* Posts by Voland's right hand

1241 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

EU copyright law: Is the Pirate Party's MEP in FAVOUR of it?

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Re: The girl in the picture

Read the fine jpg filename: http://regmedia.co.uk/2008/09/26/pariscollage.jpg?x=648&y=429&crop=1

Questions?

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Voland's right hand
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Re: No surprise - Pirates want free stuff.

Quote: No surprise - Pirates want free stuff.

Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.

I did not notice the report saying anything about free. Based on what I have read so far it is very clear that all it wants is an equality of rights between man and machine for reading and an equality of rights and obligations between physical and electronic content.

One of the reasons why modern civilization is where it is now is the Statute of Anne. If it was not for it, science and technology would be (probably) at least 100 year back from where it is today.

What the publishers want is to roll back the clock 400 years and return us to the days of Bloody Mary and the Licensing Act of 1662 which gave the publisher more or less unlimited rights _INCLUDING_ the right of ownership of content. No thanks - we tried it. It results in:

1. A guaranteed publisher monopoly

2. New content not being published because the publisher is perfectly happy reprinting old shite which it owns

3. Lack of reimbursement of content creators because all the money ends up with the publishers.

Sounds familiar, does not it?

Over the last 20 years digital publishers have managed to roll back half of the Statute of Anne (and whatever is copied from it to other country legislations) provisions to the days of Bloody Mary for digital content. I am not surprised that [insert your publisher trade body] is screaming murder here. They screamed murder in 1710 when the Statute of Anne was drafted and enacted too. After all who would give away voluntarily a jolly good combination of monopoly, entitlement to violate fair use and contract law with an icing of criminalization of what should be civil offences on top.

We know what is the endgame of this - no thanks. Time to redress it and apply what was already applied once to redress it 300 years ago. Nothing more, nothing less. RTFL (Read the Fine Law).

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Microsoft wants LAMP for wireless mobe charger

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Fantastic

So we now multiply the efficiency of light generation (sub-70% even for the best LED lighting) with the efficiency of light conversion under (on average) a suboptimal angle which we can safely assume to be under 15% for a grand total of ~ 10%.

Earth to Dave: "Can I have my charger back"

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SCIENTIFIC CONSENSUS that 2014 was record HOTTEST year? NO

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Re: Cut the sh*t!

We can use any reasonable bucket of how that is measured.

This is the key problem. There ain't one. The biggest problem with temperature data sets is that a significant number of ground stations which were originally located in the countryside upon establishment have ended with the grounds of the neigbouring metropolis over time.

As a result the time series are:

1. Not continuous while presented as such.

2. The set within Eu/Western Russia and USA which is representative is actually quite small and covers only a relatively recent period of time when having automated stations with radio connectivity to the central office became technically feasible.

3. I have yet to see a single study which instead of sucking numbers out of thin air (Berkley sets inclusive) uses strictly _ONLY_ stations which are outiside urban areas by more than 100km+. There are such stations (mostly coastal observations from stations associated with lighthouses), however there is no analysis which uses just them. Everyone finds it "essential" to stick into the equations Eu and USA data which is corrupted by _LOCAL_ industiral/urban heat.

Note - I am not saying anything about CO2, models, etc. I just want to see statistics done on the only 100% clean dataset which is readily available - just stick solely to observations taken at maritime navigational facilities (lighthouses, etc) and throw out all the ones within 100km of a large city. I have yet to see any and I could not care less about the "scientific value of the guesstimate used in the correction factors for urban area data".

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MARS NEEDS BROADBAND, insists Elon Musk

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Wrong question altogether

The question is, does the remaining one billion have the money to pay their Virgin Broadband bill.

Monthly 40£ per head? In Subsaharan Africa? Do not think so. You are looking at more like 0.4£ per head (tops).

So, frankly, doing something about getting that region out of poverty should probably come first. As a side effect this will go a long way in fighting at least some of our other problems such as the refugee crisis, extremism, etc.

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Snowden doc leak 'confirms' China stole F-35 data

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Re: This is probably very bad..

do a Tu-144 at the Paris Air Show type deal.

Which part? Crash from being harassed by opponent fighter jets? Or the widows of the crews being paid French government pension (a de-facto admission of what exactly happened there)?

