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* Posts by Voland's right hand

794 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

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Audi proposes PC-packing stunt bikes

Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: Car Companies?

You obviously do not know what you are doing. Looking at the house "commuter vehicle fleet", I have:

Two cycles with SRAM grips working with Shimano dérailleurs, cranks and freewheels; one cycle with a MTB frame, shimano MTB derailleurs working with a 52t road crankset (also supposedly impossible) and one cycle with FSA crankset and Shimano derailleurs and shifts. All of that using SRAM chains (with none of the cranksets and freewheels being SRAM).

The supposed "incompatibility of parts across bicycle manufacturers" is vastly overrated. If we exclude the extortionate range of 100£+ per spare part and look at the sanely price bits you can make nearly anything work with anything. Worst case scenario - do not force it, use a larger hammer (cutter and a file help too).

The only thing I can think of which is really incompatible across bikes is bearings. Most other stuff can be swapped and moved around if you know what you are doing (which is exactly why a bike like this Audi will never get in my house - it is non-standard by design).

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'Dated and cheesy' Aero ripped from Windows 8

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Devil

Re: Can we get Gnome and KDE to do three-point-turns, too, now?

Kde3 TO kde4 - cough sputter, cough sputter... Gnome2 to Gnome3, cough, sputter, bleah... where did the vomit bucket go.

Windows is actually late to the "let's through decades of productivity research out of the window and make everything Tablet/Phone-like" party.

KDE and Gnome tried to get there first. KDE is also the worst of the two by far because it tries to retain some backwards compatible look while replacing old UI concepts with "Activities" and other similar iPhonesque/Androidesque abominations in their APIs.

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Ten... Qwerty mobiles

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Devil

Re: Xperia Mini Pro

Replying to myself on this one:

While the Xperia (both Mini and the Arc) is a fantastic phone, its factory charger is phenomenal piece of crap. It is quite temperamental on charging from USB too (it will not charge if it is "on" from 2 of my laptops)

In any case I have seen the original charger failing to charge an Xperia mini or an Arc from low battery levels (ditto for USB to PC). In fact I have seen it discharge when connecting to its "default" charger.

I suspect that the original poster who had an Xperia never start again ran into that one. So it is not surprising that it refused to boot - it never actually charged up to do so (or maybe went to critical on battery in the process as well).

The solution for me has been to use kindle chargers. Plug in the phone, in 1h the battery is to 100% straight away.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: Xperia Mini Pro

Strange, wife runs her flat regularly and it never gives problems afterwards.

In any case, it is better build and has better keyboard than half of the monstrousities in the list. It is also still on sale priced at the very reasonable ~160£ SIM free unlocked. My only gripe with it is the relatively short battery life (for an Android). You have to charge it every day (and sometimes throughout the day when used heavily).

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Windows Phone beats iOS sales in China

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Devil

Re: @Voland's right hand

And China Unicom is like what? 20% market share compared to 80% of TD-CDMA.

It can operate a 3G FD HSPA network as much as it likes - it is a minnow in the China mobile market.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: No tricks

That is actually correct for a country where the Great Shiny does not have a suitable 3G network.

Now count to 3 to see Tim Cook reverse his stance on supporting the TD-CDMA variety of 3G.

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Smoke-belching flash drive self-destructs on command

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Devil

Re: Shades of Mission Impossible?

No, shades of Apple Design (TM).

Look where the red and green buttons are wired to - these go to the unused pins on the SATA interface, the same ones Apple uses for their cursed "special thermal management" system in iMacs. I bet this drive has an entertaining compatibility problem - plug it into a reasonably new Mac and it will selfdestruct spontaneously straight away.

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Does Britain really need a space port?

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Devil

Re: Err...

Apples and Oranges.

True, Britain is producing more "assembled units" than ever. It is _NOT_ something to be proud of.

However, once upon a time, the money from manufacturing was being spread wide around a large set of other industries from big smelters to small shops running in a single warehouse making door handles and most of that was in Britain. This "food chain" had a considerable impact on the overall GDP.

That is no longer the case. Current British car manufacturing is little besides assembly. Most of the components are built elsewhere - Germany, Spain, Portugal, Eastern Europe and Far East. The British part in it is to avoid the import duties and excise which most Eu countries still have on out-of-EU car imports. There is no food chain. It is only a "top" - the rest is elsewhere.

