* Posts by Voland's right hand

2771 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Germans stick traffic lights in pavements for addicts who can't take their eyes off phones

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That's going to cost to install city-wide

I would not be so sure. LEDs are pretty easy to install and retrofit. It can be rolled out along with resurfacing and general improvements to sidewalks to minimize costs as well. In any case, the usefulness of this one is "to be determined".

If we copy a LED application, I'd rather have us copy the Eastern European approach. They recently started augmenting standard traffic lights for cars with matching LED strips on the gantries. Highly visible, cheap, reliable, easy to install and a big improvement on overall road safety.

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Ted Cruz knows where you live – if you downloaded his app

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Re: Not surprising...

Easily - it is a standard behavior for a politician. It is called "political integrity".

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Trouble at t'spinning rust mill: Disk drive production is about to head south

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Re: I'm puzzled

The data is accumulated on non-PC devices nowdays and from there all usual suspects do everything in their power to move the data to "their" cloud and not to consumer's own storage.

Starting with small annoyances like Android removing mounted pass-through SD card support and finishing with outright sabotage.

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F-35's dodgy software in the spotlight again

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Re: Now: Slower, less maneuverable and with an all new blue screen heads up display

@SkippyBing.

According to the Indians, you did read the link you posted right? Yes, I did as well as other (neither Indian, nor UK) sources.

If you note - RAF claim is that it did not use their jets full capability. Deliberately... Yeah, right. Cough... Cough... Cough... Sorry, choked on my coffee while laughing. As far as lame excuses go, this just broke the lame-o-meter.

Indians quite deliberately failed to mention that the worst of the wipeout was in 1:1 WVR. In a 1:1 within visual range the fact that Sukhoi has vector thrust, is supermaneuverable and has a very wide short range missile engagement field of view comes to play - it can wipe out anyone and anything that is not - f.e. the Eurofighter. The 0:12 number looks about right too.

The issue is that some of the tactics which give it the 1:1 WVR advantate also result in it exposing itself if the target happens to have a wingman. RAF's non-1:1 WVR results looked better, but Indians still won most of those too by the way.

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Re: Anyone seen the rabbit hole?

What idiot even *considered* that sticking mission planning and analysis in the same package as spares ordering?

It is called "moving to the cloud". Though shall not question the idea of moving to the cloud.

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Re: Now: Slower, less maneuverable and with an all new blue screen heads up display

if "antiquated" F15s and F16s flown by 3rd world countries blew our F35s out of the air

If they manage to close in to within visual range, probably they will.

F35's survival chances against recent Russian (and their chinese clones) fighters within visual range are likely to be worse than the Eurofighter (slower and less maneuverable). So if it encounters a well trained air force using even remotely up-to-date aircraft its only chance is to cleanly kill all of its opponents outside visual range with long range missiles. If it does not - it is toast.

Eurofighter WVR kill score against the by now aging Su-30 is 0:12. The RAF had its arse handed to them on a plate by the Indians last year. They scored zero "kills" after close in and they "lost" all of their aircraft. F15 WVR kill rate is 1:9. Though that one can be believed to be rigged deliberately to justify buying more F-22s): Reference for both: http://theaviationist.com/2015/08/08/have-indian-su-30s-really-dominated-raf-typhoons-in-aerial-combat-with-a-12-0-scoreline-most-probably-not/

I would not expect F35 to fare any better within visual range. Probably worse.

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Thunderbird is GO: Mozilla prepares to jettison mail client

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Re: Still around?

Given the quality of webmail services

Some of us do not like to make all of our dirty underwear available to Google for detailed inspection so they can monetize better how to screw us. Ditto for other "services".

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Er... beg to differ

Thunderbird is a red-headed stepchild in Mozilla.

Mozilla has wasted money on anything and everything - Mobile OS, etc in the last 5 years. At the same time they provided only the bare minimum (if not less) to something which has a loyal user base and is an essential part of most Linux desktops.

With such a loving parent, it is better for it to be taken by social services and adopted.

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Remain in the EU and help me snoop on the world, says Theresa May

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Re: @Voland

Do you still think that submitting to the ECHR is just like signing an international treaty?

ECHR scope, authority and submission to it are a part of an international treaty.

