* Posts by Voland's right hand

1089 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

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Hipsters ahoy! Top Ten BOARD games for festive family fun

Voland's right hand
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Still does not get close to some of the classics

Frankly, most of these do not get close to Dune in terms of the sheer fun of playing it. Axis and Allies was not bad either (especially if you hack the rules a bit).

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India's heavy launch rocket passes flight test

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Re: Solid boosters on a man-rated vehicle - yuck...

Quote: " the only country they're interested in nuking".

Are you trying to tell us that the conflict on the chinese border is settled and so is the Tibet situation? I do not think so.

If anything they are for the "other" neighbour... The one that _ALSO_ has nukes, ICBM, submarines, aircraft carriers and a BIGGER GDP.

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Voland's right hand
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Solid boosters on a man-rated vehicle - yuck...

Dunno about man-rating of the launch system. The first stage looks like it passes the tests for a successful ICBM with a global reach in its own right. If it walks like an ICBM, it quacks like an ICBM - it is an ICBM.

It has a suitable payload already as well. Curiouser and curiouser... What's next, China developing SDI? They have shown anti-satellite weapons already so that is not far off...

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New fear: ISIS killers use 'digital AK-47' malware to hunt victims

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That depends on the point of view

Not if you consider the AK47 wielded by a fanatic with strong aversion to shaving facial hair to be the actual payload.

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NY premiere of The Interview cancelled after hackers' terrorist threats

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Re: Actually...

Here's hoping that this doesn't (further) neuter creativity within the mainstream movie industry

What creativity are you talking about? Creativity is a dirty word in a world where a director team which is known to be creative (Andy and Lana Wachowski) is being publically chastized that they have done something original instead of going with an existing franchise - it was all over the tweeter feed when they released the trailer for Jupiter Ascending.

By the way - cheezy or not when it comes out in February I will be going to see it out of principle - because it is original and not a piece of regurgitated Marvel vomit. I will probably get the Interview on Lovefilm out of principle too. Anything else aside, the right of parody, humour and free speech should be supported.

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Re: Looks like the terrorists are winning again

Team America was:

1. On the previous NORK dictator watch. The current one is considerably more insane and militant.

2. Long before the South Korean Banks and national ID incidents and other fairly obvious cases of information warfare.

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American bacon cured with AR-15 assault rifle

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There is one excuse

It is hangover. It cures it.

Thisi is a statement of the fact which has been established through extensive experimentation during my first couple of years in a University in a country where you could get tripe soup in some small eateries here and there (by now mostly extinct).

As far as indigestible, it is perfectly digestible - if it has sat for a couple of hours in milk and after that has been boiled for about the same amount of time the average Yorkshire Grandma boils vegetables.

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Gigabit-over-TV-cable spec DOCSIS 3.1 passes interop test

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Re: What's the frequency range?

They are bonding much larger number of channels. Modulation plays a role, but not as much. The big changer here is that with this cable is morphing from predominantly linear TV (channel) delivery mechanism into a data delivery mechanism. Cable ops are now expected to start delivering more and more of their content over IP as this frees channels used for content that nobody is watching on a particular HSFC strand at a particular time.

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Screwball ruble closes Apple's Russia store, whole kit and caboodle

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Re: On a more serious note...

Badly.

Even if the economics did not affect it, the current sanctions bill awaiting Obama's signature is likely to cause complete termination of any cooperation on any project anywhere - basically, we will be back to Andropov's days.

It is also likely to drag Europe back into recession too. Ditto for China, at which point we will be back to 2007 economic state if not worse. Actually worse - that was a paper crash, while this one will be a fully blown structural.

The really bad part of it - Putin emerged out of the previous crisis like this - economics + Chechen war (a lot of which was actively sponsored by the West too). The Chechen war was The Day Democracy Died for Russia. If we did not sponsor "freedom fighters" that took bus hostages in Southern Russia on a weekly basis, used pregnancy ward patients as human shields and dead-man-switch rigged schools... Well... things may have developed differently over there. We are reaping what we sawed. Literally.

