* Posts by Voland's right hand

2343 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

How one developer just broke Node, Babel and thousands of projects in 11 lines of JavaScript

Voland's right hand
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Re: Copyright infringement ?

Come on, the code in question is trivial.

As a few people pointed out this is like taken from a 30+ year old basic tutorial. It will probably fail the Lego test of copyright - you cannot copyright the "natural form" of something. You can patent it, but not copyright it.

Granted, javascript is a primitive language, but none the less, even with all of its primitiveness I would have expected it to do this as a part of the base spec (*) in one line. Python and perl certainly do - * and x operators on strings respectively.

(*) I am aware that char repetition was added to the spec last year. That is still not pattern repetition or string repetition, which Perl has been able to do for more than 20 years in a single statement and Python for more than 15.

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Police create mega crime database to rule them all. Is your numberplate in it? Could be

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Wrong pic

This one is more appropriate.

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True believers mind-meld FreeBSD with Ubuntu to burn systemd

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Re: Interesting...

The down side presumably

There is no downside for normal userspace binaries - you can run them. You could run them for decades. I remember running StarOffice 3.x on FreeBSD circa 4.x or thereabouts more than a decade ago.

In the specific case of Debian or Ubuntu you do not care about binaries anyway as they are all re-built for you. If memory serves me right t ~ 95% of the packages are available for the BSD port and work. That is more than for example most of non-x86 systems like the old mac mini.

As a matter of fact, as BSD does have its advantages especially when it comes to file system stuff, I am seriously tempted to rebuild one of my older NAS-es using Debian-on-BSD.

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Re: Interesting...

A Debian port on top of BSD kernel and libc has been running for a long time. Adding the few Ubuntu tweaks and UI to that is relatively trivial.

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Oracle fires big red Solaris support sueball at HPE

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Re: Handbags at dawn?

Reap what you saw.

HP did the same to people who were offering to support older Proliants several years ago.

I have zero sympathy for them on this one.

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Google's call for cloudier, taller disks is a tall order says analyst

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Electronics vs mechanics and aerodynamics

Apple only changed connectors and electronics (to give direct access to temperature sensor bypassing SMART). That is trivial.

Google is asking for a different casing design to accommodate extra platters. That in turn means different mechanics, possibly different motors and in a worst case scenario re-computing the aerodynamic models of how everything moves inside the casing. That is a tall order.

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Iain Duncan Smith's Universal Credit: A timeline

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Re: Recruiting

You are not familiar with the idea of "departamental scapegoat"

I know a few professional ones. You look at their career and it reads fail, double fail, quadruple fail and you wonder how the f*** could these guys be still employed. Then you realize - they are teflonated and they come and sell that as a service.

You have a project which needs to be failed - you bring them in, they fail. They are sacked (and quite often paid a golden handshake), you have assigned the blame, they go onto their next project.

Lovely job if you can have it.

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Interesting coincidence with him resigning right when the docs were to be published

I will concur with the mash on this one:http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/politics/politics-headlines/i-forgot-to-resign-over-benefit-cuts-last-year-confirms-duncan-smith-20160320107332

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'Hot Tech Talent' IT job board ads caught up in sexism allegations

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Re: and the quote

"will show pictures of them in which they don’t always look cool or gorgeous. They just look like professional women at work"

These are not contradictory. As anyone who has had to work with Eastern Europeans or Russian/ex-USSR will testify.

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Microsoft will rest its jackboot on Windows 7, 8.1's throat on new Intel CPUs in 2018 – not 2017

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Re: "One solution is to boot a Linux USB stick ..."

This is the kind of person that works in a basement.

Nope. In a purpose build loft conversion with windows on all sides. The total ceiling-to-window ratio is ~ 74%. It is often referred by my colleagues as the "Crow's Nest" or the "Superstar Destroyer bridge". Light and air. From all directions.

It is trolls who hide under bridges and in dark moldy basements. Ones like you sir (*)

Disclaimer - the last time I had a Windows machine in the house on real hardware was 1997. The last time I had a VM used in work for purposes different than "customer test" was in 2001.

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Oracle fights Russian software policy with Postgres smear

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Article Picture

That is an American black bear, not a Russian one. Though it is still valid as the the question of "Does Oracle Use FUD" is pretty much equivalent to "Does the bear shit in the woods".

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Microsoft's equality and diversity: Skimpy schoolgirls dancing for nerds at an Xbox party

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Re: And Unicorns too

I don't think DNA can do that.

You obviously have not been to Eastern Europe or ex-USSR.

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Re: Perfect

Dude, you chose the wrong tags. Should have put joke tags around it for all the humor deprived sad souls who cannot see the funny part of this on a friday evening. Have one on the house.

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Apple engineers rebel, refuse to work on iOS amid FBI iPhone battle

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People? Still having principles?

