* Posts by Voland's right hand

2776 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Post-Brexit UK.gov must keep EU scientists coming, say boffins

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Re: Democracy? My arse.

The government is making the outrageous assumption that over 27 of those 28 as well as wishing to leave the EU also wish to leave the EEA and chuck out Johnny Foreigner and furthermore, also want to give up their human rights.

Please share what you are smoking. While smoking cool stuff is only sometimes a crime, not sharing it definitely is.

FREE MOVEMENT OF PEOPLE IS A INTEGRAL EEA CONDITION. YOU CANNOT BE IN EEA WHILE "Taking Control".

As far as EFTA, that train has moved on in the meantime. The Norwegian prime minister was very clear that THERE IS NO SEAT for UK on it. They have signed 20+ trade agreements different from the Eu ones with various countries in the world which will all need to be renegotiated if UK joins. That is going to happen only if Lucifer drives a snow plough.

So, once again, please share what you are smoking.

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VW Dieselgate engineer sings like a canary: Entire design team was in on it – not just a few bad apples, allegedly

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Re: Colour me surprised

In hindsight I think the problem was a gradual build up of soot in the EGR valve/Exhaust manifold - strip it and clean this and people claim that MPG > 40MPG can be achieved.

One of these in the tank after each service keeps it there. I tried the Wynn's equivalent, it is nowhere near as effective.

So were Toyota being incompetent, and/or unethical towards their customers?

Neither, they were just licensing that one from Isuzu. They now switched to a partnership with BMW for diesel engines.

By the way, the EGR valve in all engines which use the GM/Isuzu variable EGR tech is computer controlled. You do not need to remove it. You can simply program it not to open most of the time using a suitable ECU map. As they say: "Your mileage may vary". Also, if you do it knowingly, you are technically not road legal. You can of course pretend you do not know it. I did for two years (the previous owner had that map loaded in the ECU). As a result I had consistent 38.5 MPG or thereabouts on a 2007 diesel truck in normal UK driving conditions. It is now down to 34-35MPG as the ECU lost its custom map when the old battery died. While I know I can push it back up to 38.5 and significantly higher power, I prefer not to. The newer 2012+ model no longer has variable EGR and uses urea injection so it runs all the time in high power mode (just injects urea) and at 37MPG+.

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Re: It seem to me

The green mania is a fetish

Not in this case. While painful, the standard was technically achievable using technology available at the time. Personally, I think the standards were a bit too lenient on Petrol and too stringent on Diesel, but definitely not impossible to comply with.

All that was needed was for VW to concede that making the "VP of Engineering" subordinate to the "VP of Brand Development" has produced the expected results and they are behind both GM/Isuzu and Mercedes on engineering and innovation. However, instead of licensing either (or both) diesel emission reduction designs, they decided to cheat on the emissions test.

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Re: It seem to me

they could not design a diesel engine that would meet the stricter US emissions standards WITHIN RESTRICTIONS MANDATED BY MANAGEMENT

Management mandated that they do not use Mercedes urea injection or the GM/Isuzu variable EGR. Though the variable EGR would have fallen short of the delivering the USA reqs. It delivered Eu IV and V reqs and reqs in most other parts of the world at the time. USA at the time was more like what Euro 6 is now and that needs the piss in the exhaust.

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Hololens for biz shocker: Surprisingly, it doesn't totally suck

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The GUI (or should it be HUI?)

That sounds interesting. In every European language (except Hungarian) from Berlin longitude eastwards. Very interesting indeed.

Probably quite appropriate too - due to Zuck's fetish about nudity and the corresponding post-acquisition withdrawal of Oculus from the future HUI interaction market this gadget has the high quality HUI stuff totally to itself.

Though, IMHO, it is probably just HUI-evina. Like any virtual reality system that creates a conflict between what you see and what your inner ear thinks you should be experiencing.

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IP telephony biz VoIPtalk quietly admits to possible data breach

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Most importantly, they implemented a SP side blacklist

They also implemented a provider side blacklist. So you can blacklist most destinations which run the "charging endpoint" of a VOIP scam.