It is a treaty Britain invented (Winston Churchill, 1943), drafted (post-war 1949-1950, too lazy to dig out the actual names of foreign office and law dignitaries which did it), signed as a founding country (1950) and has kept signing every amendment (14 protocols or thereabouts) ever since.

If anyone needs meds this is the anti-ECHR brigade. Whatever is given to people having constant delusions and living in la-la land.

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Re: ECHR is also part of the N.Ireland Peace agreement

transferring such powers to an unrepresentative body over whom we have no democratic control.

Can you stop repeating this Gove, Treasonous May and Co bulshit. Part of the ECHR convention is that the judges are democratically elected and represent the countries which participate. So let's go through your regurgitation of High Chancellor May and the Spider (dunno Gove or Boris) drivel:

First. UNREPRESENTATIVE MY ARSE. It represents all participating countries. Adding a country to the council of Europe requires agreement of all others and it gets a judge. This includes UK. UK has agreed to every single expansion of representation since 1949. Every single time. In fact, it was instrumental to several expansions of the council.

Second. The election of the individual judges is done at the Parliamentary council of Europe which are surprise, surprise appointed by the parliaments who are participants to the convention. So they are democratically elected including by the UK, albeit indirectly. Full list is here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_judges_of_the_European_Court_of_Human_Rights

Third. The conditions are part of the convention. UK is a founding signatory to the convention and it drafted that "contract". In fact, it was Winston Churchill's idea in the first place. If the UK did not want the ECHR to have power over its courts it should not have drafted the f*** "contract" this way in the first place. So the conditions "under which it is demanded" are written by UK legal and politicians in the first place. They are no more and no less and they are something UK wrote initially and agreed to. Do not like - go demonstrate in front of Winston's monument in London. That is the right place to do that by the way. Do you dare?

Fourth. The only country which has a problem with having the rest of Europe verify that it is not descending into "Strength through Unity. Unity through Faith" is Belarus. This summarizes where our future High Chancellor(ess) stands. No need to say more.

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Re: ECHR is also part of the N.Ireland Peace agreement

Replying to myself in order to keep the joke and the serious argument separate.

On a more serious note, her (and the other lunatics) issue with the ECHR and HR convention is that it has primacy over UK law. She and the out "lunatics" are spellbound by the idea that "Parliament is Sovereign and shall not be bound".

What you just tried to explain and give for a reason is an international treaty which is a binding obligation which binds the Parliament. As far as her (and Gove, Boris, etc) logic applies any international treaties and any international obligations ratified by UK might as well have been printed on the toilet paper they used this morning. Parliament is sovereign and shall not be bound. Wipe arse with the treaty and who cares about the BOOM afterwards. Worked fine for centuries, should work fine now, right?

Well, not really. We live in a different day and age. Once you take on an international obligation, you stick to it as untangling yourself from one is not as easy as for our ancestors. We no longer fight a major war every 20 years which wipes all treaties clean slate so they are now around for decades and get built over and intertwined. For example - all Eu treaties build on top of ECHR.

So frankly, the next person starting the "sovereign and..." should stuff it. This includes her grace, the future High Chancellor Teresa May.

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Mushroom

Re: ECHR is also part of the N.Ireland Peace agreement

Unpick that.

That is easy. BOOM. Now the, BOOM, consequences, BOOM, are another, BOOM, matter. BOOM.

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Salt mine will not be enough

There is one minor problem with her idea.

ECHR membership is an Eu membership condition. Out of ECHR and European Human Right convention automatically invokes the "rule of law" procedures. No nation has gone down this road before so the I would not wager on the result. The "rule of law" was invoked on Poland for the first time ever and we are yet to see what the result will be.

IMHO an Eu member suspending the ECHR convention will end up with an ejection from the Eu.

So she might as well join Gove and openly proclaim her intentions instead of trying to get them through the backdoor.

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If Android’s wings are clipped, other Google platforms may gain

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Least likely

All of these activities will create foundations which Google can control, and which will support the continuous expansion of its plat-form, the element of all this which actually delivers revenues via services, applications, content and advertising.

Nope. It will not. In order to do these, it will leverage its "significant market power" (as defined in Eu competition law) in other areas. Trying to do this is a nearly automatic 10% of Google's worldwide turnover into the Greece rescue benevolent fund combined with regulatory intervention.