Wait a minute... First of April is in two weeks time.

Having principles is so... mid-20th century... (or even early 20th century and before that for some countries).

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Labour: We want the Snoopers' Charter because of Snowden

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Re: You can see what they're aiming at

Isn't that even beyond what ECHR ruled illegal for Putin's Russia?

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Re: Totalitarian Twits

The person who personally ordered my great grandfather shot would be proud. I suspect people walking past the Kremlin wall necropolis in the red square are hearing mad giggles coming from his grave.

Disclaimer - that person name happens to be Joseph Vissarionovich Jugashvilli. You can probably guess my opinion regarding the esteemed MP from there onwards.

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Cleggie, where are you? All is forgiven

I think we are now starting to realize that we actually did need them.

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Telling your wife why you were fired is the only punishment

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Maybe they were right

“having to tell his wife he was fired and why would be enough punishment.”

You have not met the wife, so you are a bit quick in your judgement. There are cases when this would indeed be the harsher punishment you know.

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Apps that 'listen in' to your mobile get slapped by US watchdog

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Re: Ah yes. Targetted advertising

Telling me what other people have bought (as if I care). Telling me what is "Trending" (ditto).

You do not - sheeple do. Sheeple mentality says different - "galactic battlecruiser displacement lardearse" has it, I should have it. So for 99% of the population what other people (especially ones with a galactic battlecruiser displacement lardearse) have bought, what is trendy is the key - you do not want to be seen as grumpy square pensioner who buys his jumpers from Edinburgh Woolen Mill once in a decade.

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Top rocket exec quits after telling the truth about SpaceX price war

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Re: Seems a bit ill advised

Overinflated sense of self-importance, not uncommon after your brain has been damaged by low partial oxygen pressure characteristic of the high altitudes on the corporate ladder.

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Re: We've all seen House of Cards

Nope.

There will be an investigation which is not an investigation.

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Brits seek rousing name for polar research vessel

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Re: Great preparation, tragic results

(to quote the Wiki). Is this the different story.

It is - Gjøa was not specifically designed for ice from the ground up as a polar adventure/research vessel.

That honor is carried by Fram (Amundsen + Archer) and Taimyr + Vaygach (Kolchak). They designed and operated the first proper arctic science expeditions using equipment which was built specifically for that purpose and designed for the environment.

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Re: Great preparation, tragic results

Tragic, but expected (yes, I know, such is the power of hindsight). Prior to Amundsen (first ship properly designed to "pop-up" instead of being broken by ice) and Kolchak (first research ice-breaker) practically all expeditions by all countries went into the arctic on a wing and a prayer.

So I would not actually put the "great preparation" tag on any of them. Including Franklin's one.

So if we are going to name it after a person Colin Archer would be the most appropriate - he is the Scot who build the first proper Arctic ship. The Fram. Now, I will not comment on why he ended up in Norway to actually build something that is new and advanced. That is a different story.

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Re: OK, I probably have diferent ideas of Arctic state of the art

Or "My First Icebreaker"

Second actually, RRS James Clark Ross (current Antarctic/Arctic survey ship) has theoretical 1m ice breaking capacity. This one is in the same class.

That kind of "capability" is a joke - as proved by the Akademik Shokalsky incident. The end result is that a proper icebreaker has to go in and save their sorry a**e. And even those if they are not nuclear if the ice really hits the fan, can only sit, watch observe and serve as a helicopter platform. More than 3 meters and that's it. Compared to that a proper nuclear monster can break through 10m ice. It takes it quite a bit of time, but it can. 1m ice - it literally just cruises through. Just search on gootube. It is a sight which nothing can compare with. The amount of stupid sheer power at use is just... russian...

RRS "Easy Does it" or RRS "Invest in anything but Science" are most appropriate.

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Voland's right hand
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OK, I probably have diferent ideas of Arctic state of the art

Now THIS is state of the art. What I see on the pic is a retirement sailboat. So something leisurely like "Easy does it" will be most appropriate.

Yeah, I know - having something in that class means actually being serious about the Arctic and Antarctic. It actually does not cost that much either - the price is less than a Trident submarine.

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Slack smackback: There's no IRC in team (software), say open-sourcers

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Nice infomercial

With all due respect it is not just developers that have to communicate for a productive workflow.

I would like to have my git-commits, jenkins, bug-tracking, etc chatter to my team chat topic and would like to do that without having to feed a Califonicating Unicorn.

I can do that in about an hour starting from scratch with an XMPP server and sleek-xmpp (if I feel too lazy and with too much money burning my pocket, I can buy it from Atlassian as a bundle too). It is not rocket science. It will also interface cleanly to established systems using XMPP- google talk, jabber, facebook messenger.