I would not like to think what will emerge now and frankly he was spot on in his interview at the 20 summit in Melbourn - some people are playing with fire without understanding the full consequences of what they are doing.

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'Turn to nuclear power to save planetary ecology from renewable BLIGHT'

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Re: Dunno about warming

@h4m0ny

Solar is nice in a stable climate in a location where you have sunshine at a good angle 300 days a year. Solar sucks brick sidewize through a very thin straw the moment mother nature decides to throw toys out of the pram.

Solar did not produce even 10% of its projected capacity in any of the installations around Southern/South Eastern Europe this year because the rain started in March and stopped last week - on the 12 of December. This is in a region which is supposedly optimal for solar (up to 300 days of sunshine in some locations).

So the idea that solar will rescue us if climate change (warming or not) continues is a delusion because we do not know where to put it. We put it in a location which was supposed to deliver and it "delivered" this year. Nicely. A NIL by ZILCH squared worth of electricity.

@ToddR

I live in the UK. I just happened to be in Southern Europe in summer and last week and frankly, the Somerset levels winter of 2013/2014 pales compared to what is going on there at the moment. You have flooding even on hills. The underground water level everywhere is equal to surface level including places that usually see 250-300 sunny days a year.

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Dunno about warming

There is another reason here too. It just does not work if nature goes haywire.

Let's see how renewables fare against the backdrop of what we have this year in continental Europe. Let's take Southern and South Eastern Europe, shall we? Sunshine for 6+ months a year, perfect for solar, nice steady breeze along coasts, perfect for wind, etc. Some agricultural surplus for renewable fuels too.

So how does this look this year as an example of climate change. This year the rain started in March and stopped last week. There was one sunny week - in August. Rain every day, every second day an inch of rain, every week at least one deluge with several inches at a time.

Solar - you gotta be kidding.

Biofuels - you gotta be kidding too. Last week I drove on a road between what used to be two sunflower fields for the last 20 years (used for biofuel in the last 10). The water was draining off one paddy field (looking like Vietnam) into another across the road in a nice steady 5 cm sheet. That was on a hill by the way, the ones further down looked like a lake.

Wind - well, that may produce something, maybe. But that is just one reneweable and a flimsy one too. Goes to show - if nature decides to start toys out of the pram ALL of our renewable strategy is immediately OUT of the window.

There _IS_ a renewable that can be made to work and one which has enough energy to run the whole Earth civilization for the foreseable future - it is the world oceans thermal gradient. However, we do not have a clue on how to exploit it and we are not investing into figuring out how to exploit it. So as long as we are not doing it, we might as well stick with something we can build to withstand Nature being pissed off - Nuclear (do not point Fukushima at me, that was _NOT_ built properly, other Japan nuclear stations with correct designs shrugged off the tsunami).

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European Commish asks for rivals' moans about Booking.com

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Re: Am I alone

Once you have established that the chain/hotel is OK - yes.

If you are going into unknown territory, Booking.com is the best choice out there. It is not rigged like yelp or tripadvisor, the review score + review contents are a fairly good gauge on what you are going to get. It is a quantum leap compared to Opodo, Xpedia and any other of the hotel brokers that predated them. You can find hotels even in the most remote backwater too.

There is a reason why they have become a near monopoly - they deliver something which the customer likes (and the hotels not so much). As far as price parity - Amazon does the same by the way. It is the same conditions as the Amazon marketplace. There is a way around it too - loyalty rebates (though trowing an Eu competition sueball seems to be easier).

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easyGroup railroads easytrain.com owner

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Re: The real question

The key element of EasyPricing is dynamic demand driven pricing. That works well with airlines, hotels, car hire and long range bus services because they have a natural availability constraint.

It does not work with trains period. Short range/commuter trains are packed until they bulge to the sides so no way to operate skin yer hide pricing as there is no way to price gouge more than is already being price gouged (unless you put into the network at least 4 times the current capacity). There is just no point (and no way) to try to charge 32£ for a weekly season ticket bought half a year in advance vs 400£ for one bought on the day. You can (and rail companies do) charge 400£ throughout. You decant a pint of blood and a first born and pay it.

