* Posts by Voland's right hand

2342 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Star Wars Battlefront: Is this the shooter you’re looking for?

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Re: Move along

Concur.

I am not interested in yet another FPS. Star wars games have provided some of the greatest FPSC (First Person Space Combat) experiences to date. It is sad to see a regression on this one, they could have (at least) implemented the basic controls from the original X/B-Wing and Tie Fighter. I will happily pay for a revival of those. FPS? No thanks, there is a gazillion of those around.

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Pentagon gets green light for WAR ... of web propaganda against IS

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Re: Back to the Future

I do not.

The problem is that true disinformation against an adversary via public media sources is becoming extremely difficult. It has become too easy to find alternative news sources and cross-reference. It has become very easy to uncover and expose trolls, shills and people who have vested interest in a particular viewpoint.

So disinformation nowdays works _ONLY_ against your own population. It no longer works against your adversaries. All you need is to watch Faux News for 5 minutes to see a glaring example of this.

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Seriously, if you're getting your information about current affairs from YouTube,

Seriously, if you're getting your information about current affairs from YouTube,

Some of us are not.

1. Exactly who was in control of the petrol wells bombed by Russians (in order to have their jets taken out) two weeks ago is all over the news across half of Europe. The reports include actual names and, so far, indirect proof based on their wealth graphs over the time of the conflict. I have seen/heard it on two different stations in two different countries so far (sometimes having a 80cm SAT dish pointed somewhere else from BSkyB in the UK comes in handy).

Considering the resources and the money a very pissed off Russia has put to bear on this one, it will be only a matter of time until the actual documents are leaked and there is little reason to expect that the names announced so far will be exonerated. Similarly, because of the names and Bns involved Obama and the French asking the Russians to calm down is like as pissing up-wind in a hurricane.

2. It is not on the news in the UK because of UK libel law - the evidence so far is circumstantial - people getting ~Bn wealth in under 5 years. No comment on Faux news and other USA outlets. They just tow the line.

3. As long as the names and numbers are not announced on the local news all we can do is order more popcorn. Once they are, there will be some questions to my MP to ask in the Parliament on exactly why we are offering military support and to whom. Again - no names, UK libel law, go and dig them out yourself from continental news sources.

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Galileo, Galileo, Galileo good two go

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Re: Well...

Why just nuclear?

That is the general thought in at least some of the consumers. See the range:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOM_%28missile%29

Missile technology non-proliferation my a***.

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Mega Microsoft dev tools update includes Clang codegen for Windows

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Re: Bloat?

That does not look like an intestinal problem. That looks like the effort you put when you unscrew that imaginary head you are holding off the shoulders of the subject which carries it.

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IETF standards are 'band-aids on top of band-aids' says SDN veteran

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Re: So how many RFCs did he participate in?

Cough, cough, we probably have a different definition of grandee, so let's look at some http://www.arkko.com/tools/rfcstats/authactdistr.html

I cannot think of a person I know personally who would qualify, is not in the list and is above the 15 RFC mark.

They all work on vendor specific products too. With the few exemptions that are at chief architect or thereabouts rank in a Tier one SP.

So it looks like we probably have a different definition of grandee - mine is very simple - a person who has come up with at least _ONE_ protocol, design or feature and its implementation which is in _UBIQUITOUS_ _PRODUCTION_ use today.

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So how many RFCs did he participate in?

So how many actual IETF RFCs did he participate in to claim omnipotence and omniscience? Easy to look up.

Sure, the IETF has had quite a few issues in the recent years and most of them can be traced to the specific standardization policy of one particular vendor who has actively sabotaged standard development in all standards bodies (not just the IETF). Same as other standards bodies the IETF has failed to mitigate for that - initially out of political correctness, with other reasons coming into play later on.

As far as IETF having to do band-aids, well, sorry, it is the reality when the key protocol in your network is 24 years old, the key resource on which it depends is exhausted worldwide and nobody is bothering to move to the replacement.

