Feeds

* Posts by Voland's right hand

880 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Page:

THUD! WD plonks down SIX TERABYTE 'consumer NAS' fatboy

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Upgrade, use old one as backup, rinse, repeat.

I do the same on a house scale. Old drives from the house main server RAID set are first re-purposed as MAID for media, then as backups, then as desktops (going all the way back to the days when the server was a K6 with 2 40GB Maxtors).

The current set is due for a change soon. I will probably not put WD though (my luck with them has been terrible).

2
0

Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: TalkTalk blocked my site

I've checked my three WordPress sites, and none are blocked.

They may be shortly. Talk Talk blocker is not real time, it walks your site after one of their subs has visited. So if you find it blocked in half a day or so after their filter processes data do not be surprised.

4
0

Lawyer reviewing terror laws and special powers: Definition of 'terrorism' is too broad

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: I have argued for many years

Exactly:

1. it's too broad: for example 'possession of material likely to help a terrorist'... a map of the London Underground? A recipe for gunpowder? Lunch?

Why go so far. Example the brain of a chemistry degree educated person. According to UK legislation the possession of my brain would be a lifetime jail offence because it contains:

An MSC in chemistry from the days when we did study toxicology from a chemical weapons perspective as well as proper organic synthesis. How would you like that Tabun, with TNT or hexogen sprinkles? All I need is to dig around the more dusty corners of it for the correct syntesis steps for it.

This law if applied literally should lead to immediate jail time for:

1. Anyone with a Chemistry Degree

2. Most people with Molecular Biology and all people with Microbiology Degrees

3. Most electronic hobbysts and pretty much anyone with an electronics engineering degree

4. A large fraction of degree educated software developers

5. Most people with civil engineering degrees. After all, the knowledge of what it would take to knock out a building is the most essential possible material of use to terrorists (and so are things like how to build gas pipelines, etc).

6...

22
1

Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 claimed lives of HIV/AIDS cure scientists

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: So sad

Mandatory KAL007 reference

The more appropriate reference is Siberia airlines flight 1812 which shows that Ukrainian military has the experience in shooting them too. So nothing new here.

5
2

Google's Pankhurst doodle doo-doo shows the perils of using Google to find stuff out

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Dunno about UK

Elsewhere in Europe up to the late 1940-es births were regularly recorded up to several days after the fact and birth certificates issued with dates different from the actual birthday. My late inlaw birth certificate was a couple of days out of date, one of my dad's best friends and university roommate had his 5 days out of date. To heck, some countries like Greece did not have a proper birth register and were recording births as they please up to a couple of years ago. That provided a lovely business model for some of the local "minorities" which claimed benefits for the same child 4-5 times based on registering the birth in neighbouring districts. Before pressing downvote google Maria+Greece+Blond (her "parents" had her birth registered 3? or 4? times).

So having a birth recorded a day late in the 19th century? Even in a well off family? I do not find this out of the ordinary. In fact, any date on a birth certificate not issued by a hospital and before the days of national birth registers is _NOT_ primary evidence.

1
0

Europe: Apple could NOT care less about kids' in-app cash sprees

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Google playing ball

When they'll have to discuss the stuff they really care about. Like taxes.

Correct reasoning, wrong guess. The discussion which they want to avoid is how all of this freebee scorched earth (android, gmail, etc) ensure and enshrine their unquestionable monopoly in search and advertising.

5
3

Cops nab suspect using CREEPY facial recog system

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

In other news

The spirit of Lambroso has popped off a bottle of bubbly in whichever bit of the underworld he currently resides.

Comparing faces based on a set of features closesely associated with crime - we have heard it before:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cesare_Lombroso

6
2

Huge FOUR-winged dino SPREAD LEGS to KILL – scientists

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Seen a wedgetail eagle lately ?

Ah, so it's Australian. Suddenly it all makes sense.

At least use the correct name - it is from the Counterweight continent. Now that really makes sense (provided that you do not ask the library for a list of all the dangerous animals in there).

3
0

Mwa-ha-ha-ha! Eccentric billionaire Musk gets his PRIVATE SPACEPORT

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

I would not be so sure

At this rate he will be commanding a nuclear driven (armed with ion cannons, kinetic hypervelocity armament and lasers) fleet before he reaches retirement age.

The only question is when he is going to purchase an island with a volcano on it.