In any case, what the Chinese are developing does not seem to be an equivalent of F-35. It looks more like a heavy stealth figher-BOMBER (with emphasis on the second half) designed for elimination of missile sites in a potential conflict with its two nuclear armed neighbours.

As far as fighter (including carrier fighter role) they are presently looking at buying and/or license manufacturing Su-PAKFA instead.

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Twitter complies with Turkey's 'national security' blackout demand – BLOCKS newspaper's tweets

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Re: Turkeys and other such stupid birds

Sorry, what exactly are you smoking?

Turkey in Eu is a prospect which is presently as distant as Lucipher snowploughing my street. It can happen only over France dead body and France is not alone there either.

Turkey is a member of NATO from the same days when there were 3 Fascist dictatorships in member states (Portugal, Spain and Greece) so being a member is not particularly indicative of anything as far as democracy is concerned. It was just "politically expedient" at the time.

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‘Whatever happened to Vladimir Putin?’ and other crap New Year prophesies

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Re: Y2K

No they will not.

Anything built today is built using lead free solder. It will grow hairlines and short long before then.

It is not likely that there will be a repeat of clinically in(s)ane situation observed ~ 5-8 years ago in certain telecommunications operator where they had signs on doors in exchanges "do not enter" because the boards in the switching equipment would disintegrate from looking at them. The kit still worked despite the boards being just one knock short of turning to dust because the solder had lead in it. This is not likely with new kit - all lead replacements have some degree of hairline growth over time so they will short electrically before 2038.

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FERTILISER DOOM warning! PESKY humans set to WIPE selves out AGAIN

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Re: CO2 alarmism

@StephenA

While CO2 is subject to modelling, predictions, statistics, etc P and N pollution is something you can touch, see and most importantly smell. It is also trivial to measure.

There are regions like Brittany where iIt is so f*** bad that for example you can _SMELL_ it across the English channel - 40 miles away. There are already deaths from it too. Two years ago there was at least one dead from hydrogen sulphide poisoning when trying to clear it. This is in addition to deaths of wild animals and pets which is just "part of the course".

It is also on its way to get to the same level in many in other places - Black Sea, some places around the northern rim of the Mediteranean, Mexico Bay, Yellow Sea - you name it. Each of them is measurable (no needs to juggle a model with CO2) and quantifiable with hard experimental data.

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Voland's right hand
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Lasarus Long quote on stupidity comes to mind.

1. Nitrogen and to be more exact Nitrate/Nitrite is not farce. It is actually something actively looked at presently with the regulations being tightened by the day in Eu. Unfortunately, rest of the world is not following suit.

2. Same for phosphorus.

3. If you think that these are a "replacement farce" I suggest you go and sit on a Brittany or Normandy beach in late summer. NEXT TO THE WATER. RIGHT THERE, NEXT TO THE ROTTING ALGAE. Right where the boar is in the pic. We can manifest benevolence and call the emergency services for you. Or maybe not - you do not believe that this is a problem, right?

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2011/jul/27/brittany-beaches-toxic-algae-boars

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BMW: ADMEN have asked us for YOUR connected car DATA

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Or connect it yourself

Just buy a dumb and connect it yourself. Yeah, I know - this is rapidly becoming something that is off the menu.

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Missing defective BEAGLE FOUND ON MARS! Amazing claim

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Re: Next step

Well, we are half the way there, there was a successful launch of a Reliant Robin. Now which Rover model shall we chose...

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Top EU court: Ryanair data barrel must be left unscraped

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Close

I read it slightly differently. The definition of the directive is public + one that warrants copyright protection based on standard originality, etc criteria.

The way I read it is that the court has CORRECTLY identified that Ryanair's database is _NOT_ a database. It is an interim representation of machine generated price data which does not fit the copyright requirement of originaltity. Hence it is _NOT_ copyrightable and a directive which is written for copyrightable databases cannot be applied.

However, if that does not apply, what should apply is contract law/usage agreement which Ryanair has said "no scraping".

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Bacon-smoking locals provoke noxious Chinese smog

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It's bacon

What technology? It's bacon so quoting the muppet show: "There is no Question in my mind. There is no Answer either".

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'F*** you', exclaims Google Translate app, politely

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Re: Lost in translation

you mean like mentioning Gary Neville in Liverpool?