The way VOIP scams work nowdays is - the scammer registers a toll number in a "friendly" country like Maldives, Nigeria, etc. It searches for PBXes exposed to the internet, then sets as many calls as they can to the number they have created in a "friendly country".

A SP side blacklist drops this dead. If your provider does not have it, I would suggest blacklisting anything except "well known" destination countries/regions for all international calls. Thankfully, the number system is somewhat hierarchical so blacklisting anything that starts with 4,5,6,7,8 and 9 goes a very long way.

One thing I have noted is that while automated scans are done by botnets, if they return something weird, it notifies a human which runs a more extensive break-in attempt. These do not even try to conceal their IPs and the sources where they come from are usually in "interesting" locations around the Middle East. So you can make your own guesses what will the money leached off your PBX used for.

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Jeff Bezos' thrusting cylinder makes Elon Musk's look minuscule

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Re: Size and shape!

what sort of payload he's planning to inject into what sort of orbit, if that's the word

New Amazon Prime delivery - warhead to your chosen latitude, longitude and altitude. Delivered worldwide. Make sure that the chosen destination is ready to accept it, otherwise it may be left with the "friendly" neighbours. It is up to you to guarantee that the neighbour will not peruse your 10Mt package.

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I would not be so sure

The same goes for Russians creating a "New Armstrong" or whatever.

Russians are usually quite good on the subject of "credit where credit is due" so I would not be so sure. They just may. You never know.

Though they have to run out of a fairly long list of names themselves: Titov, Leonov, Dzhanibekov, Korolev, Tsiolkovski, Komarov, Tereshkova just to start off with.

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The first stage will be reusable and looks like it will try to mimic SpaceX's vertical landing trick, perhaps even on an offshore barge.

Why mimic? Blue Origin was also designed to land vertically from the very beginning.

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Ericsson strikes partnerships with Intel and Google for pay TV

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It does not just exist, it is 95% of the market.

95% of TV and BR OSes are Android of some sort. It is usually stripped to the bone with all the Googly bits surgically removed. Sony is Android - car stereos, BR and TV. Tosh is Android too. In fact out of the big ones, if memory serves me right, only LG was trying something different.

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'Jet blast' noise KOs ING bank's spinning rust servers

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130 db can knock you out and disorient you

If you are suddenly hit by 130db siren without any ear protection you may end up in a state where you are not capable to escape the gas coming a few seconds after it. It is like being hit on the head with a mallet.

They are lucky it was just a test, otherwise there could have been a couple of dead bodies in the server isles.

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'Oi! El Reg! Stop pretending Microsoft has a BSOD monopoly!'

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Re: Machine Operating System

so instead of booting from the ROM that it undoubtedly should have,

Why? The entertainment terminals in an aircraft are dumb and useless without a network. So rather unsurprisingly, they do network boot to decrease the cost, ensure they all run the correct software revision and make any upgrade as easy as an on/off.

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Re: Linux BSOD on Aircraft?

Linux is now standard on Boeing, not sure about Airbus. Airbus originally was some sort of Windoze, I would not be surprised if they moved to Linux as well.

I flew FRA-SFO on United (11 hour flight) a couple of years back and the crew had some issues with the lighting in the hoy poloy cabin which shares something (not sure what) with the entertainment system. So they kept resetting it for the first 3 hours. As a result the entertainment consisted of watching the Linux boot sequence. Again. And again. And again.

Quite hilarious as I was working on some kernel stuff at the time. So the passenger in the seat next to me noticed that the stuff on my laptop screen looks waaaay too similar to the entertainment system and started asking questions "If I had anything to do with this".

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Boffins ID bug behind London's Great Plague of 1665

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Re: I thought this one was fairly clear to be "proper" plague

Think "Ebola" with a 14-21 day incubation time instead of the 7-day one we see at the moment.

That matches Hemorrhagic aka Purple smallpox aka BlackPox.

