* Posts by Voland's right hand

1593 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Microsoft's Surface Hub mega-slab DELAYED 'cause you demanded it

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Kudos to Microsoft

That is normal for small series and pilot manufacturing. You always do that withing driving distance from the office. However, that is what it says on the tin - small series.

I am not surprised they have to rejig the process after hitting significant levels of demand.

What I am surprised is that their marketing and forecasting is so bad. Are they so daft that they could not compare the existing HD teleconferencing to what they are making and estimate that the demand will be off the scale.

4
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

The mother of all video-conferencing systems

For a system like this it is actually very keenly priced. It is cheaper than some competitive systems from other usual suspects that are just HD video-conferencing without any of the collaboration aspects.

It also has a fairly wide (even if it is just Microsoft) interop base and is extensible (very rare for a video conf system). If Microsoft starts shipping these in volume the usual collab suspects will suffer quite badly.

5
2

Mathematician: SUNSPOT DROUGHT will mean mini ICE AGE from 2030

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: This good be good news or bad news.....

Actually there is no ammo - at least for Europe.

Both when modeled produce the same result for Europe - climate goes more continental. Colder winters, hotter (albeit shorter) and drier summers. Up to 10-15 degrees colder and up to 5-10 degrees hotter respectively.

So we are looking not at the Maunder minimum but one of its predecessors like the turn-of the first millenium small ice age. If historical references are to be believed the Black Sea regularly froze up to several hundred kilometers from the shore. The Northern Adriatic, bay of Venice, bay of Marseilles and Mare Marmaris froze too. North Sea and Baltic was regularly frozen too.

There is a reason why all the Vikings who could, packed their stuff in a boat and went to conquer Normandy, the Slavic tribes along the Dnepr (to form what is today's Russia) with some of them ending up as far as the Mediterranean. Regardless of will, on average, the Earth warm up or chill down we will observe that reason again in Europe and it ain't going to be pretty.

By the way, Texas, New Mexico, etc got many times more rainfall in places during the same period (at the expense of Mexico proper which saw drought). I would suggest to any denier to reconsider and buy an amphibious vehicle or a boat about now.

6
13

Java jockeys join Flash fans in the 0-day exploit club

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Writing from a dull place

Boring - no. Useful - not so sure.

Some of us have to develop in java and attend conference calls via Webex.

Though I have both restrained in their respective straightjackets, err... lxc containers which are used only for their specific purpose.

6
0

China makes internet shut-downs official with new security law

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

What makes you think

What makes you think that any major western democracy will have any qualms to shutdown access to let's say Facebook, Twitter or messaging services in the case of major social unrest or a major ongoing attack of let's say "Charlie Hebdo x 100" type?

None of these are utilities and none of them have any legal protection which ensures that they should be kept up and running in an emergency.

The police does not even need a court order to do that - they have enough powers under various existing pre-Internet era legislation to do that. Sure, they will be spending the next 2 years in court (and may need a retroactive law to allow this explicitly), but there is nothing preventing them from doing it under various Churchil/Petaine age regulations invented originally for the phone network around WW2. Those are still valid by the way.

3
0

On yer bike: Hammerhead satnav for cyclists – just don't look down

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: add audio-comments/updates/street names

So you do not hear any of the cars approaching. Fantastic. The only thing I hate (as a driver which also cycles in excess of 1K miles a year in traffic) more than joggers with headphones on is cyclists with headphones on.

11
8

Nissan Juke Nismo RS: Family hot-hatch SUV that looks a bit like Darth Vader's hat

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: What about the increasingly vertical frontal aspect

The "aggressive" cars have about a foot (if not more) of crumple space behind the radiator grille and a much thinner than you would expect bonnet which is designed to "crumple fold".

It appeared ~ 1998 with if memory serves me right the Daihatsu Sirion MK1 going off the scale on the Eu pedestrian safety tests. As a result they changed the rating method (so results prior to that are not comparable). By 2002~ ish all cars used similar design (I am not saying copied as it most likely was parallel development). The only more recent addition to the design is the extension of the plastic "pedestrian protection" portion all the way to the front wheels on most cars.