Neah, other stuff like the actual meanings of amateur ornithology or zoology terms. Hint - in Georgia and South Carolina shag is a folk dance, and in non-USA English beaver is a water dwelling rodent.

So test no 1 - can it translate Jarvis Cocker from UK English to USA English. If it succeeds on the lyrics of I Spy (as sung by Jarvis) it gets my vote :)

Though that one is easy. I would really like to see it translate Russian in a humour context (with its usual nested 4-5 levels of double meanings).

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Voland's right hand
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Re: costly

According to Pulp Fiction it is not.

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David Cameron: I'm off to the US to get my bro Barack to ban crypto – report

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Re: It is banned, just indirectly

you can just bump them or snap them

Some of the newer Eu entry cylinder have one or more pins which are shallow drilled making them fairly bump resistant. Not sure if the one I have is one of these (I would not be surprised).

In any case, what I find interesting is that the police and HMG keeps promoting b***cks in terms of trivial anti-crime measures (like the "Did you spy on your neighbour" aka Neighborhood Watch) and or CCTV schemes while being vehemently against even minimal measures that can provide a private individual with improved anti-crime protection.

1. Encryption of personal sensitive data.

2. Higher security locks, personal safes, etc.

3. Security of key online data.

Curious minds wonder you know... Curious minds also remember exactly where did owning any of these technical artefacts got you in Stalin days too...

Curious minds also wonder why what they promote has secondary use (CCTV) for the purposes of mass surveilance and/or making people acustomed to being under mass surveilance (watch & co). Curious minds also remember that Stalin loved that too...

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Voland's right hand
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It is banned, just indirectly

Have you tried to install an average (not top of the line) European lock in the UK to replace the POS that any beginner Eastern European crim can pick with a toenail? Show the cylinder from your "High Security" Yale/Masterlock/etc lock to someone on the other side of the channel. They will laugh their arse off hysterically.

I tried last week - I put a reasonably up-to-date German cylinder from a well known manufacturer. The model is sold widely on Amazon and used on the continent where it is considered minimal security (it barely gets past basic insurance reqs). It is combination of cuts and coded dimples - half way between a classic lock and a modern fully blown Euro Plus.

Well, the result was that I was peasantly surprised by finding that NOT A SINGLE key cutting service in the UK can cut keys for it. I will now have to cut keys for it in the local supermarket next time I am on the continent. So you choice for lock in the UK is either a POS which can be picked in under 15 seconds by a beginner Moscow/Sofia/Bucharest/Kiev burglar or a fully blown Euro Plus series coded lock which costs an arm and a leg and a prosthetic. It is quite interesting that you are also "encouraged" to disclose the latter on your insurance (and you know very well who has real time access to the insurance database).

Now, I wonder why this is the case... Historical examples come to mind. Stalin had all of the following banned for the general population:

1. Carrying and possession offensive weapons of any kind.

2. High security locks.

3. Encryption of any shape or form.

Hmm... Interesting similarities here...

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VMware finds new post-paranoia RAM-saving tricks

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Re: tps doesn't work for me anyway

I have noticed TPS seems quite effective with windows VMs

Windows zeroes unused pages, Linux does not. Linux does not keep any free memory around either - it is used for buffers and caching straight away. As a result, in a VM environment with page sharing enabled Windows VMs tend to combine better to smaller footprint.

The issue demonstrated by the researchers is common across all means of KSM/TPS/Whatever Page Sharing. By measuring the timing of a write page fault you can determine if the system has made the a read-write page into a read-only copy-on-write behind your back (essential to share it). If it has, this means that there is at least one more VM on the system which has the same page. From there on the actual exploitation depends on the data in the page. AES key is a tall order, finding out if another VM on the same system runs vulnerable software is considerably more interesting real life example.

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TERROR in SPACE: ISS 'Nauts end panic by switching computer off and on again

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Re: What did you expect?

Laptops used by crew day to day are exclusively Linux since 2013

I have no idea what US environmental control uses, but it is not likely to be Windows. VXworks on a radiation/space rated PPC is a more likely candidate.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Can you believe it?

Well, percussive maintenance usually helps too.

