* Posts by Voland's right hand

3097 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Grand App Auto: Tesla smartphone hack can track, locate, unlock, and start cars

Voland's right hand
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Re: You don't mention...

Regardless......what FUCKWIT thought that giving any phone full control of a near $100,000 vehicle was a good idea?

Worse than that. Full control authorized by a remote 3rd party which is @ Tesla central.

1. You do not own your 100K+ car. Elon does. He HOLDS the keys - he issues the auth tokens.

2. Consumer phones have had a crypto module and support for storing there strong keys since some times around Nokia N95 - mid-90es. Business specific stuff like the early XDA - since earlier. It is possible to create a secure channel between a phone and another device. F.E. Car. Even over the internet. If you DO NOT INVOLVE A 3RD PARTY. This is the design flaw here. Elon's Oauth server is the odd man out. It does not belong. It may provide you with assistance on where your car is, what it reported ONE WAY about itself, etc. It should not be the entity which authenticates you. Ever. The authentication should be simultaneous with establishing the secure channel to the car and use something which is proven to be secure and not sniffable by anyone. It should also be done mutually - the phone must authenticate the car and the car must authenticate the phone. It is a trivial RSA exchange where Elon should not be included. By design.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: You don't mention...

Do not think so.

The attack is basically not having multiple secuiruty levels and OAuth2 tokens for them and haivng an OAuth2 token hijackable.

OAuth2 is retarded by design. Gimme a token, here is my authentication credentials. Here, token for you. Now you can do anything you effing want. Different auth levels? Fine grained control? Yes, we have heard of it. Some other time.

Going back to Android vs iPhone. If a remote system access is designed around OAuth2 it will be the same for both. By the way, if I was designing this I would have gone for public crypto instead. No Man In The Middle running OAuth at Tesla central. Car, here are my credentials, sign my key. Only that key now gets access - similar to the way a car key works. Not hijackable as you have to get the private key out of the phone which at the very least needs phys access and actually can be stored on the crypto module so not hijackable at all. At least without NSA resources.

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Here's the thing: We've pressed pause on my startup

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Re: And on, and on, and on, it goes

All you need in a remotely-controllable TRV head is, effectively, a solenoid

Nope - will not work. Working fully functional solenoid "cut-off" off flow if installed on all radiators may mean a potential full flow cut-off, overpressure and a leak or damaged pump. In fact, even if you cut-off all but one you may damage your pump - depends on what is the flow setting. Also, a good pump will push against the trv valve so much that you cannot against that with a solenoid and batteries - you will drain them in 10 minutes.

This is why programmable TRVs (I have ~ 6 of those in the house and they make quite a bit of difference on the gas bill) use a small step motor. The motor turns a very conventional scew which pushes the valve on/off.

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Integrator fired chap for hiding drugs conviction, told to pay compo for violating his rights

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Re: When you've done the penalty, that should be it.

Not even that.

1. Clean criminal record was not a mandatory condition of employment and part of the contract. WTF?

2. The chap asked (rather pointy) questions on this to verify it during his interview and had that confirmed. WTF?

3. Disclosure of criminal record was not part of the contract. WTF?

The employer fired him not for having one but for "not having the integrity to tell about it" while not having this as a requirement.

I suspect he would have won an employment tribunal in most countries and/or a contract law lawsuit.

Oh, and Murdoch's media can go suck a sour one here. He would have won regardless of what legal recourse did he chose for the purpose. The f*** fascist little sh*ts are not the law and they need to learn that they should abide by the law just like everyone else. In every country where they have a version of the Volkisher Beobachter.

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Airbus flies new plane for the first time

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Devil

Re: First Flight Challenges

This is just an extended version of the existing model. Not an entirely new plane. So having a rather dull first flight is not so surprising.

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Big Music goes mad for chat bots and AI

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Re: "The report does caution that the bots may not be very intelligent."

My exact thought.

It does not take a lot to teach a bot to gyrate (or thrust) its navel to comply with the entry requirements for a music video channel. +/- some leather pants.

So the fact that the bots are nowhere as intelligent as needed for other industries is not an issue.