From that perspective it is especially grand to listen to an explanation on how to do things by someone who is so incompetent that they did not account for IPv6 in their 1.0 spec - there is no v6 support in Openflow prior to 1.3. So Openflow as released was not just a bandaid it was the mother of all band-aids. It was bandaided further after that by bolting in some v6 and by adding OXM match extensions.

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Report: VW execs 'knew' about fuel economy issues last year

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Re: Off t' Chippie

always smells like a mobile chippy but seems to go okay.

You cannot do it with newer diesels. An old diseasel from 20+ years ago will run on anything. You may need a fuel tank pre-heater in colder weather as well as to insulate the fuel pipework under the body.

The new ones - not so much. The injectors can be clogged up very easily resulting in the ECU going nuts and feeding wrong amounts of fuel to a grand total of a very nice engine repair bill.

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Re: I drove the Polo Blue Slumber

did not have to carry all the extra crap that's supposed to protect your a

Err - solid three stars on all tests on EuroNcap if memory serves me right so that model already carried a lot of what is the norm today in terms of vehicle body protection. Not all, but a lot.

The 1993 16 valve 4 cyl vvty 1.0l is also a not that far off from nowdays in terms of emissions. It achieves ~ 47mpg/150g CO2 combined without start/stop.

So to be blunt - the Polo Blue Motion is an example of marketing and branding driven development. It would have never left the assembly line in the days when VW did not have a brand development director equal in rank to head of engineering and on the board.

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I drove the Polo Blue Slumber

I drove that POS as a rental last year. It was the most miserably underpowered and worst performing piece of junk I have ever driven. To put things into perspective - a 1.1l 1997 Vintage Micra would have felt like a Tornado jet by comparison. It should have been called Blue Slumber as it was clearly refusing to MOVE in traffic (Someone in VW needs to understand that MOVEMENT is something you apparently need to be called Motion).

The dash indicator was constantly grumbling that I have to shift into higher gear despite it refusing to accelerate even with the pedal into the floor. It had its mirrors sacrificed on the altar of aerodynamics to the point where each lane change needed a prayer to Virgin Mary before commencing the maneuver. All in all - a total POS. I was so happy to chuck the keys back on the Avis counter at the airport that I ended up forgetting my neck pillow on the rear seat so I could not sleep on the flight back.

All in all, I am not surprised in the slightest that the numbers were hideous in real life - if you have to floor the accelerator _AND_ downshift for nearly any maneuver, that will inevitably show up in a real life fuel consumption.

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Australian test finds robot essay assessors on par with human teachers

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Who told you that teaching is well educated middle class

It was. Like 50 years ago. It has been anything but middle class in the UK for a few decades now and we are starting to consume the consequences.

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Who owns space? Looking at the US asteroid-mining act

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Re: Home Delivery

The one that isn't in a smouldering crater?

That may be even more interesting than you think.

Second law of Newton is a b***. If you start mounting an en engine on every package the economic case for any bulk goods from orbit to Earth disappears in a jiffie. Even a tug is likely to be too expensive. So you have to calculate the whole thing for slinging the packages out of a "slingshot" launch catapult and only adjust the package final trajectory during reentry.

That ends up in quite an interesting orbital mechanics problem as launching every package from a rather large (several km at least) asteroid in Earth orbit will push that asteroid out of its parking position. The difference between a crater made by a small 1-2 tons delivery package and the crater done by an asteroid multiple km in size is quite substantial. Underwriting _THAT_ risk will be the really interesting part.

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Re: No problem for a long time to come

Parachutes from 100km up I suppose, but that's not very accurate.

Read Volume 2 of NIght's Dawn, "The Neutronium Alchemist". It is the only place I have seen so far which describes a technically achievable and economically feasible method to ship metal and other crude commodities from orbit to earth. It also describes what else can you use it for.