Long range trains nearly everywhere in the world run under capacity. The very few exemptions which are long range _AND_ have a capacity constraint (hello Eurostar, Elipsos, etc) operate "skin yer hide" pricing already and there is no way they will allow anyone else to operate the same route.

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Branson sinks sub dream: Plan to explore Earth's bottom scrapped

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Colour me surprised

Well, the design on the pic can never go under several hundred meters. 180 degree vision glass canopies are nice for shallow coral reefs. Mariana trench - not so much.

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Terror bomb victims demanding Iran's .ir will appeal US ruling

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Different reasons

TLDs should not be subject to a single country law, period. International law, international treaties - yes. Single specific country - no.

And I am not even going to comment to applying hillbilly village (aka US State) law to this.

In any case the correct precedent is elsewhere - maritime. You can put _ANY_ ship under arrest for unpaid bills. You however are _NOT_ entitled to confiscate the ship's flag or all ship flags of a particular country of registration. Similarly, you cannot just go and confiscate let's say the Liberian, Panama or other small country ship registry either (despite the fact that a lot of them are actually operated mostly out of New York and London, not out of their countries).

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HORRIFIED Amazon retailers fear GOING BUST after 1p pricing cockup

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Re: price mistakes

Not if the order is fulfilled. Then it becomes interesting.

F.E. When United cocked up their pricing algo a few years back they honored their tickets. Under similar circumstances a few years ago another airline (which we can safely call Scumbag Air) did not. They should not have been allowed by consumer law, but large companies in the UK can generally get away with mass murder if they want to. Small ones - not so much.

The problem this time is with companies which have taken the AWS economy to its ultimate extreme - their shop front is AWS, their payment is AWS and their _FULFILLMENT_ is A(W)S too (the mechanical turk, warehousing and logistics). So the orders were fulfilled before the owner could do a thing. Outsourcing your core business without leaving a _SINGLE_ control point - gets you every time, all the time. It is not a question of will, it is a question of when and frankly, I am finding it a bit difficult to commiserate here - you get whatever Christmas you deserve.

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Re: >Start with the first step.

Actually, I hate dynamic pricing. When suppliers try to game the system for their advantage,...

That is OK, provided that you can play the game too. The problem with UK is that unless the seller is a small company they can wiggle out of a dynamic pricing cockup. F.E. Ryanair did a while back. So did Tesco and a few others. It is small companies that suffer in cases like this.

In fact, this is something where I agree 100% with some of the small Eu regional airlines which have completely abandoned their earlier experiments in dynamic pricing - it is not a game which a small player can (and should) play. If the pricing algo cocks up you cannot absorb the costs so you might as well (grudgingly) accept lower margins and lower revenues, but stay alive instead of maximizing and taking the risk of going bankrupt on a cockup.

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REVEALED: Titsup flight plan mainframe borks UK air traffic control

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Re: Is the Register sure this is an IBM S390

I heard the same from a couple of blokes on the plane yesterday - it is 15year old IBM mainframe rebadge by Lockheed.

I ended up on a plane brought in "manually" half-way from a divert to Charles De Gaulle. Funnily enough, the people guiding it took a considerably more optimal path - the 320 cut in across Croydon and leveled onto approach somewhere over south London instead of taking the usual lumbering scenic route over all of London.

The pandemonium at LHR was complete - the few planes coming in to land on manual guidance could not unloaded. The few planes being unloaded could not get their luggage off the plane because the luggage transport was full of bags for the planes scheduled to depart. You name it.

In any case - as most mainframe based systems it looks like it has an over-reliance on the mainframe never failing and no true primary-to-backup fallback. Mainframes fail very very rarely, however once they fail, you pay for the fact that the system was designed without system level resilience. Just like in this case.

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US Navy's LASER CANNON WARSHIP: USS Ponce sent to Gulf

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Re: LIMITED RANGE

High power lasers tend to heat up the atmosphere on their way. This provides significant (and non-linear) beam attenuation limiting them to a close-counters weapon within the Earth atmosphere.