Yeah... Can't touch this.. gyrate ... Can't touch this... gyrate... Hit me baby one more time...gyrate...

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USS Zumwalt gets Panama tug job after yet another breakdown

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Re: This is payback time

Yeah not really. A 25 year old carrier should have all such issues long since sorted out.

Yes and no. It has had the propulsion system candidate for an overhaul and replacement every effing time it was in dock including a drop-in replacement by a modified nuclear unit from one of their subs.

It was postponed every time for budget reasons up to this time. This time it was postponed for political reasons as it was pulled out of dock on the Syria voyage one year ahead of schedule and the propulsion replacement postponed once again (for the 6+ time) until next time.

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And that is a surprise, to anybody? UK electric drive warships have had their share of problems

Yes, but bearings?

Come on, WTF? How is a bearing on an electric ship any f*** different from a bearing on a normal ship? How is a bearing on an electric destroyer (albeit ultra-obese one) different from a bearing on a nuclear submarine? In fact a nuclear submarine bearing has to survive considerably harsher conditions - it has to manage 10+ Bar pressure differential while making virtually no noise.

This is just somebody reinventing the wheel and charging an arm and a leg for it abusing the procurement system. Both UK and USA case. Should I mention the 3 letter acronym? Guess not, we all know it anyway.

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No super-kinky web smut please, we're British

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Re: Spanking or caning that leaves a visible mark is out, as well as anything involving urination

Do not think so: http://www.bbfc.co.uk/releases/secretary-2003-3

In any case, what do you expect to happen when a soft porn newspaper + video peddler whose business is on the wane becomes a major political sponsor. I would not expect anything different.

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CompSci Prof raises ballot hacking fears over strange pro-Trump voting patterns

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Gimp

Re: Icon

Can ElReg add a TrumpBoi icon please?

I believe you used it already.

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Hey techbros, make an airplane mode but for driving for your apps – US traffic watchdog

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Joke

Re: Texting while driving banned in 46 states

You do not need to ask. You can easily guess.

As Chris Rea sang on the subject:

She says, "That mess, it don't get no better

There's gonna come a day

Someone's gonna get killed out there"

And I turn to her and say, "Texas"

She says, "What?"

I said, "Texas"

She says, "What?"

They got big long roads out there

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Re: If Fines Can't Stop It, Can Technology Really Provide An Answer?

No it cannot. Sony (Android) and Windows phones have had driving mode for ages.

It's called app-remote on Sony and phones ask you to install if they encounter a recognized model of a Bluetooth enabled stereo and/or Mirrorlink capable stereo. If memory serves me right, Lumia does the same - it goes into drive mode if it recognizes the environment as a car. I am pretty sure you can install the app-remote app on non-Sony phones by the way.

So at least some companies have been shipping technological solutions for 3+ years now. Unfortunately the effect has been near zero. In fact while all older Xperias from around JLo (T) onwards came with this by default, the latest one I got this year (M4) did not have it pre-installed and pre-configured.

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Visa cries foul over Euro regulator's stronger authentication demands

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Wonderful

The regulation threatens to cramp one-click shopping and automatic app payment technologies for anything other than small payments, the argument goes.

Excellent, where can I donate a beer to whoever came up with this idea. For once the regulator doing their job.

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2016. AI boffins picked a hell of a year to train a neural net by making it watch the news

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Re: Obligatory HAL reference

Given that the Nazis sterilised deaf adults

Most likely same as the Soviets. There were different rules inside and outside the house. KGB ran full scale research on radiology and genetics while officially supporting the party line that this is an invention of the Capitalist propaganda.

The Gestapo employed a small number of deaf people who had professional lip reading ability exactly because the best lip readers are deaf. I have come across references to this in both Soviet and Western historical works so I have no reasons to believe it is not true (Soviets were lamenting that they had a couple of agents in Poland picked this way). It's been a while - I came across this 20+ years ago so cannot remember the exact source.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Obligatory HAL reference

No. How it copes with non-native speakers.

