* Posts by Voland's right hand

1610 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Bill Gates – I WISH I was like Zuck and spoke Chinese. Yep, I drink poo

Voland's right hand
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Trollface

Re: French - Anything but easy.

My exact thought. Dear old Bill. As clueless as ever.

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The new Falcon Heavy: MOST POWERFUL ROCKET since the Apollo moonshots

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A bit economical with the truth in that video

Well, the most lift since Saturn _IS_ Energia. 100 tons. While quite impressive, the Heavy Falcon is not just there, yet. It is however the closest we have gotten to Energia so far.

Otherwise, all that is missing from the picture is Elon buying a volcano somewhere. Everything else - he already has it.

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I ain't afraid of no GHOST – securo-bods

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Utter bollocks

You can restart the services one by one if you want. No need to reboot. Or restart only the ones that are clear to be affected (exim).

By the way - debian patched eglibc packages do not restart it which is weird as they are usually quite a**l about it and have a list of packages they need to restart on upgrade (usually exim, ssh and inetd).

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Official: Whiteboxer Super Micro is a $2bn server company

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Re: a mere 20 years...

Well, I guess you can get somewhere by having having constant rev fans in a bad airflow design, no regard for MTBF beyond warranty combined with a noise and thermal envelope which would have made the Concord Olympus engines stall with envy.

At least this has been my personal experience with their boxes over the years. I have bought them once or twice and I have regretted every single time I bought them (while quaffing ibuprophen to quench the headache after installing on them).

I admit - it is a good manufacturer for "rack-n-stackers" which have thousands of guys who do nothing else but pull dead ones out a rack and stick blank ones all day long (provided they have good ear protection). Anything else - not so much.

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'One day, YOU won't be able to SENSE the INTERNET,' vows Schmidt

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Err... You missed the point

I suggest you go read the detailed description of a civilization with rooms with 360 degree displays.

It is called Farenheit 451

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Oi, Aussie sports fans! Take that selfie stick and stick it

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Re: Wouldn't this problem take care of itself?

Nice croc

Why just the croc? Insert your choice of [ trapdoor spider | jellyfish | snake | shark ].

In any case, I like the idea of the selfie zone. Can we have it right next to sharp bends (especially at car races) so nature can take its course.

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BOT AN ABOMINATION: Mechanical DRONE VAMPIRE spreads wings

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Re: Nice.

Inherent design problem.

Bats cannot do that either (though they need a tree, wall, etc instead of a meatbag).

I was actually more impressed by how this moved in the air to be honest (again - not surprising).

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Microsoft: We bought Skype. We make mobiles.. Oh, HANG ON!

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Re: I wish Skype worked

Welcome to the P2P nature of the beast I am afraid. As long as it remains P2P that will be the case. The performance is unpredictable. This is why I use it only for IM. If I have to do a call I pull hangouts and if I have to do a conference I (grudgingly) use Webex.

Though frankly there is very little P2P left in Skype as it is, because the supernodes are now mostly from a population of dedicated server instances seeded on Microsoft Azure. None the less, the lack of predictable performance inherent to the architecture is still there.

From that perspective the massive b***rdization of SIP in Lync is better. It also works nowdays - even on Mac and Android.

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Amazon gobbles chips firm Annapurna to speed up cloudy data centers

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Re: There are other reasons for the networking costs

Can you back that up?

Cost per GBit forwarded is in line with it. Have a look at the 1G and 10G port cost curves for example. When 1GBit came out 15 years ago it was in the range of several k per router card (the original GSR trident and its Juniper equivalent) and ~ 2K per NIC. It is now 10£ with the curve complying with Moore's law all along. The same goes for mid-range routing/switching processor costs normalized by PPS or GBit. 10GB ports and NICs are also going down the same way.

The problem is that the requirement for Gbit forwarded has grown more or less with the same curve (or faster) resulting in the end-cost of networking equipment required per rack, per datacenter and per company being constant or growing. That is expected - it "serves" a Moore's law governed population of compute.

Asking for networking kit cost in a datacenter to drop in absolute numbers is a bit disingenious as this in fact implies a faster than Moore's law drop.