Overall, in the battle of gun vs laser I will always bet on the gun. Especially with the "rail" prefix on it. There is f*** all a laser (or a close defence cannon) can do against a hailstorm of unguided lumps of metail falling on it at Mach 7 fired from 300+ miles away. It is not that much different in space by the way (though there particle beams may have a chance too). Ditto for orbital weapons - a salvo of kinetics hitting something at re-entry velocity is no different from a small nuclear strike. Delivering the same amount of firepower with laser is simply not feasible - the atmosphere will dissipate it.

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DNA egghead James Watson sells Nobel prize for $4.8m, gets it back

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Key contribution to the discovery has been omitted

What all the stories omit is that the Chemistry dept was across the street from The Eagle and the "analysis" of the X-rays was taking place in the evening there. All experimental protocols, etc omit a key variable - the number of pints it takes for the images to do a double helix in your head.

In any case - nuts as his opinions may be, he is entitled to them and the way he is being treated for them is not cool. Pity it takes Gasprom to secure his pension.

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EU law bods: New eCall crash system WON'T TRACK YOU. Really

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Mushroom

Err... it is useless for a different reason

With all due respect if an ambulance is called to a place where I have smashed myself to a point where I cannot call it, I would actually _WANT_ it to have my full medical record handy - correct blood, correct list of allergies and intolerances, etc.

If the call is with just "location, car, fuel type" it is completely useless, thank you.

The system is idiotic as designed. What it should do instead of having a car GSM phone is to use paired user phone(s) (something that can be identified and opt-ed in to match to correct medical records) to place the calls instead. The relevant functionality is in every bluetooth car stereo already - all you need to do is to hook it up to the airbag activation circuit.

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Égalité, Fraternité - Oui, peut-etre. Liberté? NON, French speedcam Facebookers told

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Quote: Shouldn't that only get the satnav manufacturer into trouble if, as the article states, the law does not cover those receiving information.

Actually most SatNav software on sale in Eu will not display camera warnings in France and if memory serves me right in Switherland for this exact reason without you going in and tinkering with the settings.

Law is an ass and napoleonic law doubly so - it _DOES_ not leave the magistrate _ANY_ freedom of interpretation as in AngloSaxon law. This is a double-edged sword as if there is no offence specified there is no way for the judiciary to engage in creative interpretation and sentencing as they do in the land of the Common Law. However, if there is an offence (as in this case) they have no choice, but to administer the assigned punishment which they did. C'est la vie.

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Furious GTA V gamers seek similar ban on violent, misogynistic title: the Holy Bible

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Re: How is the Bible still legal in Blighty

It is legal because there was no test case to prove it illegal.

There needs to be a test case. Even if taken by a lawyer on a pro-bono basis (not likely), there are still expenses to be had so someone needs to start dangling a cup on one of the public financing sites.

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Violet, you're turning violet! Imagination unveils graphics-tastic hobbyist board

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This looks like my next media player

I am definitely buying one when it comes out - it will drop-in-replace an AMD Debian box which serves as a media player at present :)

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Never fear, Glassholes – Intel to the rescue! 'New CPU' for tech-specs

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Well... if it uses Intel will be matching the description

Idiot Outside

So I concur, I am more likely to walk of a cliff than wear this.

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Star Wars: Episode VII trailer lands. You call that a lightsaber? THIS is a lightsaber

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Re: Seems they're re-using stuff again...

Assuming the Empire was overthrown you are still looking at at least Tie Advanced or Tie Defender there. As far as nearly any interpretation of the Star Wars universe in games, etc is concerned the Fighter was obsolete shortly after the beginning of the Rebellion when the Rebels deployed X-Wings instead of the ancient Z95 Headhunters.

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Re: I'm pretty sure it won't cut your hand off

Err, try disarming an opponent with a short (or long for that matter) sword with the standard twisting + "take the blade" (easiest starting from 6th). If the sword would have had a "magic cut through everything" guard that would have been "your wrist just went missing" moment. Granted, the technique is useful only against a much weaker opponent, but... none the less...