This is an essential difference between USA and Eu law:

1. Eu does not require a monopoly to intervene, having a sufficient market share to bend the market conditions is sufficient intervention grounds. Google has that in services, mobile OS, search and advertising - every single area mentioned in this write up.

2. Trying to leverage an area where you have a significant market power to "invade" another one is an automatic intervention. It may not happen today, it may not happen tomorrow, but it is guaranteed to happen and may be backdated by more than a decade for fine purposes if need be.

So yeah, sure, Google can try to strong arm its way into _ANY_ area it likes using existing assets. It is guaranteed to get whacked. Even the astronomical amount of money it has used to sponsor TTIP and friends will not help it here, because it is an _EXISTING_ legislation - so TTIP arbitrage rules do not apply.

It is one of the interesting aspects of Eu market - a player which has reached the "significant market power" criteria in one market is actually disadvantaged in entering new markets or expanding in markets where it is not in a pole position as it cannot leverage most of its existing assets. Compared to that a minor player can cross-bundle and leverage as much as they like - until they reach the "power" criteria in one of them.

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Ten years in the clink, file-sharing monsters! (If UK govt gets its way)

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Re: His (her) Master's Voice

There is a word for this kind of behaviour by a women, Whore

Why only in women? The moment you apply this term to politicians it transcends sexual orientation.

As my dad used to say. Son, never mistake a v**ina for a c*nt. The former is an essential part of anatomy in half of the human population. The latter is a type of character, usually male and most often found in politicians and celebrities.

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Anonymous whales on Denmark, Iceland with OpKillingBay DDoS

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Re: Anonymous = failure

Since being founded. The more paranoiac part of me still thinks that Anonymous in its current form is failed black op. Someone _WANTED_ to associate the symbolism in V for Vendetta with negative in the public eye. They have mostly succeeded too.

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Romania suffers Eurovision premature ejection

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You are mistaking the contest (which is pocket change) with overall access to EBU material. EBU material != contest.

Romania has failed to pay for their EBU dues and content they got (and used) from the EBU.

As far as putting Simon and the Eurovision contest crew and participants on the same boat without water, food and oars and letting them sail into the sunset - I am with you. That would be a splendid use of UK viewers money. Can we have the producers of Big Brother on the same boat too? They can produce the resulting real time feed from the boat as their final farewell programme. It will be fitting (especially when they start eating each other).

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BOFH: Thermo-electric funeral

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Come on, it is a USB stick, not an Opel/Vauxhall radio for which you have lost the PIN :)

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Woz says 'Jobs started Apple for money' – then says it must pay 50% tax like he does

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He is an Australian resident for tax purposes (and actually on the way to naturalize as a cittizen). The amount he earns puts him into a bracket with a max 45% and effective 30-45% rate. Adding the health insurance levy and other taxes you probably get close to 50% - the maximum possible effective tax rate for an Australian resident. I doubt it is above 50% though.

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RIP Prince: You were the soundtrack of my youth

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Re: The soundtrack of my youth

You missed Keith Emerson. This year too.

What a lucky man... He was...

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Hands up, who prayed for AMD? Well, it worked

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We did pray for it

However, this is still ANAList news - they are all behaving ANALitically and yelling hurray at a set of future promises. The financial results are, unfortunately, still pretty dire. Though, as the whole industry is in dire straights, they probably as dire as everybody else so not so bad at the end.

So we shall continue "The Demise of Itanic Prayer", AMD is not out of the woods yet.

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Lock-hackers crack restricted keys used to secure data centres

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Re: master suites

Any site which has a master key gets whatever it deserves.

Like it or not:

1. The master key concept is known in the security industry as a backdoor

2. The master key can be reverse engineered from any lock/cylinder which matches it.

It walk like a backdoor, it quacks like a backdoor it is a backdoor. Unlocked one.

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Intel told Irish council all was well just before 12k job cuts announced

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Re: Wonder how much

From the context, it would appear that this was around 25 years

If the grants have not been repaid, 87£ with 25 years of compound interest assuming an average 5% rate are 294 million. 5% is actually significantly less than Intel bond rates over some of this period so its a fair deal

So if the grant has not been repaid - well, they should pay up. Same as for any other grant.