This is something which was used by the Nazis in WW2. A deaf lip reader will immediately notice if someone is non-native speaker even if his language and pronunciation is so fluent that nobody notices while listening to him.

There is more than one way to form sounds - especially accented vowels and the various hissing sounds in anglo-saxon languages. Due to the differences in muscles, etc and even things like milk teeth vs grown up teeth learning them as a child results in different mimics compared to learning them as an adult.

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Who's in Peter's file? Moneybags Thiel hits up Silicon Valley brains to join his Trump think tank

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Re: Well...

Trump won with an extremely low marketing spend

So the nasty adverts sponsored by Thiel, Luckey and other people who are on the boards of other corporations are just figments of our imagination. Nice to know that we are living in an illusion. Where is the blue pill?

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Reg man 0: Japanese electronic toilet 1

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Re: Blimey!

At least there, there's rarely a surprise

Hehe... you never had to experience the results of throwing a pack of activated yeast in one. It used to be one of the fav "national park pranks" during in my youth.

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Voland's right hand
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t was also toilet design that led to Jony Ive

Now I know where did I see those white rounded corner shapes before...

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Snail mail thieves feed international identity theft rings say Oz cops

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Devil

friends noticed a bank statement envelope open in their letterbox and months later learned that parties unknown had used the information in the letter to socially engineer a bank call centre and establish a new user for an internet banking account. Months later, thousands of dollars disappeared*

What is a bank statement envelope? Is it a species of Tyrannosaurus Rex? I thought you can see those only in a museum.

With all due respect if you are still getting documents which can result in identity fraud by insecure snail mail you will be hit by identity fraud. Bank statements, credit card statements, etc do not belong in a snail mail envelope - they are actually more secure online (*).

* I wish I could make the idiots in the tax office stop sending me tax code changes by snail mail too.

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Veeam kicks Symantec's ass over unpatentable patents

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No

No, A+/- shows if a file has been backed up or not.

Other filesystems on other OS-es have support for backup selection attributes (if memory serves me right VMS is one of them), DOS does not.

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Donald Trump confirms TPP to be dumped, visa program probed

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Re: oh yea..

It is important to remember that English is a second language for many people.

You sorely missed @DavCrav's point.

The original poster pretended to be an American worker. With all due respect, if he has _THAT_ level of English he should be replaced. Like it or not English is the standard technical communications language in 90% of the world. If you are _THAT_ illiterate you have no right to complain that someone more literate than you has taken your job using a program which is supposed to bring QUALIFIED labor

Now, does that program bring in QUALIFIED labour - that is an entirely different story.

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China cites Trump to justify ‘fake news’ media clampdown. Surprised?

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Re: Does that include advertising?

If China suppresses all the fake news,

You never lived on the other side of the Iron Curtain and it shows.

The trick is not to provide fake news, the trick is to provide selective news. Example: A leaflet circulated during Andropov's days in Schools: "Откуда исходит угроза миру" (Who is Threatening World Peace"). I still keep it for an essential lesson for my kids on how the world works.

Said leaflet had a very detailed breakdown on state of the art USA weaponry at the time - Ticonderoga missile cruisers, B1-B, etc. And how they "threaten world peace". What it missed is that Ticonderoga Mk 1 is pretty much a 1:1 equivalent with Slava class and Frunze class nuclear Battlecruisers (Peter the Great is an example) will wipe the floor with it. Ditto for B1B vs Tu-160. But you do not put such things in a news item. You FILTER them - you see, here is the threat to world peace and we are not threatening it, no, really no, no.

Xinhua is a fine example of said approach - it usually does not openly lie. It is just very selective on which truth the proles can have access to.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Does that include advertising?

My exact thought.

Most fake news operations have nothing to do with political influence. They are all about money via clickbait.

So the first place to start is the Chocolate Factory. They make a lion's share of the fake news money, followed by surprise, surpise Facebook, Yahoo and Microsoft. After that they pay some pennies to the actual fake news producer and various parasites in the food chain like Taboola and other clickbait promotion networks.

So if fake news are to be limited, ad blocking is probably the starting point.