So the correct name should be "automotive assembly" industry, not "automotive industry". In any case, while the "size" of the car industry may look impressive on paper its impact on GDP is actually disproportionally small.

In any case, for the overall "good of the economy" it would have been better if Britain had none of the current assembly plants and let's say at least 10% of the parts manufacturing Germany (through the likes of Bosch) has nowdays. That is where all the development (and most of the margins) go and that creates a much wider and more "even" positive impact on the economy.

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Ten... Ultrabooks

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Devil

Re: So I guess these are all 1366x768?

Computing fonts, shapes, etc everything for more dots eats GPU and in the absense of GPU support for font scaling (which if memory serves me right is the case for Intel) CPU. In fact, that probably eats more than the display itself.

So in fact 1366x768 is pretty much optimal for 11-13 inch as long as it can support more dots on the VGA/HDMI/Whatever port it can output to. It is not that pixelated to irritate you, gives enough pixels for the desktop to lay things out and at the same time provides a good balance in terms of CPU/GPU power consumption.

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Facebook co-founder renounces US citizenship pre-IPO

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Re: Really?

It is a person associated with facebook's "inception". Now, can you please once again explain what exactly do you find astonishing.

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Sony blames record $5.7bn loss on everything but Sony

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Devil

Re: "poor consumer appetite for shiny gear"

"Now there's no Ericsson, there's no way I'm buying." - there are still some handsets which are SE, not Sony available at fire sale prices and I will probably buy a couple while they last. Agree - after that - no thanks.

I have had enough experience with horrid after-market support, termination of spare parts and consumables less than 2 years after model releases (Vaio Picturebooks anyone), systems especially designed to selfdestruct after the warranty expires (Vaio P3 laptops with a heatsink designed to fry the keyboard) and so on. I suspect that SE's not stellar, but generally acceptable software update policy will be going too :(

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Software functionality not subject to copyright: EU court

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Devil

Re: The Oracle cannot be all knowing then.

There is still one more step here.

The API is an expression of the _EXPECTED_ functionality from software.

This decision discussed the functionality, not the "expectations" and not the "way of expressing them".

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Nokia cries patent 'Havoc!', unleashes dogs of law on two continents

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Devil

Re: I'm guessing Nokia saw the HTC One

You are mistaking E72 (and 71) which are the crown jewels of Nokia and Symbian for the average Symbian phone.

A good counterexample would be N95 - the supposedly super-phone/mobile computer to provide functionality on par with the original iPhone. Its software had so many memory leaks and bugs that it could not stay up for more than 10 minutes with heavy data or VOIP use. Non-working camera software, filesystems chronically corrupt - you name. The joy of Nokia "as shipped".

In any case, in terms of build quality the only thing on the market to really rival the iDevices is Sony Ericsson. Neither the HTC, nor Samsung come anywhere near. While it may not have the latest software, in terms of "well made" it is way better.

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Black Ops II to take gamers to open worlds... and destroy them

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Devil

Re: What kind of...

No, Swedish actually: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stridsvagn_103

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Skype slurping software threatens IP exposure

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Devil

Part of the system design unfortunately :(

Being a P2P system skype needs the other person IP to communicate directly. There will always be a way of extracting the destination IP with Skype. If Skype fixes the bug which allows extracting it from Skype itself you can still sniff network traffic and see where it goes.

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Jury mulls verdict in Oracle-v-Google Java spat

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Devil

Re: so if APIs are copyrightable...

Just SAMBA? Think of anything and everything.

If Oracle wins this practically prohibits any development of interoperable software without taking a commercial license. That will be the end of the software industry as we know it affecting both free and paid for alike. It is from the "I love the smell of monopoly early in the morning, it smells like 300% profit margin" book so Oracle will not be letting go and it will get some Amicus Curae from the usual suspects in the next rounds.

If Oracle loses on all counts it will have an interesting effect as well - mostly on open source software. Presently a lot of the "do not link", etc is enforced through the gratuitous rubberstamping of GPL notices on includes, headers, etc which are in fact API definitions. If Oracle loses, commercial software will be able to ignore these with impunity and communicate with GPL software in ways that are considered "unacceptable" at present. Ditto for the other way around which is usually less of an issue at present.