This is not present on most commercials. The bonnet of Transit van is still as thick as it was 10+ years ago. The crumple space is missing too.

0
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

I was going to say the same

I was going to say the same. Some of us have to drive on crap country roads and take equipment to customers and conferences.

If I want a metrosexual car review I can read mainstay press.

Disclosure No 1: I have driven a juke as a rental. While somewhat dysfunctional in terms of internal arrangement it is OK as a car. At Meah level... kind of OK.

Disclosure No 2: I drive a 2007 Isuzu Rodeo Denver crew cab (mostly pristine, mods are only on the electronic side - 5V circuit, etc). It will be taking some kit for a demo to a conference this week. This time it is nothing major in terms of size, but not something you can fit into a juke together with your luggage. It has in the past taken kit to places which will simply destroy a Juke by loading it (your average half-rack router nowdays usually exceeds the rear axle loading on most cars).

1
0

Oxford Uni unearths 800-year-old document to seize domain names

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: I read it as oxfordcollegegirl.com

Can we have a Taylor Swift icon?

4
0

Canadian dirtbag jailed for SWAT'ing, doxing women gamers

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: @Francis Boyle - What a difference...

As for this little human residue I would just chain him somewhere in the basement of his parents

This will not fix him. Neither will prison - there he will get contacts which will feed his obsessions getting computer services in return.

The solution here should have been: "Here is an axe lad, here are some warm shoes and mittens, there are trees that need cutting somewhere around the border of Alberta and Northern territories. We will discuss if you can have computer access again after you have done that for three years. Off ya go."

27
0

China wants to build a 200km-long undersea tunnel to America

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: The Chinese and Russians are going to build it??

The Russians built three railways across Siberia over the last century and a half. The third one is not on the map - it cuts over todays' Mongolia, North Eastern China to Korea. It was built by Russians around the turn of the century and the land around it leased from countries where it passed. That arrangement did not quite last through the wars and revolutions. So as far as doing it and going wrong - they can and there is little to go wrong.

Problem is elsewhere - what is the business case?

There is definitely no business case in end-to-end traffic. Containers are cheaper to moved by ships and if the passenger trade ever gets to sizes which overload completely the current passenger capacity it will be cheaper to build passenger versions of the monster than build a railway. Beriev actually has long range screen effect versions of both Be-200 and A42PE. So do the Chinese for their equivalent if satellite photos are to be believed so that is not far off.

There is no business case for the usual railway "connect many places" either. What is it going to serve on the way? The seals and polar foxes in the Ohotsk sea? Last time I checked they do not need the latest Foxconn products.

12
0

Ford's 400,000-car recall could be the tip of an auto security iceberg

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: The more of this I read

@chris 17

It is not just the update. The update is the least of the issues with car-centric instead of user-centric connectivity. By the way, even joe average user is so trained on updates nowdays that he/she will actually usually press yes. Phones finally made sure of that.

The update being the least of the issues.

Scenario 1. The Eu idiocy for emergency calling in accidents driven by car manufacturers which are scared sh*tless from losing control - worthless. Emergency services get a message and so what? Do they know the number of occupants? Do they know their identities? Allergies? Blood groups? Organ groups? F** no. Useful? I doubt it.

Scenario 2. Car requests from each and every phone in the car it can pair with to send an emergency message in a crash. Let's suppose that the driver has an anaphilaxis level allergy (I do) and the passenger who has had one blood transfusion too many in the past cannot take blood which does not match in secondary or even tertiary (M, K, etc) groups (example - my mom). That _WILL_ be useful if transmitted as well. World of difference between the usability of either for emergency services.

So what do we get? The first one - because the car manufacturers marketing would rather let people die instead of making anything related to the car not car-centric.

1
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: The more of this I read

I would MUCH rather have my car NOT connected, and secure,

Wrong logic. This means that a major issue with the car is not fixed until you understand about it and take it to the dealer.