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NASA injects cash into solar electric motor

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Re: ... will help send large amounts of cargo, habitats and propellant to Mars...

Poo ionizes nicely. Perfect propellant :)

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Clucking hell! Farcical free-range egg standard pecked apart by app

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Re: omitted

That is not the trick.

The trick is to put some sprinklers in the "free range" portion. The chickins do not like rain, so while "legally" free range, they stay inside and fatten up (or egg lay at caged hen rate).

So on paper (and on your app), you can have a chickin per whatever number of square meters you want. In reality, they are all sitting inside the shed at near-caged-hen density.

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Chinese crypto techie sentenced to death for leaking state secrets

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Re: .... and 29 of his former colleagues have also been punished.

Should that be "relatives". Reading between the lines this sounds like "business as usual" - nepotism off the scale and then some.

He himself, wife, brother in law all working in a classified crypto lab. Who else? Mother? father? nephew? cousin? Cousin's wife? Cousin's cat? Cousin's hamster?

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Re: Well, it's China.

To be more exact - "delayed" death sentence - so it is correctly timed for all "interesting" bits from the prisoner to be recycled and slotted as replacements into the new rich in need of transplant.

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Are bearded blokes more sexist?

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You are not the only one

A lot of us who wear beards today have grown up in the days when orthodontist interventions had a much lower success rate, varicella vaccine was unheard of and some of us have even been around smallpox before it was eradicated.

We carry beards to conceal one or more of the above and that has nothing to do with misogynism.

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Intel preps for layoffs: Chipzilla sharpens axe for deep job cuts

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Re: Mature markets and good enough for home use

This has been the case for 3+ years now. A 3 year old laptop with a mobile 1.7 GHz AMD A4 from those days is perfectly fit for purpose for most of us. Ditto for desktops - My 4.1 GHz A8 is perfectly fit for purpose 3 years after buying it. If we will start looking at "replacement candidates" the number is now at 5+ years (early E series CPUs and Atom). That is several times longer than the replacement cycle on which the PC industry has grown up (2-3 years average)

It hit AMD earlier as it is limited to CPUs and GPUs so it is more vulnerable to the computer replacement cycle.

The effect on Intel was delayed by Intel doing flash, networking and other odds and sods which were not affected as badly as the CPUs. That cushion has been exhausted as well as the sub-250G flash drive prices have tanked. As a result Intel will have to adjust to the "no-more-growth" paradigm.

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US congresscritter's iPhone hacked (with, er, the cell networks' help)

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Re: within the grasp of powerful crime gangs and government agents

When you work for a crime gang or a pervasively corrupt government you tend to know you're not the good guy

With all due respect, the definition of good when getting into 3 letter territory gets very fuzzy in most countries. Even countries which start from the "moral high ground" quickly descend into financing "freedom fighters" which take whole schools hostage and execute primary school kids.

In fact, compared to some of the more reprehensible acts of KGB, GRU, CIA and friends, the mob looks like a catholic nun convent.

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Re: within the grasp of powerful crime gangs and government agents

Powerful? Not really. I have installed SS7 feeds in Telehouse as a part of doing some "remote hands" moonshining for an Eastern European VOIP provider.

You need a rack a server or two, a front of some sorts and a PO. There are no proper background checks really so if you have 20k budget to take out a target, you can do that with ease. Alternatively, the same budget will buy you "anything you want" in one of the "fifth tier" island banana republic mobile telcos.

20K is not a "powerful" gang budget by any means. Sure - it is not "free" and not "lonely hacker with fake Aspergers in mom's basement" type of hack, but it is not a "nation state" hack either.

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Obama to admit Moon landing was faked?

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Yeah. I suspect they will more than make the difference on the winner not being one of the usual suspects.

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UK authorities probe 'drone hitting plane at Heathrow'

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Re: rant

Have you read the code?

I have actually. I was blamed to be one of the registered DC persons a while back when I was still doing sysadmin for a living.

That is exactly why I am saying that the law should grow some teeth - that would help not just with the drones, but with "one nation under CCTV" too so we do not have crazy excesses like the Ring of Steel around Royston.

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"always one idiot"

More than one. Much more than one.