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Re: No problem for a long time to come

Mining is not that bad (if you can get nuclear power into orbit). If you do not have a BIG power source it becomes pointless.

The difficulty is the delivery of the mined product. There is very little difference between the tech needed to hit an opponent with a E.L.E and the tech to launch a refined slab of metal foam to a suitable sea landing area so it can be towed and smelted. In fact they are pretty much the same.

No Earth government will tolerate having the biggest sling every invented in somebody's else hands.

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Re: Manifest Destiny

Those space colonies sure will pledge alliagnce to the bald eagle in the long run, will they

Depends on the bald eagle taxing their tea.

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Re: Well...

Ah... I've just spotted a flaw in my statement.

Exactly. We have started wars for much less than that.

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Sysadmin's former boss claims five years FREE support or off to court

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This does not happen just to sysadmin

When I left my last job going to a competitor, the employer went as far as ordering me to turn off all equipment (I work from home) and banning me from the company premises until my notice ends. I did not even have the means of communication to download my latest payslips and PXX certificates as these were available only via electronic means and only from the company Oracle Financials. I could not even go to the office to hand-in my badge and company equipment - it had to be handed to another employee which had to come to my home.

So, after manifesting such rabid paranoia, I did not expect them to come calling especially regarding architecture and code (stuff clearly within the remit of anti-compete clauses). Well, they did - they ended up pestering me repeatedly including once at 7pm on a Sunday night regarding how stuff works and why it is architected this way despite it all being described in detail in code + changelogs, whitepapers and presentations over the years. I ended up having to tell them off and threaten using my current non-compete + lawyers.

Just to put things into perspective - we are not talking about a mom and pop-shop here. We are talking about a high tech multinational with > 100Billion USD capitalization.

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Amazon's new drones powered by Jeremy Clarkson's sarcasm

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Re: That's a big drone

Most people outside the USA will not have a suitable landing space. In addition to the usual "it is larger" vs "it is smaller" there are significant differences to suburban planning.

Your average UK (and most of Europe for that matter) suburbia is lines of identical hoy-polloy holding boxes and a maze of fences. You simply cannot find a place to land safely anything that big anywhere in UK or Western European suburbia in the areas built before the 1930-es or after 1970-es (mansion owners excluded). In the UK only the short inter-war and early post-WW2-war period before the hoy-polloy control (sorry, Urban Planning) act has garden plots of sufficient size to accommodate a landing spot. The rest of Europe has significantly smaller suburbia to start with and it is similarly constrained by planning regs from the start ( late 60-es).

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Telegram Messenger delivers candygrams to stalkers

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Re: Who Wrote This?

Nope. It sounds like an IM app with encryption. All IM apps do a change status on going to/from foreground or shortly thereafter. They also do it to all contacts.

Telegram makes things slightly easier by being a predominantly mobile app so the correlation between foreground and talking is significantly higher. Otherwise, however, it is no different from gtalk, the f***book messenger, etc with OTR2.

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Meet ARM1, grandfather of today's mobe, tablet CPUs – watch it crunch code live in a browser

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Variable record format

Hehe... Blast from the past - full OS level record management in file IO. The app developer had no clue what is going on behind the scenes, VMS was managing it all for them including by default revisioning the file on each open for write. So if it decided to do the actual writes as variable size, the app developer would have had no clue of that - it would have looked like ordinary record retrieval to the application.

The end result was the most insane open() syntax known to man. My recollections were that it took 5+ lines of optional args to open a file in VMS Pascal.

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Samsung Gear VR is good. So good 2016 could be year virtual reality finally makes it

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Re: VR makes me want to hurl

It's only electrical pulses, it should be doable.

Grab a 3d model of a brain and have a look exactly where this is and give it a thought on how you are going to get electrodes into that. It is an interesting thought exercise (only thought for now - doing anything beyond thought is extremely unrealistic).

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Re: VR makes me want to hurl

Um, did you not read the article?