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TERROR in SPACE: ISS 'NAUTS FLEE 'gas leak' to Russian module

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Re: You can't get to there from here

The russian one. Soyuz attaches to any of the russian modules (multiple attachment points). Not sure where it is attached now.

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MAINFRAMES are SO NOT DEAD: IBM's launched a new one

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Err... wrong market need

There is a market need for "safety without investing into software failover and clustering".

These require qualified software developers, testers and in most cases fairly complex test setups to verify failure paths. That costs money and quite a bit of it too.

This is what mainframe addresses and it does it pretty well too.

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PlayStation-processor-powered plutonium probe prepares Pluto pics

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Re: Routers... in Space!

Why bother? Excuse me for being blunt, but we are not putting anything out into that region anytime soon. Pu 238 is not manufactured any more so even if we get our s**t together to launch something there is nothing to fuel it with. It will take years to replenish the supply to a reasonable level so that outer solar system launches can start once more. Am 241 generators are still in their infancy, it will take a decade or so to get to the point where they can be incorporated into designs.

So from that perspective the overall situation with missions past the Saturn orbit looks pretty grim.

Otherwise, from the perspective of "Earth to Dave" communication the gain and signal to noise ratios of the dishes and dish systems harnessed for this purpose on Earth are phenomenal. There is nothing you can gain on top of that using a space relay.

This leaves only one use case for an interplanetary relay - the communicating probe being behind the Sun and us in a desperate need to have semi-realtime link to it. Frankly, we are not exploring the solar system at a rate where this is necessary. Once it becomes necessary we are perfectly capable of slotting something into Earth-Sun L4 or L5 which should do the job. Several probes have passed reasonably close to that already (STEREO-A/B, Spitzer, etc).

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You go fast, but we go 'further' and 'deeper' – Voda tells 'Speedy' EE

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Re: Bandwidth is overrated

Quote: With game downloads now regularly topping 20gb I've had to learn patience with my 50mbit broadband

Reality check in the context of the article: So, 20GB game download to your phone?

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Amazon's new EC2 compute instances run on SECRET INTEL CHIPS

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Lovely part number

Lovely part number. Just drop the 2 from the front.

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Bloke in Belgium tries to trademark Je Suis Charlie slogan

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Neah...

You are looking at the wrong news source.

According to verified sources it is 100% Klingon.

http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/society/birmingham-now-100-percent-klingon-2015011394318

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Icelandic brewers knock up whale 'nad beer

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Who told you that it will be thrown away

Whale 'nads, kidney (or to be more exact the glands sitting on top of the kidney in mammals), hypothalamus, pancreas, etc used to go straight into the pharma hormone extraction business.

So this used to be not thrown away - it is about the same evolutionary distance from us as cows, but MUCH bigger volumes to feed into the same process (so even complex protein based stuff like growth factors, etc could be extracted and used in humans). Similarly, other stuff went into cosmetics, etc.

It is thrown away now as a result of conservationists efforts because using it does not pass the cost-benefit and security risk assessment in pharmaceutical companies.

Do not understand me wrong - killing endangered species when there is absolutely no need for it is a CRIME. However, once they are dead, they are dead. So wasting them in this manner only because not a single one of the pharma companies wants to see yet another GreenPeace demo in its parking is a CRIME too.

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Professor's BEAGLE lost for 10 years FOUND ON MARS

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There were a handfull of pixels sitting on a wall...

A few pixels in this photo, a few pixels in the next one, and next one, and next one...

And a some rocket science level image processing. Actually not rocket science, spy sat science.

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Attackers planting banking Trojans in industrial systems

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Why use cryptolocker?

I would have thought that the threat to turn on/off the water flow to a city of 1M+ until all major pipes rupture from hydraulic shock or the threat to dump a few hundred tons of industrial chemicals, sewerage, etc into the nearby river (and call the EPA immediately therafter) are considerably more effective ransom demands than encrypting a hard drive.

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Peers warn against rushing 'enhanced' DATA SLURP powers through Parliament

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Close but no cigar

1. Based on the reaction - they have won

2. The "We are Charlie" or "We are with Charlie" moment lasted less than the walk down the Champs Elissees yesterday. Looks like the UK politicos in the front row have failed to understand what are they marching for.