These devices that provide an excellent stable platform allowing folk to get some wonderful images. That is perfectly fine use case. Out. There. In the country side - wildlife photography. As far as any use in residential area in order for it to be legal under existing law you have to be registered with the ICO as a data controller, have your details public ally available and have them displayed on the drone in a manner which makes them READABLE by the people you take pictures of. _THIS_ is what the regs on CCTV systems say. THIS IS WHAT THE LAW IS AND IT IS NOT OPTIONAL. ALL drone operators not carrying such signs and using it anywhere where it can even theoretically observe a person without that person granting prior consent are breaking the law.

IMHO, that law should grow some extra teeth and get criminal penalties in the 5 year range attached to it including open season for taking down any drone and immediately destroying it if found non-compliant. That should be enough to deal with the problem.

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Apple pulled 2,204lbs of gold out of old tech gear

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Energy is not (very) relevant here

A phone in a landfill (or any piece of modern consumer electronics) in contact with water and acids from all the organic matter which is rotting along it will start leaking a coctail of toxic stuff.

1. Lead - this is actually the most harmless part. It is also not leached at a high rate because it is mostly in the display glass - it will take decades for it to leak from there.

2. Rare earths

3. Tantalum from the capacitors

4. Organometalics from the display

5. ...

It has to be processed and scrapped correctly for environmental reasons. Getting anything back is an added bonus.

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Re: Love 'em or hate 'em...

You don't make piles of cash by selling stuff that lasts or is easy & cheap to fix.

Sure you can. Bosch is a good example - all of their white goods kit is repairable, spare parts are available for everything. They do, however hold and enforce patents and registered designs on everything and this is how they ensure that they make money on repairs too. The same model works fairly well for quite a few other consumer goods manufacturers.

In fact, if I look at what comes nowdays in the shopping basket, it is significantly more repairable than 10 years ago. Manufacturers have learned that there is a significant fraction of paying customer which will repair on environmental grounds instead of chucking stuff into the landfill and have adjusted accordingly. The only non-repairable stuff are supermarket toy/electronics ranges and for these - caveat emptor.

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House passes broadband bill despite promise of White House veto

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Re: Oh, GOP establishment....

Because I live in a different continent.

And how exactly it will help you if you have said idiot in control of Minuteman missiles?

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I am sending pouting selfies to a robot. Its AI is well buff

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Re: Read it till this point

Wow! Who knew?

Lots of people. The "is this face pretty, trustworthy, etc" is something that has been researched very heavily and some of it using proper scientific methods and large data samples. Similarly, what makes a fully or semi-artificial (made from multiple real elements) face for an avatar believable or not. Absolute "perfection" as symmetry, etc is perceived as "creepy" by 80%+ of the population.

All of this is actually very well known - lots of (fairly) scientific papers on the subject. Some of it in use in 3 letters too by the way - at least some of this has been financed by them in the past as they sometimes need this (or at least used to) for agent selection.

Clearly, whoever wrote the AI which looked for "symmetry first" has failed to do the most basic research in his field.

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Read it till this point

There are the usual things: symmetry of the face,. That is the point where it became clear that whoever wrote the algo and fed the initial data has no clue.

For the reference - pretty much all holders of the "my jaw just dropped" award in the actress guild as well as all supermodels are slightly ASYMMETRIC. This is a well established one in various experiments - if you give humans a perfectly symmetric sample (usually obtained by reflecting half a face in a picture along the vertical line) versus a sample with some minimal asymmetry the choose the latter. The same goes for perfect versus a couple of imperfections here and there. Just a few examples of asymmetric and imperfect beauty which have at some point held the crown of "Possibly the Most Beautiful Woman on the Planet": Ornella Mutti, Angelina Jolie, Mila Kunis.

The list can be continued ad naseum. It is a reality - you do not get in that category with a "perfect face". Shows that whoever did the algo and explained it was an engineer and needs to get out a bit more :)

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Czech Republic to rebrand

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This is not rebranding

Чехия or when using latin alphabet Czechia is how all Slavic nations refer to it anyway and have referred to it even when it used to be Czechoslovakia (to the extreme displeasure of the Slovaks).

It is not rebranding. It is a restoration of a historic brand.

At least they are not restoring it to "Moravia" (as that would mean a war with the Slovaks and Southern Polish for the name).