Sure, I did. There is a massive gap in VR systems especially for gaming and/or immersive action experiences.

You get change in your head (and respectively inner ear) position not only from moving your head. You are expected to be moving your whole body too. There is no way in hell, on earth or otherwise to provide a non-vertigo inducing experience of a X-Wing or Starfury using a VR headset. Same goes for car racing simulators as well as any first person shooters which has a more complex motion in 3 dimensions like rolls, going up/down stairs, jumping, etc. So headset VR will successfully deliver a big PUKE as far as games are concerned.

It is highly dubious that it can deliver for sports. A key feature in sports reporting are close-ups and changes of angle for key moments. A typical sports closeup in VR looks like several G (at least) worth of acceleration while at the same time your inner ear gets no sense of motion. That is a mighty PUKE in 5 minutes or so of watching football, even less if watching basketball or tennis. You can of course broadcast with no closeups for VR. That will not live beyond the "watch it once" for the novelty of the experience.

The only thing it is good for are various fly-on-the-wall tightly controlled user experiences. A choice of Porn, Porn or Porn and some Big Brother for good measure. Maybe some of what 3D TV failed to deliver in terms of actually seeing movies in proper 3D.

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Outsourcer didn't press ON switch, so Reg reader flew 15 hours to do the job

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Re: Let me guess

I had that one as well on a couple of occasions.

It is not just Dell. Nearly all servers which have WOL and/or a management controller of some sort on board are like that - they will indicate that the power is connected, but not power on unless you tell them to.

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What the world needs now is Pi, sweet $5 Raspberry Pi Zero

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Missed the hub. You cannot have mouse, keyboard and wifi dongle on one USB Port. That is 14 more if you power the hub separately and nearly 20 if you want a hub which is capable of powering the Pi too without an external power supply.

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Re: Overpriced

Once you add the cost of WiFi or Ethernet it is not any different from B or B+ as cost. That is also likely to necessitate a USB hub as these will eat a significant chunk of the already measly Pi USB power budget.

Let's face it - a compute with _NO_ network connectivity is rather useless in this day and age.

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Nuisance call blocking firms fined £170,000 ... for making nuisance calls

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Can we have some collection statistics?

I bet that most of these fold, fail to pay and are restarted under new names shortly thereafter.

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Microsoft Windows: The Next 30 Years

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Re: Sorry Nadella looks more like Erdogan...

Close, but no cigar.

Sat Nad's delusions of grandure have so far failed to deliver 8Bn+ of sanctions levied onto Microsoft. That is roughly the economic effect of Russian tourism withdrawal (4Bn per year or thereabouts) and the stoppage of issuing of transit documents for any Turkish trucks carrying trade to Middle Asia via Russian Territory (4bn+, hurts Turkey more, but is not on the news). This is before gas, etc.

I know - Sat Nad can still get there, take on the DOJ or the Eu commission perhaps? MSFT has a history in that. It has always managed to pull it off during the Empire days. Trying to do that today will definitely be an Erdoganism.

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Lenovo slings privilege patches at in-built tools

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Hardware vendor doing software

Hardware vendor, trying to do software. Nothing to see here, move along.

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Nest defends web CCTV Cam amid unstoppable 24/7 surveillance fears

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Exactly

Resistance is futile, you are the product and you shall be monetized.

So, no thanks. I will stick to my own DIY system based on RasPi, Motion and some python to push the images to an offsite server.

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Cyber-terror: How real is the threat? Squirrels are more of a danger

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undermined the Daesh-involvement hypothesis and fingered Russians as the likely culprit.

The evidence was Russian language used in the binaries.

If we consider for the moment the amount of foreigners which the Turks have assisted in supplying to Daesh, Al Nusra other groups which all differ only in the shade of black they use for their flags, that starts to look extremely circumstantial and flimsy. With 16K+ foreigners being allowed to move freely up to last year into Syria the attackers could have used any language. French (with or without Belgian accent), Dutch, English - you name it. If they had previous cyber-criminal history, that language most likely would have been Russian.

