) the results will suck. There is plenty of other stuff which is much easier to produce and is significantly more effective.

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Re: Sites?

BAN CHEMISTRY! THINK OF THE CHILDREN!

Labour government tried. And succeeded - it was discussed in the House of Commons at the time.

I remember writing to my MP regarding Labour using court orders to prohibit potential subversives attending an adult education high-school level Chemistry course a few years back.

So UK government has indeed tried and has successfully applied a CHEMISTRY BAN to suspect on the basis of the mere suspicion that said suspect may be dangerous.

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Recruitment giant PageGroup hacked, Capgemini dev server blamed for info leak

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Re: Is it still a leak when it comes from a sieve

This is why you use a new and disposable email address if you ever have to get your details into one.

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Silicon Valley VCs: We're gonna make California great again – on its own

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Devil

but all remain fringe groups due to a very simple fact – states can't cede from the union

Indeed. Welcome to the Hotel California. You can check out any time of night, but you can never leave.

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IoT worm can hack Philips Hue lightbulbs, spread across cities

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Re: ANY i.o.t

I beg to differ.

If it has a known protocol and if it is BEHIND a firewall and talking only to MY GATEWAY - I am all for it.

I have been fighting with the dishwasher for the best of today. It is having a hissy fit and claiming it has "water issues" which I cannot diagnose properly because I cannot interrogate its damn microcontroller and the codes on the front panel are not sufficiently informative.

I would have loved it being connected as long as it is not going anywhere outside my network - this would have allowed me to ask which of the 3 sensors in charge of the damn filling is at fault (reed counter for water volume, water fill cut-off or water level) while it is running through its tests. All of it without getting off my desk a couple of floors above it.

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IFTTT isss notttt afraiddd offf Microsofttt Flowww

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Trollface

So in addition to "business critical" untested badly written Exel we will now have a choice of similarly "business critical" untested badly written IFTTT or Flow. Neither one of them having any resemblance of use cases, design, formalized testing, release or revision control.

Isn't life wonderful...

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McDonald's sues Italian city for $20m after being burger-blocked

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Re: The real reason @ Voland's right hand

I'll disagree a bit on this actually, plenty of Italians

No disagreement - if you noticed I did not mention Italians. Or French. I did that on purpose too. Some nations are even more rabid in their food fanaticism then the British.

There is also a big difference between Europe or Latin America and let's say Asia.

In the latter you quite often do not know if they are cooking you a rat and do not have a single language in common with the cooking staff to ask if it is a rat. While I would not have gone to McDonalds, I would have given some serious consideration eating in a local eatery anywhere in Asia.

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Re: The real reason

Here's a clue people...celebrate cultural differences,

You do not need to explain that to a German tourist. You do not need to explain that to Scandinavian, Czech, Polish and most (not all) Russian tourists. This is why even places where every second is a German tourist (f.e La Palma in the Canaries mid-season) do not feel like somewhere in Munich.

Try explaining that that to a Kentish Chav on Tenerife or just take a stroll down Costa Del Crime.

Similarly, on the Canaries you can immediately discern if you are in a neutral zone (Corralejo about 7 years ago), British colony (Caleta de Fustes - renamed Costa Caleta to please the Chavs) or somewhere where non-Brits are a majority - f.e. Valverde on El Hierro.

You have Mcdonalds, Pizza Hut, Indian and Chinese and Fish and Chips in Costa Caleta. Only that - no Spanish food at all. In Corralejo you have that and some remaining local food. In Valverde or other similar predominantly non-brit places you have one semi-moribund Chinese restaurant, no Indian, no Macdonalds, no Pizza hut and the rest is local food. Which is superb.

Now, why is this so...

Well, the whole BrExit thing is rooted much deeper than a lot of people would like to admit.

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Re: The real reason

maintaining the look of the building

The feel of a city is not just the building look. It is the food, the overall vibe, etc.

In any case - even if the building did not have an M sign, the one mile worth of discarded cardboard boxes with M on them around it would have had the same effect.