6
0

Microsoft: You NEED bad passwords and should re-use them a lot

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Even a "harmless" site is still a potential attack vector

Forget the k1dd13 p0rn. It can be used to spearfish you back or spearfish one of your contacts. Go and explain that it is not you to the hapless victim after that.

Unfortunately, the only known solution to the password problem equates to a full loss of internet anonymity and privacy. Namely, you can drop the passwords altogether if you use client certificates (and tie the important ones to a physical key storage). So for the time being we still use passwords - they are like democracy (as per Benjamin Franklin quote): they are bad, but we are yet to figure out anything better.

1
11

Can it be true? That I hold here, in my mortal hand, a nugget of PUREST ... BLACK?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: If I coat my car with this...

Radar - most likely no. The cops have mostly switched to IR laser guns and this should be perfect for them. Ditto for any laser rangefinder - there will be nothing to return back, so this clearly has some very obvious applications.

1
0

Watch: DARPA shows off first successful test of STEERABLE bullet

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Use a sword

That knight probably never saw actual battle, then. Swords leave horrific injuries and are usually wielded with very uncivilized anger.

Usually - yes. If you want to be a swordsman and live to a retirement age - no. Sword requires clarity of thinking and control of emotions to be effective. The moment you "use your anger" is the moment you die (assuming you are trying to engage someone who is competent with the blade - they will make a shish-kebap out of you).

0
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: It's been done before.

Firing a missile out of a gun which after that deploys active guidance systems has been the de-facto standard for tank-on-tank weaponry for 20 years now: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9M119M_Refleks

The "new" part is making this small enough to be fired out of a .50cal

4
2

'The writing is TOO SMALL': MPs row over Parliamentary move to Office 365

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Really?

Several Species of Small Furry Animals Gathered Together in a Cave and Grooving With a PICT

http://rock.genius.com/Pink-floyd-several-species-of-small-furry-animals-gathered-together-in-a-cave-and-grooving-with-a-pict-lyrics

Funny, how Pink Floyd have foreseen that more than 3 decades ago. Just, wondering which model of Blackberry is called Claymore...

0
0

LibreSSL crypto library leaps from OpenBSD to Linux, OS X, more

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Two thumbs up to Theo DeRaadt ...

Not so fast.

I am not. Theo's lot has refactored for security and maintainabilty:

1. Most of the BSD codebase (both Net and Free have taken back quite a bit from the Open tree).

2. Most of the original unix utilities - the whole net tools/inet lot, cron, etc.

3. Bind (talking of hairballs nothing can compete with Paul Vixie code - even openssl)

4. God knows what else. 1,2,3 are just off the top of my head.

If any team is capable of refactoring SSL it is them. Not anyone else.

19
2
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Two thumbs up to Theo DeRaadt ...

This pretty much terminates the discussion on the future of OpenSSL.

Now watch how the linux distros will pick up this instead of any of the competing projects (even Linux foundation driven ones) the same way they have picked up OpenSSH, OpenBSD inetd, tftpd, etc.

9
2

Acer cranks Chromebooks with Core i3 models

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Same spec can get you a decent AMD machine

Not impressed - for the same spec I can get a decent AMD based laptop. Thin computing is supposed to be cheap too :)

2
1

Computing student jailed after failing to hand over crypto keys

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: I still want to see ...

So if you have a copy of paradise lost or Midsummer nights dream

Or Bulgakov, Pasternak, Vysotski, Okudjava, etc - pretty much any Russian writer from the second part of the 20th century wrote in a way that has 5+ meanings in it. Part of expressing your thoughts while living in a police state I guess.

We should probably learn some lessons from them. It is becoming useful.

3
1

Boeing to start work on most powerful rocket ... EVER!

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

The announcement is also factually incorrect

As far as slideware goes the biggest rocket ever to be planned is still Energia in its Vulcan configuration (175 metric ton to LEO). That is 45 tons more than this. Energia was successfully tested in its Polyus (4 strap-ons, satellite payload) and Buran (4 strap-ons, shuttle payload). From that to Vulcan is just one step - attach the extra 2 boosters. The components from that are proven too - the engines used in the Energia (with some modifications) lift Zenit (Russia) and Atlas (USA) rockets into orbit till this day.

Otherwise, the SLS design is clearly guided by one single thought - "No Russian components". However, instead of licensing indigineous USA tech from Elon Musk, the SLS team quite clearly prefers to go technologically backwards to the days of the shuttle launcher design. It is a technological step backwards. It can bet that it will be both more expensive to run and more expensive to build than the next Ariannes or anything Elon or the Russians have in the queue. All in all - a typical government handout.

