* Posts by Ken Hagan

4600 posts • joined 14 Jun 2007

North America down to its last ~130,000 IPv4 addresses

Ken Hagan
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Re: Canecutter - 2 things wrong with IPV6

As normally deployed, the 128-bit address space is actually only 64-bits public. If your ISP gives you a /56, they're giving you 256 networks to play with. That's more than the 1 you need, but it is a far smaller chunk of the IPv6 unicast space than even a single IPv4 address is of that space, so calling it "wasteful" is harsh.

Also, and partly in response to another poster's remarks about routing tables, one of the reasons why they went for a 128-bit space was so that they had bits to waste. The idea is that quite a few routing decisions can be made without complex tables at all, just by inspecting prefixes. Ironically, the protocol that now needs massive tables is IPv4, which owing to the balkanisation of the address space now requires brute-force-sized routing tables in some places. There was an El Reg article about this a few months back, but I can't remember enough of the details to google it.

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Microsoft: This Windows 10 build has 'NO significant known issues'

Ken Hagan
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Re: Hallelujah - File Explorer's file path limit is not 256 any more !

I suggest you read the documentation. The limit most certainly *is* Win32's and the "\\?\" prefixing is documented as a way to skip Win32's validation and pass the filename blindly to the lower level. It sounds like you've failed to distinguish between the Win32 personality and the NT OS layer. MAX_PATH continues to apply to the Unicode APIs if you don't use the prefix and I don't think I've ever met and end-user who did.

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Ken Hagan
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It would have been XP, but your recollection is flaky.

This has always been a problem. It was originally possible for an application to make itself the top window. This is an important feature. If you launch a child app to perform some task (and setup programs often do this) then it is quite irritating to the end-user if that child app is not visible because the parent still has the focus.

Some apps abused the feature, insisting on spewing themselves in your face every time they felt they had some "important" message to give you. Eventually MS said enough was enough and changed the rules. But there still had to be a way, and it was only a matter of time before the bad apps learned the new rules and we were back where we started.

Around the XP time-frame, MS nearly came up with a set of rules that worked. It took the twats quite while to produce a work-around. That's probably the halcyon period you were thinking of.

This is one of a class of problems where the following rule is true: For any massively rude behaviour, there will be some managers who reckon their program is important enough to justify it and some of them will employ programmers who are smart enough and unscrupulous enough to pick up the bonus for making it happen.

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Ken Hagan
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Re: Hallelujah - File Explorer's file path limit is not 256 any more !

The limit is not Explorer's. It is Win32's. It was promised (back in 1991 or thenabouts) that 260 characters would be enough for any file. This was over three lines of typing in a command prompt back then and the designers clearly asked themselves what would be a stupidly long name and then doubled it.

(There is an API work-around and so Microsoft could have written Explorer to be able to handle longer names. This would let you quietly create files that your other programs couldn't handle properly, perhaps causing a buffer overrun or a truncation-related security flaw, depending on quite how they couldn't handle it properly. Microsoft presumably thought that the ability to dig yourself deeper into trouble wasn't a great feature. I'm inclined to agree.)

Of course, some people like to put all the meta-data for a file into the parent's (and n-fold grandparent's) directory name. This is typically a crap idea because you lose it the moment you move the file somewhere else, but people do it anyway. Such people can quite easily blow the 260-character limit. The view of an operating system designer is that these people are twats and they can sod off.

I would note in passing that *any* fixed limit will eventually upset some "test suite" and that having no limit at all will eventually produce an eco-system where twats store file contents in the filename and the files themselves are empty -- just because they can.

Unix has similar hard limits, but they are generally larger and less documented. The consequences are that (firstly) Windows gets the schtick and (more importantly) the equivalent failure in Unix-land depends on what application you are using. That's not actually better.

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Teaching people to speak English? You just need Chatroulette without the dick pics

Ken Hagan
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Re: why english?

"However, why we (in UK) default to learning French in School is beyond me."

The other reply is probably why we started with French. Why we persist is probably more due to the over-supply of French teachers compared to other languages. Remember, for the *main* foreign language being taught in a school, you need *lots* of teachers who are comfortable in the language.

We could change to Spanish. (One could make a case for other major languages like Arabic, but I think you'd struggle to put even one Arabic language teacher in every secondary school, let alone the numbers you'd need.) However, it would require a big push from high-up, probably ministerial level, and that would doubtless offend the French Ambassador more than it pleased the Argentinian one.

Also, if everyone is going to speak English, then teaching *any* foreign language in UK schools is more of a cultural aspiration than a business one. The choice of language is therefore not motivated purely by the number of business opportunities it opens up.

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Ken Hagan
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Re: @Anonymous Coward No True Statement...