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SpamTorte botnet gets turbo-charged

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Major nuisance

This is the source of the major spike "FedEx Invoice" spam over the last two weeks.

Relatively primitive, but as it is using "legitimate" servers it is not covered by most blacklists and has a fairly high rate of getting through.

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Brexflation: Lenovo, HPE and Walkers crisps all set for double-digit hike

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Re: You know the joke meme about how do you confuse a blonde ?

from us under false pretences and handed to criminals in Brussels.

You really need to share what you are smoking.

Every piece of Eu legislation is something Britain either at commissioner level or at Eu parliament level had to agree with. The latter is elected directly by the entire Eu including the British representatives. The former is selected by the UK government which is supposedly democratically elected.

Up to Lisbon, there was no way to overrule a veto and Britain used it the threat of it quite extensively to get exactly what it wants. After Lisbon, veto could be overruled, but AFAIK there is not a single case where British veto was overruled.

In either case, before a piece of Eu legislation can become a part of the UK statute book it also needs to become a UK law and be voted by UK parliament.

So, frankly, you are repeating Farage and BNP drivel without a single shred of evidence to it.

In fact, there is an even better way to confuse a blonde (sorry, Brexiter): ask him to quote exactly one piece of undemocratic and fraudulent Eu legislation which has gone on the British statute book _WITHOUT_ British agreement in the commission (which means government) and Eu parliament (directly elected) and UK parliament (to vote in the actual law).

Your moronic rant is one more example of the fact that 99% of the Brexiters do not know how the legal system in UK works and how the legal system in UK interacts with the EU.

In fact, if you are complaining against Eu law you should start with blaming Farage and the other nuts as they have been part of UK Eu representation for ages and voting for all those "undemocratic" laws.

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Re: I can't help but feel this is the calm before the (shit) storm.

And regardless of their fate, a policy is now running of making it a definite bonus point in two equally-suitable candidates.

My wife was asked the same question during an interview recently. So this is definitely not anecdotal evidence.

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Re: Whilst I don't disagree with the thrust of the article...

Shush, otherwise the UKIPers will believe the that the Brexit vote has had the desired effect.

The vote has not. The pound drop has.

It is however as in an old Bulgarian/Serbian/Macedonian/etc joke:

Q: "Ivan why are you laughing with glee after your house burned down? Why are you happy?"

A: "The neighbor's shed burned down too".

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Re: Whilst I don't disagree with the thrust of the article...

simply growing potatoes

Potatoes are going to get significantly more expensive (same as any "British" fruit and veg).

They are collected predominantly using seasonal labor which comes mostly from Eastern Europe and is paid in Euros or Euro equivalents. If their salary is reduced by 20% they will simply not bother to get over here and pick the stuff. So if any of them were not paid in Eu to start with they have already asked for a 20% rise.

Ditto for a large percentage of other stuff relying on cheap labor like car washing, etc. There were 5-10 Bulgarians and Romanians in the beginning of the year in my Sainsbury parking lot. There are now 1-2 left because the money they were sending back home simply no longer adds up. And so on.

So anything dependent on imports goes 20%. Anything dependent on imported manual labor goes up 20% too. What will be the inflation in the new year now is in totally "god only knows" territory, but it will not be what the Bank of England is forecasting. No way.

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European F-35 avionics to be overhauled at Sealand, says UK.gov

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This "aircraft" is getting better and better.

And? Do you expect anything different from USA adapting Russian tech?

The school of thought, the design approach is drastically different. When Russians are left alone they deliver some impressive engineering. It may be butt-ugly, but it does the job. When Americans are left to their own they also tend to deliver (albeit you may not like the price and timescales as in f.e. F22).

When Americans try to incorporate Russian tech you get an Antares. Or F35-block B. If it does not blow up on the landing pad it will be a heap of trouble for years to come. In fact it is better if explodes on the landing pad so that it cannot be marketed as a genuine piece of BAE innovation (which it is not - it is the old Yak-141 design repackaged in a different fuselage).