Charlie Hebdo == being offensive is not a crime. It is a essential, non-revocable and inseparable part of free speech and democracy. Well, to be honest, I did not expect Mr Cameron and Mrs May to get it.

The ONLY corrective action which needs to be taken after last week is the immediate revision (with the view to revoke most of them) the blasphemy, hate speech and various other laws of the same ilk. While I am sympathetic to the ones being offended, let's face it we cannot draw a universal line (as needed by law) on what offence is permissible and what is not. We cannot regulate how thick skinned we are supposed to be. So being offended inclusive of historic and religious reasons is a normal part of life and the right to offend is a fundamental right.

By the way the revision of laws across the Eu should go as far as an ultimatum to the states in Eu which have a blasphemy law (Ireland, etc) - they are either in without it or out with it. We cannot have the moral ground to critisize Taleban abroad when we allow them locally.

It is really sad - it took only a day for the politicos to join the proverbial Christian, Jew and Mulsim from the Charlie front page cover "Charlie Hebdo must be veiled!". Oh well, to be honest, I did not expect anything else.

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DAMN YOU! Microsoft blasts Google over zero-day blabgasm

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@Big_D

Quote: they actually put users at risk by publishing code that exploits the issue

1. The quality of software development employed by your average crime syndicate located in the Wild East is on an order of magnitude higher than the quality of the average big corporation software development located in the not so Wild, but Warm and Humid South-East.

2. So the value of protection from not releasing the code is NIL. The description (or often the patch itself) is sufficient for an average Russian, Romanian, Bulgarian (or anywhere around there) software developer contracted to a crime syndicate to produce a working exploit in a few days (tops). In fact, I know people who are capable of doing so in an afternoon between two espressos (with no description, purely on the basis of patch analysis).

3. The value of the exploit as a working test case is priceless. Anything else aside, the "developers" (quotes intended) in big software corps located in the "sweaty" part of the word look at testing and testcase writing as a job for lower caste subhumans (I have had "developers" threatening to quit when being told that they have to test and write tests for their code more than once). So they are _NOT_ going to write a test exploit (even if they were qualified to do it). The availability of a test exploit allows the current test staff in your average large corp to test the fix. Otherwise they would have been unable to do it.

So the disclosure style and substance are spot on. It is the timing which is idiotic. Even google itself does a partial lock-down over Xmas. This time should have been accounted for in the "90" days.

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Re: Sorry, but Google were uttely wrong.

Yes and no.

Depends if the release date is reasonable. Not patching stuff for years after it was first reported (as in some 2000-es Oracle vulns) is unreasonable.

109 days instead of 90 is actually reasonable especially in this case.

There is a mandatory freeze and do-not touch period in most institutions around Xmas. While the 90 days mandatory disclosure is somewhat reasonable, the lack of adjustment for the 15th of December to 5 of January is extremely counterproductive.

So in this specific case I agree with Miscrosoft (which does not happen that often especially on security).

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SURPRISE: Norks' Linux distro has security vulns

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Re: Impressive computing power shown in that picture

If it is a computer at all. Based on the console style it looks like a verbatim clone of some piece of old Russian military equipment.

Some of these are analogue. Also, while (even if it is a computer) it may have a fraction of the computing power of a Pi it will probably be alive and kicking after the EMP from a nearby 300Kt airburst. The Pi will not be.

All of this if they Norks did not f*** it up while cloning. The way they did trying to clone RedHat (or whatever else they cloned for their distro).

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French Google fund to pay for 1 million print run of Charlie Hebdo next week

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Fixed that for ya: So; Google supports needling, taunting and provoking BIGOTS REGARDLESS OF RACE, NATIONALITY, PARTY AND COLOR.

Unless of course Mrs Marine Le Paine cover (the first one), The Pope and various affiliates have all been converted to Salafist variety of Islam overnight.

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Saudi Arabia to flog man 1,000 times for insulting religion on Facebook

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Re: Meanwhile in the uk... Police Scotland are now monitoring Social Media for any offensive

You mean re-started lashing, right?

It took a case brought by Italian parents in front of the Eu court of Human Rights and SIX (yes, SIX!!!) years after losing this case for UK to ban corporal punishment in schools. The UK government also defended the case to the last minute by all means necessary.