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There are other reasons for the networking costs

Well, while I have considerable respect for James, I have to disagree with him somewhat.

Networking equipment itself is also generally following the Moore's law. Networking equipment cost != networking costs and this is where he is being a bit disingenuous.

Most cloud providers tried (inclusive of Amazon) to do DIY networking done by software engineer as a replacement for proper resilience which is using algorithms and protocols for which there is a mathematical proof of convergence.

For Amazon this cheapskating experiment ended up in the majestic clusterf***s of 2013 when they had several zone-wide outages due to unhandled network failures.

From that moment onwards Amazon has been buying proper equipment to augment the DIY. This expense however is a natural result of a failed networking experiment (for which James should do some Mea Culpa) combined with a failed design (again, Mea Culpa needed) and the cost of fixing it (again - Mea Culpa James). It is not your normal purchasing and cost curve to which Moore law should apply so he should stop complaining.

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Is it humanly possible to watch Gigli and Battlefield Earth back-to-back?

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What?

No Highlander 2 and 3?

<Meldrew Mode>

I can't believe it

</Meldrew Mode>

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SPACE the FINAL FRONTIER: These are the images of COMET PROBE ROSETTA

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Anuket having a deep crack

Someone has been overdoing the Egyptian mythology or Stargate SG1. Probably the latter.

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Kim Dotcom flails desperately, launches chat service

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Flop

The flopping sound you hear is this falling on its face.

Chat is an extremely crowded mature market. I do not see how a new player can even dent the monopoly of something like Google Talk. The fact that most Tier 2 chat providers have met their maker over the last 2 years speaks volumes :)

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Four TB good ,three TB bad, says disk drive reliability study

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Woaaa...

43%??? Nuts. I am glad I did not buy Seagate this time (I got a couple of 3 TB drives for a video MAID).

Good to see the stats though - I was just about to order some drives to refresh my house server. After seeing these there may be "food for thought" and dropping back to 2TB instead of 3.

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LEAKED: Samsung's iPHONE 6 KILLER... the Samsung Galaxy S6

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Re: And the price will be?

Trying to imitate Ivanova from Babylon 5: 8 cores... EIGHT!!! Whoaaa...

What do you really need in a phone FFS? Camera? I wold rather have a compact with decent optics (along the Nikon L330 lines). Games? There are tablets for that. Really, what else may you need an 8 core for? I cannot get the 4 cores in my desktop busy unless I compile something for crying out loud. And 8 cores?

I updated the "home fleet" using Xperia Z series little brother - the SP. 150£ off end-of-line sale, fully Cyanogen capable (as a future safety), unlockable bootloader, Mirrorlink, camera on par with the new iPhone (if not better), Gig of RAM and dual 1.7GHz core crait/adreno, 32+5G of Flash (mmc), LTE, bgan WiFi, NFC, BT 4.0, 4.6 inch 319 DPI screen.

So no new phones coming soon and definitely no Sammy the Plastic Easily Broken Whammy in this house. Every time I have had to deal with Sammy phones, tablets or monitors over the last 6 years it has always ended up in dealing with their repair shop. No thanks.

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Oz father and son team plan suborbital spaceplane

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What are the civilian applications?

50kg payload, starting from 40km up (baloon), hmm... The military applications are fairly clear - there is bugger all 99% of 3rd world AA defences can do against that. Now what once again were the civilian ones?

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Oracle opens Uncle Larry's cut-price bit barn emporium

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Looking at the numbers

The big difference comes from RHEL licenses and NetApp. Surprise, surprise...

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US military finds F-35 software is a buggy mess

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Re: Maybe they've adopted Agile/SCRUM

That is an interesting idea - nuclear weapon delivery system in an endless beta...

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Come and Twiddle Tek Gear's one handed keyboard

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I am looking at the angle of those fingers

And I see a 3 letter abbreviation - RSI.

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EU copyright law: Is the Pirate Party's MEP in FAVOUR of it?