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Under the Iron Sea: YES, tech and science could SAVE the planet

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Re: Iron is not enough

I am not a chemist

I am actually (albeit one that has gone to IT very long ago). At the concentrations at which you are looking at sulphate is mostly harmless and will end up being either bound by bacteria (sulphur is also an essential element) or hug a Ca or Mg ion from the environment and proceed towards the abyss below.

Just to be clear - I agree with Trevor that there are places where Iron itself may be enough, there are ones where iron + silica may be enough. However, I would venture a very educated guess that these are actually few and far between.

Based on the common prevalence of various microelements in the environment you are likely to run out of other microelements _LONG_ _BEFORE_ you run out of Iron and in that case you are not doing anything useful regardless of how much Iron you are dumping into the ocean. Similarly, even if they are around and Iron is not, throwing Iron into the mix will deplete them and they will become the limiting factor overnight.

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Iron is not enough

1. You need a whole laundry list of microelements and some of them are even higher on the "naughty" list than Ferrous Sulphate. The regulations unfortunately are not taking into account fact that you are dumping them in micro-quantities (if not nano-quantities) and to an exact measured spec. They just say no. There is also a way around it - agriculture has already done that for microelements.

2. The guy who dumped it off British Columbia is probably full of it. That is not a part of the ocean that is anywhere near being a marine desert so the benefit of seeding it with extra microelements should be NIL.

Temperate oceans are regularly stirred by winter storms so they do not go into a desert state. There is an excellent proxy for ocean desertification - visibility. The visibility off British Columbia is is usually sub-5m dropping down to sub-1m during the algae growth season. That is _NOT_ a desert, no point to seed it. Now, bang in the middle of the Indian ocean, visibility is 30m+. Now that is what I would call a desert.

Additionally, the whole thing should be controlled in a very careful manner - if you overseed the algae will bloom too fast and the fish population will not catch up resulting in a Black Sea or Mexican Bay style "overfished sea" style bloom.

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Tough Banana Pi: a Raspberry Pi for colour-blind diehards

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Re: not “plug compatible” in software terms

@Spoonsinger.

Again - Beaglebone is _ONLY_ 100MBit. The only SBCs available in quantity with decent "generic" Linux support that are 1G are the various Allwinner clones.

100MBit t in this day and age is not enough for a decent thin client. The difference between 100Mbit and 1GBIt for any of X, VNC or RDP is staggering. 1G is perfectly usable desktop. Not much worse than the real thing for most day-to-day use. 100Mbit... err.. not really...

Similarly, the difference between accessing $HOME (for local applications) over 1G is quite significant. In this day and age there are way too many idiotic apps which constantly scribble over a SQLite backend (example - the whole mozilla family). That is lock, read, write, unlock, reading and updating metadata every time. As a result where 100MBit was more than sufficient for a accessing a home directory 10 years ago, it distinctly sucks today.

So while the beaglebone is a tolerable desktop when taken on its own it sucks royally as a thin client.

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Re: not “plug compatible” in software terms

What would motivate anyone to buy one of these rather than (say) a BeagleThing or similar

In theory - Beagle same as PI is a 100MBit Ethernet. So if you are looking at 1G which is essential for a decent thin client this will do (if you can find a trusted source of software).

In practice, 100Mbit is more than sufficient for backup as well as most controller apps. 100Mbit is in excess of 25GB/hour effective backup speeds which is more than sufficient for an SME. Pi's problem for these is not its speed which is lamentable - it is on par with a 2003 Crusoe I have lying around. It is the power on the USB.

In any case, if you are looking at SATA, GigE (and potentially - legacy inerfaces like VGA) the correct board is the CubieBoard (model 2 or 4). This looks like a bootleg clone of a Cubie by the way with some very dubious software thrown in.

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Beyond the genome: YOU'VE BEEN DECODED, again

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Re: A damn fine article

Actually I disagree. Disclaimer - I used to do Mol Biol as a career for a few years before giving up twice (once back to Chemistry and the second time from Chemistry to IT).