Rear, but 90%+ fatal.

Last pandemic with high incidence of hemorrhagic cases was in the early 18th century - 1730 or thereabouts. Even that one was not 100% hemorrhagic form though. Higher than usual, but still mostly normal pox cases. However, nothing of what we know about smallpox does not exclude the possibility of a strain being 100% BlackPox. By the way, as far as biological weapons go, that will be the mother of all bioweapons.

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Re: I thought this one was fairly clear to be "proper" plague

Not quite; the Athenian epidemic of 430 BC described by Thucydides, who contracted it himself, was likely Ebola.

Read the article - while the description fits Ebola, the haemorrhagic form of SmallPox as seen in several ancient pandemics is also a possibility.

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Re: I thought this one was fairly clear to be "proper" plague

I dont buy the 'spread by coughs and sneezes' version of the Black Death,

Any plague strain alternates between the three forms - bubonic, pneumonic and the relatively rear intestinal.

The virulence (and hence the ratio) differs between strains. So even if the predominant mechanism for the Black Death was pneumonic, it still spread around via flea bites and was still carried by rodents (by the way the claim in the article about "via skin" is bollocks).

As far as the countryside, recent studies show that the long term plague infection reservoirs in nature are not rats and mice, but gerbils. Gerbils can carry the disease for significantly longer before dying. So Y. Pestis was quite at home in the predominantly agricultural grain growing English countryside of the fourteenth century.

It spikes and goes pandemic in cities exactly because it kills rats with 99% mortality. So the flees escaping the dead rat seek something else to bite and transmit the disease to humans. A modern city is not any different from medieval to that respect. We still have 10+ rats per human living in the sewers, so an outbreak will create a similar outpouring of infected flees.

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Voland's right hand
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Re: I thought this one was fairly clear to be "proper" plague

Not quite; the Athenian epidemic of 430 BC described by Thucydides, who contracted it himself, was likely Ebola.

Which is my exact point - all historical books call it plague. The only 3 pandemic diseases which get a honourable mentioning in historic literature are Plague, SmallPox and Cholera. Anything that does not look like classic SmallPox or Cholera (f.e. even the haemorrhagic aka "purple" form of Smallpox) is called Plague. So if once upon a time there was an Ebola epidemic in Europe (as suggested here) it would have gone down as plague in the history books. Similarly, most medieval pandemics of dysentery, etc have been written down as Cholera.

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Voland's right hand
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I thought this one was fairly clear to be "proper" plague

The Great Plague symptoms were very well described in literature from that period. It was unmistakably bubonic plague which is caused by only one bacteria - Yersinia Pestis.

This differs from some earlier pandemics which have little "medical description". In the early middle ages and before that people called nearly anything with 80%+ mortality plague. The only other diseases getting a honorary different mentioning were Smallpox and Cholera. So we in fact do not know if some of the earlier pandemics were real plague or let's say extremely virulent flu (middle ages version of the Spanish Lady).

Now, why the Great Plague was so great is a different story. Plague was not uncommon in the middle ages. A small epidemic here or there happened every few years. These however, did not become Great Plagues. While looking for an explanation of why a particular plague became Great in the bacteria looks plausible, the actual cause is more likely to be environmental - spikes and falls in rodent populations. Just like the mice spike in Europe this year (I have never seen so many, neither in UK nor Eastern Europe).

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US Congress blew the whistle on tax-dodging Apple, claims Europe

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Re: Somehow I don't see why this is sooo difficult

it shouldn't matter where the profit is made in order to pay US tax.. Which is exactly the case. Apple Ireland is _NOT_ a USA company. End of story.

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Re: If the USA...

It is not the tax structure, it is what is patentable.

If you look at what various subsidiaries of Apple, Starbucks, Amazon, etc are paying a lot of it is IPR on business methods and/or software. The decision to make that patentable is the key enabler of the Leprechaun Jar building.