An example is BMW taking the thoroughly and fully cretinous decision of allowing key programming via EBD2 while the alarm is in active state. So anyone with a tool which costs 30$ can steal a car which costs 60k. So let's imagine a hypothetical situation similar to a zero day exploit where you are driving a car which is vulnerable somewhere out in the sticks in the deepest darkest Eastern Europe/Latin America/South East Asia (scratch the ones that do not fit). Do you want the next villager down the road to appropriate your car (or your car to crash, stop just because it feels like it, etc) or you are happy to have the firmware uploaded?

What I am not happy with though is the car doing it by _ITSELF_.

This is what is massively opened for abuse including tracking users, updating at the wrong time, etc. What I would want is the car to ask my phone nicely via an app on my phone if I agree that a particular action is appropriate at this particular moment. Ditto for firmware updates, recall alerts, servicing - everything.

The problem is that the car manufacturers will never ever agree to that. They are obsessed with the car doing everything and never ever relinquishing the control. An example of this obsession is the next Eu safety reg which instead of mandating car pairing and car initiated emergency calls in case of a crash has gone for sticking a GSM SIM (with all the opportunities for abuse coming with this) into the car itself.

2
3
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

That is the least of your problems

Quality assurance needs to be excellent too; imagine a duff update going out that bricks your vehicle or, worse, causes safety issues.

That is the "good case". Now imagine an update which screws up the update system in addition to any of those so you cannot fix it without re-flashing the control computer(s).

6
0

Ditch crappy landlines and start reading Twitter, 999 call centres told

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Dear children...

You forgot

0) Do not try to take a selfie with the fire

5
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Fantastic

So for an emergency response we are now going to rely on a company with ZERO European presence, not compliant to Eu laws and in no way required to provide even a modicum of resiliency for cases of major emergency.

Whataboy. How much whalesong did they consume before suggesting this?

11
0

Decision time: Uninstall Adobe Flash or install yet another critical patch

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Won't somebody think of the children?

That shall be all children sites and all educational sites with BBC proudly leading the pack.

2
0

HTC in crisis: How did it get to this point? How did it get this bad?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Hehe

HTC, quite simple, stop your phones from looking like crap after a few months of ownership, do some water and dust proofing, try and innovate on battery life, sort the God awful camera, bring back external storage...

Err... That is called Sony. That ship has already sailed and there are no tickets available. The range starts from right above landfill (E series) through midrange with M and SP and to Z for premium. What you wrote describes exactly any one of them (even the M and E). Including the battery life optimizations by the way (probably the most aggressive on the market).

So just doing this will not be enough, it will have to innovate on top of that.

4
0

'Real' vampires reluctant to 'come out of the coffin' to social workers – barmy prof

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Er, no, you're NOT a vampire @ Volands right hand

Source - Russian folklore. Undead things (Leshie, nezhit', etc) do not get up if you stake them with an aspen stake. (Осина in Russian).

Probably one of the reasons vampire stuff never got particular popular in their folklore.

1
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Holmes

Re: Er, no, you're NOT a vampire

Stake, life, unlife? Was the stake aspen as commanded by tradition or you went for a poor pine substitute? Curious minds want to know you know...

3
0

Black and Latina boffins regularly mistaken for janitors, study finds

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

60%? Where is it so people can apply there

60% ? That would be stellar for a public company in the UK. More like 30% and if you get more than said 30% you will be actively discriminated against (so much for the labour code prohibiting salary discrimination).

0
0

Osbo PRINTS first Tory budget in 19 years with his BARE HANDS

Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Trollface

Re: In the spirit of George Orwell, lets rename IDS's role as

can say I don't recall any 'ass' in Animal Farm.

Err... I think you ought to have a reading problem if you read The Animal Farm and do not remember Benjamin the Donkey. Unless you are one of Napoleon followers.