Doing the same with "ubiqitously installed" bunch of proprietary clients based on proprietary json streaming protocol which is subject to change at a "ubiquitous" moment notice with no community control over it?

No thank you, the idea which this infomercial tried to brainwash me into does not pass the basic smell test. It smells rotten, I will stick with standards instead.

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Silicon photonics boosted with UK fabrication research

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Next on the research list is to integrate the lasers with waveguides and drive electronics

I always thought that the shark is the traditional first integration subject.

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Osbo slaps down Amazon and eBay – who'll be liable for traders evading VAT

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Re: Time to look for some eBay bargain tat, then

It will not really kick in.

Honkong post is cheap as chips and everything can be declared as a present.

So unless he forces them to police VAT thresholds on sellers too and drops that to be make it not worth it to re-register yourself vatless every month...

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Get lost, Windows 10 and Phone fans: No maps HERE on Microsoft's OS

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Re: Car entertainment units

Are you saying that the car entertainment unit is for entertaining the car - or for entertaining the people in the car?

It is people in the car, but they do not get a choice of what the OS is. They buy a car + infotainment system or an infotainment for retrofit.

Same as my Sony car stereos run Android. I do not get a choice on the subject - I bought a Sony (ditto for any vehicle bundling it). I actually know it is Android only because I have actually gone and read the license list on the about page of menu at the bottom of the unit settings. 99.9% of users will not get anywhere near that.

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It's thought that the current owners of HERE – BMW, Audi, and Daimler – want to concentrate on a mobile operating system that people are actually using. ®

Err... not people. Car entertainment units.

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Judge orders Universal Credit internal reviews must be disclosed

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Re: A "chilling effect"

Their future consluttancy directorships.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Ah, Iain Duncan Smith

They do.

He passes the tests for signs of life.

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Re: Reality Check

It should be just the only one.

The vampire in chief himself.

Unfortunately, he is as likely to resign as Dracula to go vegan.

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Storks bin migration for junk food diet

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This will cause a problem for the storks

Some other day. The buggers are extremely adaptable.

Any source of food - they are there. Like vultures in India and Brazil with the difference that they also kill anything up to a rabbit in size while eating rubbish and carrion when they come across it.

The new all-year-round farming methods provide an alternative food supply to rubbish dumps. There are 20-odd storks walking behind a tractor on average nowdays in Eastern and Central Europe (thanks to much lower use of pesticides). Anything the tractor or combined harvester spooks as it ploughs, seeds, cultivates (or whatever else it does) is terminated on the spot. While they are lovely birds, watching a full size rabbit wriggling speared on the beak is not for the people that have weak stomachs. Neither is the process of it being swallowed whole by the stork after that.

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Who'd be mad enough to start a 'large-scale fire' in a spaceship?

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Re: I hope

It will not be anywhere as bad as people think it will be.

A fire in zero G may not even burn unless you set it up in an oxygen enriched atmosphere or support it with electric heating.

The lack of convection is a killer. Any burn will be extremely localized and will "eat" its oxygen allowance nearly immediately smothering the fire in the process.

On earth, convection will take away the products of the burn and bring new oxygen. In zero G there is nothing to do that.

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Hotel light control hack illuminates lamentable state of IoT security

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Re: IoT - Idiots or Twats. You choose

Why avoid it. I would love to have a conference there.

Just post the python code to mess with the system on the conference mailing list on the first day.

Then sit back, relax, enjoy the show.

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Want to kick butts? Go cold turkey

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Re: Long odds

that the first ten years of cold turkey were the worst.

If you are smoking 20+ a day it takes ~ 7 years for all cravings to go away.

I also tried the lot - pipe, cigars, etc by the way. They are not helping - just another (similarly unhealthy) way to get your fix.

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Voland's right hand
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Bollocks

It took me a year of patches and gum to drop to a point where I could cold turkey. I tried several times before that and I could not last more than a few days.

I was smoking more than a pack a day though. Based on personal experience, going cold turkey is nearly impossible until you have dropped the nicotine dose to less than an equivalent of 5-10 cigs a day. If you are smoking a pack and a half - dream on.

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Hi-def ExoMars launch vid lacks volcanic lair vibe

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Why do you expect it to be spectacular?

This is Proton - M. The village bus.

It ain't pretty and half of the engineering in it is determined by the limitations of Russian railways and nothing to do with rocketry, but it "just works" (TM).

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Swedish publishers plan summer ‘Block Party’ to thwart ad blockers

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Blocking the blockers is trivial

Just publish ads yourself server side.

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Western Digital spins up a USB disk just for the Raspberry Pi

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Re: The price baloons. To what exactly?

Is WD using a proprietary USB connector?

The pic shows standard micro-USB3.0. Or at least something that looks like it.

Isn't the Pi aimed at hobbyists and schools?