Prior to that, the patent portfolio of most corporations did not have the right mix of IPR to create a scheme where subsidiaries are _USING_ something, have to license it and this will pass accounting and tax audit scrutiny. Today all it takes are a couple of business method patents (f.e. in Apple's case the way the Apple store, support, genius bar, etc is set up is patented as business methods), a few design patents, trademarks and voila - you have a portfolio that is licensable to a subsidiary.

The real deal patents - the technical ones are not part of the mix because the subsidiaries are _NOT_ building anything, they are importing already built stuff from yet another party (the supplier). So, the best way to kill the current Leprechauning methodology is not to reform the tax code - it is to reform the patent system and ban software, business and design patents.

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Petulant Facebook claims it can't tell the difference between child abuse and war photography

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Re: Vietnam!

We can test that. In fact we SHOULD.

It is a pity neither me, nor anybody in my household has a F***book account. I would have tested it.

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Facebook retreats, that is a new one

On one side, I should probably pour myself a celebratory drink. Facebook has been made to retreat on its Talebanic policies for once.

Just let's be clear and not kid ourselves. Facebook Talebanic prudishness is _NOT_ driven as much by the howler monkeys from the various ultra-right and religious organizations. I call bull on that. If that was the case, Facebook would not have been caught red-handed massaging USA election news in a direction the howler monkeys are not happy with. I suspect this comes from Zuk core "values" and while having respect for other people and privacy is not part of them, he clearly has an issue with nudity. That is all nudity, period, regardless of the age of the subject. Deep complexes from looking at himself in the mirror? Maybe. Who knows.

On another hand, it took half of the government of a European nation led by its prime minister to join the protest and post the "offending" picture for him to retreat. That is just nuts.

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Elon Musk says SpaceX Falcon 9 fireball investigation is 'biggest challenge yet'

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Mark Zuckerberg said he was “deeply disappointed” about losing his satellite, adding that he had invested in Aquila technology

How about investing into the core business like decent editors, moderators and decent image recognition for monitoring content instead.

Example: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/sep/09/facebook-deletes-norway-pms-post-napalm-girl-post-row

What's next? Mandatory bukhas on everyone to be allowed into Zukerborg's sacred garden? Or photoshopping a bra onto "Liberty Leading the People".

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You should install smart meters even if they're dumb, says flack

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Remote meter reading is about the only thing that could credibly be touted as a benefit

The actual benefit and use case in the original white paper very carefully edited by all the usual energy suspects is turning off grannies' supply and freezing them without having a human involved. See, machine did it, we are had no clue it will do it.

There is _NO_ other benefit. If the benefit is "remote metering", then can we have a regulatory mandate the smart meters not to include a power cut-off function of any type (local or remote). Can we? Asking once... twice.. thrice... Nope, do not think so, suddenly there is a silence from the industry.

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Sony wins case over pre-installed Windows software

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Re: "without pre-installed software"

Laptops without pre-installed/supplied with operating systems are almost like Unicorns.

There is OS and there is the gigantic raft of non-updateable crapware which used to be shipped on Vaio and other consumer laptops.

IMHO, forcing via regulatory means all PCs to be available _ONLY_ with plain Windows and any "preinstalled crapware" to be an optional free add-on is long overdue.

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UK nixes Land Registry sale

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The goose that lays golden eggs

Only an idiot (or a person with a vested interest) will bring a goose which lays golden eggs to the Sunday market.

The land registry is a guaranteed source of revenue for the crown. While selling it may help to improve the balance sheet (so it does not look like Greece) today, it is a very bad idea going forward.

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Florida Man's prized jeep cremated by exploding Samsung Galaxy Note 7

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Always carry a fire extinguisher under the passenger seat

Crap chargers, crap batteries, crap phones and other crap infotainment electronics. It is a small wonder that there are so few fires. I barely saved one of my cars after the stereo combusted and set the central console on fire. If it was just 20 seconds later the car would have been a write off. In this case, a new console off E-Bay, new switches, one hour of crimping and two days of cleaning resurrected it (for now).