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Boy wrecks £22k worth of MacBooks by weeing on them

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Devil

Re: Piss? Sounds like a load of shit!

Urine is much more conductive than water. If any of these laptops had a viable battery pack and the urine got inside they are pretty much dead. The only thing to save kit in this case is to wash it ASAP with lots of deionized water and let it dry.

However, there is just no way a minor can relieve himself successfully over 20+ laptops. Granted there is an obesity pandemic, but someone with "capacity" that BIG. Give me a break. Someone is seriously taking the piss here. Literally.

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Griffin Helo TC Assault

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Devil

Re: Bought my brother in-law a mini copter for Xmas

Based on childhood recollections (circa aged 10) of chasing a cat together with my neighbor (aged 8) using his RC tank:

1. The cat will not like being shot at

2. The cat will figure out that the tank is being controlled pretty fast. You can set that to "immediate" if the cat has some siamese blood in its veins.

3. Once the cat has figured it out you will need a skin graft and a tetanus injection.

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Expert: UK would break its own rules with web-snoop law

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Devil

Re: So what?

Quote: "You will find some rights in the Declaration of Human Rights". You are missing the point. UK parliament is sovereign and cannot be bound.

The Declaration of Human Rights is _NOT_ fundamental as far as UK legal system is concerned. Nothing is. Any law can modify any right in any way it likes and as long as it has been voted through by the parliament that will be it.

As an example - UK had a "Declaration of Human Rights" before. It is called "The Bill of Rights of 1689". So how much of it stands today?

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Devil

So what?

This would have mattered under Napoleonic law. There a new law have to explicitly amend any relevant old law to keep the whole system coherent. Additionally, no law can override a fundamental right without an applicable amendment to the constitution. This puts a very good systems of checks and balances.

UK is not using Napoleonic Law. Under UK law:

1. The parliament is sovereign and cannot be bound. It can vote through any frigging drivel to its liking period and it does not matter if it suspends in part or in whole any right including part or all of the Magna Charta. There is no fundamental right in the UK law. There is no fundamental right to life, privacy, liberty, whatever. It is all left to the parliament's decision (I am tempted to say "whim").

2. Any new law can override any old law and precedent without mentioning that explicitly and keeping the "coherence" of the system is left to the courts (and the lawyers).

So this overrides the Data Protection Act... From a UK legal standpoint - "Yeah, so what?"

Now should it be that way is another matter (IMO it is about bloody time to have a constitution and a working legal system).

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Nokia still has a patent business

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Devil

Re: I've seen this movie before

Not quite.

SCO never had a research department the size of Nokia research. It never had an IPR portfolio the size of Nokia either. In any case "this movie" is not likely to be "shown in theaters" for very long.

In order to collect revenue from patents you have to file them. In order to file them you have to have working engineering and research. If times gets rough this is the first thing which the management consultants rationalize as surplus to requirements.

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WD soaked in sales cash bonanza after Thai flood hell

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Devil

Re: That's nice.

I love the smell of lack of competition early in the morning, it smells like revenue...

The smell of revenue after the rain (and the flood)...

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Google Drive Issues on Mac

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You are asking too much

If Google wants me to try Google Drive then it needs to take the handbrake off and get out of first gear.

First gear? California? The Holy Land of Automatic "because it pollutes less"? You gotta be kidding, when was the last time you saw a manual gearbox in Silly Valley?

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Basic instinct: how we used to code

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Devil

Ughh... Still shudder when I recall those days

Ugh... Crippled language with crippled syntax and crippled capabilities resulting in crippled brains.

I ended up writing a set of routines to emulate a proper stack including recursion in order to be able to use in high school. I had those memorized and started every program by typing them in (don't you love languages which have no external library capabilities). That annoyed the hell out of some of the faculty :)

I wish Fort (and Logo) for that matter were more popular. They made for some much cooler (and more understandable) "education" languages.

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Indiana cops arrest violent 6-year-old

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Devil

Re: @voland - @kistark

Quote:

"

Teacher: Little girl, let go of that radiator at once.