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Voland's right hand
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In theory the F35B, as a stovl, wound not really need a runway - some straight bit of road should do the trick.

No it will not. You will need a BIG blowtorch to free it from the melted tarmac after that.

While the Harrier could land nearly anywhere, that is no longer the case for the F35 because of its exhaust temperature. If it is landing on tarmac it will melt it, if it is landing on grass it is pretty much guaranteed to be set on fire.

This is part of its Yak-141 inheritance. Lokheed bought the VTOL tech which went into the F35 from Yakovlev and if you look at any of the Yak-141 footage you can nearly always see the fame from the take-off auxiliary at take-off/land or hover.

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China passes new Cybersecurity Law – you have seven months to comply if you wanna do biz in Middle Kingdom

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Re: Espionage

Although looks like the Chinese population

Err... spelling mistake. Surely: "Although looks like the Chinese corporations"

Data retention is costs in more way than one. It is a storage cost, it is a security cost and it is a a potential reputation cost (if data is stolen). Corporations would rather avoid it. If they can.

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Fleeing Aussie burglar shot in arse with bow and arrow

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Re: He should be lucky

it was a recurve and not a compound bow

My exact thought. If it was something like my eight year old daughter's "toy" that person would have had a shattered pelvis or hipbone (even with the "harmless" training arrows). Even a "junior" compound bow for kids makes nice 9mm holes in 18mm plywood.

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UK spying law delayed while Lords demand Leveson amendments

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Re: First the Brexit vote, now this.

And what do you call the political system

I call it UK. One of the only two countries in the world (the other one being Saudi Arabia) without a well defined complete system of fundamental law called constitution. If you do not like the way this country works, f*** LEAVE. Oh, sorry, without having any clue on how it works (and has worked since 1215), you have voted for the others, the smelly foreigners to LEAVE ('cause that was what the vote was really about). Here's some news for you - I suggest you learn the basic principles:

1. Parliament is sovereign and cannot be bound unless it binds itself with a specific decision. Even in that case it can turn around a week later and do something different. An example here is the Bill of Rights (yes, UK used to have one). The parliament over time has canceled nearly all of the rights in that bill as it seemed convenient.

2. The government has no right to suspend, cancel, amend or change any law unless specifically authorized by an act of parliament.

3. The parliament did _NOT_ authorize the government to suspend, cancel, amend or change the Eu Communities act, the Human Rights act and a ton of other legislation which is required in order to invoke article 50. This is something even Josephina Vissarionovich May admits - she is preparing a "Grand Repeal Act".

The court had absolutely no choice on the matter. They are there to uphold the law and the law of the land says that because the act which set up the referendum gave the government NO rights to enforce it, it has no choice but to go to the parliament every step of the way. Either that or do an Erdogan.

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Fresh Euro Patent Office drama: King Battistelli fires union boss

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Re: King Battistelli

There is a fundamental difference, Voland:

That is yet to be seen.

It took 2 years during which the media was still freely publishing and before the Reichstag act in Germany.

It took 4 years and two elections before Mussolini had sufficient power to restrict the freedom of the press.

It took nearly 10 years, two coups and several elections until Kimon Georgiev added the restrictions on the press to the Law of the protection of the state.

I do not grok Hungarian to look that one up, but I bet that was the case there too.

Fascism does not rise in a day and "the nation not being served by journalism" is the first step there. It took 10 years for the Volkischer Beobachter to swing the public opinion to a point where Hitler could win the elections. Daily Mail tried to do that too once already too - it has history and form in being a fascist rag. It failed that time. I personally hope it fails again, but with the country prime minister quoting from the Mein Kampf and supporting the newspapers which call to lynch anyone opposing her this does not seem likely.

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Devil

Re: King Battistelli

Make that 'Duce'.

Historically (do we like to admit it or not) fascist governments have had public support in their countries. Let's face it - populist ideas like "kick all foreigners out", "work only for locals", "this judge dared to apply the law, let's lynch him" have much stronger appeal than democracy, rule of law and/or fundamental freedoms. Anyone who disagrees with this statement can have a look at the front pages of the Volkischer Beobachter, Express and Sun this week.