While doing it I noticed a few things - the fire retardants in the modern car ABS do not fire retard. The f*cking thing still burns. The fuses are not particularly effective either. They will not blow even if half of the console is on fire and both the stereo and the accessories are short provided that it is "fried electronics short", not a direct one.

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World eats its 10 millionth Raspberry Pi

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Re: I thought I'd buy one to try when they first came out..

If you are doing something that intensive

I figured that one out. There is an order of Banana replacements for the Raspberries coming from Germany. Proper SATA and proper Ethernet.

If these work I will move my entire production "fleet" to tropical fruit and relegating the Pi to prototyping and/or "education" - what it was intended in the first place.

While x86 seems like a viable option, I am not too keen on them. I have a whole box of old thin clients and via motherboards. The power consumption is quite high, cost per unit if using proper SATA flash drives is too high and reliability if using something cheap for storage (f.e. USB) is pretty bad.

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Re: I thought I'd buy one to try when they first came out..

10 of them?

Do they breed like aphids?

Unfortunately they do.

I built 3 "outbuilding service kits" beginning of this year. Pi2+ and Model3 - a Pi, 1-2 cameras (due to Pi's own refusing to work with uvc and motion had to use ELP modules), a cell modem on two of them and some storage. Internet gateway + CCTV + some telemetry + heating/aircon remote on/off for an outbuilding/summer house.

Reliability of all 3 ended up being utterly abysmal. The moment something "interesting" like a large transfer happens on USB and half of the devices on the USB bus kick the bucket (usually camera, sometimes cell modem or storage). This is not the usual power supply issue - all 3 have 3Amp power supplies, just the USB and WiFi (on model 3) being utter tripe.

So they will now have to breed like aphids and the functions will have to be split into "one device, one function" resulting in either 6-8 Pis or more likely 3 Pis and 2-3 Tp Link 3040s to do the "heavy" network lifting. Either that or looking at an alternative SoC - something like MIPS Creator or one of the new Chinese Arm ones which have a proper GigE and/or SATA.

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Come in HTTP, your time is up: Google Chrome to shame leaky non-HTTPS sites from January

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Re: Really?

So that there is no-one to interfere with Google in monetizing your traffic.

The moment a site goes https it can no longer be transparently proxied. If you look at Android releases, only 5 onwards (grudgingly) provides some level of half-decent proxy support. That is for a reason.

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Apple: Crisis? What innovation crisis? BTW, you like our toothbrush?

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1200+ for a ceramic???

The headphone link in the article took me to a page advertising a "new" ceramic watch which did not even have a ceramic wristband for 1200+ f*** quid.

It looks more or less like the Ceramic Fossil I bought the SWMBO for 104£ 4 years ago. Just bigger and uglier. It also has a cheap plasticky strap instead of a proper ceramic chainlink wristband. The one Fossil shipped with their ceramic watch so far has survived for 4 years including at least one full speed wipeout without a single scratch. It looks as pristinely white as when the day it arrived.

Sorry, not a chance in hell I am going to part that amount of money for this PoS.

While at it, what is the correct "Ridiculous Headphones" link.

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Brexit? We have heard of this, says Dixons Carphone CEO

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Re: UK shoppers + Dixons

Not necessarily. It has its uses.

You cannot really wait the 3-4 days it takes for Amazon or Cooperative electricals to deliver white goods if you have a family with kids and the washing machine has decided finally (after 7 years of daily abuse and multiple repairs) to bend its axle.

According to the Murphy's law it will do it on Friday night so the earliest you can get a new one from anywhere else is Tuesday.

That is the main use case - you go, tell the shop droid to load a new one into the boot and you are back up and running by Sat mid-day before the pile of dirty kid's clothes from [football | rugby | cycling | running | whatever other sport ] has filled half the kitchen.

The other primary use is minute shopping at LHR after realizing you have forgotten the kid's headphones (that is the only thing that is reasonably priced there and you really do not want to deal with plane rage after the rest of the plane has had enough listening to your sprog's choice of music or Angry birds for 3 hours).