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Re: The girl in the picture

Read the fine jpg filename: http://regmedia.co.uk/2008/09/26/pariscollage.jpg?x=648&y=429&crop=1

Questions?

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Re: No surprise - Pirates want free stuff.

Quote: No surprise - Pirates want free stuff.

Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.

I did not notice the report saying anything about free. Based on what I have read so far it is very clear that all it wants is an equality of rights between man and machine for reading and an equality of rights and obligations between physical and electronic content.

One of the reasons why modern civilization is where it is now is the Statute of Anne. If it was not for it, science and technology would be (probably) at least 100 year back from where it is today.

What the publishers want is to roll back the clock 400 years and return us to the days of Bloody Mary and the Licensing Act of 1662 which gave the publisher more or less unlimited rights _INCLUDING_ the right of ownership of content. No thanks - we tried it. It results in:

1. A guaranteed publisher monopoly

2. New content not being published because the publisher is perfectly happy reprinting old shite which it owns

3. Lack of reimbursement of content creators because all the money ends up with the publishers.

Sounds familiar, does not it?

Over the last 20 years digital publishers have managed to roll back half of the Statute of Anne (and whatever is copied from it to other country legislations) provisions to the days of Bloody Mary for digital content. I am not surprised that [insert your publisher trade body] is screaming murder here. They screamed murder in 1710 when the Statute of Anne was drafted and enacted too. After all who would give away voluntarily a jolly good combination of monopoly, entitlement to violate fair use and contract law with an icing of criminalization of what should be civil offences on top.

We know what is the endgame of this - no thanks. Time to redress it and apply what was already applied once to redress it 300 years ago. Nothing more, nothing less. RTFL (Read the Fine Law).

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Microsoft wants LAMP for wireless mobe charger

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Fantastic

So we now multiply the efficiency of light generation (sub-70% even for the best LED lighting) with the efficiency of light conversion under (on average) a suboptimal angle which we can safely assume to be under 15% for a grand total of ~ 10%.

Earth to Dave: "Can I have my charger back"

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SCIENTIFIC CONSENSUS that 2014 was record HOTTEST year? NO

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Re: Cut the sh*t!

We can use any reasonable bucket of how that is measured.

This is the key problem. There ain't one. The biggest problem with temperature data sets is that a significant number of ground stations which were originally located in the countryside upon establishment have ended with the grounds of the neigbouring metropolis over time.

As a result the time series are:

1. Not continuous while presented as such.

2. The set within Eu/Western Russia and USA which is representative is actually quite small and covers only a relatively recent period of time when having automated stations with radio connectivity to the central office became technically feasible.

3. I have yet to see a single study which instead of sucking numbers out of thin air (Berkley sets inclusive) uses strictly _ONLY_ stations which are outiside urban areas by more than 100km+. There are such stations (mostly coastal observations from stations associated with lighthouses), however there is no analysis which uses just them. Everyone finds it "essential" to stick into the equations Eu and USA data which is corrupted by _LOCAL_ industiral/urban heat.

Note - I am not saying anything about CO2, models, etc. I just want to see statistics done on the only 100% clean dataset which is readily available - just stick solely to observations taken at maritime navigational facilities (lighthouses, etc) and throw out all the ones within 100km of a large city. I have yet to see any and I could not care less about the "scientific value of the guesstimate used in the correction factors for urban area data".

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MARS NEEDS BROADBAND, insists Elon Musk

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Wrong question altogether

The question is, does the remaining one billion have the money to pay their Virgin Broadband bill.

Monthly 40£ per head? In Subsaharan Africa? Do not think so. You are looking at more like 0.4£ per head (tops).

So, frankly, doing something about getting that region out of poverty should probably come first. As a side effect this will go a long way in fighting at least some of our other problems such as the refugee crisis, extremism, etc.

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Snowden doc leak 'confirms' China stole F-35 data

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Re: This is probably very bad..

do a Tu-144 at the Paris Air Show type deal.

Which part? Crash from being harassed by opponent fighter jets? Or the widows of the crews being paid French government pension (a de-facto admission of what exactly happened there)?