By correctly assigning the correct label to IDS you are showing that you are capable of putting Benjamin's skin on too so I am assuming that as highly unlikely.

Signed... Another donkey and one proud of being one (sorry, appropriate icon missing, so using the troll).

P.S. As far as "stopping being one" - having a full understanding what Napoleon and his followers are doing and how they are changing the commandments is not very good for you.

0
1
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: In the spirit of George Orwell, lets rename IDS's role as

Stop being a ass. In the George Orwell sense too. As in Animal Farm.

0
5

Furor rages over ICANN and Facebook's bid to publish home addresses of website owners

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Why Facebook?

Push more small businesses to use F***book instead of their own website.

0
1

Evil NSA runs on saintly Linux, Apache, MySQL

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

No need for that

Well, I do not know their actual design, but if they are doing what I used to do (and still do on my own network with autofs) there will be no need for that. There will be _ANOTHER_ Snowden (TM) incident anyway.

Autofs + NFS is great to stich space on worker nodes into a single filesystem view. You have node A, B, C.... Each has /exports/work-space as working area. NFS+autofs makes /var/autofs/workspace/A point to node A, B to node B and so on and you can manage that dynamically as you add and replace nodes via ldap, nis or even hook it up directly into your workload system via an executable map. The kernel unmounts workspaces that are not being used after 5 mins of inactivity so you do not get any stale mounts.

The applications can now be unaware of actual data location - it all looks and works like magic and you get an enormous cluster which is significantly FASTER than any cluster filesystem for a large range of use cases. There are some limitations like you have to do HA in underlying RAID, but if you know what you are doing you can scale to huge sizes without cluster and OO store investment.

There is a fly in the ointment - it is nearly impossible to do ACL control of who mounts what. Some data may be protected via permissions and NFSv4 ACLs, but not a lot. So someone with access to one node can lift all of the data over time, copy it and bugger off to Sheremetevo. This is where true cluster and OO filesystems are a better fit because they may incorporate object audit trail and a node that is reading sequentially all of the data will show up immediately.

7
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Childcatcher

They have sysadmins who knows autofs

Now that is commendable. I approve. It allows you to build filesystem distribution out of thin air on any odd commodity box. The problem is - it is "old school" sysadmin tool. The whippersnappers have no clue what it is and how to use it.

Last time I interviewed candidate sysadmins out of 87 (or was it 92?) CV submitted by UK recruiters for a Linux sysadmin position the number of people who have heard of it was a nice round ZERO.

It is a pity it does not see the attention it deserves (for that exact reason) in Linux lately. It still works, but various corner cases (containers, phys filesystems, etc) are broken.

4
3

Mars rover Opportunity shuns dodgy flash chips, relies on RAM

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Those panels are asking for "wash me"

I am surprised that the martians have not scribbled "wash me" in martian on the panels.

17
0

US senate committee wants Twitter, Facebook to report 'terrorist' posts

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Another idiotic law

Well...

If we assume that the background information is correct and this involves only companies which already monitor user posts, this is yet another grand idiocy creating a new law to cover what is already covered by existing law.

Knowingly not reporting a crime is a criminal offence or to be more exact a whole raft of them. This does not need any laws, it needs enforcing current ones (which actually have criminal penalties for failing to report).

0
1

Behold the mighty Swiss SPACE JUNK NOSHER PODULE

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Not so sure

The long lived space junk is from retired observation/spy sats and retired geostationaries. These are too high to experience significant drag and will remain there for ages. They are big so the net approach does not make sense. Similarly, nudging them is not going to push them out of the way. You need to attach and push it for quite a while to deorbit it.

Everything else we launch is in relatively low orbit and will end up reentering within a few decades anyway.

Also, trying to get anywhere near a retired spy sat (even with the intent to clean them) may earn you a set AEGIS crosshairs locked onto your cleaner satellite.

0
0

Linux on the desktop is so hot there's now a fight over it

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

+1

Linux on the "commoner's" desktop is not likely to happen. The PC industry has tied its fate to Microsoft and it is even less likely to try something stupid in lean times like this.