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Surprise! Another insecure web-connected CCTV cam needs fixing

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Trollface

Re: Is Mr. Bumble running these IOT outfits

Not, just realtime embedded development at its "business as usual setting". It is unfortunately, not Mr Bumble, it is his staff.

They have a brain rotting disease known as realtime embedditis. The primary symptom are uncontrollable urges to take on the OS in hand to hand combat and run everything in real-time, because if you miss an interrupt or a frame somewhere the world will end and the lamb will break the seventh seal.

So everything has to be re-invented and no component can be used off the shelf because, oh my god, the off the shelf stuff does not have this precious 0.0005% optimization and it is not running in realtime as a part of one giganto-monolitic statically linked blob. It is running as a separate process? There is an IPC? It is written in Lua? It uses components from well established framework like OpenWRT? It is not using DIY encryption and "my special supercrypto"? The world has ENDEEEEED, run for the hills.

This cannot be helped - it comes with the territory in embedded land. We will see it for a couple of decades at least until the current crop of numpties dies out.

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Facebook to hire 500 more in Blighty

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Re: 1000 real people

involve more than creating new posts

You do not alter reality by creating new posts. There are enough people out there to do that already.

You do that by selectively deleting or promoting them.

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Amazon's Netflix-gnasher to hit top gear In December

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Re: Yarrgh

Want the latest episode of The Grand Tour? £1 direct from the production company.

You are misunderstanding how such "premium exclusive content" is marketed. It is not something you will get from the producer. Ever. It was commissioned specifically as a leader for a large content bundle by a content bundle seller and it will not be made available on a PAYG basis.

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AWS shines light on Virginia solar scheme

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Devil

Re: Well good, maybe, if it's your own money...

Looks like these produce power solely for Amazon - they are not grid connected. So no public subsidies by the look of it.

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Here's how the missile-free Royal Navy can sink enemy ships after 2018

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Devil

Re: Actually, a mosquito

Or just a modern torpedo,

Sure, it can launch a Sting Ray or any of the other ASW lightweight torps - they can be air dropped. They do not do a lot of damage - 45kg of HE will knock out a sub. They will not be enough even for most modern lightly armored ships. It will damage them, but not knock them out. The heavy torps (which are nowdays predominantly made for submarines) are out of the question as they are in the > 1.5 ton range and not adapted for air launch.

Compared to a Sting Ray WW2 torpedo carried by Swordfish had 250kg+ warhead. 250kg of HE (I know the WW2 was not HE, just good old TNT) will split anything short of an aircraft carrier or heavy cruiser in two with one hit.

So if we continue the idea of torpedo aviation (lots of it is in jest), it will need proper air launched torpedoes. Not ASW weapons like the Sting Ray. In the absence of such weapons a clone of the more advanced late-WW2 anti-ship torpedoes +/- newer guidance may not be such a bad idea.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: Actually, a mosquito

Given most battleships these days have hardly any armor

Correct. You need a very small fraction of the warhead size which was needed to knock out something like Richelieu, Bismark, Yamato or Aiowa class battleship. Those could take 3-4 600mm torpedo hits and still function. A modern navy ship - not so much. The only ones that may need more than one are Nimitz class aircraft carriers and even they will probably stop launching after a successful hit.

In fact the more braindead simple it is, the far less likely an enemy would be able to jam it.

Maybe. Maybe not. While modern surface ships are less armored most of them are significantly more maneuverable. They also have CIWS so a torpedo has to literally "surface from under" the ship to get through. A WW2 air-launched torpedo approaching at a couple of feet depth will be knocked out. At the very least they have to attack at higher depths - 2-3m or thereabouts. The best idea is probably not the British models, but a replica of the German ones from the end of the war (though german submariners hated them). These were electric (no trail) and had a timer. So if they did not hit the target once the timer expired they started spinning in an expanding spiral until they hit something. Throw 3 of these and no ship regardless of how maneuverable it is will be able to escape.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Actually, a mosquito

Modern British torps are nearly an order of magnitude heavier than the torps carried by the Swordfish. There is no way you can load one on anything smaller than a Mosquito.