In any case, what the Chinese are developing does not seem to be an equivalent of F-35. It looks more like a heavy stealth figher-BOMBER (with emphasis on the second half) designed for elimination of missile sites in a potential conflict with its two nuclear armed neighbours.

As far as fighter (including carrier fighter role) they are presently looking at buying and/or license manufacturing Su-PAKFA instead.

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Twitter complies with Turkey's 'national security' blackout demand – BLOCKS newspaper's tweets

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Re: Turkeys and other such stupid birds

Sorry, what exactly are you smoking?

Turkey in Eu is a prospect which is presently as distant as Lucipher snowploughing my street. It can happen only over France dead body and France is not alone there either.

Turkey is a member of NATO from the same days when there were 3 Fascist dictatorships in member states (Portugal, Spain and Greece) so being a member is not particularly indicative of anything as far as democracy is concerned. It was just "politically expedient" at the time.

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‘Whatever happened to Vladimir Putin?’ and other crap New Year prophesies

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Re: Y2K

No they will not.

Anything built today is built using lead free solder. It will grow hairlines and short long before then.

It is not likely that there will be a repeat of clinically in(s)ane situation observed ~ 5-8 years ago in certain telecommunications operator where they had signs on doors in exchanges "do not enter" because the boards in the switching equipment would disintegrate from looking at them. The kit still worked despite the boards being just one knock short of turning to dust because the solder had lead in it. This is not likely with new kit - all lead replacements have some degree of hairline growth over time so they will short electrically before 2038.

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FERTILISER DOOM warning! PESKY humans set to WIPE selves out AGAIN

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Re: CO2 alarmism

@StephenA

While CO2 is subject to modelling, predictions, statistics, etc P and N pollution is something you can touch, see and most importantly smell. It is also trivial to measure.

There are regions like Brittany where iIt is so f*** bad that for example you can _SMELL_ it across the English channel - 40 miles away. There are already deaths from it too. Two years ago there was at least one dead from hydrogen sulphide poisoning when trying to clear it. This is in addition to deaths of wild animals and pets which is just "part of the course".

It is also on its way to get to the same level in many in other places - Black Sea, some places around the northern rim of the Mediteranean, Mexico Bay, Yellow Sea - you name it. Each of them is measurable (no needs to juggle a model with CO2) and quantifiable with hard experimental data.

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Lasarus Long quote on stupidity comes to mind.

1. Nitrogen and to be more exact Nitrate/Nitrite is not farce. It is actually something actively looked at presently with the regulations being tightened by the day in Eu. Unfortunately, rest of the world is not following suit.

2. Same for phosphorus.

3. If you think that these are a "replacement farce" I suggest you go and sit on a Brittany or Normandy beach in late summer. NEXT TO THE WATER. RIGHT THERE, NEXT TO THE ROTTING ALGAE. Right where the boar is in the pic. We can manifest benevolence and call the emergency services for you. Or maybe not - you do not believe that this is a problem, right?

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2011/jul/27/brittany-beaches-toxic-algae-boars

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BMW: ADMEN have asked us for YOUR connected car DATA

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Or connect it yourself

Just buy a dumb and connect it yourself. Yeah, I know - this is rapidly becoming something that is off the menu.

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Missing defective BEAGLE FOUND ON MARS! Amazing claim

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Re: Next step

Well, we are half the way there, there was a successful launch of a Reliant Robin. Now which Rover model shall we chose...

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Top EU court: Ryanair data barrel must be left unscraped

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Close

I read it slightly differently. The definition of the directive is public + one that warrants copyright protection based on standard originality, etc criteria.

The way I read it is that the court has CORRECTLY identified that Ryanair's database is _NOT_ a database. It is an interim representation of machine generated price data which does not fit the copyright requirement of originaltity. Hence it is _NOT_ copyrightable and a directive which is written for copyrightable databases cannot be applied.

However, if that does not apply, what should apply is contract law/usage agreement which Ryanair has said "no scraping".

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Bacon-smoking locals provoke noxious Chinese smog

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It's bacon

What technology? It's bacon so quoting the muppet show: "There is no Question in my mind. There is no Answer either".