Buying anything else though... You have to be an idiot - there is plenty of other places to get what you want, for less money and with a better spec.

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Kaspersky to 1337 haxors: take down our power grid. We dare you

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Re: Hacking a simulated power station

Ukraine. Apparently.

If their complaining from 2 months ago that Russians are hacking their power grid over the Internet is to be believed.

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Pains us to run an Apple article without the words 'fined', 'guilty' or 'on fire' in it, but here we are

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Re: Water to 30 meters, but what about SALT water??

First, the article is factually incorrect:

Samsung has long touted a similar degree of water resistance as a major selling point for its Galaxy line of smartphones,

Samsung is a relative newbie to the IPXX world. Panasonic, Sony, etc have been there for several years now and are still way ahead of both Apple and Samsung.

Second, even pools are not necessarily freshwater. I had a "jacuzzi pitstop" on my annual trip through Europe at a German spa. I was surprised to find the water twice as salty as the Mediterranean (at least). Apparently the mineral springs run through a rocksalt layer somewhere. I want to see it surviving that for more than a couple of minutes.

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St Jude sues short-selling MedSec over pacemaker 'hack' report

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Re: Lawsuit?

Not so fast.

If the exploit proves to be the real deal, well, I see nothing wrong in monetizing it THIS way. In fact it should be monetized THIS way because this is the ONLY way people are finally going to learn start paying attention.

This is especially so in the medical device area. There nobody gives a flying f*** about device security, so hitting the board and the infestors in the "financial cajoles" repeatedly is the only way to get their attention.

Is the exploit a real deal or not - that will be proven in court.

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Microsoft to slap Slack with Skype – reports

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Yuck

One proprietary DIY messaging protocol versus another.

While I am no great fan of XML, XMPP is at least a standard. Of sorts.

Yuck.

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UK will be 'cut off' from 'full intelligence picture' after Brexit – Europol strategy man

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Re: Okay, riddle me this

There are very different operational arrangement levels.

The "operational arrangement" with Macedonia did not even involve stolen car VINs at some point (not sure if it does now) resulting in one of the police heads (if not the minister of the interior or the prosecutor general himself - do not remember off the top of my head) being picked up at the border crossing with Bulgaria while driving a stolen BMW which he apparently bought legally from a local car dealership in Skopie.

The present level of cooperation with Russia is probably even less than that.

If the UK wants _THAT_ level of operational arrangement, well, that should not be a problem.

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Re: Yet more Brexit nonsense

Politicians represent interests.

The level of sharing between Europol and "Independent" UK is mostly a DPA matter.

_ALL_ Eu countries have some level of vested interest in "Independent" UK being deemed DPA-unsafe. The unsafer, the better (for them). Every notch of unsafeness is one more Datacenter and one more piece of business by a Eu company which is presently run in Slough or somewhere else in the UK being moved to Ireland, Scandinavia or Eastern Europe. It is the same as with other business. One less Nissan factory in Sunderland is one more Nissan factory in let's say Varna or Timishoara.

So, I do not quite see this opinion as a hidden agenda case. It is more of a realistic assessment.

After the initial dismay, Europe is now looking at the UK the way vultures are looking at a fresh roadkill. Quoting Ice age: "And it looks like there might be a fatality. I call the dark meat". That attitude does not quite facilitate any sharing any time soon.

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Data protection directive

Well, sharing some data will be outright illegal after that, at least until the DPA arrangement between Eu and UK is sorted out.

Considering the legislative intent of Teresa May as it stands, the likelihood of that one sorted out is even less than access to common market while introducing immigration controls.

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When you've paid the ransom but you don't get your data back

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I'd previously set up "Crypto Canary" (see https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/100368-cryptolocker-canary--detect-it-early?page=4

That one is ineffective as it looks for new files with given extensions.

You need the opposite - drop a file into several "folders of interest" and set a trigger on trying to delete it or overwrite it. Call it "DO_NOT_TOUCH_BOFH_AT_WORK.doc" if you wish. You do not even need it in every folder - it is a canary, having a couple of them on shared storage is more than sufficient.