While all of this discussion seems somewhat in jest, a small, slow subsonic aircraft built out of composite materials is something sorely missing from most naval forces inventory. If it can make effective use of the surface effect it needs much less energy when flying too - much lower IR signature too.

Though as it is least likely to be able to carry anything particularly big in terms of ordnance a loiter munition/kamikaze drone is probably a better option.

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Three CEO confirms hack, 133,827 customers were exposed

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Devil

Not necessarily.

This sounds like an insider job with the data being used for a ridiculously stupid scam envisioned by Dumb and Dumber.

So it is quite possible that all interested parties are already packed and in the bag before the data was resold on the market.

In fact, if they were not so terminally Dumb, they would have made more money reselling the data then buying 8 phones (even if those were platinum plated ones).

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AI can now tell if you're a criminal or not

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Re: Quality research

Previous studies in the area had datasets in excess of 100000 - the whole "bio-measurement" (as it is incorrect to call it biometrics) database from criminal identification using the Lambroso method has been fed into statistical analysis a gazillion times.

Each and every time the idea that "this persons shape equates to increased probability of criminality" has failed to pass more detailed statistical analysis.

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Devil

Sorta

Phrenology was just skull measurement. You are looking at Lombroso's "Criminal atavism" in its worst form here.

Anyway nothing can surprise me in a world where someone who was thrown out of Congress hearing for a judge for being too racist for the 1980-es standards is appointed to lead the USA judiciary.

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Surveillance camera compromised in 98 seconds

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Devil

Problem is, there's an assload of stuff that doesn't work unless it's connected to the mother ship. For example, a Honeywell wi-fi thermostat.

Hehe... Someone trying desperately to imitate nest without having the same monetization business plan. What a bunch of numpties.

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The Pew 'gig economy' study is here, and it's grim

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Re: Never fails to surprise me

They succeed because they process in a "friendly" destination.

Nobody will call an international number to hail a taxi. At the same time nobody cares about doing what is effectively an international order for it.

In any case, the best (and probably only) way to deal with these is to force ALL delivery vehicles and ALL hire cars to carry a tachometer ASAP. The tech is available, it can be installed today. A GPS synced one - tomorrow. That will be the only way to deal with Yodel and DPD trucks driving at 50mph in 20mph zones and flashing lights at you if you stay at the speed limit.

The moment all of these have to comply with the "time behind the wheel" safety regs the whole business will suddenly stop being as appealing as it is today.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: market failure

Rather than cities like Paris and New York banning Uber, perhaps they should just require that all jobs entered into apps go into a central city run database/clearing house

They should go where they belong - on a payroll.

This is employment, not gig as the employer determines everything. So the employer for starters has to:

1. Pay the minimum salary

2. Pay all other taxes and national insurance

3. Comply with health and safety requirements related to driving. These are not just "union spoilsport" rules - they are there to keep people alive on the road.

The moment Uber and other other gig companies have to do all that they stop being "competitively priced". In fact they end up costing the same as "legacy" businesses providing the same service.

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LinkedIn officially KickedOut of Russia

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Devil

Re: Like this move from the Kremlin...

Not the issue here.

The issue here is USA continuing to refuse to provide adequate data protection to foreign subjects. The whole thing was long in the making and all interested subjects could have made the USA government negotiate with Russia an adequate bilateral data protection agreement which is different from the usual "banana republic bend over and comply" (like Privacy Shield).

USA State Department, however, completely refused any negotiation (multiple times as well), despite that being clearly against USA business interests. While I can sort'a feel their pain, I disagree with the sour grapes approach. They have been trying "regime change" operations of all sorts for 20 years and have failed every single time. In fact, lately, Putin has been one move ahead of them most of the time. While doing that they have forgotten what they are actually paid for by the USA tax payer.

As a side effect this is also a protectionist measure. With the requirement for the operation to be locally self-contained it becomes more difficult to pretend that large part of the service happens elsewhere. So advertising (and other) revenue and income has to be declared locally and taxed correctly.