Little Girl: No.

...

"

I am not going to call you an idiot, but you will never be a good teacher, you will always fail if you have to teach anyone anything and you will never be a good people manager as well.

1. She is not a little shit. She is an intelligent six year old which knows very well what she is doing with IQ well above average. She is non-violent. She may be stubborned, doing whatever she wants, etc but she is not a _LITTLE_ _SHIT_. No 6 year old is a _LITTLE_ _SHIT_. No human you are responsible for is a "LITTLE SHIT". Ever. Even if he kicks a principal. You need to understand why she has done so and deal with it. Part of the job do you like it or not.

2. The incompetent union protected dolt that was trying to herd the class into the classroom as described in the original post did not understand some of the very basics of her profession (as I said, crowd control is a key requirement both for an educator and a manager). You have to chose your battles and win them. She never bothered to actually sit down in front of the girl for 30 seconds and have a normal, human, non-"LITTLE SHIT" conversation with her. She was just running around like headless chicken, clucking, complaining and end of the day going to the principal.

3. By the way, I did a stint with the same class for a semester as a volunteer teaching assistant for an activity (they needed an extra person to take the kids swimming) and I did not have a problem with anyone in that class. Neither had their PE teacher. Neither had their "proper" teaching assistant. On the day when the "mayhem" was happening she was off sick so the actual "competence" of the teacher showed up with a vengeance.

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: @voland

I am going to reply once, to avoid repeating the same thing to multiple posts:

1. The teacher is _NOT_ a prison warden. However, the "Crowd Control" part of teaching profession is officially a requirement. One of the criteria during an Offsted inspection _IS_ "Is the teacher in control of the class or not". If not, she fails automatically even on the rather loose UK criteria.

2. The teacher "in control" of that class blamed 4 kids as non-educatable and requested EP evaluations and statements on 4 of them (out of 12). Out of the 4, 3 that were _TAKEN _ _OUT_ by their parents and moved to a new school are doing fine now at the age of 11 (top of their class all of them). The remaining one has developed a fobia of school which to the point where she has a dislexic statement (I do not think she is dislexic - it is the little girl that attached herself to the radiator). Her parents are now sorely regretting that they did not take her out.

3. Parents can do very little if the Principal is an idiot and the teacher is a union protected incompetent. A principal that has so little authority in his school that he has to call police to put a 6 year old under control is beyond salvation. This means his authority is ZERO. ZILCH. NIL. That 6 year old will now be followed by a horde of others. 6 year olds behave that way. It does not matter what you do at home, you leave them for 2 hours in the presence of someone they know is a muppet and there will be an ongoing riot all right. If there is no riot, they are not "normal" 6 year olds. In fact, that is not different with any students (I have seen more than once 16 year olds behave the same way when they see that the teacher is a muppet).

4. There are plenty of ways for a principal (and a teacher) to have an unquestioned authority even in schools that in rather rough neighborhood. No need to be a prison warden to be respected even by year one. In fact "not being a prison warden" is probably a requirement.

5. While I am not a professional teacher, I have taught in secondary, high school and university and I have never, ever had any issues with "class discipline". In fact, for some of the "elected" classes I have taught I have had issues with overcrowding and too many people wanting to move to my class (despite it being more difficult). This means that you have to make the class interesting though which is beyond the abilities of a lot of people who pretend to be "teachers".

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Voland's right hand
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Devil

Re: I suppose it's a bit late to suggest...

No, firing the principal and his staff would be more appropriate.

When a police officer who has no particular qualifications with regards to childcare whatsoever is capable of calming down the "unruly" subject and making him walk voluntarily to the car my only conclusion is that the school staff is beyond incompetent.

99% of the time when I hear an incident like this the person at fault is the incompetent parody of an educator in front of the whiteboard. I used to do volunteer work in a school before the "all adults are paedos" Labor mandate.I remember out of a class of 12 in a private school I remember seeing the following breakdown (same age group - 6 year olds):

3 students hiding in the toilets

1 pretending to be sick

1 refusing to cooperate but in class

1 refusing to enter class and attached to the radiator in the hallway in a manner where the only means to detach her would be breaking a limb or an angle grinder to detach the radiator.