12
0

Korea’s third biggest phone maker faces $180m OBLITERATION

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

You have misidentified the customer

What people do not want is an unremarkable Android phone

People do not. Operators do. Pantech does not cater to people's needs, it caters to operator's needs.

That is why if anyone will bail it out, it will be the operators so that they have a disposable el-cheapo option for the pre-payed crowd.

3
1

London officials won't take Uber to court – because cabbies are suing the drivers anyway

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Nice

+1

The cabbies should stop complaining and order some GPS enabled taximeters so I can see exactly how many times did they go around LHR before taking me to my destination.

17
0

HDMI, thy end is near: Qualcomm's Wilocity gobble will let mobes, tabs beam 4K vid to TVs

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

News at 10

Prevalent radio SOC manufacturer recommends to stick head in the microwave and disengage brain. More radio noise good, brain bad. News at 10.

No thanks, I will stick with cables.

2
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Not so fast...

Only some actually. Out of my recent purchases less than 50% have VGA. It is all HDMI and/or DisplayPort now especially in small form factor land.

0
0

Amazon snubs FTC: We'll see you in court over kids' in-app cash blowouts

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Easy access?

Anyone who has access to your kindle can pretty much shop their brains out. There is very little protection against purchases and this is by design. Kindle is actually not the worst offender - Kobo beats it by mile. So from that perspective FTC has a point. Kind'a.

The level at which FTC does not have a point is that all Amazon purchases result in an immediate email report in the account holder inbox and are clearly visible on his device. Unless the parent was an idiot to set-up a fully separate account for the kid, with an email they cannot read and stick their credit card into that they will be getting full report of what the kids are shopping. So effectively the kindle account is a "family account" with an arbitrary number of devices associated with it while Google and Apple accounts default to a more personal and per-device setup.

I know a few households which have moved from Google Play and iDevices to Amazon exactly for that reason: "Sure, shop whatever you want - just keep in mind that I will get the bill 5 mins later and I will know what you bought". That will probably not work with on under 8-year olds as "dad will know" is not a sufficient inhibitor to a "more weapons" buying spree. If your kids are older it is the best option out there. Definitely better than Google or Apple. So will I by the way - I am definitely going to switch to KIndle's for the kid's devices over time as I swap them out as it gives me more parental control at all levels.

As far as refunds, Amazon is the only retail experience I have never ever had an issue with refunds. You ask for a refund - you get it outright, end of story. No Tesco style "you opened it you bought it".

So all in all, Amazon may probably have a case here.

6
5

VSANs choking on VMware's recommended components

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Bad software engineering

That is exactly why a (V)SAN should be able to support rate throttling and andvanced queue management for IO operations in software before it even hits the controller. As any network engineer will tell you, throwing "more bandwidth" at a congestion problem is only a temporary replacement for active queue and congestion management. Storage is no different (regarldess of how much does it love to pretend that it is).

Take some slightly bigger server(s), throw some more cores in and voila, you just managed to congest that controller queue once more on "supported" hardware.

3
1

Microsoft, Google et al form club to push 25/50 Gbps Ethernet

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Why?

You should shop around a bit more if you pay £500

Actually, no I do not. In order for a 10G NIC to push 10G in real life you need multiqueue, adapter based hashing or flow matching and hash control at the driver so you can tell the OS to map consistently flows onto their matching consuming cores.

The 320£ or so NICs do only a fraction of this functionality. So while theyconnect at 10G pushing them to 10G in a useful manner is not feasible (or will cost you double the CPU compared to a decent NIC). So you spend 180£ less on a NIC and have to shell that in cost of extra cores in your box (or even double that).

The lowest 10G NIC worth buying on the open market at present are the Broadcom bnx2x series which depending on the actual type of 10G interface in them retail in the 500-560 area. You also have to tune them to your job too. It is nowhere near automagic on any OS.

Even that does not do all I would like to do as there is no deterministic flow matching. For that you need to check for a few more 100s in your wallet.

0
1
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Why?

10G adapter cost per port is still quite significant. I develop on an 8 core Athlon, which costs 450. The extra 10G Ethernet costs north of 500£ alone. This sounds like a rehash of "direct attach" cabling at higher rate and using a customer MAC layer (probably to avoid some royalties).

As far as 40 being already in the market the incremental cost between 10 and 40 is such that there is a market demand for something in-between.