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'F*** you', exclaims Google Translate app, politely

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Re: Lost in translation

you mean like mentioning Gary Neville in Liverpool?

Neah, other stuff like the actual meanings of amateur ornithology or zoology terms. Hint - in Georgia and South Carolina shag is a folk dance, and in non-USA English beaver is a water dwelling rodent.

So test no 1 - can it translate Jarvis Cocker from UK English to USA English. If it succeeds on the lyrics of I Spy (as sung by Jarvis) it gets my vote :)

Though that one is easy. I would really like to see it translate Russian in a humour context (with its usual nested 4-5 levels of double meanings).

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Re: costly

According to Pulp Fiction it is not.

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David Cameron: I'm off to the US to get my bro Barack to ban crypto – report

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Re: It is banned, just indirectly

you can just bump them or snap them

Some of the newer Eu entry cylinder have one or more pins which are shallow drilled making them fairly bump resistant. Not sure if the one I have is one of these (I would not be surprised).

In any case, what I find interesting is that the police and HMG keeps promoting b***cks in terms of trivial anti-crime measures (like the "Did you spy on your neighbour" aka Neighborhood Watch) and or CCTV schemes while being vehemently against even minimal measures that can provide a private individual with improved anti-crime protection.

1. Encryption of personal sensitive data.

2. Higher security locks, personal safes, etc.

3. Security of key online data.

Curious minds wonder you know... Curious minds also remember exactly where did owning any of these technical artefacts got you in Stalin days too...

Curious minds also wonder why what they promote has secondary use (CCTV) for the purposes of mass surveilance and/or making people acustomed to being under mass surveilance (watch & co). Curious minds also remember that Stalin loved that too...

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It is banned, just indirectly

Have you tried to install an average (not top of the line) European lock in the UK to replace the POS that any beginner Eastern European crim can pick with a toenail? Show the cylinder from your "High Security" Yale/Masterlock/etc lock to someone on the other side of the channel. They will laugh their arse off hysterically.

I tried last week - I put a reasonably up-to-date German cylinder from a well known manufacturer. The model is sold widely on Amazon and used on the continent where it is considered minimal security (it barely gets past basic insurance reqs). It is combination of cuts and coded dimples - half way between a classic lock and a modern fully blown Euro Plus.

Well, the result was that I was peasantly surprised by finding that NOT A SINGLE key cutting service in the UK can cut keys for it. I will now have to cut keys for it in the local supermarket next time I am on the continent. So you choice for lock in the UK is either a POS which can be picked in under 15 seconds by a beginner Moscow/Sofia/Bucharest/Kiev burglar or a fully blown Euro Plus series coded lock which costs an arm and a leg and a prosthetic. It is quite interesting that you are also "encouraged" to disclose the latter on your insurance (and you know very well who has real time access to the insurance database).

Now, I wonder why this is the case... Historical examples come to mind. Stalin had all of the following banned for the general population:

1. Carrying and possession offensive weapons of any kind.

2. High security locks.

3. Encryption of any shape or form.

Hmm... Interesting similarities here...

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VMware finds new post-paranoia RAM-saving tricks

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Re: tps doesn't work for me anyway

I have noticed TPS seems quite effective with windows VMs

Windows zeroes unused pages, Linux does not. Linux does not keep any free memory around either - it is used for buffers and caching straight away. As a result, in a VM environment with page sharing enabled Windows VMs tend to combine better to smaller footprint.

The issue demonstrated by the researchers is common across all means of KSM/TPS/Whatever Page Sharing. By measuring the timing of a write page fault you can determine if the system has made the a read-write page into a read-only copy-on-write behind your back (essential to share it). If it has, this means that there is at least one more VM on the system which has the same page. From there on the actual exploitation depends on the data in the page. AES key is a tall order, finding out if another VM on the same system runs vulnerable software is considerably more interesting real life example.

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TERROR in SPACE: ISS 'Nauts end panic by switching computer off and on again

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Re: What did you expect?

Laptops used by crew day to day are exclusively Linux since 2013

I have no idea what US environmental control uses, but it is not likely to be Windows. VXworks on a radiation/space rated PPC is a more likely candidate.