1 hiding in the library

All of that in an "elite" British private school with multiple _OUTSTANDING_ Offsted report ratings.

Are all these kids "at fault" - give me a f*** break. The teacher - yes. The principal - doubly so. Kids? I doubt it.

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Billionaire astro mining venture long on hype and timescale

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Re: Silly

Not really.

An example out of Sci-Fi, specifically Night's Down, Part two - The Neutronium Alchemist comes to mind. It describes in reasonable detail exactly what does it take to set up such a facility which is likely to be economical even for good old iron in the absence of a space elevator:

1. Foam up the metal to be brought down. A very little gas of your choice which you can extract from a "wet asteroid" as well goes a very long way in vacuum.

2. Splash 'em down on water in a controlled fashion. Shape the chunk of foam to be splashed down appropriately and give it some minimal control surfaces to direct it initially. This is the rather optimistic part so I would actually give the leading edge some extra thermal protection as well. If you have started mining asteroids you have most of the materials to create ceramics handy. In fact, in zero G you may be able to create much bigger "tiles" than on Earth.

3. Build the final stage of the refinery on earth - tow the foam into a cut-n-smelter yard. Being foam its density is lower than water so it will float.

By the way, Lewis missed that one the biggest reasons for Pt to be expensive now is that the Spanish sank most of the platinum they pillaged from the Inkas somewhere in the Atlantic so it does not drop the price of Silver.

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Apple sued for every touchscreen device by Flatworld prof

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Devil

Re: Can I...

No.

If he was issued this 15 years ago on the basis of a working system he deserves a patent. It is what the system is for - to protect an inventor building stuff. He actually built it - hallelujah.

The more interesting question is "Why nobody managed to find this when looking to invalidate the patents owned by Apple".

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Oracle v Google round-up: The show so far

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Devil

And there is no such one really

While the entire affair is not particularly pretty all code shown by Oracle in this slide deck puts Google firmly in the clear.

There is a well known precedent in IPR law known as the Lego precedent. Lego sued some of its competitors for allegedly copying its "bricks" and tried that based on both Copyright grounds and Design Patent grounds. It failed.

The reason is that in order to get a functional "brick" you need to have the recesses on the bottom, the pointy bits on top and in order to connect bricks in different combinations you have to have those bits rounded. The reason for the Lego brick shape is not design, not copyright - it is because it is functional and any other brick based system will have to have a similar shape.

Coming back to Google vs Oracle, it has no case for copying an API and there is very little case to apply copyright to an API. Anything trying to implement the API will be functionally similar to the existing implementation - same as Megablock bricks are similar to Lego bricks. From there on, if an API is public and if there is no _OTHER_ means of prohibiting the implementation of said API, an implementor can copy the definitions of the functions and there is very little that can be done against him. It is a form of the "Lego precedent" - there is no other way to do that.

Oracle is showing only definitions and function declarations in their slide decks. These fail "The Lego Test". So will any piece of code for which there is "only one sane way of doing it". They have to show a piece of code which requires a non-trivial implementation which has been copied.

Did Google copy chunks of code is not relevant here, it is "did it copy something that is subject to IPR protection".

It will be good if this sees its day in court and it creates a precedent, because regardless of who wins the scope of frivolous application of "Copyright" tags to include files, library definitions, schemas, etc - things essential for interop is likely to see some drastic reduction and this is good for everyone.

By the way, SnOracle is not the biggest offender here - most opensource projects are way worse including. They frivolously slap GPL2 on include files, API definitions and other items from the 2+2=4 variety.

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Ten... Satnavs to suit all budgets

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Devil

Re: Info please

First of all, why tablet? I have seen Tablets bolted in various configs on Eastern European taxis (a lot of taxi franchises there run some very cool Android software which does SatNav + request queue, dispatch, etc). It takes LOTS of real estate so unless you are driving a van you will find it a bit too big (or will have to mount it somewhere where you take your eyes off the road to see it).

So instead of a tablet you can use let's say Sygic (they license Tom Tom maps them and build a UI of their own) on most Android handsets (there are some known problems with Galaxy series, but all the rest are usually pretty fine). I use Sygic on my Xperia Arc S and wife got it on the Xperia X10 Mini Pro.