0
1

Hey, Marissa Mayer: Flexi working time is now LAW in UK. Yahoo!

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: So you can now legally ask for flexitime?

[Wait three months]

Boss: No.

Nearly. They are now obliged to provide a justification for the no. This is something HR can do once and they can use it from now onwards.

The result is that businesses which do not want to say yes or cannot say yes for valid reasons will continue saying no. Similarly, businesses which were amenable to this before will continue saying yes. So all in all, nothing has changed as a result.

3
1

Facebook 'manipulated' 700k users' feelings in SECRET EXPERIMENT

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: First comment: Useless research from the "DUH!" dept.

Sixth comment.

Next it will be the individually crafted reorder of your newsfeeds being monetized for ad-slinging (actually product placement) purposes. Welcome to the world of tomorrow, which Orwell, Huxley, Ira Levin and Gibson could not even dream of.

4
0

New MH370 search zone picked using just seven satellite 'handshakes'

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Ughh... bad news

Looking at the new search area it now covers a tectonic plate boundary with its associated ridge, activity, etc.

Chances to find something down there are pretty slim. It took nearly 2 year to find the Air France black boxes in a similar location and we knew where it fell. This does not look good...

3
0

USB charger is prime suspect in death of Australian woman

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

We can't expect everyone to buy their battery chargers from John Lewis.

Err... John Lewis is still a supermarket of sorts.

Frankly, any supermarket is a disreputable source as far as "own brand" electrical goods are concerned. They are sourced in a manner similar to horse lazagna and slavery prawns by the same sourcing department.

It does not cost much more to get a genuine charger or a proper CE marked 3rd party replacement nowdays from a proper online computer supplies shop. Misco/Global Direct and the More group taken together stock pretty much everything under the sun.

0
3

Physicist proposes 1,000-foot state-sized walls to stop tornadoes

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

No bricks will survive category 5

No bricks will survive above category 3 tornado.

The only thing that may stand a chance is something half-dug into the ground, with nice aerodynamic shape and some tank grade armour plating to go over all doors and windows when things get ugly. Effectively "a nuclear shelter of a house". This will cost ~4-5 times more than current construction sans the armour cover for the windows and doors (just the dug-in concrete shell). With the windows and doors you are looking at 10x times or more. I do not see anyone starting to build any of these any time soon.

2
3

What is it with cloud computing? Engage VM, disengage brain?

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: It'll calm down eventually.

It will not. For a different reason.

Try being a startup and showing the VCs a payroll with a 2+ qualified sysadmins (to ensure that a bus running over one does not cause interruption) and some local kit (so you have a viable DR and cloud-to-cloud transition strategy).

You will have your arm twisted until you move the whole lot to the cloud, because the cloud is good and cloud is infallible. The "engage VM, disengage brain" happens at VC/financing level, not at engineering level. All of Trevor's arguments (which I agree with and practice myself) will be brushed aside and brain shall be disengaged.

1
0

Glastonbury debuts festival wide Wi-Fi network - fitted to COWS

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Why fibreglass cows?

Yeah, I was just starting to think of the joys of managing the self-organizing network, adjusting the power in real time as the cows move, etc.

Spoilsports... Fiberglass...

2
0

WiFi WarKitteh and DDoS Dog to stalk DEF CON 22

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Cats n Dogs...

Shortyly we will have this kind of kitty... http://www.imdb.com/media/rm1267112192/tt0239395?ref_=ttmd_md_nxt

0
0

EE in giant VoLTE-face as it tries voice calls over Wi-Fi... again

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Problems with SIP?

Just a few comments:

0. Use strong machine generated password for all extensions even if this means getting rid of old SIP phones which cannot do more than 8 characters or special chars in the password.

1. Make sure you ACL any extensions to specific destination ranges. F.E. ACL any extensions that are local only to the local LAN so they cannot be re-registered from outside. This is especially so for phones that cannot do strong passwords.

2. Make sure you use _NON_ numeric usernames especially for outside extensions (just map them to a number in the dialplan). F.E. My-crappy-android-phone maps to 6731.

3. Set call limits.

4. Blacklist any Palestinian authority networks completely (you can get their address ranges from RIPE). 90% of brute force SIP scans I have seen come from there, rest are US based). The idea is - they brute force an extension password, register and then clock to a premium rate number in Maldives, Mozambique or somewhere else they control. If you have the correct ACL they cannot do it. If you have call limits they also self-throttle themselves (they try to originate 4+ calls so a 4 calls-at-a-time call throttle is an automatic killer). No comment where your money really goes as Hamas uses the same address ranges.