With Samba or Windows 2010 you can lock out the user and machine doing it the moment you detect a write.

With other filesystems you are on your own and will need to track changes via a script and declare full shutdown and quarantine manually once it has been detected. In any case - you will have it detected in time, before the encrypted files have propagated into the backups and that is what matters.

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Re: Is it legal to pay this?

No different from kidnap for ransom pay-outs, and there's no law against them across most of the world

No law - sure. Now if you also explain me exactly how to get that past accounting as a business expense...

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Tesla driver dies after Model S hits tree

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Re: standard operating procedures

MIlk floats, mobility vehicles or even the death traps on wheels like G-Wiz are lead batteries. Most hybrids are NiMH.

It is only now that the newer vehicles have LiPo batteries and I am not surprised that Joe Average Fireman does not yet know how to deal with it.

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It's time for humanity to embrace SEX ROBOTS. For, uh, science, of course

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Re: The ROTM began long ago

Is that why Henry's have that painted smile on their faces?

Maybe. There was a case of a cleaner fired from one of the UK hospitals after caught on the job trying to shag it.

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Re: Dr Kate Devlin

Probably not 28,000 years but how common place were they? How did society view their use? Was such use even encouraged?

Depends on actual society. Europe before Christianity - common and in some societies in active use in various rituals. Just ask any scholar specializing in Early Middle Ages European history to explain to you in detail the Spring Harvest ritual of the Slavic tribes and the exact function of the wooden dick attached to the statue of Perun (the Slavic god of Lightning).

Similar rituals were in use in Norse tribes, amidst pre-Christian Germanic tribes, etc. The god differed, the ritual differed, the only constant was the dildo.

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NHS 'paperless roadmap': Fewer dead trees, more data control

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Meanwhile other countries have happily instituted paperless health record systems years ago.

That is because they usually have form of central identity database. One of the biggest problems of doing anything in the UK is that you do not have a reliable identity database and/or personal identifiers to which to link data. Each part of the state uses its own (NI, NHS number, etc).

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Meet Deliveroo's ‘bold and impactful’ new logo. No, really

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Re: K9

As indeed did I .My very next thought was "but it isn't April 1st."

Correct, but you need to show exactly what does the company think to all those delivery slaves which have shown utter disrespect for the workhouse owner by objecting to the pittance being paid while the owner(s) relax on their yachts parked along the promenade in the Antibes. It is such a pity that they do not understand what "sharing" really means when you are sharing with a Business 2.0 person.

So it is quite apt and quite on time. TWO FINGERS. That will please the society for the preservation of English traditions in gesture swearing.

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BA check-in system checks out: Staff flung back to cruel '90s world of paper

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Re: It's just resting...

My exact thought. Amadeus is butt ugly beyond belief and requires training to work with. It, however, is relatively reliable. What usually fails are various gateways built to interface to it.

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Re: Outsourcing = problems

At least this time it is weeks down the line, not years down the line. So in theory, all the culprits are still in the same managerial positions. In theory.

In practice, despite the company losing millions as a result of this wonderful idea, they will not be seen hanging on their suspenders out of the cargo hold on a 767 doing a short test flight around Heathrow. Though they should.

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QANTAS' air safety spiel warns not to try finding lost phones

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Re: The ultimate iPhone destruction video waiting to be made?

In my experience they score so low they have to add an extra piece of paper

You have not seen Wizzair. I suggest you introduce yourself to the lovely experience.

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EU will force telcos to offer 90 days of 'roam like home' contracts

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Re: 'Improvement' gives poorer service

Perhaps just get a SIP number in the country of your choice

Will not work for 2FA and other apps which need SMS. I clock less than a minute or two on roaming voice on my Eastern European phone per year, however without it being on roaming ~10 months a year I cannot pay the utility bills and other expenses I incur there (utility bills, etc for my summer house).

It is either a single market or not. So I do not quite see the justification for this 90 days malarkey.

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