It work flawlessly around EU (walking mode too) and has most of the advanced features you find an embedded satnav (speed traps, visual lane change assistant, current/incoming speed limit, 3D view, landmarks, etc).

My only complain is that it barely breaks even on "charge budget" on the Xperia Arc S and does so only if you tell it to be economical on the eye candy. At 4in the Xperia has a screen the size of most high end SatNavs the screen is brighter, the traffic updates cost you much less as they piggy back on your normal data contract and it just works. So you do not really need a tablet, a BIG droid will suffice.

By the way, the charge budget is likely to be your big problem on a tablet too. Running at full brightness with GPS and Bluetooth enabled as well as using a lot of the CPU and GPU can eat more battery than the charger can supply.

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Battlefield Earth ruled worst film EVER

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Devil

Re: I must like shit movies then

The list was compiled too early so it could not include BattleShit^Hp.

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Killers laugh in face of death penalty threat, say US experts

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Devil

It can be about deterrent

It can be about deterrent - if the punishment is public. This is valid for any punishment (including the death penalty).

A private "humane" punishment can never be a deterrent because the population does not observe the punishment and does not see exactly what it will go through if it commits the offense. So why on earth can someone expect it to be deterred?

In any case, the system is broken, we should be:

1. Forced labour, not "Hotel Stay twiddling thumbs and learning new techniques" - there are enough yellow fever and malaria breeding grounds swamps to irrigate and minefields to clear worldwide. Regular reports on the public service announcements on TV are essential - there is no better deterrent than watching someone in the last stage of yellow fever kick the bucket (it can be merely cleaning the streets for minor offenses of course). Channels that do not transmit let's say 1 minute during each news bulletin and/or 5 min per day in advert breaks should not get a license.

2. Term in advance - you are welcome to commit any crime you like as long as you serve half of your term first. Want to kill someone, fine, sign the papers and do 7 years of digging trenches in a malaria swamp (if you do not do it in advance you dig 'em 15 years). If you quit early you get nothing (besides the set of diseases and amputated limbs).

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Lytro light field camera

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Devil

Crime scene photography

I am not sure about other uses. There is however a particular use case where the ability to play around with focus after the fact will be appreciated - criminology. This can allow to take tens of shots of a crime scene instead of the usual hundreds.

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Oracle considered entering smartphone market

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Devil

Re: Oracle isn't entering the smartphone world

Oracle and Sun before it has been a (smart)phone software provider for many years through Java Mobile Edition.

The main reason for SnOracle to throw toys out of the pram is that:

1. It was collecting revenues for Java off most smartphones and a lot of feature phones. It will no more. It was getting money for nothing on this one. 99% of the few people who had code for java mobile edition have rewritten it for Android nowdays.

2. Google delivered where SnOracle failed. Java mobile edition is an overall failure. It was used only for minor features and featurettes - it was never backed by an app distribution channel, infrastructure and it never offered its developers access to the full power of the underlying hardware.

So this suit is actually about Google successfully terminating SnOracle (smart)phone software provider business (present and future). Larry has never been particularly forgiving about his company losing a revenue stream and, to be fair, there are very few occasions where he has lost one. It is not surprising that he is not taking it in very well.

In any case, Google should have gone with Python or even Ruby for Android instead of entering the "write once, run nowhere" quagmire. In a day and age when Apple has made all software developers write in Objective C once more anything in possible :)

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WD lets loose ferocious 1TB VelociRaptor

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Devil

Re: Plain lie

Why are you asking the question when you know the answer :)

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China warns domestic mobile phone makers of IP dangers

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Devil

Re: Bless 'em

In China - you probably cannot.

Elsewhere - you definitely can.

Chinese handset manufacturing has grown sufficiently to spill out on the world stage. That is when the fun begins.

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Himalayan glaciers actually GAINING ice, space scans show

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Devil

Re: So which is it?

Neither.

The "shrinking" glaciers are downwind from the heavily polluted India.

The "growing" glaciers have virtually no industry upwind from them for thousands of miles. See the jetstream map for the area - before it reaches Karacorum it blows across Afganistan and the virtually uninhabited portions of Iran and Northern Pakistan.