The target markets in the announcements are quite descriptive - these are all people who can afford something that fits their very specific needs and see Clippy (and its more voluptuous Cortana incarnation) as a parasite which gets in the way.

Disclaimer - the last Windows desktop in the house was wiped in 1997 and I presently have 5 (a personal per head + 1 shared) Linux desktops, 4 Linux laptops, 3 Linux STBs and 2 RPi based controllers. All of that is running Debian. Based on running that Linux is fit for purpose to be a desktop for Joe Average User 99% of the time.

The problem is not in fitness for purpose. The problem is that the PC industry will not accept it. It has become dependent on the upgrade cycle brought by MSFT OS releases and even the abject failure of the last 3 releases to bring new PC requirements is not likely to wean it off this dependency.

9
2

7/7 memories: I was on a helpdesk that day and one of my users died

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: When being made redudant turned into a positive...

At least you were dialing from home.

I had an interview that day and they stopped the trains right before I got on the one to Kings'X. So I drove all the way to the other side of London (and made it) instead. I have never seen so many Chelsea tractors on their roof. The older RangeRovers and Discoveries are extremely unforgiving to trying to dial without a handsfree while way above the speed limit (it was mostly big 4x4 - I did not notice any overturned "commoner'"s cars)

I counted 10+ on my way that day (one motorway and a piece of M25). If we extrapolate that number to all motorways leading into London the overall casualty number will probably be significantly higher than the official one.

3
0

AMD looks at sinking sales, gulps: It's worse than we thought

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Try to stop relying on Microsoft

Not relying on Microsoft == certain death for a PC component manufacturer. Anyone who tried this switched back or did not live long.

Microsoft system reqs have been dropping since Vista. So it is not particularly surprising that the PC industry is suffering. The "upgrade every 2-3 years" demand cycle created by the ever growing resource hog that was Windows 95-98-Me-2000-Xp-Vista train is just not there any more.

Even games find it hard to continue pushing the hardware to new horizons. There is very little new hardware can add in terms of visual reality beyond what has been achieved already. We are clearly in diminishing returns territory here. While AI can be (it is not today) an even bigger CPU hog making the user shell out extra dosh for a more bastardly computer opponent is a questionable proposition. The user will prefer to shoot at other users with a similar level online instead.

Even the developing world is no longer a market driver. Whoever wanted to have a PC there got one. The rest may never purchase one and go straight to "consumption" mode on a tablet or phone.

So any PC component manufacturer which pretends that there will be growth in the future is not sharing whatever their marketing team has been smoking. PC is a legacy business now and should aim for what it can deliver - steady slowly declining or "business as usual" revenue stream with a steady profit margin. From there on the infestors can take it or leave it - you cannot get growth where there are no conditions for growth to be found.

3
0

Look! Up in the sky! Five Brit satellites on one Indian rocket!

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

The natural result of abandoning a space program

The natural result of abandoning a space program is that you get a country which you supply with humanitarian aid to sort out things like basic sanitation to launch stuff for you.

If shame could be mentioned somewhere within the same sentence with the words "Westminster" and "politician" this would have made for a nice "commemoration plaque" of national shame. Unfortunately, those 3 words do not quite go together. There is an odd one out. Usually the "shame" one.

7
3

WHY did NASA probe go suddenly SILENT - JUST as it was about to send pics of remote ice-world?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Repair job

You never know, there are a couple of bandit garages on the last junction of the galactic bypass before Alpha Centauri. They are supposed to be cheap - they service vogons and making a prostetnic pay is rather difficult.

2
0

Google's Cardboard cutout VR headgear given away GRATIS by OnePlus ... SELLS OUT

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

This would explain some of the price differentials

Well, a decent set of lenses which does not introduce horrible chromatic aberration would cost at least 30-40 £. That would explain some of the price differences.