Similarly, with all oil sold by the same groups back through Turkey on the world market they have more than enough money to buy a kit off the dark net. That generally comes with a choice of Russian or Russian for the code origin. English is only the "Export Documentation".

In any case, the threat of cyber-terror is very real, but still remote. It will stop being remote after smart meters are deployed. I love the smell of grid failsafes kicking in early in the morning. All you need to do is to program the meters to flip the switch on-off at the same time in a sufficiently big areas and you get a lovely Boom.

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Stretch - not sure.

That third-party hackers might help them in accomplishing their goals is also a stretch.

If the estimates from the US special forces raid which terminated their head of oil production and pinched all of his hard drives last year are correct, they have more than enough money to purchase the best attack kit money can buy from Russia, Ukraine or somewhere else in the ex-CIS.

What is more worrying is that they will continue having the money. Turkey put into a dispute state (which means that deliveries will stop) their Gasprom agreement last month (long before the shoot-down incident). That is 25% of their energy production. What people do not realize is that they are a major manufacturing site today. They build everything from Bosh (and under license) chainsaws to Transit vans and Renault Clios. The energy for that has to come from somewhere and the money they pay for the oil burned to attain it will be more than enough for the recipient to purchase an attack kit.

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Cartoon brings proper tech-talk to telly

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Trollface

IDF

WTF does the Israeli Defence Force have to do with a kid's cartoon?

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Second Dell backdoor root cert found

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Re: Next time I have a hardware procurement choice....

I do not quite see your point. The problem is not Dell (or Lenovo) hardware. It is the complete and utter incompetence in bundled software. That is common across the board in most hardware manufacturers. They "Do Not Get It". It does not matter what you do in software - you may walk on water, feed the hungry, etc, a geezer in the hardware department which has managed to reduce the number of capacitors on the board by one will get a bigger bonus and more kudos than you.

So rather unsurprisingly, they suck bricks in software (something which makes me wonder about the wonderful EMC deal as storage == 90% + software).

The solution to this is not to blacklist their hardware. It is to wipe their software and install from retail media. C'est la vie - it is something you have to budget for when buying a PC if you want it to work well.

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Dell computers bundled with backdoor that blurts hardware fingerprint to websites

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You missed the point

It is exactly what Mbeki from the Dell Service Department in Lagos needs. He also needs your credit card number and the CVV code, but that is something he will get via a minimum amount of social engineering.

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Suck it, Elon – Jeff Bezos' New Shepard space rocket blasts off, lands in one piece

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Re: Lacking context here

It is monetized. The engine design has been purchased by the United Launch Alliance. Effectively the usual suspects - Boeing, etc have conceded that Besos has done a better engine design than them.

We will see on the actual landing mechanics - I suspect that will be monetized as well. The rocket showed some very impressive stabilization capabilities.

The difference between Bezos and Elon is that Bezos as a habit monetizes by component not e2e - every single piece of the Amazon puzzle can stand on its own starting from the backend (which is now AWS) and to the logistics. This is no different - it is being monetized by component.

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Homebrew crypto in Telegram hangout app full of holes, say security pros

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Re: The "attack" described is not on the messaging, it is on initial authentication

Well, where else do you get 'em if not at the initial authentication? That's how you MITM everything AFAIK.

Initial authentication in the Telegram case is same as ssh - recognize other party's key and cache it. That allows MITM with any system (ssh, OTR2, etc). For that, it does not look any better or worse than any system which does not rely on x509 certificates (again, ssh or OTR2 are examples).

The more interesting MITM would have been a MITM on sessions. Now that would have been an encryption failure.

While Moxie is generally right, he sets the bar too high. There should be encryption for the masses and this looks like a reasonably good implementation of a mass market encryption product. Not as good as the top of the line stuff, but miles ahead of what you get out of the box.