My SWMBO pinched Roald Dahl's autobiography from the daughter during the hols. She is still depressed after reading the description of systematic, vicious and unrelenting abuse which was permeating the UK education system in those days. All I could tell to her on that was: "Well, I have told you more than once that 'The Wall' is a documentary".

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CES: WELCOME YOUR ROBOT OVERLORDS... and, er, co-workers

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Re: That's just what we need....

Hehe... Watch when the bots start applying the disability and equality legislation to deal with the stairs problem.

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Hey, bacteria: Resistance is FUTILE – boffins grow new super-antibiotic

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Re: Past, learn from, uh...duh...huh?

Quote: Highly questionable research practices in microbiology labs,

1. Trans-species plasmid transmission is extremely rare (and difficult).

2. The most common bacteria used in a lab are Gramm negative B. Subtilis and E. Coli, not any of the really nasty antibiotic resistant species from the Staph and Strep family which are Gramm positive

3. Going back to 1. If you manage to show an antibiotic resistance plasmid transmission from G- to G+ species in the wild you can probably ask for a Nobel straight away.

4. I used to play with both bacteria, yeast and cell cultures for a living (and as a part of a degree) for years. Even in the "Darkest, Deapest Eastern Europe" (the place where "lab assistants" for UK and USA professors tend to orginate ya know) waste goes into the bleach bucket _AFTER_ it has been through the _HEATER_. The latter is because we (as I used to be one before going to IT), the "cheap" lab assistants are f*** lazy and hate to scrape agar from petris. It is much easier to melt it out so it was a standard practice to use a "dirty" sterilizer for the purposes of melting out all the crap into a tray to go into the bleach bucket. With all due respect if _THAT_ was the origin for antibiotic resistant species we would have all been dead by now. Surive steam at 160C, then bleach? Yeah... B***cks...

As far as 2-3 weeks course (in your point 1), you are talking syphils, other treponemas, asperghillosis, yeast infections, lime disease or other "specials". You are definitely not talking staph, strep and various bacterial "colds". These are either dead within 72 h (we treat them for 72 more just to be sure) or resistant so 3 weeks are as useless as 1. In fact, these (3 week or repetitive prescriptions instead of changes) are to be blamed for at least some cases.

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Erik Meijer: AGILE must be destroyed, once and for all

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A few good pints

The few good points he has made are not sufficient to result in the summary conclusions.

Scrums suck, no doubt about it. I have yet to see a scrum that is not a waste of time.

Test driven development as used in most companies does so too because in most cases developers write tests to test a piece of code and NOT THE FAILURE CONDITION BEHAVIOUR. However test driven development does not suck as a general rule - it is doing it wrong which sucks.

Other elements of agile - retrospectives, etc are quite useful when done properly.

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BAN email footers – they WASTE my INK, wails Ctrl+P MP

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What goes around, comes around

Didn't the same MPs vote for a mandatory inclusion of company registration details in an email footer? Left hand, may I introduce you to the right hand, you should probably get together and figure out wtf are you doing.

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Ford recalls SUVs … to fix the UI

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Re: Push-button gear change? Really?

Quote: Yep. Vauxhall / Opel cars operate exactly the same. Whoever sold the car to voland's right hand obviously didn't explain that method of releasing the brake - the dealer that sold my car didn't show the other way to me. The car will do both though I've yet to see a use case for the 'manual' method.

Rented car, figured it myself. As far as the use case - try driving in central/northern Italy or Spain. Somewhere in a city with 15% hills and try joining traffic uphill. Bonus points for doing so with a proverbial Sicilian driver stuck up your a*** behind you leaving only 15cm between yours and his bumper.

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Re: Push-button gear change? Really?

Quote "Seemed like a brilliant idea."

Bollocks. Now try to join into traffic from a 15 degree gradient side street uphill. With someone behind you and minimal visibilty (something quite common in Spain, Italy, Greek islands, Dalmacian coast, etc). This is not just "uphill start". It is uphill start with "hesitation" which is an essential part of driving there.

With a normal manual handbrake you can easily nudge out, see someone driving across, stop, wait, nudge, stop wait then join on the 5th attempt. Your hand is on the handbrake, clutch is down, other foot on the gas. You do not move any of them between controls. Trivial with manual . In fact it is a mandatory driving exam exercise in a lot of countries (I had to do it 20+ years ago when learning to drive). Trivial with automatic too - the gearbox does it for you (slipping back on a hill will light up a gearbox fault).

