* Posts by Ken Hagan

5449 posts • joined 14 Jun 2007

Linux is part of the IoT security problem, dev tells Linux conference

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"And firewalls fall far short of offering protection, he said, for obvious reasons: they're oriented to block traffic from the outside, and if you haven't turned off UPnP, Things expect to open whatever ports they wish."

A few errors there. ... Even the cheapest routers have firewalls that *can* block outgoing connections if you want to. They also let you turn off UPnP and Things *expect* to be able to open ports whether or not you have allowed it. (They are merely disappointed if you don't.)

We don't actually *need* the changes (however sensible) mentioned in the article. We already have the tools we need. A bit of end-user education would go a long way here. Even once we have the changes mentioned in the article, it will still be possible for end-users to get it wrong.

0
0

Euro space agency's Galileo satellites stricken by mystery clock failures

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: It's not a GPS-alike it's a GPS!

I think you will find that Joe Public has never heard of GNSS, and whilst he probably thinks the US are the only providers, he doesn't actually care as long as his smartphone can tell him where the nearest pub is.

1
1

Kill it with fire: US-CERT urges admins to firewall off Windows SMB

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Samba can disable SMB1 as well

But, but ... XP has already gone away, unless you are the NHS or a similar organisation which has paid loads of cash to MS, in which case I'm sure this vulnerability will be patched.

Yes, that'll definitely happen. To suggest otherwise would imply that MS were simply laughing all the way to the bank and the NHS management were a bunch of fools pissing someone else's money down the drain.

4
0

Just give up: 123456 is still the world's most popular password

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: The source of the leaked passwords?

"Most of the email addresses will be for example.com as well..."

That depends on how they validate it. I tried using no@example.com as my Microsoft account during a Win10 installation, only to be told that it wasn't a valid email address. I had to find some other way of not giving them any contact details. (Eventually, I think I discovered that if I failed three times then it took pity on me and let me use a local account.)

1
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: List # 15 and 20

"So how likely is it that some/all the other trivial passwords are from (less cunning) bots?"

Less cunning? If someone learns that 389fj2kf674hk is being used by a bot, it is probably easy to destroy all accounts that happen to use that password. If they learn that 12345 is being used by a bot, they cannot delete anything because (in their heart of hearts) they just know that 5% of their customers are using it, too.

0
0

Opera scolds stale browsers with shocking Neon experiment

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Miserable old gits

"This is El Reg, no place for common sense and alternative viewpoints"

Or rather ... This is El Reg. For *any* given "innovation", some of the people commenting here probably tried it years ago, agreed with everyone else that it was crap, watched it sink without trace, and are now dismayed to discover that a bunch of twenty-somethings think it is a new idea worth trying.

It's all the more distressing when the new idea is "more eye candy". The cycle-of-reincarnation period for that can't be much more than half a decade. How young do you have to be not to be able to remember the last time someone promised either "lots more sound and animation will make computers more friendly and easy to use" or (at the other end of the cycle) "we need to make everything either flat or, better, invisible so that it doesn't get in the way".

3
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Document-Centrism and the Right Tool for the Job

"Kolondra contends that browsers, after two decades, have become rather stale and are tied to a document-centric model that doesn't reflect the way people interact online today."

Perhaps there is room for more than one browser on a desktop. Quite a lot of what I do on the web involves extended pieces of writing. I'm quite happy using a document-centric browser for that. If this Kolondra person, or anyone else, can come up with a better way of doing some of the other stuff then I'm happy to use a second browser with a completely different UI to perform that completely different interaction.

The main problem I foresee is that user shells tend to want to associate just one application with (say) https:// urls and will almost certainly manage (somehow) to launch the wrong app *every* time.

2
0

Google floats prototype Key Transparency to tackle secure swap woes

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Explanation?

I can't find, either in the article or any of the links, an explanation of how it works. Is it just too clever?