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WDLabs goes Pi-eyed and sees triple

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And it most likely blows across all three

The Pi is a nice piece of kit until you try to use the USB in earnest. As in storage, uvcvideo or god forbid a combination of them and or networking (which is also off USB).

I tried building a "DIY Time capsules", "outbuilding servers" and/or CTTV systems out of one of my spare Pis. The moment I tried attaching a decent drive to them they no longer survived receiving the weekly backup (situation was OK with older slow drives). Ditto for running USB 3G modems. Ditto for trying to run the wifi as an AP (as it is over the same broken USB). Ditto for trying to run any serious storage/network load while having a USB uvcvideo. And so on.

If you really want storage on an Arm Soc - get a Banana. I have not had a single issue once I replaced my "USB in use" Raspberries with tropical fruit and relegated the Razzies to duties which do not involve strenuous USB exertions. When you do not need to use the USB, the Pi shines by the way - I have systems with 6+ months uptime doing motion using the built in camera and/or stuff via GPIO.

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And with one stroke, Trump killed the Era of Slacktivism

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Re: One thing we can count on with Trump

It might be fun, seeing Carly as FCC chair...

Wash your mouth.

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After Microsoft joins Linux, Google Cloud joins .NET Foundation

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Wrong Pig

That pig needs afterburners and some weapon pods to carry napalm. Hell is freezing over and desperately needs an emergency warm-up

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PoisonTap fools your PC into thinking the whole internet lives in an rPi

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Re: Mac can be pawned too.

By the way, if memory serves me right DSL Nation had the 0.0.0.0/0 DHCP + reply to all arps with itself madness patented. So this guy may end up receiving a patent lawyer nastygram shortly.

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Mac can be pawned too.

This is the old DSL Nation modem fugly DHCP hack - in its native form it does not work on Mac.

What the guy missed is that USB is actually "shared" media - you can present TWO usb interfaces to the host. 0.0.0.1/1 and 128.0.0.1/1.

Bingo. Mac joins the other ones as pawned too. The guy should have thought a bit more in depth on what is happening instead of blindly repeating the old DSL Nation madness.

Fairly trivial to defend against too on Linux - you can (and should) configure it to reject anything larger than class A. This is a 3 liner in /etc/dhcp/dhclient-enter-hooks.d/

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Searching for 'Fatty Kim the Third' banned on Chinese social media

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Trollface

Re: Gugle Trainslate

You sure you spelled it right?

Fatty Kim the Third, not Fatty Kim the Turd.

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UK warships to have less firepower than 19th century equivalents as missiles withdrawn

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Devil

Re: When was the last time a RN fired a shot in anger?

"If the Chinese, Russians, or even India came geared up with purpose, all we could do is issue a strongly worded bloody communiqué anyway."

Correct. Peter The Great alone can terminate the entire UK surface fleet without breaking a sweat and without expending all ordnance. Even the older Slava class missile cruisers carry enough missiles to terminate most of the fleet while being able to take out any aircraft carrying counterattacks from UK non-existent aircraft carrier before they get in range. All of their anti-ship missiles are supersonic and with high-G maneuvers in terminal approach.

Chinese do not yet have anything that heavy hitting, but the Sunburn carrying Sovremennuy class destroyers they bought from Russia can probably knock out half of the UK fleet in one salvo (if the SS-N-22 is as good as as advertised). Their native stock and their fleet aviation is more than capable of finishing the job after that.

India has 7 guided missile destroyers capable of launching supersonic anti-ship cruise missiles (Brahmos which they developed jointly with Russia). Their first salvo can take nearly all of UK surface fleet, the older native and USSR destroyer stock and the fleet aviation will finish the job after that.

So you are indeed correct - UK fleet presently is capable of dealing only with banana republics. Any major power will have it for light midnight snack and the only hope of retaliation are the attack submarines and or the "family atomics"

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Re: When was the last time a RN fired a shot in anger?

Other than the sub sinking the General Belgrano; have they done anything offensive

They have. But not at another navy. Land targets in Afghanistan and the gulf wars.