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The "attack" described is not on the messaging, it is on initial authentication

El-reg should read the referred articles before repeating unsubstantiated opinions.

1. The attack described is not on the messaging which is DH with a 2048 bit followed by AES. That so far is not broken.

It is on the "usability" feature in authentication which visualizes the public key based on fingerprint same as f.e. SSH, etc - you do not see the full key, you see only X bits on first connection.

That attack works only for initial authentication. Once the two parties have authenticated for private chat, the full 2048 bit keys are used. In most cases, for the "unpleasant" type of characters using Telegram that authentication will be performed the moment the phone is handed in to the new recruit. So the window of opportunity for a MIM is rather slim (and not much different than for example SSH).

2. Making identity == phone. So what? A user can go in and get a phone with Pay-As-You Go SIM in most of the world with next to nothing identity checks. Then they use it for authentication of the initial setup during training and then it is game over - you cannot snoop on the channel.

The only weakness I can see is the fact that Telegram pinches your address-book and metadata and maps it to contacts. Even this is not particularly relevant if the phone is used as a dedicated device _ONLY_ for encrypted communication. If it is used normally as the user you can pick out the "interesting" ones based on their subscriptions and their contact book.

All in all - if this is used purely for encrypted IM and nothing else, it looks OK.

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Europe didn't catch the pox from Christopher Columbus – scientists

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It was around before that

This is not the first finding, though this one is probably the best preserved one. I have seen various articles on this as far back as 20 years ago.

Syphilis was around before Columbus, but not as prevalent as during the 16-17th century for a completely different reason. A lot of late stage 2 and stage 3 syphilis symptoms are similar to the symptoms for leprosy. As result in the early middle ages most syphilitics ended up in the leprosy hospices. These were run by the church (Dominicans if memory serves me right).

A pope edict closed down the church run leprosy hospices shortly before the first expedition by Christopher Columbus. As a result along with leprosy stage 2 and stage 3 syphilis sufferers were thrown out onto the streets to fend for themselves including resorting to the "oldest profession". The rest as they say is history.

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ICO fines PPI claims firm £80,000 over 1.3m spam SMS deluge

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Re: Good

The fine can be any size. Company folds, no fine is paid, director starts another company, rinse, repeat.

As long as the fines are not personal and the penalties are not criminal this will not stop.

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Blocking out the Sun won't fix climate change – but it could buy us time

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Re: Key Homo Sapience species trait

Er, people aren't starving because they're fussy eaters.

Nothing to do with eating, to do with growing. My dad, grandad, grandgrandad, ... has grown ALMONDS. I SHALL GROW ALMONDS TOO. Oh, shit no water around, that is a problem, how about growing wheat or barley? NO I SHALL GROW ALMONDS and I shall call my congresscritter/congress of people's deputies rep/Grand theocrat/whatever to ensure that my ALMONDS GROWING interests are not impinged on.

Depending on the region, search and replace ALMONDS with rice, potatoes, olives, grain, etc - you name it.

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Re: Key Homo Sapience species trait

Hoping that we suddenly evolve the ability to be able to breath under water

Even 200 m rise will be less than fraction of a percent from the dry land. So you will only need to breath under water if you refuse to adapt and move elsewhere. Yeah, sure, there are whole countries that have an issue with moving elsewhere, but once again these are less than fraction of a percent of the overall population. So that is clearly a case of forfeiting adaptability. Just this time it is in the name of politics.

The parts that are 50C today will be 50C tomorrow - that is 5%+ of the world surface. While the various projections for Sahara expansion may look fugly on a map they once again affect a fraction of a percent of the world population.

Global warming does not pose a threat to the survival of the human species.

It poses significant threats to the preservation of the current political and socio-economic status quo. F.E. Europe will not be the same if most of Holland and half of its capitals end up under water. We will have to deal with mass North-African/Middle East migration and a lesser migration out of Polynesia. Though, once again - the migration rate per year we have organized today by meddling in their politics is of an order of magnitude above what would have been a climate induced one. Also, if we take the cynical view, at this rate, there will be none left to migrate from Global Warming as they would have migrated out of the war zone anyway.