Proteomics as such is _NOT_ paticularly useful. That is one of our biggest problems in understanding how things function. DNA sequence gives you a reasonable amount of info and you can deduce what has happened by comparing two sequence (point mutations, deletions, insertions, etc). You can relate this statistically to diseases, etc without even looking at protein structure.

Protein sequences on the other hand are of very little usefulness because we have no clue how exactly are they folded and because most sequencing methods fail to pick up how are they glycosilated. That is an enormous can of worms both in the IT sense (folding software) and in the biochemical sense (how to replicate them with all sugary strings attached).

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World's best threat detection pwned by HOBBIT

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Not relevant

The key piece of info is who wrote the demo malware. With all due respect, there are not that many places out there which have the competence of Crysis for both analysing malware and demoing exploitability of concepts. To put it bluntly - these guys are good, I would not want to have them as an adversary.

As far as bypassing the defences it shows something which has been known since time forgotten - no defence can stand against a determined, competent adversary in possession of the appropriate resources.

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DNA survives fiery heat of re-entry on test rocket

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Not surprising

In my previous life I played a lot with DNA. It extremely sturdy for an organic compound of natural origin and nearly impossible to get rid of.

All lab people working on RNA regularly lament on the subject of DNA contamination. If it happens there is no way of removing it short of spraying the contaminated area with a DNA-se enzyme solution. This has been picked up by various industries looking for reliable markers (aka Smart Water, etc) too.

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Sony cuff-puter to do one thing smartwatches can't: Give you DAYS of hot wrist action

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Re: Pebble?

If it is paired to a smartphone there is no need for compute power in the first place. This is the most ridiculous part about the current smartwatch generation. You already have a 4 core monster sitting somewhere nearby so why the hell are you sticking half a gig of RAM and 600MHz CPU as well as all radios known to man into a wrist device? WTF?

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NASA 'nauts have a go on Star Trek replicator IN SPAAAAACE (sort of)

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3D printing with metal is hard on earth

In space the printed part does not oxidize, dissolve nitrogen or any of the other things which prevent a realistic use of 3d printing of metal.

So if anything, runing a functional 3d printer in space is likely to be easier than on Earth. However, it will, by necessity be an external experiment (or require its own built-in-airlock).

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Reuse the Force, Luke: SpaceX's Elon Musk reveals X-WING designs

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but also with the deck pogoing up and down like a Clash fan in 198

Size matters, size matters.

I suggest the author of the article takes the Stena Superferry between the hook of Holland and Harwich. I have done the crossing in a level 6 storm and you could not feel a thing. If the landing barge is big enough it should indeed be OK for a reasonable storm (I would not try to land on it in a tropical hurricane). It also depends where you land. The beauty of sea launch and recovery is that you can do it anywhere. While the Indian and Pacific oceans always have a sizeable wave, the Atlantic puddle quite often calms down to a nearly-lake state (especially in the tropics).

As far as wings... these are not wings, these are aerodynamic control paddles same as on the ESA reusable "spaceplane" project. Nice design - should allow the rocket to use less fuel during the return phase.

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Coming clean: Ten cordless vacuum cleaners

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Re: Why cordless drills came first

Err... The eldest male offspring? I thought that is who is blamed to vacuum clean by default. I was until I left home and I always try to blame mine nowdays. The problem is that every time I try to blame mine (either the elder or his younger sister) to do the vacuuming I find them setting up the Roomba in the room to be cleaned.

C'est la vie, vacuuming is somewhat of a thing of the past.

From that perspective the only thing you use a household vacuum cleaner in a non-DIY/non-Workshop context for is to go around the corners left by the roomba once a month. Something like the Dyson (the long wand version) or the Black-N-Deckers will actually be quite appealing for that job.

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BIG FAT Lies: Porky Pies about obesity

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Re: Good stuff.

European soft drinks are largely sugar,

Bollocks. There are two zones in Europe as far as Big Soda is concerned. Germany, UK, etc - all use sugar and some artificial sweeteners. Southern and Eastern Europe imports HFS in quantity and all drinks are done to 3rd world/Arab world specs. Best example is Bitter Lemon - my kids start spitting it out the moment we cross the Czech border on trips (both of them distinguish between sugar and HFS and cannot stand the latter).