Probably for the better too as we are rapidly reaching a situation where only nuclear powers have navies worth considering in a fight. Everyone else has just patrol/missile boats - basically a glorified coast guard.

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Re: Right decision

Ship killing has been performed by aircraft and submarines

Really? You need to find your hot air valve and deflate yourself a bit.

So the Israeli's INS Eliat never sunk right? Oh, that was a HMS once too, right? The battle of Latakia gulf never happened either, right? The battle of Baltim never happened, right? The battle of Tartus never happened, right? INS Hanit has never ever been hit by anything, right? And the whole development of Gabriel mark 1, 2, 3 and 4 was never ever justified.

That is the middle east. Shall we move a bit further and continue?

So, the Indian navy never ever sunk Khaibar (again, an ex-HMS). Never damaged any other Pakistani ships either, right?

Or let's look at good old Harpoon, right. It has MORE kills when launched from missile boats (because of Iran using it in the Iran/Iraq war) than from the air.

If anything, in terms of effectiveness and hit ratio ship-to-ship missiles when used have proved to be significantly more effective than air-to-ship ones. Their range nowdays is such that there is bugger all difference between them launched by ship or air - the stand-off distance is in the hundreds of miles.

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Virgin Galactic and Boom unveil Concorde 2.0 tester to restart supersonic travel

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Re: Wheels in the Wings Design Flaw

That's the speed of the aeroplane, not the metal strip.

Bingo.

None of the engines on Concorde were ever actually on fire

I never said they themselves were on fire. I said they set it on fire.

The afterburner exhaust setting the leaking fuel on fire was the initial conclusion of the investigation.

While short from electrics and the flameout (which you mention) have been raised as a possible cause as well later on, neither was proven so the afterburner setting it on fire has always remained as one of the probable causes.

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Re: No overland

Waaaaaaaaaaaait a second.

Everywhere I see Boom mentions 9000nm refueled/4500 unrefueled.

WTF is refueled? Where? How? Are we talking about landing or they have gone off the deep end looking to do in-air passenger aircraft refueling

There is a fairly limited number of options to land for a refueling stop in the Pacific between Sydney and Hawaii and practically none between LA and Japan unless you fly around the Pacific rim instead of direct. That kinda limits what this aircraft can be used for.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: Wheels in the Wings Design Flaw

Relative loads were very different.

Sorry dude, you have failed to grok the root cause and the actual design flaw.

What happened to the Concorde at Charles De Gaulle could have happen to any aircraft. The difference between 200kt and 150kt is minimal - a piece of hardened steel bouncing of a wheel will puncture the tank in either case.

The difference is the aftermath. Due to the way the engines are positioned on the Concorde the whole wing caught fire because the leaking fuel went straight into the afterburner exhaust. The exhaust temperature of a normal non-afterburning turbofan even cranked to max is usually too low to set jet fuel on fire. There is a whole raft of aircraft incidents with fuel leaks out of wings, not one of them caught fire. Example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Transat_Flight_236 - the leak was out of the engine itself. That would have killed a Concorde there and then. Do not even get me started on oil and hydraulic fuel leaks. If you walk around budget airline craft on an airfield - half of them have traces of these. Once again - some of these would have set a Concorde on fire.

This is the main reason why they were taken out of circulation - no matter how you armor fuel tanks and lines, shit happens - fuel leaks, oil leaks, hydraulic fluid leaks - they all can burn. This is why an afterburning engine is a no-go for civil aviation - it will set that on fire straight away.

This is what makes this new supersonic aircraft interesting - it is claimed to be non-afterburning. If it is non-afterburning on takeoff it will succeed where Concorde failed regardless of how small is its undercarriage and what level of armor does it have on its fuel tanks.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: No overland

So, no chance in a Sydney to London.

In theory - that route is 70%+ over water and the rest over deserts where you can negotiate to remain hypersonic too so doable. The only slow stretch is the first 45 minutes over France.

In practice - 10h vs 24 hours stops making a lot of difference - you lose a day. That is different from 10h vs 3h (especially flying west) - you do not lose a business day and this is what Concorde passengers were actually paying for.

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