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Re: Can you believe it?

Well, percussive maintenance usually helps too.

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TERROR in SPACE: ISS 'NAUTS FLEE 'gas leak' to Russian module

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Re: You can't get to there from here

The russian one. Soyuz attaches to any of the russian modules (multiple attachment points). Not sure where it is attached now.

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MAINFRAMES are SO NOT DEAD: IBM's launched a new one

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Err... wrong market need

There is a market need for "safety without investing into software failover and clustering".

These require qualified software developers, testers and in most cases fairly complex test setups to verify failure paths. That costs money and quite a bit of it too.

This is what mainframe addresses and it does it pretty well too.

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PlayStation-processor-powered plutonium probe prepares Pluto pics

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Re: Routers... in Space!

Why bother? Excuse me for being blunt, but we are not putting anything out into that region anytime soon. Pu 238 is not manufactured any more so even if we get our s**t together to launch something there is nothing to fuel it with. It will take years to replenish the supply to a reasonable level so that outer solar system launches can start once more. Am 241 generators are still in their infancy, it will take a decade or so to get to the point where they can be incorporated into designs.

So from that perspective the overall situation with missions past the Saturn orbit looks pretty grim.

Otherwise, from the perspective of "Earth to Dave" communication the gain and signal to noise ratios of the dishes and dish systems harnessed for this purpose on Earth are phenomenal. There is nothing you can gain on top of that using a space relay.

This leaves only one use case for an interplanetary relay - the communicating probe being behind the Sun and us in a desperate need to have semi-realtime link to it. Frankly, we are not exploring the solar system at a rate where this is necessary. Once it becomes necessary we are perfectly capable of slotting something into Earth-Sun L4 or L5 which should do the job. Several probes have passed reasonably close to that already (STEREO-A/B, Spitzer, etc).

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You go fast, but we go 'further' and 'deeper' – Voda tells 'Speedy' EE

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Re: Bandwidth is overrated

Quote: With game downloads now regularly topping 20gb I've had to learn patience with my 50mbit broadband

Reality check in the context of the article: So, 20GB game download to your phone?

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Amazon's new EC2 compute instances run on SECRET INTEL CHIPS

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Lovely part number

Lovely part number. Just drop the 2 from the front.

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Bloke in Belgium tries to trademark Je Suis Charlie slogan

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Neah...

You are looking at the wrong news source.

According to verified sources it is 100% Klingon.

http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/society/birmingham-now-100-percent-klingon-2015011394318

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Icelandic brewers knock up whale 'nad beer

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Who told you that it will be thrown away

Whale 'nads, kidney (or to be more exact the glands sitting on top of the kidney in mammals), hypothalamus, pancreas, etc used to go straight into the pharma hormone extraction business.

So this used to be not thrown away - it is about the same evolutionary distance from us as cows, but MUCH bigger volumes to feed into the same process (so even complex protein based stuff like growth factors, etc could be extracted and used in humans). Similarly, other stuff went into cosmetics, etc.

It is thrown away now as a result of conservationists efforts because using it does not pass the cost-benefit and security risk assessment in pharmaceutical companies.

Do not understand me wrong - killing endangered species when there is absolutely no need for it is a CRIME. However, once they are dead, they are dead. So wasting them in this manner only because not a single one of the pharma companies wants to see yet another GreenPeace demo in its parking is a CRIME too.

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Professor's BEAGLE lost for 10 years FOUND ON MARS

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There were a handfull of pixels sitting on a wall...

A few pixels in this photo, a few pixels in the next one, and next one, and next one...

And a some rocket science level image processing. Actually not rocket science, spy sat science.

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Attackers planting banking Trojans in industrial systems

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Why use cryptolocker?

I would have thought that the threat to turn on/off the water flow to a city of 1M+ until all major pipes rupture from hydraulic shock or the threat to dump a few hundred tons of industrial chemicals, sewerage, etc into the nearby river (and call the EPA immediately therafter) are considerably more effective ransom demands than encrypting a hard drive.

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