By the time you get to somewhere near Turkey border (or Spain going south) _EVERYTHING_ is laced with HFS to a point where you will _NOT_ find a drink with sugar any more. You can also see obesity in countries which never had it before and it is the generation which has grown up with the "new" stuff.

Why... Well... It will be interesting if one of the Soda companies spokesdroids provides the answer. I am just stating the bloody obvious which you can see from the labels in the supermarket.

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Re: Good stuff.

I agree with the general gist of the article, but it is missing a couple of finer points.

1. Obesity cause is not food overconsumption. It is the food that has changed in the 70 years between the war and now. The people during the war did not get their gob stuffed with food where everything is marinated in glucose-fructose syrup. Anyone trying to repeat the food industry claims that the stuff is harmless is full of shit. Example: Prior to coming to the UK I used to do very little sports while eating half a hot bread right out of the bakery with half a jar of jam on it just for breakfast. Either that or half a kilogram of cheesecake. It was however _REAL_ jam (with sugar, not gfs) and _REAL_ bread or cheesecake made out of flour and yeast without a page list of bromates and other shite in it. I tried to keep that lifestyle in the UK with the result being 20kg gain in a year or so. Nowdays, I have completely blacklisted all gfs, bread and anything out of the crisps and sweets isle. As a result my weight is now back to normal. So the problem is not pies and calories, the problem is that the industry is deliberately putting sh*te in the food and is allowed to get away with it.

2. Obesity presently strikes in most cases from early childhood onwards. The present generation of whales becomes that before the age of 10. In order for the age-expectancy reduction to bring the expected financial results their life expectancy needs to be shorter by several decades (due to the longer period during which they are whales). At least. That is not the case - according to stats the reduction is presently a decade or so. So attributing to whales the "smoker effect" is a bit pushing it.

3. Biggest flaw in the article. It assumes that the tax contribution of a whale is the same as the tax contribution of a normal person. This means that a whale can do the same job as a normal person. Err... Plain and simple - that is not the case. The stats show a significant average income discrepancy (and tax contribution discrepancy) between the whales and the lean ones. Once this is added up into the equation I am no longer sure that the overall conclusions are the same.

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Europe may ask Herr Google: Would you, er, snap off your search engine? Pretty please

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Re: Funded by Google's oppostition

So? Your point is?

Anti-pollution control conservatives in the USA are funded by the Coch brothers. Gasprom has (quite successfully) funded anti-frakking greenies in several European countries, etc.

All politics have to be funded and funding by "competition" is the usual order of the day.

In any case, Google share is likely to dip slightly over the next 5 years due to the move of Mozilla to Bing/Yahoo. In fact, I suspect that one of the reasons why Google did not give Mozilla the terms they wanted is exactly this - to create an illusion of competition in the industry.

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Useless 'computer engineer' Barbie FIRED in three-way fsck row

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Re: Oh dear me no.

Err... if she did not get the boys to do the hard work her name would not be Barbie. Let's face it - this is what Barbie indoctrination is all about.

Disclaimer - I got a daughter age 6 which is given samples of the anorexic wh*re effigy once in a while as a present. She plays with them from time to time too (not often thankfully).

However, you are more likely to see her feet sticking from the 80l crate of lego in the playroom looking for the bits she need to complete the next model. That or trying to disassemble the shared computer with a screwdriver I left lying around :) For which I am greateful - she seems to be reasonably impervious to indoctrination. The fact that pestering for anything based on adverts on CITV is an automatic NO in our house probably was some help here too.

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You'll go APE for our new Gorilla Glass 4, Corning reckons

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Dutch tears and strained glass

Strained glass - dutch tears, duralex, etc is very difficult to break. I have dropped Duralex (which is another example of strained glass) plates and glasses onto a tiled kitchen floor floor plenty of times.

Nearly always the plate survives. Sometimes, it even manages to chip the tiles. However, once in a blue moon the strained glass will break. Trust me you do not want to be anywhere near when this happens. It is like a fragmentation grenade - sharp small shards fly out up to 5m in all directions.