5. Blacklist all countries you are not likely to dial or pin-protect them in your dialplan.

6. Do not use 15060, 1506X, 25060, etc as a security through obscurity, these are scanned too.

7. If your phone supports it and if you have the time to set up SIP/TLS always do, it is well worth the effort.

8. If you are asking where do I know all that shit from - well, not doing it has costed me 40£ a year and a half ago. I was lucky - I had a call throttle and the idiots self-throttled. I know some people who have not been so lucky to the tune of 500$+

1
0

Yes. Facebook will KNOW you've been browsing for smut

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

We are nearing peak advertising

The immunity to advertisement disease has infected most of the internet and is spreadig to the TV and other legacy media.

This is actually a development for the worse as it will mean more infomercials (including fraudulently disguised as real news ones), more placement, more endorsments and other sh*t. While we are becoming well trained to dealing with personalized ads (and ignoring them) the logical step further (personalized fraudulent product placing pseudonews) is likely to take quite a few by surprise.

It is only a matter of time until browsing history, shopping history and internet surfing habits are combined to adjust your "news" to ones that are commercially viable. It is solely a matter who will do it first: MS NBC, Amazon Washington Post or whoever Google (as usually late to the party) will acquire next.

2
0

London commuter hell will soon include 'one card to rule them all'

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Oh dear...

While I was there on business, I can imagine tourists feeling that being fleeced for effectively not being a 'local' leaves a bad taste in the mouth.

Same as London then :) There is a similar surcharge for not using Oyster nowdays.

1
0
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Jobs for cash are the least of the problem

Taxi drivers generate "valid" inflated receipt by doing 3 circles around the target and taking the scenic route, not by having no trail.

So unless Taxi drivers are officially Uber-ized with the receipt being on the basis of real distance from A to B (not the round-n-round-we-go driven one) this is yet another gimmick with no value.

0
0

Apple: REIGN OF FIRE coming to Europe courtesy of old iPhone chargers

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Apple Flambé

It's spelled iXtinguisher and it is a registered trademark. Expect a visit from a fruit (cake) lawyer.

0
0

NASA scrubs FLYING SAUCER over Hawaii ballocket mission

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Hawaii

Wrong guess. Here is the right one:

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jun/11/-sp-el-nino-weather-2014

El nino year - all bets are off and any previous data on wind patters is invalid.

0
0

DINOSAUR BLOOD: JUST RIGHT, as Goldilocks might say, if drinking it

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Jurassic period had FOUR TIMES the atmospheric density !

That may as well be one of the reasons.

Great White/Bluefin Tuna style methabolism may be another. Both are perfectly capable of spurts of activity to "warmblooded level" even in a relatively cold environment while consuming a fraction of the food needed by a warmblooded animal. I actually like this hypothesis - it makes sense. It also explains why dinosaurs managed to spread all the way to the poles. While there were no perfmanent ice sheets at that time it was still quite cold there.

3
0

Glacier's hot butt melts ice, boffins say

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

No boom today

No boom today, boom tomorrow...

There will always be a boom tomorrow...

Boom...

Sorry, but someone just had to put things into perspective (if the geothermal zone is the size of the whole glacier it will be comparable to Yellowstone and when something that size goes boom...)

3
0

Everyone can and should learn to code? RUBBISH, says Torvalds

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Are you referring to the same people that show three finger salute to press and call fellow developers something that would be befitting to Samuel Jackson (once you transalate it from Finnish to English).

1
1
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: The man is correct

Mandating that anyone learn anything they hate is a waste of time.

If we continue this argument anyone who pretends to hate math should be excused from math. Same from English. Same from other subjects. We might as well make everything elective including education altogether. You do not like to spell, go and have some fun in the garden. Go, enjoy. Or alternatively, you do not like PE, fine, go be obese, have another hamburger, wattaboy.

With all due respect, I do not buy that argument. The idea of teaching only enjoyable things is a ton of fresh bovine excrement. I did not enjoy geometry in school at all and I hated every minute of it. I now understand that in order to get anywhere in science, tech and engineering I had to study all that. Quite funny too - I remember more geometry today than algebra and calculus which I loved and enjoyed.

Back on the CS subject. Software and coding is one of the ultimate expressions of problem solving. You devise a way to represent your data, you devise how that data is transformed and you devise how that data changes state.