It is not warming which melts Himalayan glaciers, it is particulate polution. Most moisture coming up from the Indian ocean across India with the monsoons settles on the windward (facing India) slopes (along with all pollution it picks up on the way). The slope facing China is a mountain desert with rainfall comparable to the middle of the Sahara.

Even 1% albedo change from tar which industry, badly maintained internal combustion engines and diesels put in the air can make more damage to glaciers and snow cover than all of the annual temperature changes reported so far combined.

Nothing to see here, move along, it is still humans who make for the "melting", just nobody wants to admit "how" they do it.

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Soup up your home network

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Devil

Re: 5Ghz problem

More APs is not the answer, more APs is usually the problem.

If you have an AP per room there is no way in hell you can have a sane frequency plan even if you tinfoil every room (and ground the tinfoil). Unless you live in a one bedroom flat of course.

I have an AP on my work network, an AP on my router (which goes into the DMZ I should really turn off) and an AP on my home network. That fills the 2.4 band chock-a-block in 20m radius. 5GHz is slightly better (more channels) but it will get filled up before you furnish an average house.

In any case - you are better off with a design taken out of the cellular book - sucky (but reliable) 2.4 "umbrella" with the power to the MAX to cover the whole property and "microcells" - 5GHz APs with the power to the MIN to cover only spots where you are likely to need more bandwidth - office, sitting room, etc.

The article misses one of the biggest annoyances in a home network - PAUSE frames. WiFi is all good, but the APs are connected with something and this is nearly always a variety of Ethernet. Pause frames destroy any multimedia use and will appear in most mixed 100MB/1G and some pure 1G environments. After having to debug this a couple of times I now put "pause disable" as a key requirement for any new 1G gear. If it does not have it, it does not enter the house.

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Ten... Bedroom Gadget Treats

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Re: What - not one webcam listed!

The TV has that as an option. Check the spec.

Me coat.

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Re: jake: you're missing the point!

Exactly - like selling a 130 quid "light based sleep assistance device" which does the same job as a 19 quid lava lamp and one of old Sade albums on the stereo. WTF?

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Whisky IN SPAAAAACE: Zero-G Scotch is matured aboard the ISS

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Re: Finally! Some serious scientific research.

No. Serious marketing.

In order for alcoholic drinks to mature correctly the liquid needs to have at least some minimal circulation in the cask. That naturally happens when gravity is at play. A good wine cellar has almost constant temperature so convection does not really play. Other factors however like density microchanges from evaporation of alcohol near the cask top, interaction of booze with the cask walls, etc play a similar role. These are _SLOW_ and this is why wine, whiskey, brandy and rakia are supposed to mature slowly.

That is also how you fake it and accelerate maturity. Freshly activate the wood by "burning" it in a microwave (it actually turns to charcoal at the edges), stick it into the maturation vessel, warm it up and provide stirring (standard lab teflon magnetic stirrers do nicely). Voila - here is your "mature" brandy in a week. Been there, done that.

Coming back to zero-G. None of that works in zero-G. There is no convection and a density change does not cause a flow in the liquid. Any change in the liquid will be limited to the brownian motion. So the Whiskey will either fail to mature or will taste like shit.

This is marketing, not science.

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MPAA boss: 'SOPA isn’t dead yet'

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Re: Reworking?

He does understand it actually. So does the industry.

The problem is that not in their understanding, the problem is in the economical fundamentals based on which the industry operates. It does not try to satisfy demand and match demand to a price. It tries to inflate demand through artificial scarcity. Delay DVD release, delay special release, delay release based on regions, limit how the content is available and so on.

Let's compare that with the music industry - did you notice that RIAA has not been in the news for years and it is just the MPAA now? Of course it would not be - all prices for CDs, downloads, etc are now demand based and made to match actual demand using feedback from sales forecast to sales correlation. The entire idiotic cycle of limited release of singles, then limited release of album, then... is in the gutter with a 5 inch stake in its heart.

What needs to happen to the movie industry is a legilsatively applied Stelios (the real one tried to break their monopoly, but failed, guess airlines are easier). The moment the movie industry stops using economics of artificially induced scarcity and becomes a modern demand based economics system based on demand driven pricing the ever repeating cycle of "one idiotic law proposal after another" will go away.