Hmm... A phone with a strained glass screen. Why I do not feel comfortable with the idea of being near this when it is dropped...

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USB coding anarchy: Consider all sticks licked

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No, would not work

Rule number one of successful exploitation of vulnerabilities - immediately patch the hole you used to get through so that the next attacker cannot get through.

So the fact that the USB does not seem vulnerable means nothing - it may have hacked firmware already which closes the original exploit hole.

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Whitelisting USBs does not work

In most cases USB ID is programmable in firmware so by whitelisting you have done little to avoid being hit by a hacked USB implementation. All modern USB storage works without any ID specific quirks so the fake ID peripheral will work and will be able to execute the attack.

In any case, USB is and will remain a more difficult attack vector compared to other peripherals. It does not have RDMA which was present in Firewire and is back with a vengeance in thunderbolt. With that you can do anything you like to the target without the target being able to mount any defence whatsoever.

By the way, this article firmly holds the crown for the least readable and worst English grammar on el reg so far. Granted, it is "before 4 th double espresso" time here... Still, I had to re-read some of the sentences more than a couple of times.

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Attack reveals 81 percent of Tor users but admins call for calm

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Will not help you

Will not help you.

All you need is to throw a DPI into the mix and do traffic shaping on the DPI in-transit instead of the compromised server. Shape a flow down, shape a flow up, compute a correlation coefficient, done.

In fact, this can be taken even further. The natural Internet congestion and different traffic flow rates resulting from it can yield the same results, you just need Bayes stats instead of simple correlation. This is a classic big data problem, given a sufficient dataset you can nail pretty much any client if you can get a data sample near source and near entry. You do not need the data itself, all you need is is basic TCP stats on it - window, rtt, etc.

Check, mate.

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The Toyota Aygo is PARKtastic ... but it is very much a City slicker

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Re: Wonderful little cars

It has devolved.

The original 1.0L 3 cylinder came to Toyota group from its Daihatsu division as the driving power inside the Daihatsu Mira aka Cuore/Charade. IIRC it first appeared on the 1998 Mira and really came to shine on the 2003-2007 Mira/Charade.

Compared to the Aygo, the Mira/Charade is a briliant city vehicle - no thrills, utilitarian, functional and most importantly zippy - 12s to 60, not the snail pace 15 you get from the Japano-French geriatric. It is also geared very low (same as the Daihatsu 2003 SIrion mk 3) so the 12s does not depict the real driving experience in city conditions - the performance in 0-30 is considerably higher than what can be expected from the 12s number (sub-4s if memory serves me right).

Its sole problem was the utterly inept marketing by Daihatsu in Europe compounded by internal restrictions inside Toyota group and the mandate of: "though shall address youf and pensioners and though shall not compete with the Yaris". So it did not sell around here anywhere near the levels at which the Mira sold in the far east (there it is outsold Toyota proper left right and center).

Compared to that (which are the Aygo roots), the original Aygo was a step backwards and this one is not an improvement either. I will take a 2003 Charade over an Aygo any day today, pity they do not make them any more.

In any case - it is surprising that Toyota are not shipping a Turbo version of it. A turbo for the 1L Daihatsu/Toyota 3 cyl has been available for ages taking its ~55-65 bhp (depending on sub-variety, exhaust assembly, etc) to nearly 100. Otherwise - I agree, the original unit is now way old in the tooth to be competitive with the new VW group small vehicles.

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World leaders rubber-stamp tax recoup effort at G20 gabfest

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Re: But I thought western free-market democracies were all in favour of competition!

Hehe...

Different levels of competition, different levels. Competition between companies vs competition between countries. Competition between companies requires a level playing field which in turn in a global world requires a reasonably uniform tax and legal environment across all countries.

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Meet OneRNG: a fully-open entropy generator for a paranoid age

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Similar to Via CPUs

This as a source of entropy looks similar to the hardware RNG on Via CPUs (similar quantum noise source), just fully "DIY".

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