As I said before, will a kid write a line of code or not after school is irrelevant. The skills on how to look at a problem and how to address it systhematically will stay on and be useful for life. That is way more useful than Microsoft Office slavery indoctrination (even if the actual method of teaching said skills is not particularly pleasant).

7
3
Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: The man is correct

You are missing a few points and so is Torvalds:

1. Unless you try, you will not know if you can. For example, I did not graduate with CS and I earn a living by coding and problem solving. I am grateful that I was exposed to IT in school when IT meant coding and not Microsoft Office indoctrination and office slavery training. It is the same as with other things - math, english, history, physics, chemistry, etc. None of them is for everyone, but that for some reason is not a barrier. So why software should be special?

2. Software development and the parts which distinguish real from fake software developers such as finite state machines, data representation, etc teach you how to formulate a problem, represent the data needed to solve a problem and how to go about solving it. This is universally usable across a very wide area of human knowledge. However, it is presently taught only to CS and math. I agree, it is not for everyone - I know plenty of people who suck at solving problems regardless of their knowledge area. However, those who can will benefit from it even if they do not write a single line of code after leaving school.

3. Having some knowledge of what it takes to code will decimate the parasitic "we will charge you 30 warm and himid client man years" industry and that cannot be bad. This is besides the "developers" (quotes intended) in that industry having graduated with CS from and earning a living without even knowing what a finite state machine is and how to go about to implement one (I usually start interviews with this question and 95% of them inevitably fail at that point).

10
14

UBER UBER ALLES: Investors value ride app at $17 BEEELLION

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: You could be right

Quote: " If we assume 20 global cities the size of London"

That is the wrong value assumption. In London you can hardly spit without hitting a taxi.

The value of apps like Uber is not London. The value is in smaller cities. I end up in let's say Six Mile Bottom, East Anglia and I need a taxi. I have no clue what the local taxi company number is, I pull an app, I punch it, pay for the taxi getting there from Cambridge and getting me where I want to go. That is also a bigger journey (both financially and in terms of Uber's cut) than a lot of journeys in London.

If we look at the city size distribution analysis for large developed countries that is where the market is. Also, in that market the real competition to Uber are not taxi, it is the hire industry. If I can rely on a sane tariff and sane service between A and B in any unknown location around the developed world I am not going to pay Hertz and Avis the stupid amount of money I pay them now.

Hertz valuation is 12Bn, Avis 6.33Bn add to that Sixt, National, etc and you have a very healthy size market into which Uber+taxis can eat for the next decade.

3
0

IBM, HP, others admit products laced with NORK GOLD

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

@dan1980

What you are describing is 100% correct for "pseudo"-brands such as supermarkets and el-cheapo clothing chains (as for example the ones implicated in the Bangladeshi factory collapse disaster).

That is not correct for most real premium brands. These hold their supply chain in an iron fist (usually without any velvet gloves). Examples here would be Apple, most boutique French labels, etc. There are clauses in their contracts that any subcontracts have to be approved and any suppliers have to be approved too.

When I hear that Tesco has no clue what is in their product I actually belive that. They have their supply chain set-up in such a way that it provides them with plausible deniability regarding the truck guy relabeling the horse meat from the horse abbatoir as beef. This is done on purpose too. I find it difficult to belive that Apple, Omega or one of the boutique clothing labels supplying shops that do not even have price stickers on their stuff do not know their goods origin.

0
0

AMD tops processor evolution with new mobile Kaveri chippery

Voland's right hand
Silver badge

Re: Dude, you are so full of it, it is not even funny

@Blitterbug

Funnily enough in the rare cases when I am called as a "witch doctor" to tend to the sick and wounded PCs somewhere I dread the AMD sign as much as you do. I know what I am going to find:

1. Half of the memory spec required for the OS

2. The slowest disk possible money can buy (I did not believe people still do SATA with 8MB cache until I pulled one out of an AMD machine 2 months back).

3. Add to that a crap realtek or ralink network and you get a complete picture.

As I said - there is nothing wrong with the CPU. In fact the current crop is superior to Intel at all levels (that was not the case with the early E series Fusion vs Core). It is the cretins in PC vendor marketing that continue to insist on downmarketing and crippling the kit on purpose which are the problem. I am typing this on an AMD notebook by the way which is spec-ed by HP as 4G RAM max, sold with 2G, Windows 7 and Seagate Thin (should be called Seagate Slow). It presently has 16G and a hybrid drive and it goes like the clappers (as it should).

15
0

Page: