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* Posts by Voland's right hand

921 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

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Driverless trucks roam Australian mines

Voland's right hand
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Re: Not to mention...

Oh, they do.

Just the raise is called differently: "Software upgrade", "Old model obsolete", "Increase in the cost of parts" and goes directly to the manufacturer.

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Asteroid miners hunt for platinum, leave all common sense in glovebox

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Re: Is there any Titanium up there?

There is plenty of titanium down here too.

Titanium is not rare, just a total pain in the arse to refine and work with same as Aluminum used to be before we discovered how to get it electrolytically.

If memory (from my chemistry days serves me right) you have to clorinate Ti02 into TiCl4 first (ugly and expensive as making Cl2 out of salt takes lots of energy), then purify that by distillation, then reduce TiCl4 into Titanium foam using Sodium (again ugly and expensive and costly). The Titanium you get from that has to be smelted into usable form with Sodium removed (I forgot how that one was done but that was painful too). The thing people forget is that the reason for a lot of Titanium properties as a material is not Titanium, but the thin coating of TiO2 which it forms immediately in contact with air (or any oxidizer). You cannot smelt or weld Titanium in a normal atmosphere - it will oxidize. You have to do it under Argon - once again lots of money, especially for smelting.

Most of these processes are not realistic in space. Clorine, Sodium are expensive (due to energy required) but abundant on Earth. Up there - not so much.

So even if we find a couple of rocks with a usable TiO2 content up there we need to figure out a whole new way of getting Ti out of them. If we do so, we might as well do that on earth - TiO2 is not rare (and not expensive either).

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Re: But there is no concept of private property.

You may not care what UN says, but that has a shiny forecast of ending up with UN dragoons, TANSTAAFL and rocks being lobbed at the Cheyenne Mountain.

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Sailboat cracks 100 km/h for first time

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Re: As a sailor, that's hardly practical.

SFO bay? SFO bay does not have the wind field for this baby.

That thing has Playa de Jandia and Costa Calma written all over it. You get some very strange conditions there - the island shields the area from the Atlantic and you get 20-30knots steady wind from the desert. Psychotic kitesurfer paradise. I have seen them go at 30-40 knots on a regular basis (one of the reasons why they do a leg of the world championship there). They cart someone out with something broken on an ambulance at least once a day there during the season - at 40 knots falling on water is like falling on concrete.

I suspect that the place in Namibia where they tested it was similar - desert + a shielded bay. SFO does not have that so you are not likely to get it anywhere near the speed at which it becomes "interesting".

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'There may come a day when Hobbits promote slot machines ...'

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Devil

Re: Minus dots

That book has now been removed from orbit. Not surprising - they can expect a lawsuit. Same as the author of the "Last Ringbearer".

Frankly, the Tolkien family is overstepping the line by far here. It is a venerable tradition to build on other people's works in world literature. Examples - Christopher Priest and "Space Machine" vs Wells and "Time Machine", Volkov's Emerald City series vs "The Wizard of Oz", etc. If we go further back in time we have Decameron & Canterbury Tales vs Aesop's fables.

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Evildoers can now turn all sites on a Linux server into silent hell-pits

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niginx is not that "popular"

To start with - nginx is not that popular. Now if this was squid, apache traffic server or pound...

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Dead Steve Jobs was dead wrong on Flash, bellows ColdFusion man

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Devil

Re: Apple makes even Microsoft look good.

Vector graphics, video and other multimedia support.

HTML was a little too late to offer it with HTML5.

It does not matter is flash good or bad. It has taken 99.9% of the market before any alternative solution (and no, java is not an answer, java is the question and the answer is no) and has retained it for half a decade. It is entrenched. It will take years before any alternative has a market share worth mentioning.

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Apple seeks cooling fan patent for iPhone, iPad

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Devil

Re: not sure about the clutch

It will be an "everlasting wonder of maintainability" for a different reason.

If you think that iPhone/Pad/Whatever was bad on water contact before, just watch how bad it will become when it has a fan. A special contraption to splatter the water evenly across all components in the casing and ensure it is dead outright. LOVELY IDEA...

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Smartphone biz shocker: Nokia sells fewer devices than Lenovo

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I am not surprised

I have two xperias in the household and the next raft of upgrades will be Xperias too.

The latest and greatest software is not everything. In fact, I would rather have _NOT_ the latest and greatest, but some level of quality assurance on whatever is shipped. The amount of bugs I have encountered on my "fleet" is inexistent compared to some of what I have observed on "leading edge" Samsungs (and iDevices for that matter). Hardware is similarly excellent. Compared to HTC or RIM it is a "no contest". You take one, you take the other and you walk out of the shop with an Xperia in hand.

My only gripe with the Xperias so far has been that they are very picky on what they connect/charge from.

So Sony overtaking the other also-runs is not surprising. Just get an Xperia for a few months and you will understand why (as well as why it was one of the very few Androids to hit a 90%+ el-reg review rating). I hope they keep up with this level of commitment to quality in the future.

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Chinese e-cars to turn London cabs green

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Devil

Re: 186 miles?

It looks like the taxi ranks will be getting charging sockets which IMHO is an unfair subsidy.

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Devil

Re: EuroNCAP first

Not 240 - 180. The important thing is the difference - the taxi was going at 60+ and the GTR rear-ended it incoming at ~ 240. The difference in speed was 180. After that it careered off the road (still going at ~ 60+) and whatever was left of it impaled itself on a tree short-circuiting the battery distribution system and smashing some of the batteries in the process. The report is unclear if it was the taxi that also hit another taxi in front during that or that was the remains of the GTR.

All in all, I am surprised the batteries did not explode outright. A similar smashup with a petrol car (rear end collision followed by impaling the "tank" area on a tree) would have caused a tank rupture and a "Pinto Redux".

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EuroNCAP first

I would like to see this car undergoing a proper EuroNCAP first.

Second - "proprietary battery technology" is all nice but it requires similarly "proprietary" recycling facilities. Does BYD have recycling facilities in Europe? If they do not, they are not compliant to Eu directives on car waste so they can take it and sell it elsewhere. Leaking end of life batteries with "proprietary" chemistry - definitely NIBMY.

Reading the accident report I have to agree - everyone in the car was dead on the spot, before it hit the tree. No car could survive a direct hit from a Nissan GTR traveling at (estimated) 180km/h at the moment of the collision.

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Judge GIVES APPLE THE FINGER in multitouch iDevice patent case

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Devil

Re: PATENTS MUST BE INVENTIVE and NON OBVIOUS!!!!

Finger motions may (or may not be) obvious.

Picking multiple events off a touchscreen in a manner which is reasonably free of artefacts and can be used reliably for multitouch input is not necessarily so. If you do not believe me - try writing it. Have fun :)

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iPad Mini: Why is Apple SO SCARED of the Kindle?

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Education? More like car aftermarket...

7 in is exactly the size of an average headrest back... So any competition and price reduction in that range is very very welcome by all of us who have kids in the back seats.

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Amazon's Virginia cloud data center knocked out – again

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Devil

Re: We know who to blame

Say thank you if it is the cleaner.

I have seen what happens when an idiot plugs in an old "classic" welder in a UPS socket of a 6U AMC Symmetrix. It was ~14 years ago when only bank branches could afford such beasts. They forgot to tell the idiot who was installing the metal doors to the equipment room not to plug into it.

It was not a pretty sight...

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Salesforce CEO Benioff: Win 8 is 'the end of Windows'

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Devil

Re: For someone who lives in a big city

That is not everything he fails to see.

If Microsoft did not ship regular upgrades to its OS, the PC OEMs would have arranged contractually (for a pot of gold) for it to do so. So he _WILL_ be buy a new windows 8 machine at some point for the simple reason that he will have no choice on the matter. The hardware OEMs will make sure to that.

The only way his future may come true will be if Google stops f***ing around with ChromBooks and ships "Android for PC".

The other possible alternatives (Apple and Linux) are not likely to kill Windows to a point where the future will be bright and Cloudy. Apple continues to market itself as a premium product and will always be out of reach for a large segment of the userbase. Linux will probably continue to be ~ <5% of the userbase - mostly the technically literate and technically inclined. This leaves a nice gaping market void where Windows will continue to reside unless something like Android for PC kicks it out.

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Google rolls out new, cheaper Chromebooks 'for everyone'

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Devil

Re: Nah

Why Netbook? You can actually buy subnotebook with a properly max-ed out spec for that amount of money.

I bought an end-of-line sale Vaio with 4G RAM, AMD Fusion at 1.6G, 500G hard disk and same screen size and resolution for roughly the same amount of money yesterday. It will never be booted into Winhoze (some idiot at Sony installed 32 bit on it) and go to live with Debian on it from day one.

So frankly, this is very bad deal for that amount of money. 99£ for a chromebook - I may consider it. 200+? Forget it.

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Google 'uniquely positioned' for move to mobile internet

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Devil

"Active" Google+ users

Active contributing content != Active contributing money

Google+ monetization does not require you to visit the site (after logging in initially). What Google is interested in are your likes, dislikes and which sites do you go to. It is an incentive to keep you logged into Google so you can be monetized as well as means to get a more fine-grained monetization perspective on your behavior.

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Ocker CANNIBAL DEATH SPIDERS invade Japan!

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Re: Only a flesh wound

I do not think you would have gotten that lightly if bitten by a Sydney funnelweb. So the article got it right - we (I live outside Australia) should say thank you that it has not decided to leave the Sydney area and go on a world tour.

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Microsoft reports low Q1 earnings on sluggish PC sales

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Re: Yup, good luck with that!

This time it will be slightly different.

The release of each new version of WIndows starting from 3.0 (with the exemption of the transition of 3.10 to 3.11) has required a bigger, better and fatter machine. This is the first time when this is not the case.

This breaks this never ending upgrade spiral and makes everyone in the PC racket cower in fear of it going right. Not that they will be any better if it goes wrong too.

As a "Windows Free for 15 years" household owner I can only say - pass me the popcorn please.

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Why Google and Amazon could end up cooking their own chips

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Amazon has another ace up its sleeve

Amazon has been incredibly successful in creating wholesale elements out of key infrastructure components for its business. AWS started as its shopfront hosting service, ditto for most of its other cloud services. It now provides fulfillment, shipping, financial services, etc for companies that are competing with it at some level. All of that is profitable and all of that has customers.

So even if Amazon itself does not have the volume based on its own devices, it can and will establish yet another Amazon wholesale product. SOC as a Service anyone?

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Ukraine navy to deploy DOLPHINS WITH GUNS ON THEIR HEADS

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Devil

Re: Pistol.

P11 is an underwater firearm. However, considering the level at which Dolphins rely on sound there is no way in hell you can make one fire this firearm more than once. The negative conditioning from the splitting ear pain will make sure of that. Ditto for the Russian equivalent.

However, there is something else that used to be made in Ukraine which is more suitable. I used to have one of their harpoons - pneumatic reservoir with hydraulic arrow actuation. The thing could split rocks and the end of its range and 200g+ of 9mm metal arrow can do at least (if not more) damage compared to a gun.

It got broken beyond repair in the 90-es - the hydraulics were using sea water and they got clogged up. During that time the Black Sea pollution induced blooms became so bad that they stopped running the regular intercity hydrofoil services because their cooling was being clogged up by gunk faster than they could clean them.

This brings me to the more interesting question - how the hell do the dolphins survive in what has become of the Black Sea. Toxic plankton blooms, industrial pollution, leftovers from the Chernobyl effluent - you name it. Everything you can dream of and even more. Dolphin? In that soup? They will need more money for specialized dermatologist veterinarians than for trainers.

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Last month ties for WARMEST September on RECORD

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Devil

Not just US temperatures

Southern Europe (and especially Balkans) were insanely warm for most of September. In fact they still are. September temperatures were ~ 30C and it was ~ 20C during the first 2 weeks of October.

So it is not just USA.

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Windows 8 pricing details announced as preorders begin

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Devil

Re: I only had upgrade discs for a while

Buy a computer that does not have Windows pre-installed.

Any of the machines in the server/microserver class come without anything on them.

Example - HP Microserver, dual core low power Athlon, up to 8G ECC RAM, 4 Hard disk caddies, size of a large shoebox - base config ~ 100 £ (after rebates or sale discounts) up to ~ 300 once you stuff it with RAM to the gills and add a nice fanless low power Nvidia to it. Voila - here is your perfect desktop for anything but die-hard gaming. It will consume less power and you can leave it always on too. Comes without any Winhoze. Ditto for Dell, etc analogues.

Same for office class servers. Most of them are silent nowdays so they do nicely as a desktop. You can have a Xeon (off a fire sale) for under 300 if you look around and it will have no Windows on it either.

The only place where it is difficult to avoid Windows tax is laptops. A couple of years ago it was possible to get a barebones laptop from places like overclockers. Unfortunately they have stopped selling them now.

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Fukushima operator feared shutdown if risks revealed

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Devil

Re: During the meanwhile ...

Quote: 25,800 becquerels of Cesium...

How about some fish with a cocktail of lead, mercury, cadmium and rear earths sprinkled with organic and silicone carcinogenics? Oh, sorry, forgot... Nobody bothers to measure these...

While everyone fretting about Fukushima (and the potential future Fukushimas), nobody is paying attention to the fact that 95% of modern industry has only a fraction of major disaster protection that goes into the design of a nuclear plant. The number of people dead from "bog standard" industrial chemicals washed off by the tsunami in Japan will exceed Fukushima death toll by orders of magnitude. Ditto for the Thai floods (had some Thai rice lately? Checked how much lead is in that?)

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And the latest winner of the Nobel Peace Prize is ... the EU?

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Devil

Re: Seriously though...

You are very brave to predict that about you and your children.

Every time I am tempted to make such a prediction I give a second thought to just how many of the predictions of Robert F Hamilton about the future from the background to Gregg Mandel's trilogy have come through (or are about to). I give it another careful thought and decide not to make any such predictions...

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Bloomberg's bomb: How SEC shredded Facebook's pre-IPO claims

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Devil

Facebook should and is entitled to count you as a user

In the web 2.0 model a user which is logged in, pushes likes, etc on third party sites is _WAY_ more valuable than a user that contributes contents because it provides actual marketing information which can directly translate into market analysis and advertisement targeting AKA revenue.

So f***book is in fact correct to count these.

Now as far as the other stuff - that does not surprise anyone on this site. Right?

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SpaceX confirms Falcon rocket suffered engine flame-out

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Re: Though

The "early" days did not have today's engine control and management systems. So a design which was not feasible in the "early" days may be the right way of doing it today.

In any case - the most long lived and successful launcher - the Soyuz is a multi-engine/multi-nozzle design.

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eBay frets as right to resell comes under scrutiny

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Devil

Devil's advocate mode

This precedent goes both ways. If it is not overthrown it will be only a matter of time until it is enforced in the other direction - for export.

All of those foreign students which study in the USA will be automatically criminals if they decide to take their old textbooks back home overseas and sell/lend/give them as a present to someone. The same applies to a lot of the peace corps and other charity programmes who trawl college and school bookshops and libraries for out-of-use textbooks for use in their 3rd world education drives.

If you look at the bigger picture this is beyond counterproductive. Textbooks are recurring purchases with regular reprints and regular printing of new editions. For each copy which is "illegaly" resold you get tens if not hundreds of copies which are bought via the regular channels.

It is in the publisher interest to get the biggest possible audience for a textbook to ensure that the the reprints and future editions are ordered by as many schools and students as possible. Artificially limiting textbooks by territory means losing mindshare and giving it away to other publishers.

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Massive strike at Foxconn's iPhone 5 factory

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Re: I love Luddites!

You are closer to the truth then you think.

Luddites (and their bretheren from the continent) were one of the first forms of labor revolt against using slavery practices on the modern industrialized ship floor. Their only problem was that they blamed the wrong reason - they blamed the machines instead of the owner and threw a "sabot" in its workings whenever they could. Hence the word "Sabotage".

In any case, China is another bit of history repeating. They are now about to learn what the west learned the hard way for several centuries: having proper unions, and proper labor code is an essential consequence of high tech manufacturing. As a factory owner you have to be a complete idiot to take the risk of employees throwing the proverbial "Ludd" SABOT into the proverbial workings of a multi-million dollar machine. It is better to haggle with the union once in a while and even have it strike once in a while, because a union organized strike under the auspices of the labor relations law is a predictable event. You can safely shut down the plant and restart it again (in fact the union may do it for you). Compare that to someone "dropping" the wrench into the workings of a million+ semiautomated electronics assembly line.

In any case, can someone pass me the popcorn please. China is utterly unprepared for what is to come next - having the "Luddite" movement and the worker revolts the West had in the 18th and 19th century. Neither are we (as we have moved all of our manufacturing there without a plan B).

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LOHAN plugs into some hot LiPo treatment

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Devil

Re: LiPo at altitude

Not just that.

LiPo capacity drops nearly exponentially with temperature.

I suspect it needs to keep itself warm as much as it needs to keep warm the motor. That will add some more weight and logistics around insulation.

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Archaeologists resume Antikythera Mechanism hunt

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Devil

Re: There aren't any

There would not be any for another reason - making one would have been very expensive by those days standards I would expect a ship to carry one (at most).

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Svalbard overtakes medieval summers

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Devil

Err... Isn't that from the dept of bleeding obvious?

Svalbard is at the end of the Gulfstream which according to all models during the medieval "warm" period was weaker than now. The medieval "warm" period had considerably more continental climate across Europe. So it was "warm" like the last ~ 18 moths +40C in summer, but -20C in winter too. For example, the Bay of Venice, Bosphorus, the Bay of Marseilles as well as the Black Sea had multiple recorded freezings in the 10th, 11th and 12th century.

They have not had one during this "global warming" bout. Yet. For that you need the temperature at Spitzbergen (whatever, I like the old name better) to drop further indicating an even weaker Gulfstream and not to rize.

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McFlurry McMisdemeanour costs Welsh lass McJob

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Devil

Re: Never mind the McFluffys

I suggest you watch "Falling Down": http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0106856/

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Devil

Re: "Mounsey may have a point" ho ho ho

I suggest you take a kitchen scale and see _EXACTLY_ how much 1g worth of chocolate sprinkling (which is made of porous chocolate) is. Note - sprinkling, not chocolate shavings (which are not porous).

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Re: Extras

Actually, all she needed to do for an appeal was to bring said chocolate pieces and a set of kitchen scales and demonstrate the difference between "normal", "stingy" and "lots". The chocolate used for such sprinklings is porous so the difference is not in "grams" as suggested by the register in the bootnote. It is in tens of milligrams (at best). If she puts a whole extra gram of sprinkling on top it form a layer.

Frankly, sacking someone for 50-100mg of chocolate is beyond grossly disproportional.

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Most biofuels fail green test: study

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Devil

So where does dual fuel - Ethanol + Oil production stand here

My french is very rusty, but if I understand it right the study assumes that oil/ethanol is a mutually exclusive choice. This is not so. Nearly all oil producing plants also have a significant plant mass byproduct. This can be converted to ethanol.

Example - sunflower = oil from the seeds, ethanol from the rather hefty plant mass.

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Scientists: 'Castration is the key to a longer life'

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Re: 'Castration is the key to a longer life' You first.

Quote from Wall-E:

I do not want to survive, I _WANT_ _TO_ _LIVE_ !!!

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Apple begs ex-Google bods to fix crap maps app

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Devil

Re: Open Street Map

Not really.

Other people have managed to achieve high quality navigation on mobile using Tom Tom licensed maps.

Sygic - it is the best cross platform Sat Nav and probably best offline sat nav for Adroid. I have not tried the iOS version, but I would expect it to be as good.

Apple should have bought it instead of this farce.

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Inphi: Don't skimp on memory for those virty servers

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Devil

Re: But what about clustered systems?

Seconded,

I would like to see the same benchmark run versus a microserver tray (something like Dell C5220).

The base price of a 12 microserver chassis with 32G RAM per node is way less than the cost of a 4 socket box spec-ed to the max RAM capacity.

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Made for each other: liquid nitrogen and 1,500 ping-pong balls

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Devil

Re: Amazing

More. Look carefully at the audience. Zoom into fullscreen if you have to. You will see that these are not the 9k paying students you are looking for.

This looks like a circus run for the entertainment of candidate foreign students during an open day tour. If memory serves me right you are allowed to charge these more than the base 9k fee which locals have to pay.

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Swiss railways ticked off at iOS clock knock-off

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Looks like average 50+ year old swiss clock

If you take a swiss clock from 50+ years back second hand is nearly always red and blobbed at the end. Even Omega used to do them this way.

These are the sole distinctive features - the rest is bog standard. So even if they had a trademark on it then, they have failed to defend it (as per trademark law) by chasing everyone and their dog in their _OWN_ country who did clocks to the same design.

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Did GM food cause GIANT TUMOURS IN RATS?

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Re: Need to independently study GM vs. "Roundup"

So was agent Orange. Originally...

With similar results. Apparently...

Frankly, as far as someone discovering statistically significant correlation between a weedkiller and cancer - I am not surprised. We have seen that movie before.

Same for the GM crops. I can bet a case of beer that they did not grow them in a lab environment free of weedkiller and bought them off the open market. If so, they are guaranteed to be contaminated with similar doses of weedkiller as to their "control" experiment. So that is not surprising either if you think of it - just an unclean negative control.

What is really bad news here is that if proven correct, it writes off the last "safe" weedkiller out there. Come to think about it - even if I do not use every second neighbor around me pours liters of that sh*t annually on their lawn to keep it clover-free, on their driveway to keep it weed-free and so on.

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Ten backpacks for tech-heads

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Devil

Too low rating for swissgear

I have a Hudson (slightly bigger version). However, if the pictures are correct this one has them too:

1. Passport/document pocket on top. Perfect for traveling - you do not spill your overflowing gadget store on the front every time you need to show an ID at an airport check-in.

2. The "document/spare clothes" stores is not big. It is enormous compared to any similar laptop-size/overall size backpack. I used to have a similar size Dicota which could barely fit a few folders there. Here you can fit the spare clothes for a 3 day trip. In fact, there is enough space for documents in the laptop compartment so this one is clearly designed with the techie day trip in mind.

3. Very nice sturdy handle on top - once again, helpful when getting it into and out of luggage racks when traveling.

Downsides: the side braces are a bit fiddly (elastics) and the combination of brace + pocket does not hold a flask very well. That is probably the only area where my old Dicota was better (it had classic belts instead of elastics).

It is definitely the "original" swiss army knife of techie backpacks. You may pay for it, but it works.

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Microsoft, RIM ink new licensing agreement

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Re: $300K, idiots

QNX already has reasonable filesystem support including the ext2(and later) filesystem family so it is not that. http://www.qnx.com/developers/docs/6.4.0/neutrino/sys_arch/fsys.html

Nothing to investigate by the way.

1. Your average SD card usually has a simplistic wear leveling algo which is designed to work with FAT. To be more exact it is designed to compensate for FAT constantly scribbling onto the file allocation bitmaps in the beginning of the disk. While most of them will work fine with other fs that is not guaranteed by the manufacturer so as a device manufacturer you prefer not to try. One more thing to go wrong :(

2. As a device manufacturer your assumption is that Joe Average Luser will pass family photos between the device and a Windows machine. If you do not interop for that you do not sell. The easiest way to interop nowdays is USB storage. The days of sync software are so passe that it is not worth it to discuss it.

3. If you have to interop with Windows you have to license patents for that which Microsoft holds. C'est la vie. The only leeway you can get here is if these patents are covered by one of the covenants from court orders for anticompetitive behavior. By the way, FAT is the de-facto standard for consumer device interop so I am really surprised that the EU commission has not looked into MSFT licensing practices for this.

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Devil

Re: Lipstick on a pig

FAT - yes. exFAT? Not so much.

The only use case I can see here is so that the phone can read cards that have been vandalized by the Windows 8 family of products into this "new FAT" format prior to that.

I am not convinced that this is a usecase which is worth paying for.

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Smartmobe Wi-Fi blabs FAR TOO MUCH about us, warn experts

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Devil

You do not need to stick a CA

Just ask for WiFi sign-up with certs pretending to be a particular high-profile site - amazon, yahoo, paypal, when the user asks to connect to that site.

Broken AP sign-up certificates and broken AP sign-up screens are endemic and most users accept them without thinking and without _LOOKING_ at what the cert pretends to be. You can even pretend to offer "free" for giving a mail or answering a questionnaire so it looks realistic.

After that transparently proxy with a MIM any connections to that site. Capture credentials. No need to stick a CA at all.

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Prof casts doubt on Stuxnet's accidental 'great escape' theory

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Prof does not know what he is talking about

LAN extension is quite common method of delivering Internet in the 3rd world and ex-Soviet block.

Plug a cheap switch in the basement of the apartment block, everyone gets a Cat5, all flat, virus paradise (most people do not run CPEs either).

Cheap as chips too - costs per sub is a few $.

So if the virus was designed to stick to LAN and an infected machine was connected to one of these Internet networks it would have escaped same as on LAN.

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Apple Lightning adaptors reveal limitations

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Devil

Re: Yikes!

That depends on what are the license conditions and the royalties. The new connector will surely have a few patents slapped on it (this is Apple we are talking about after all).

Apple effectively killed the 3rd party power adapter market for the Macs a few years back. I would not be surprised if they refuse to issue licenses for power-only accessories for the new one (they definitely will not kill the home/car electronics interface golden goose).

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iPhone 5: skinny li'l fella with better display, camera, software

Voland's right hand
Silver badge
Devil

Re: And?

Apple user population are on 2 year contracts. This may not be a compelling reason to throw out your shiny No 4. It will however clean up the "upgrade shiny No 3/3GS" market.

By the way - same as you are I am underwhelmed. This does not mean however that it will not be a commercial success.

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