1
0

Kobo Glo HD vs Amazon Kindle Paperwhite: Which one's best?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Kobo keeps you free

There is an excellent script that comes with Calibre which reformats Gutenberg (and other free ebook sources) content into Kindle format. I have loaded quite a few books on mine using this method.

8
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

The war is not being waged on the device

The device is a proxy - the real war is in the backend and is a war Amazon has won. Though if the war was being a device-only it would have won too. The software (and hardware quality is higher).

Our household started with both in the days of the first kobos sold in the UK (the ones resold by WHSmith) and the first kindle (the one with the keyboard). We kept that for a while, but nowdays I am actually inclined to even re-buy books I actually "own" on Kobo to get them on the kindle.

A recap after 4 years:

1. The 3 kobos we have had over the years are dead and buried now.

1.1 Flimsy USB connectors. I re-soldered or hacked 2.5mm plugs instead of them as they were broken, but all in all nowhere near Amazon old kindle (the newer ones are worse) build quality.

1.2. Seriously buggy software which breaks and cannot be recovered without a windows PC. After resetting it for the 8th? or 9th time I got sick of it and assigned it to the scrapheap. A device that needs a service laptop to carry just to fix it is not a device fit for purpose.

2. Amazon has managed to convince quite a few publishers that did not give Kobo international rights (especially kids and teenage books) to sell e-book version in Europe.

3. The Kindle bought at the same time as the first Kobo is still alive and in use. It is joined by a kindle app on every android device in the house and a new (though much flimsier) little 6 inch brother.

Check, Check, Mate. No more kobo in this house.

3
4

Will rising CO2 damage the world's oceans? NOT SO MUCH – new boffinry

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Not news?

Not quite correct in either case.

Ca and Si (for diatomic plankton) as well as microelements is the actual limiting factor to plankton formation, not CO2. The level of CO2 in the tropics and let's say off Alaska in spring is about the same. However, the tropical ocean remains crystal clear, mostly devoid of plankton compared to a blooming ocean in the temperate and polar regions. The latter simply have higher mineral contents due to the vagaries of seasonal circulation and/or more stuff being brought up from the deep by winter storms.

Depending on how much microelements and Ca+Si you add to your plankton soup you can get any result you like starting from "whoa this is good" and ending up with "certain doom".

1
0

German army fights underground Nazi war machine hidden in Kiel pensioner's cellar

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Stalin and co just made folk vanish

Stalin also documented it. The big ERASURE of the tracks is Chrushov's job.

If you pick the 1952 edition of the World map printed in any Warsaw pact state you will notice an interesting anomaly - there are 16 Soviet republics, not 15. Stalin had no qualms to put his Super-Getto on the map. There is a 16th republic - the Jewish Soviet Republic which is beyond Kazahstan on the Chinese border. You can even see why too - the map shows rare earth, etc being mined in the area (what is missing is the Uranium mines and supporting industry, but that is an expected "detail").

If you pick the 1956 edition (I have both) that is missing. NEVER EVER HAPPEND Товарищ. Понятно? Chrushov and Co disappeared it from history completely (along with quite a few other things).

5
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Indeed

Sounds like the nuthead 2.5 miles down the road (next village) from me who has a Churchill tank parked in his yard. AFAIK nobody is bothering him. He is not paying road tax on it and as far as I know it does not have a valid MOT and insurance :)

Nobody bothers other nutheads either. I nearly crashed into a wall of an old house in the Czech republic last year. I was driving peacefully down the road and from behind the bend came out a WW2 Willis with a twin Erlicon 50 cal mounted in the boot barrels pointing straight at me (the incoming traffic). I nearly lost control there and then.

My granddad used to own a WW2 BMW bicycle with a sidecar (it was supposed to be mine when I grow up, but my older cousin destroyed it by smashing in it). In full SS regalia with markings, nazi crosses, etc (AFAIK it was abandoned after a mechanical problem by the guys assigned to arrest him and execute him on the spot in 1944 - two weeks before the country was liberated). The only thing the milicia (on the other side of the iron curtain) made him do was to remove the machine gun and hand it in.