Exactly. Only a hobbyist will assemble "My Time Capsule" or "My CCTV system" himself. Spinning rust is still the best means of storing data for both. Yeah, I know, "real" hobbyists are supposed to take a soldering iron in hand and peruse the GPIO interface, everyone else who does not, is not worthy and should be treated as scum. I know, but I disagree - my razzies have no GPIO use at present - they all drive USB peripherals +/- an onboard camera.

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Voland's right hand
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That may get in my shopping list

This is quite tempting to combine a Pi and a drive into a "DIY Time Capsule" to run amanda from the shed. Temptation... Temptation...

It all depends on price, as you end up having to use a USB hub for most Pi use cases anyway, a more power hungry, but cheaper USB drive may suffice. The other issue with USB drives is that Linux has no effective means of controlling the power consumption. hdparm does not work over the USB storage interface. So you are totally at the mercy of the drive firmware as far as spin-up/spin-down and actual drive power metrics are concerned.

By the way - I see a USB3.0 interface on it, while the Pi is 2.0. So the Pi angle looks more like marketing. This is a dedicated external enclosure drive - all vendors now do them with USB onboard to save costs.

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Dell plans sale of non-core assets to reduce EMC buy debt

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Is that a buy-then-break-apart job?

Is that a buy-then-break-apart job?

Of course it is.

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Former US anti-terror chief tears into FBI over iPhone unlocking case

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FBI can go the legal route

They give the phone to their computer forensics lab (which they have), the lab unsolders the chip (which they can), they run a brute force cracker on the possible PIN combinations (digits only, most likely under 8), which they also can. You can do that on a fat enough desktop for crying out loud.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Give them the source!

There are random goto statements. See here: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/01/28/line_break_pilot/

The third example is Apple.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Kind of what I said a couple weeks ago.

They'd hack the hardware, possibly reading the security key

For a 4-8 digit (digits only) PIN? Gimme a break. That can be brute forced on a desktop PC once data is available. It is simply a matter of sourcing the data and it can indeed be done by taking the flash out and reading it off-line.

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Shock: Russian court says Russian court is right in slapping down Google monopoly

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Leaving the political background aside

If we leave just the meat of the case it is identical to proceedings being brought in the Eu competition commission which are still dragging on. This one: http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_MEMO-15-4782_en.htm

There are if memory serves me right similar proceedings opened competition authorities in nearly every jurisdiction on the planet.

The only thing to differ from the Eu (and other) proceedings here is that the case has gotten past the competition watchdog, the competition watchdog has quite rightfully decided against Google, Google has tried to protest in court and the court, once again, quite rightfully, has given it a slap in public.

When the Eu case will finally reach a decision it will not be any different (unless Google defangs the Eu competition commission through the transatlantic trade partnership first).

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Microsoft traps and tortures poor little AI in soulless Minecraft world

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It's an ekk.. ekk... ekk... DRINK!!!

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British IT outsourcers back Remain in the EU referendum campaign

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It's a double edged sword

Exporting services of UK workers is one edge. Using foreign services instead of UK workers is the other.

When we limit them strictly to Eu, they are significantly smaller than people tend to claim. UK living standard tends to be too high to work well in "providing services from the UK" computation.

The reverse direction is also negligible. Most other Eu countries and even some USA companies with significant Eu presence have moved a lot of what used to be done in India and the far east to Eastern Europe (both in-house and outsourced). It is simply better value for the money for a German company to get things done across the border to Brno in the Czech republic than in Bangalore (despite Czech salaries being higher than starting IT salaries in the UK). Similarly, Amazon has found its "better place" in Romania and Vmware in Bulgaria.

UK PLCs and UK Government have so far not joined that trend. The only large outsourced project with Eastern European labor I can think of the top of my head is the digitization of the library and archives of the Parliament (including the secret sections by the way). Done with Bulgarian labor. The rest of UK outsourcing still goes to India as the tradition (and other "factors") command.

So all in all the effect of in-out on outsourcing will be minimal. In fact, as noted by some people as Eu regulations on data, labor, etc will no longer apply it will become easier for UK companies to ship jobs overseas (and they will).

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Dell's Ubuntu-powered Precision Sputnik now available worldwide

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Multiple no-buy flags

Nice, but lots of red flags.

1. Price - major red flag. For that amount of money I you can have both a monstrous 8 core Athlon black edition 4.7GHz desktop/workstation and a perfectly usable low end laptop to connect to it.

2. Intel inside, idiot outside. No thanks. I'd like to have my Radeon as present on A4 CPUs, thank you. Intel is yet to come up with anything that gets even close for predominant Linux use (2D acceleration, font accel, etc).

3. Hell label. Sorry. Dell label on the lid.

Nope, no buy. I had some ideas on refreshing my "travel development" laptop, but its A4 and 16G RAM are still coping with what I throw at it so I will pass this time.

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