1
0

Terry Pratchett's self-written documentary to be broadcast in 2017

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Literary critics

[shakes head in disbelief]

So real humans (and presumably they were ones with balls of their own) actually sat down and thought about the fatality rate and instead of thinking "well colour me surprised" they actually went away and did some research to figure out how to do it less fatally.

1
0

Europe mulls treating robots legally as people ... but with kill switches

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Legal persons, not natural persons

"And if the car is found to be liable, then the industry-funded statutory insurance would pay."

And that's the problem. When companies are turned into legal persons it works because if a company is found to be liable then that company pays. There is therefore a clear incentive for that company to be careful in its behaviour.

What you are suggesting is more akin to turning *all cars* into *one* legal person and charging manufacturers a flat fee to add one more to the pile. That externalises all the legal costs of negligence when writing the driver software, resulting in a clear incentive to cut corners on the software, which is precisely the opposite of what Joe Public actually wants if he is expected to share a road with these things.

0
0

Thanks, Obama: NSA to stream raw intelligence into FBI, DEA and pals

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"raw intelligence"

That's oxymoronic. Happily, the article itself refers to "raw surveillance data". Unhappily, this implies that what the NSA are feeding has not been boiled down in any way. Wouldn't it be more efficient, and secure, to analyse the raw data once and then feed the results to these other agencies? Isn't that what the NSA are for? Happily, the answer is "yes" and so we have the re-assurance that the US government is *too stupid* to act as an effective police state.

2
1

TV anchor says live on-air 'Alexa, order me a dollhouse' – guess what happens next

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Making impulse purchases more likely = good.

Making chargebacks and lawsuits more likely = less good.

Losing their PCI compliance = much less good.

The complaint here is not that Alexa makes it easy for you to spend money. It is that Alexa makes it easy for someone else to spend your money. That's not actually legal and if it becomes a running joke that Alexa fails in this way then eventually Amazon are going to lose in court. I don't know what the PCI rules are, but I would hope that creating a system where anyone within earshot of Alexa can use your credit card is in breach of those rules and presumably Amazon becomes a lot less profitable if they have to start using PayPal to process payments (because their own system is no longer allowed to operate).

0
0

Programmer finds way to liberate ransomware'd Google Smart TVs

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

In my experience, programmers are perfectly capable of writing clear instructions (perhaps because that is their day job) but they are usually kept away from the writing of the manual because that's customer-facing and "everyone knows" that you shouldn't let techies talk to customers.

Consequently, the manual is written by someone who doesn't understand the product and who believes that details are scary.

17
1

Government calls for ideas on how to splash £400m on fibre

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Really?

I imagine that "access to" is short-hand for "we've found a copper wire and installed an ADSL2 modem at our end" and "24Mbps" is shorthand for "this is the maximum possible speed assuming that the customer is next door to the exchange".

0
0

‘Artificial Intelligence’ was 2016's fake news

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Trigger warning

Replace "thick" with "ignorant" or even "untrained" and the comment is no longer inoffensive. It certainly doesn't brand all offshore workers as anything, just the ones selected (or condemned) to first-line support. Since HR are *probably* trying to steer the more clued-up (and therefore more valuable) staff into second-line support, this shouldn't surprise anyone.

Btw, I'm sure Andrew is aware of how we spell things over here but we've been spelling them correctly for 150 years and yet Mr Webster's idiotic nationalistic experiment hasn't gone away over there. Maybe in 2017 they'll finally notice that (to pick but one obvious example) no native speaker *anywhere* *ever* has ever pronounced the two vowel sounds in "color" in the same way and so Mr Webster wasn't even right by his own standards.

8
0

Virgin America mid-flight panic after moron sets phone Wi-Fi hotspot to 'Samsung Galaxy Note 7'

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Achem, funny not funny

"I'd probably change the name and then turn my phone off"

That would cause even more panic. The offending phone is no longer functioning, *probably* indicating that it has malfunctioned. It's probably on fire right now. Or, if it isn't on fire, it was probably switched off by the terrorist, who is now lying low until the panic is over.

2
0

Twas the week before Xmas ... not a creature was stirring – except Microsoft admitting its Windows 10 upgrade pop-up went 'too far'

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Hmmm, so "Windows 10 is such a substantial improvement over Windows 8" that it is a working environment that "you can live with", eh?

Well, yes, I'd have to agree with that. I'm not aware of a single respect in which 10 is not significantly better than 8, now that they've back-ported all the slurping. (A pity that the important comparison is with 7, because that's what all the corporates are still running.)

"if your hardware can handle it, go with Windows 10 64 bit, w/ at least 16GB of ram."

There's no question of whether the hardware can handle it. The OS and shell works fine with 1GB, even for 64-bit editions if you can trick the setup image into accepting the system in the first place. You'd only need 16GB of RAM if you were running an app that demanded the other 15GB. Also, you will struggle to find an x86-class CPU from the last ten years that isn't x64-class, though they do exist, and struggle to find one from the last five years that doesn't have sufficient graphics on the CPU to handle the Win10 UI. (I'm not sure they do.) You probably *won't* be able to find a system that could run Win8 that can't run Win10 (and rather more efficiently, too). But again, the important comparison for corporates is probably Win7 and there probably are low-end machines running Win7 that would need a RAM or graphics change before the Win10 installation will work.

2
0

Landmark EU ruling: Legality of UK's Investigatory Powers Act challenged

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Screensaver Browsing

The chap who runs Andrews & Arnold once posted a blog entry that included a very small icon. The small icon in question was the site icon for one of the larger freebie porn sites. At the end of his posting he casually informed his readership that they were all now "users of a porn site" as far as Her Majesty's Government were concerned.

Perhaps if more sites did this, we could have some impact.

5
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

It's OK, his hypocrisy is only temporary.

I'm sure that once the Brexshit hits the fan and David Davis returns to the back benches he will rediscover his passion for personal privacy.

5
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: This is great news...

"Those who dwelleth in the UK are subject to the laws passed by Her Majesty and her Parliament..."

Indeed, but I think you will find that there is an Act of the UK parliament, signed off by Lizibet, that makes the ECJ the highest court in this sort of matter.

12
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Yup...

" And you are not going to get people to vote for a third party on the basis of one issue alone."

It's getting to the point where quite a lot of people might be thinking that the third party is the only one talking sense on quite a number of issues, but admittedly they are only little things like Europe and human rights, so you're probably right.

12
0

Snapchat coding error nearly destroys all of time for the internet

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: WTF is an App doing quering network time?

Regardless of what Snapchat *thought* they were doing, the fallout from this would indicate that Apple's/Google's response should be to block out-going NTP traffic from every process except the one that the OS uses to set the time for the device.

15
0

Strong non-backdoored encryption is vital – but the Feds should totally be able to crack it, say House committees

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: 2 + 2 != 5

Nah! The basic problem is that the voting public let them get away with this sort of ignorance in a way that wouldn't be tolerated in other fields. Saying "we want no back doors except for when we do" is really no less idiotic than saying "you can't get pregnant if you're raped, so you must have enjoyed it actually, you slut" and you really can't imagine a politician getting away with the latter statement.

(Yes, I know, in an ideal world you wouldn't be able to imagine a politician even making the latter statement, but ...)

11
1
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: 'MURICA! FUCK YEAH!

"a small island to the right"

To whose right? Trump's? I doubt it. Perhaps turnwise would be a better description.

2
0

Oi! Linux users! Want some really insecure closed-source software?

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: There are solutions

"The good news is that Adobe appear not to have heard of ARM or MIPS."

Shhhhhhh!

1
0

HMRC IT cockup misses nearly 1m Scottish taxpayers for devo PAYE letters

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"And highly respected companies like Apple and Google avail themselves of these services, so they must be legal."

I refer you to Margaret Hodge's recent book on the subject. Apparently the requirement is not so much that the scheme be legal but that in the opinion of a QC it is arguable in court. Once that, somewhat lower, hurdle has been crossed, it is safe for a tax adviser to punt the scheme. Their clients then have to decide if it is worth the risk, but since HMRC have such a woeful record of prosecutions, most people decide that it probably is.

4
0

NASA – get this – just launched 8 satellites from a rocket dropped from a plane at 40,000ft

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: "from the GPS system work out the wind speed on the surface." How?

Following the PDF link to http://clasp-research.engin.umich.edu/missions/cygnss/docs/CYGNSS_FactSheet_October2014.pdf and googling over to https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/psd3/multi/remote/using_reflections.html (section 4), it looks a bit like the sort of thing you'd laugh your arse off if it were used in a film as a plot device.

Semi-plausibly, you can use the reflections of GPS signals off the ocean surface like a radar to figure out large wave profiles and (from that) broadly infer ocean surface conditions. I say broadly because the height that is inferred in this way will depend on the wave's direction of travel and you have to know that from some other way, and the height of a wave will in any case also depend on how many miles it has been building up, which again you have to know by other means.

However...

Much less plausibly, if you have a black belt in boffinry, you can also use the GPS signals that are *scattered* from *surface ripples*, producing an interference pattern. The spectra of these waves apparently depend very sensitively on the actual local wind conditions so you can skip all that "other means" crap and proceed directly to omniscience.

So they are watching the slight fuzziness of a ripple, from a hundred miles up, through a hurricane, using someone else's transmitter. (And, as various folk have remarked upon in these forums over the years, the other guys transmitter is already compensating for both Special and General Relativity to be even vaguely useful in the first place.)

Launching the satellite on-the-wing looks positively pedestrian in comparison.

2
0

Oracle finally targets Java non-payers – six years after plucking Sun

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: True Evil that makes even Microsoft look good

"The sooner Java dies the better,"

It can die tomorrow, for you, if you want. Take a look around your business and identify all the Java apps that you still use. Then, for each one, inform your company's legal department that from next year they will *need* something *in writing* from each of the relevant vendors *indemnifying* you against any legal action by Oracle on licensing. Separately, make estimates of the cost of non-compliance and tell the accounts department that this money needs to be set aside "just in case" and should therefore be factored into the operating costs of continuing to use these applications.

Your company's legal and accounting brains should be able to sort out the rest.

18
1
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"But what do you use for a rich internet client then?"

If by "rich internet client" you mean a write-once-run-anywhere platform then the short answer is you don't. Please stop looking. The world has seen repeated attempts over the last two or three decades to create a single platform and every time we end up with something that gives a barely usable experience on at most one of its supposed targets.

Separate your UI from your back-end. If you can do that properly, the former will be a trivial thin layer and the latter will be portable. Trivial thin layers can be optimised for each platform. Portable code can be recompiled. If you have trouble with either of these operations, find a new career.

31
1
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: All very dubious

"I'm sure some half competent lawyers could mount a robust counter attack based on the inability to easily get an uncontaminated wholly free version."

My thoughts exactly, but if we are both wrong then the logical consequence still isn't a new yacht for Larry. The first logical consequence is that businesses start asking themselves whether they have any Java-based apps on their systems. The second is that, having developed the tools to answer that question, it starts to be really difficult for third-parties to *sell* such products so they stop making (or even supporting) them. The third is that fairly soon no-one is using Java and it becomes just one of the things that your AV product quarantines on sight.

14
0

Microsoft's Edge to flush Adobe Flash in Windows 10 Creator’s Update

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

So have the BBC, but it hasn't helped.

2
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: BBC take note

I'm opted in and running on an ARM-powered laptop and I *still* get messages telling me I need to go and find Flash, for *most* AV content on bbc.co.uk. Your mileage may vary, but mine's crap.

0
0

Top CompSci boffins name the architectures we'll need in 2030

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Yawn

I could have written that list 20 years ago. Come to think of it, I'm pretty sure I *read* that list 20 years ago. Curiously enough, mere demand does not conjure supply out of a unicorn's butt, so we're still waiting for them. Yes, they'd be nice, but unless you have some evidence that these old problems are newly solvable, there's no news here.

0
0

A single typo may have tipped US election Trump's way

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Their election chances were damaged because the truth got revealed...

"They also hacked the RNC, but didn't release those emails."

That's probably because the RNC emails didn't contain any background material about Trump. Certainly the appearance from the East side of the pond is that the Republicans were as surprised as the rest of us with his performance in the primaries and responded simply by not bothering to field a candidate this time around. We've ended up with an Independent winning. Is that the first time this has happened?

3
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: A single typo may have tipped US election Trump's way

"The Palmer Report has a lot of eyebrow–raising information up, if you care to look."

Just had a look and, yes, *that's* the sort of thing that, if proven, would justify all the talk about rigging the election. That's where people should focus their attention. The wikileaks stuff just looked like mud being flung in a dirty campaign and I find it really hard to believe that it swayed enough people to make a difference.

2
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: A single typo may have tipped US election Trump's way

Was anyone actually swayed by whatever revelations followed these hacks? Hasn't it been fairly obvious for about a year what sort of people the two candidates were?

Come back if you find evidence that someone actually fiddled with the voting machines. Until then, shut up because nothing else that people are talking about counts as "hacking likely to affect the vote".

31
7

Blue sky basic income thinking is b****cks

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"GREETINGS, MEAT SACK..."

Sorry, I don't speak COBOL. Do you have a colleague written in a proper language?

1
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Mixed feelings

"What about the sort of smart clothing one might require for a job interview?"

If the interviewer is such a shallow-minded twat that they insist on smart clothes then they can bloody well pay for them. I don't see why the welfare system should foot the bill for the prejudices of a by-gone age.

2
5

'Emoji translator' sought by translations firm

Ken Hagan
Gold badge
Flame

Re: What a load of bollocks...

Perhaps the truth is that a picture *costs* a thousand words.

The time spent typing in two random emoji could be better spent just writing the flipping words. The time spent playing silly mind-games trying to decipher them could be better spent having sex (or whatever it was that the text interrupted). The time wasted because the meaning got garbled in transit is lost forever. The fact that professional translators think you need special skills to figure out what they mean is a really big clue that these hinder communication, not help.

Use words, you numpty, and whilst we are at it can you shit on that horrible ribbon and bring back a menu with (you've guessed it) some fucking words on it.

13
0

Europe to launch legal action against countries over diesel emissions cheating

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Oh, here we go again!

"as Britain has been fined numerous times, it seems it will do nothing but take money from the population"

If the people are stupid enough to keep electing a government that ignores the law, then I'd argue that the people deserve to be punished. You do have a choice in the polling booth, you know. You don't *have* to vote for the blithering idiots whose mere touch turns everything to shit.

8
2

Is your Windows 10, 8 PC falling off the 'net? Microsoft doesn't care

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Don't think Microsoft has the monopoly on dodgy DHCP clients

"To the people giving me thumbs down, go and run a packet trace, this is exactly what an Apple client does."

And did anyone so much as suggest that it isn't? No. Your downvotes are for two quite different reasons. Firstly, you said something that makes a particular OS look inept. Expect downvotes from fanboys. Secondly, you said something a while back on an unrelated topic that put someone's nose out of joint. Expect downvotes on everything you post until they forget who you are or they find someone new to pester or (but it won't happen) they get a life.

And to all those people in these two categories: May you choke to death on mince pies this Christmas.

8
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: See no evil, hear no evil.

That was pretty much my first thought, too. Given reasonable rates of updating, by the end of the year there won't be any machines running Windows on the internet. Are we *sure* it is a *Microsoft* patch that is causing this problem?

1
0

HBO slaps takedown demand on 13-year-old girl's painting because it used 'Winter is coming'

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Arseholes

"I realise you can't beat the the novel format after all."

I think the real truth is that you can't beat the *original* format. Each format has strengths and weaknesses and a competent author will play to the former, making it very hard to produce an equally good "translation" into a different format.

As a result, producers who buy the rights to a book might be better advised to buy the rights to the characters (or universe) depicted therein and then commission someone to write a different story. (This needn't be the original author and unless that author has some experience in the other medium perhaps it shouldn't be.)

I think I read somewhere that JKR made a lot of friends when she first met the producers of the first film and suggested that quite a few things would have to change to make the books filmable. Cue huge sighs of relief from the screenwriting team.

1
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"In this case, it looks like the publishers have dibs on clothing bearing the phrase, and the website allows you to print it on T-shirts. Hence, infringement."

Perhaps the girl should use Google Translate to create a non-English version of the text and upload that instead. I hear that translating random phrases into Arabic is a popular meme right now.

0
0

Sysadmin told to spend 20+ hours changing user names, for no reason

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: funny thing about these requests

"All clashes of initials should be referred to 2IC for prompt resolution"

Well if HR are doing their job properly, they won't be taking on anyone whose initials clash with an existing employee.

5
0

What can we use to hit Intel between the eyes, thinks Qualcomm – a 10nm ARM server chip

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: People don't buy x86 because of Performance or anything

I don't care *why* is it that way for x86 now. I am merely pointing out that it *is* and that those equivalent standards for ARM are only "being quietly worked on" and not "working". As and when the ARM folks get their shit together I look forward to the "harder times ahead" for the x86.

0
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: People don't buy x86 because of Performance or anything

"Everything Linux works on Arm. [...] The platform is definitely there. And tested and running for years thanks to Android and rpi and domestic routers and switches."

If you say so, but this guy reckons that's a huge steaming pile of crap: -> http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/10/10/linus_torvalds_says_arm_just_doesnt_look_like_beating_intel/

I have to say that my own experience of running Linux is more in line with his. I have several ARM-based machines and my options for putting the latest Linus kernel in each of them are (i) ha ha ha ha, (ii) learn about this particular machine's boot-loader, grab the vendor's kernel from a git repository, figure out what kernel options are required, try some builds and debug the results.

On x86, the proces is download an ISO, burn the CD (or write the stick) and boot. Job done.

2
3

90 per cent of the UK's NHS is STILL relying on Windows XP

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Amortisation, anyone?

Anytime you buy some equipment, you should ask yourself when it will become worthless (at least for accounting purposes). To a first approximation, that happens with the expiry of either the hardware, the software or the vendor. It sounds like the hardware is still going strong in these cases (or is readily replaceable in the case of desktop PC systems) and so your main worries are software and vendor.

Someone selling you kit and agreeing to share the design and all source code, with an agreement that says you can use that information either if the vendor disappears or if you think the vendor's support offering is too pricey, will immediately have an expected lifetime of N-times longer than the schmuck who sells a closed system. That makes it N-times cheaper than the (closed) competition.

If your bean counters are doing their job properly, that should mean that an organisation the size of the NHS basically need never get into this sort of situation again. Indeed, any use of a closed system should immediately raise suspicions of corruption and back-haners, since it is so vanishingly unlikely that the deal is being costed fairly.

Afterthought: A private sector organisation has to consider a fourth possibility, the expiry of itself. That might present a compelling argument for something that is cheaper this year and we'll worry about the costs next year. Countries tend not to go bankrupt, even when they run out of money, so they probably *shouldn't* be worrying about that fourth possibility.

1
0

Are you listening, Mr Trump? World's largest tech distie is now owned by the Chinese

Ken Hagan
Gold badge
Trollface

Re: I'm sure...

Nice troll.

Er, it was, wasn't it?

[re-reads]

Oh.

2
0

Take that, creationists: Boffins witness birth of new species in the lab

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Meh...

That was indeed in the fine article, but only as part of the career background of one of the teachers of the person doing the experiment in the article. The experiment that was the subject of the article was a demonstration of changes in viral DNA. The bacteria remained unchanged at the end of paragraph 3.

It's this kind of lazy shifting from one thing to another that I was crtiticising in my comment, because it makes it easier for the nut-jobs to make it look like scientists are shifty and slack with standards of evidence.

1
0

Forums