As long as this is not happening there will be a SOPA every year, rinse repeat, try again. That is what the industry needs and its main lobbist understands it pretty well so do not underestimate him.

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Asda knocks out Kobo e-reader for £49

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In my case it is junior & grandma

Wife got a kindle and frankly she is clocking about 5% of the time junior (age 10) and grandma (age 67) are clocking on their Kobos. I cannot keep up uploading books. So the device passes the kid and the grandparent test.

I can second that Kobo store works fine under linux. I bought junior some "monster candy" at the airport to keep him occupied on a 3 hour flight (the Eldest omnibus to be more exact) and it showed up on the reader straight away exactly as it would have showed up on a kindle. My only complaint so far is that Cyrillic font titles are sometimes not rendered correctly (probably missing fonts).

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Use the holy word of God to stay secure online, says bishop

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Book codes, and their variants, have been around a while, no?

For many years all the way up to WW2.

If memory serves me right, Soviet intelligence (or to be more exact whatever was left from it after Stalin ordered its extermination in 1937-1939) used book codes to communicate throughout the war.

From a crypto perspective a book code is a form of one time pad. If it is executed correctly (no reuse) it is a very strong encryption method.

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IPv6 networking: Bad news for small biz

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Re: crazy academic led BS as usual?

Q: Are there any "smart" TVs that support IPv6?

Yes - Samsung. All of their recent TVs are Android inside which has native support for IPv6. No idea if it is enabled or not though.

In any case, there are a lot of untruths and half-truths in the article. The "Holy Church" of IETF is actually actively looking into all of this - the relevant workgroup is called homenet with the most active participants being Linksys, Dlink, Apple and other classic "consumer" device vendors.

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RIM to exit the consumer phone market

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Re: Teens

This assumes that the teens that use Blackberry are likely to become wealthy corporates.

That is not quite the case nowdays.

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'Intelligent systems' poised to outsell PCs, smartphones

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Re: Not exactly

IDC conjecture assumes that: There will be no "ready-to-use" off the shelf ARM based platforms and developers which want to get something done using OTT will go Intel (and thus windows).

Close but no cigar - there is already a healthy market of "mostly baked" ARM based SOCs in the far east. That is the territory where Via retreated after being defeated by Intel.

Even if we assume that Intel hits their power targets for the new Atom and even if we assume that it hits the price point under current and future Wondermedia, OMAP, etc SOCs it still will not have all those GPIOs which are present on these systems. These will have to be grafted using yet another unspecified 8 or 16 bit controller(s) which costs extra money to integrate and build.

IDC is making the mistake of extrapolating POC development to real system. A lot of the POC work is being done on Windows and early smart meters, smart devices, etc all have a rather expensive Windows build driving them. That will not necessarily be their production build. In fact it is least likely to be.

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Medieval warming WAS global – new science contradicts IPCC

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Re: It's easy to lose patience

So how does that fit with:

1. Same period - increased rainfall in southern USA allowing for the existence of the Pueblo Indians civilisation.

2. Same period - draught in Mexico and Yukatan peninsula and the downfall of the Mayan civilsations.

3. Same period - multiple incidents of freezing of the mediteranean sea and black sea against a backrdop of hot summers and higher annual temperature average in Europe

4. Same period

If you take any model for _GLOBAL_ warming and look into the details you will see Europe with a more continental climate - cold winters and hot summers, wet Texas and Arisona, dry Mexico and so on. Just take the b*** f*** model and read the result before you spout rubbish please. Even the model produced by the "Not another old university in Cambridge" shows exactly that.

So in fact the evidence from Antarctica fits into a puzzle with a thousand other pieces already in place - from archaeological evidence from Viking and Pueblo settlements through historical records and down to pollen and tree ring records. I for one am not surprised with it and it _FITS_ the cross-disciplinary (historicans, archeoogists, geologists and climatologists) consensus about the climate in the last 2000 years. The only _NEW_ thing here is that it is from the Southern hemisphere. Before that the records were mostly from the northern (not just Europe - all of it).

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Half of Apple fanbois would bank with the iPad titan

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Re: 30%

That is exactly why they will never be a bank. They cannot take the same obscene cut on banking as on their other stuff.

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