So from that perspective, I do not see the likelihood between the Duce (which like most fascists had significant public support for decades in his country) and Batistelli whose public support in EPO is somewhere around 0.

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FBI drops bombshell, and investigation: Clinton still in the clear

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Devil

Bingo

If someone told me 16 years ago that USA has a black president and the next candidates are a woman and someone who divorced twice and is now married for the third time to an ex page 3 model I would have told him to go check his meds.

Anything people say, Dubia should get a monument. He was so monumentally bad that USA political life advanced a couple of centuries in a blowback response.

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Twitter trolls are destroying democracy, warn eggheads

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Trollface

Re: from what i've seen...

Slightly more complicated.

The perceived anonymity of the medium and lack of face to face interaction bring out of the woodwork behaviours that are normally suppressed in public. Spend 10 mins reading Tw*tter or F***book and you will come to realize just how unhinged is part of the population. They hide it during their day to day life as they are trained to conform by society and/or afraid to cope one in the face. The moment they show up on Tw*tter and F***book they throw away most of their inhibitions.

This behaviour creates a perfect storm when interacting with politicians. Politicians (even the few smart ones) by trade try to reach as many people as possible - their social network settings are set to allow the maximum possible amount of people interacting with them. As a result they end up being the perfect target for Urgghh of Urghhh's basement and his friends.

So in addition to the two obvious use cases you have mentioned there is a third one - someone with serious problems using a politician on the web to satisfy his urges.

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Build your Type 26 warships next year? Sure, MoD – now, about that contract...

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You never know, that may mean getting only one carrier and the second one being sold to China to build a floating "Hotel/Cazino" out of it.

Now, why the Hotel/Cazino is launching Su-33s.... That is a different story.

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Re: Have they finished the aircraft carriers yet?

They would need a different propulsion system to generate the steam needed for the cats to work..

Correct. I still do not understand how did they manage to find an excuse for not being able to mount the arrestor hooks. Come on, this tech is as old as the aircraft carriers themselves. IT IS NOT rocket science.

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Computer forensics defuses FBI's Clinton email 'bombshell'

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Re: Wrong headline?

When it comes to republicans, hypocrisy has no limits.

Let's fix it for you: When it comes to politicians, hypocrisy has no limits.

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Re: What's truly important here...

Actually I see an independent investigation into the leaks from the FBI, and many career officers being shown the door with extreme prejudice.

Not if Trump wins.

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What should the Red Arrows' new aircraft be?

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Re: Trigonoceps (displays are kept well away from the crowd)

Was down in Devon recently

I saw one of their last shows above a city. They were flying literally above my house. This was several weeks before Shoreham which resulted in a severe restrictions on all airshows in the UK from there onwards.

Well. No more.

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Anti-ultrasound tech aims to foil the dog-whistle marketeers

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Re: Or

Most adults have a hearing threshold under 16KHz leaving a couple of KHz to squeeze a beacon in.

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World's shortest international flight: now just 21km in 7 minutes

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Re: 66.1kms

Versus:

1. Getting to the city center and trying to find where to park for a business meeting.

2. Fighting rush hour traffic to hit same meeting.

It is the same as going to London. Driving is a theoretical possibility. Until you consider the availability of parking in the area.

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Power to the (outsourced) people – globalisation starts small

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It is not a a question of cost

Another is to hire students and (paid) interns,

A gang of students (even well paid ones) + 1-2 grey beards have always been more cost effective than sending something to a warm and hot climate.

The problem is that you cannot create a business model out of that and you cannot skim and pocket on the process. There are no junkets, free dinners with old school friends, etc either.

You also have to treat students like humans - accommodate their schedules, goals, etc.

So, what's the fun in that? Also "what is in that for me" for a given CXX value of "me". None. So definitely, outsourcing it goes. Under Consulting guidance.

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