It also poses significant threat to biodiversity, though even the worst projections are nowhere near what the Earth has endured in any of the large extinction events like the Late Devonian mass extinction or the Permian mass extinction. In fact, compared to the big 5 mass extinction events (http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/extinction_events) it will not even register on the paleontological "radar".

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Key Homo Sapience species trait

Key trait of Homo Sapiens as species is adaptability.

How about actually using it? Yes I know, it is sacrilegious to consider the possibility that Chinese and Far East will eat spuds instead of rice, people of Middle Eastern origin (regardless of their religion) may have to eat pig and we, westerners, may have to eat guinea pigs or horses or dogs for that matter. Flexibility and adaptability are the key trait that has enabled human survival as species over time.

Those who have chosen to forfeit that trait for religious, societal and other reasons - well, you need to check the dictionary definition of Darwin Award.

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OpenBSD's native hypervisor emerges

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Re: what's stopping me

I think you missed the point (and so did the article).

This is a kvm replacement for OpeBSD. Even if it runs just Open/Free/NetBSD and Linux initially as guests that is still quite valuable for environments where you want a bomb-proof hypervisor.

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Yahoo! Mail! is! still! a! thing!, tries! blocking! Adblock! users!

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Re: One less now...

Well, if you're using an adblocker they aren't making any money from you.

They are - by trawling your email, building a martketing (not just advertising) profile and selling it to someone else. The fact that they are selling somewhat damaged goods and the profile is not usable by the advertiser because of APro in that case is not so relevant. It can be used by other means - it will now change the selection of what is "related" offered on various e-commerse sites, etc. All stuff marketeer scum loves.

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How NSA continued to spy on American citizens' email traffic – from overseas

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Re: Haven't a clue

As soon as you start with bounties, [bad guy warlord supporter] will hand over [insert rival warlord], get some hard currency to carry on their work while you do their dirty work.

That is fine - the process reduces the number of warlords over time. A few rounds and they are down to:

1. A much lower number than now.

We presently have several _THOUSANDS_ of terrorist organizations and groupings in North Africa, Middle East and Afghanistan/Pakistan competing to get the world's attention. That is the biggest problem and the rationale for the surveilance - they are so many that we can no longer target them via humint and track them.

2. The survivors will be well known. No more obscure Al-clusterf** of the day from village in the middle of nowhere (insert your rural backwater salafist community of choice).

Now terminate the remaining ones by conventional means (Expendables, Soldiers of Fortune working for the bounty or just a hellfire missile through the window).

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Re: Haven't a clue

+1.

For the same amount of money you could have purchased the necessary humint for targeting and sent teams of "Expendables" for each "interesting" target (or purchase a "soldier for fortune" style termination) 20 times over. People are corrupt. If the amount of money wasted on anti-terrorist surveilance was used on bounties instead, there would have been a grand total of zero surviving ISIS, Taleban and Al Qaeda "key personnel".

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Roundworm infection increases female fertility

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Re: This one is a known "immune system modifier"

Time to scour this worms waste products for antihistamine compounds and/or hormonal stimulants/depressors, methinks.

They are being scored. Off the top of my head there is at least one guy in Oxford Uni who is working on that. There are a few places elsewhere too.

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This one is a known "immune system modifier"

If memory serves me right, the same nematode has the interesting property of drastically decreasing the acuteness of asthma and allergies in infected people. The mechanism is still unclear - probably both production of antihistamines and adjustments to the host immune system. While having a few 40cm worms in you may seem to be a cure that is worse than the disease a lot of asthmatics will probably beg to differ.

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Tech firms fight anti-encryption demands after Paris murders

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Re: WRONG

Why fake? Full body burka and any female ID card with a middle-eastern sounding name will do.

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