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US anti-encryption law is so 'braindead' it will outlaw file compression

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Re: "Math cannot frustrate court orders"

Congress shall make no laws that conflict with those of mathematics or nature

laws of mathematics == laws of nature. However, I see your point, when explaining things like this to liberal arts you have to use small words and things like 2+2.

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"Math cannot frustrate court orders"

Sure it can and so can physics, chemistry or any science for that matter.

Court cannot change a scientific fact. It is like ordering Pi to be 3 instead of 3.14159... Oh, forgot, an imbecilic idiot legislator who graduated with liberal arts tried that one too.

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Cinema boss gives up making kids turn off phones: 'That's not how they live their life'

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Re: Piracy Ok Too?

Paying for movies and music isn't how many live their lives either.

Paying for movies and music isn't how 22 year olds live their lives either. That generation simply is not willing to pay. They have accepted as a norm not to own anything and to have their dirty underwear exposed to all and sundry. They however expect everything for "free" in return.

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ExoMars works! 2 Mbit/s link established and camera snapping

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Re: Astounding !

Especially when you consider that in the UK, many people living just a few miles from major towns would kill for that kind of broadband speed.

Well, this one is obvious - the connection to ExoMars was not supplied by the GPO. Or whatever it is called today.

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Flying Spaghetti Monster is not God, rules mortal judge

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Excellent

Now, can we serve the same judge on the same bench a lawsuit that strips S***ntology of religious status in his state.

End of the day, it was devised by the late Ron L Hubbard as a bet with sir A. Clarke on who will come up with a more convincing religion. He actually lost the bet which p***ed him off and he released his creation into the wild.

So, based on the precedent the esteemed judge has established in this case, we can now have some fun. Popcorn. Big bag please.

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Bay Area man forced out of his $400 box home

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Re: fire hazard

Utter bollocks.

This is all I can say when hearing this from an official a country where 95% of the residential housing is wooden (actually nowdays OSB3) panels assembled on a wooden frame. It may be violating other reqs (such as minimal size, space and amenities), but fire hazard? Give me a break.

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Line by line, how the US anti-encryption bill will kill our privacy, security

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You do not need to

You need wallets. And election season.

Feinstein represents silly valley if memory serves me right. If she continues down this road her chances of being re-elected are highly correlated with Lucipher working for the Mountainview county council as a snow plough driver.

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Lauri Love backdoor forced-decryption case goes to court in UK

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Was the evidence like this?

http://i1-news.softpedia-static.com/images/news2/Arnold-s-T-800-Terminator-Runs-Linux-Kernel-4-1-We-re-All-Doomed-473236-2.jpg

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Universal Credit at high risk of cyber-attack, fraud from the outset

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Why this does not surprise me

Listening to the "Vlad" for a half an hour is sufficient to establish the fact that he is both mildly paranoid and largely delusional (the "quiet man" speech is a good example). From there on it is a classic case of "fish rots from the head" - the whole project has been paranoid and obsessive on not overpaying an extra penny here and there by mistake while being obliviously delusional on the subject of real threats.

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Would you let cops give your phone a textalyzer scan after a road crash?

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Voted yes for exact same reason

First, while the ECU does not have a precise RTC, it has one in order to timestamp logs. It would record the crash and you can interrogate it. All you need is to compare its time to the phone time and you will get the crash time exactly down to fractions of a second. In addition to that, depending on what apps you are running the crash may also be recorded on the phone accelerometer. So the argument about "inexact time of the crash" is illiterate, at best.

Second, from a legal perspective, this should not need any new law. Existing law in most jurisdictions allows the police full and unfettered access to the car, inhabitants and cargo to investigate a crash.

Third, there is a long standing precedent basis which curtails the right not to self-incriminate yourself in such circumstances. For example, you are automatically guilty if you refuse to submit yourself to an alcohol or drug test in the aftermath of a crash. Same for speed cameras and "identifying driver", etc. The moment you get in a vehicle you wave half of your rights not to self-incriminate in pretty much any legislation worldwide.

So on the balance of things, it is better if:

1. The police does it systematically

2. The evidence obtainable through this is strictly limited by a law so the police cannot use it for fishing expeditions looking for other stuff.

If these are not in place they will do it anyway, but without any controls to limit what can they obtain and what can they use the info for.

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