With a magic handbrake? The moment you depress the clutch it deactivates so you are now committed to behaving like the proverbial german car driver - accelerating the Me109e onto an attack vector and the other drivers be damned. You cannot abort "the attack" without _MOVING_ a foot or a hand to another control. This is why it is a bad idea. Utterly stupid design - both Audi and GM.

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Re: Push-button gear change? Really?

Trust me, it can be worse - a button activated handbrake on manual which will work only if you put your foot on the footbrake so you can no longer "start off handbrake uphill".

The imbecile in GM which put that on the new Opels should be made to drive in mountains for a week as a punishment. I was in a place where 10% gradient is considered "flat" last week and it was "fun". Trying to join into traffic coming uphill from 15% gradient side street with such "hand brake" was definitely not a rewarding experience.

As far as push buttons for gears for auto, the UI for that has settled for automatic long ago as well. There is no point to reinvent the wheel - BMW M series and Daihatsu F-Speed have shown the "right" button based gear shift decades ago.

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Marriott: The TRUTH about personal Wi-Fi hotel jam bid

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El Reg should try running WiFi at a conference for once

FFS, either run WiFI in a major conference or interview for example the IETF network support team. Trying to run WiFi with device numbers in excess of 100+ per AP and device densities in excess of 1 per m^2 is actually very hard.

While at it, Mariott, Hilton and especially Hyatt WiFi including conference areas indeed sucks rocks sidewize through a thin straw. Major conference support teams (IETF, IEE, etc) usually spend a week or so fixing it before every event. After that it works like clockwork for some time until some cretinous imbecile decides to "improve" it by jacking all APs to max xmit power and setting them to auto-channel selection.

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A Cambridge boffin told me YOU'RE A BIG, FAT LIAR

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Yeah, so any hypearctive kid is also a pathologica liar

Err... Knowing how much some teens and pre-teens (and adults for that matter) fidget during even the smallest mental exertion... I have some doubts here...

This also means that the next gen polyugraph can now by bypassed using copious amounts of ritaline... Interesting...

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Samsung forks 4K with Tizen tellies

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Entertaining

Someone needs to go back to business school.

The best way to slow down the adoption of a product is to create a standard war around it. Dumb... Dumber...

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Acer to unveil a 15.6-INCH Chromebook WHOPPER at CES

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Re: Price starts at $250

Most importantly - it is roughly the price for which you can get a proper _UPGRADEABLE_ AMD A4 based HP which can take 16G RAM (specs on HP site lie to undersell the kit - all A4 systems can take 8G+), has proper video subsystem and not an Intel joke, can take a proper hybrid or SSD hard drive and can be used for real work offline.

In fact, I bought the one I am typing this on for 245 or thereabouts (discounted because of a scratch on the lid). It was a fairly decent Linux machine even without the upgrades. With a 16G upgrade, spare battery and a hybrid drive it is on par with a 600£+ business spec laptop.

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Huawei? Apple and Samsung's worst nightmare, pal

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Re: Whose worst nightmare? Samsung's! Not Apple's.

China is the oldest continual civilization

Err... Bollocks. Multiple dark ages, multiple empire collapses, multiple history rewriting too. By that standard the modern specialists in accounting fraud residing on the south eastern edge of Europe are a part of the Ellinic civilization and their neighbours across the local pond are continuing the traditions of Chehiz Khan and Tamerlan empires. Or maybe not.

A more apt description is "the oldest continuous history rewriting for ideological purposes". Including now. There were great civilizations on the territory of modern China. The region as a whole however is renowned for one thing: innovation not surviving.

Just one example: they had fleets, naval power, ability to navigate in open sea long before Europeans. They did not just lose it (as many other discoveries), they carefully went around and erased any mentioning of it from their history books to ensure that this moment of greatness is not remembered. As a result we do not even know what the ship design was today. It was not the "junk as we know it" - they were according to the few remaining records 2-3 times bigger than Santa Maria. Nina and Pinta. And this was done again... and again... and again... After all - it is difficult to claim greatness when quite obviously you are sh... compared to your progenitors.

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