And so on. They should just leave the history buff alone. He is harmless.

31
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Pity it wasn't a French tank

Really? Does not sound like scarper to me: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Abbeville

Their performance in the first gulf war does not sound like scarper either. In fact if memory serves me right they were the _ONLY_ ones to engage Iraqi armour directly armour to armour within cannon range and they steamrolled over it by all means. Compared to them yanks just drove down a shooting alley opened for them by A10s without ever firing a shot in anger.

29
9

Hold my vodka, comrade – I got this: Ruskies blast supplies to the ISS

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Why are you concerned or surprised

Norhing surprsing. Cold war is back by all means. We will see and hear even less as we go along.

0
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Bring incense!

Ok, who is the downvoting bastard!

The ghost of Werner von Braun.

8
0

Boffin: Will I soon be able to CLONE a WOOLLY MAMMOTH? YES. Should I? Hell NO

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Let 'em loose in Russia

Good - that depends on the definition.

Providing a viable meat and dairy producing animal for the far North of Russia, Finland, Norway, Canada and USA - that sounds good as an idea. However, that begs the question - why not achieve the same using Caribou?

3
1

What's black, sticky, and has just 8GB of storage?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

That is half of the story

Linux also does not have a corporation behind it which has been burned once by a class action suit (the early Intel onboard IGP case). That is the reason why MSFT is quite strict as far as the minimum spec nowdays.

Windows can run on lower spec machines than that (albeit not anywhere near as low as Linux). It is MSFT which is refusing to endorse such low spec machines for end-user shipment. You cannot get discounted OEM licenses and you cannot sticker the machine with the precious MSFT stickers if it does not pass their min spec tests.

3
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Thin clients on wifi

Used to, but not any more. People requirements have changed, applications requirements have changed too.

I have a big box of retired thin clients and the exec summary from using libreoffice and el-reg without the adverts in firefox over X as a test is:

* 100Mbit and 600-800MHz 32bit in-order CPU (Crusoe, early Via Eden): barely usable. User experience is awful, you can see it redrawing, it stalls, etc.

* 1Gbit and single power 1GHz low power Athlon: works. Just about. CPU load is regularly past 50%.

* 1Gbit and dual core 1GHz Via (recent HP thin client models): works perfectly, but why? You might as well stick some flash into it and run things locally with the user data over NFS. That's what I did and it is now "happily ever after"

* X terminal thin client on wifi is a complete oxymoron. I tried to run that in the past several times both with and without OpenVPN (for compression purposes - it actually improves things quite a bit). The most recent one was using Samsung chromebook. Same story - more flash (hacking a 64 SD card into it permanently), apps locally, data in the network and "happily ever after".

There is absolutely no reason whatsoever to run "Terminal" type thin clients any more for performance/cost reasons. The sole reason is management. Even in that case it makes more sense to run the applications locally on the stupidly overpowered recent CPUs and have only the data in the network.

Do we like it or not this is a reality - VDI is dead.

0
5

Original LIZARD JESUS is found in Wyoming

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

It it me or it looks more like an imperial fleet tecnical staff...

Like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMXbodUzeR8

Around 0:20

0
0

Apple's Swift creeps up dev language survey – but it's bad news for VB

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Stack Overflow use introduces a big bias

Languages which make your head hurt and have sub-par online documentation will be significantly ahead of stuff that "just works".

Github will have similar (albeit less pronounced bias) - stuff that is buggy or in need of constant redesign and refactoring because of language choice (and/or lack of understanding of how to use the language due to bad documentation) will also have significant bias - commits will be posted by the hundreds if not thousands instead of just getting it to work out of the box.

7
0

Rosetta spots potholes IN SPAAACE: Someone call the galactic council

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Did someone do the math?

the surface falls in and creates a sinkhole In that gravity? It is more likely that it is being blown out to space by the escaping gases (just gently, not violently) and possibly resettling somewhere else around the comet.

0
2

Forums