Conversely, my own experience learning French and German was that I became more idiomatic in the target language if I attempted a direct translation of some Inspector Clouseau-like stereotype.

Sometimes, I am wondering if one can use these mistakes actually as a tool of teaching. ;)

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Script-blocker NoScript lets in ANYTHING from googleapis.com

Ken Hagan
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Re: Googleapis.com

"you'll be using C runtime, MFC, C#, DirectX, ADO, ... all of which are third party binaries "

Nit-pick. These aren't third-party binaries. Simply by booting up a closed source OS, you've already handed over the keys to the kingdom to your OS vendor and these are from the same source.

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UH OH: Windows 10 will share your Wi-Fi key with your friends' friends

Ken Hagan
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Re: Off

If you don't know that it exists, how are you supposed to turn it off?

Quick question: what's the list of things that have to be turned off as the first thing you do with a new Windows machine?

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Ken Hagan
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No significant known issues, he said.

What ... the ... %"@!

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Why OH WHY did Blighty privatise EVERYTHING?

Ken Hagan
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Re: The Purpose of Government.

Even if you accept the "services" argument, the best way for a government to provide those services appears to be to collect the cash (using its legal authority to levy taxes) and then go into the marketplace and buy those services from someone with a clue. That is, it appears to be possible for a private concern to provide a better service *and* do it for less money (thereby leaving some left over for profit) than a public concern. This is probably because public concerns can't go bust (unless they're Greek) and deep down the civil servants know it.

Sadly, governments appear to be crap at both collecting cash and regulating, too, and it isn't obvious that these functions can be privatised in the same way. We do have some experience of regulatory capture, in various industries, but it seems to be even worse than just having ignorant politicians in charge. The French had a privatised tax system in the eighteenth century but they (the Farmers General) were, as the saying goes, "first up against the wall when the Revolution came".

And it certainly came. Took the rest of us a quarter of a century to confine it to France.

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Britain beats back Argies over Falklands online land grab

Ken Hagan
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Re: "Not til we have some planes to go on them..."

I don't think C&C time lag is necessarily the point. In principle, you could have a button that puts the drone into autonomous combat mode, whereupon it does whatever it takes (pulling rather more g-s than a pilot could, if necessary) to remove the target you've identified. In practice, I'm sure the extra sensory and processing hardware required is not yet standard issue on existing drones. However, I'm sure DARPA are working on it.

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Ken Hagan
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Re: Outer Manchuria before the Falklands

Yeah, that's a *proper* Russian strongman. The present lot are just limp in comparison.

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Ken Hagan
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Re: Argies are too late @Flocke Kroes

"That's the Northern Ireland that's still part of the UK right?"

That's the one, and it precisely proves the point. In the 1990s, the UK government made a public declaration that the UK had no territorial interest on the island of Ireland. Northern Ireland remains part of the UK only because the local people want it to.

(It's a slightly different case because of the size of the population, of course. There were rumours in the 90s that the UK had offered to hand over the territory in line with historic claims by Eire over the entire island, and been politely refused on the grounds that they didn't want the loyalist groups to become their problem.)

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Microsoft's magic hurts: Nadella signals 'tough choices' on the way

Ken Hagan
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Re: Apps + Windows Phone

I think the general gist of the reason why is that the API available to phone apps is not sufficiently close to the API that all those desktop apps were written to. I haven't looked too hard at the modern phone API, so I'm just guessing.

However, it was certainly true for WinCE, despite the fact that CE never ran on devices that were as feeble as the original Windows. Microsoft never really appeared to understand that you had to port more than the branding for it to actually count as a port.

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That shot you heard? SSLv3 is now DEAD

Ken Hagan
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"How can one of the big national banks (part of Lloyds Group these days) have the temerity to operate like this?"

The parent (secure.lloydsbank.com) is even worse, supporting SSLv3. BoS probably deserve some congratulations. :(

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As the US realises it's been PWNED, when will OPM heads roll?

Ken Hagan
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Re: Such amazing security measures worth $82bn...

It's OK. The average internet user is so illiterate that they won't realise the exclamation mark is part of the password.

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Ken Hagan
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Re: Ha

"He's a democrat. It comes with the territory."

The previous administration reckoned that the same problems could be solved by writing blank cheques to just the part of the government that doesn't have to tell us how they spend them.

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BT: Let us scrap ordinary phone lines. You've all got great internet, right?

Ken Hagan
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Re: But let us keep all the hardware, of course

"I don't have a problem with them replacing POTs with VoIP as long as the same obligation of QoS is carried over."

I don't know (anyone able to confirm or deny?), but I would expect that the relevant service level agreement was drafted by a civil servant who retired before ever finding out what VoIP was, so if BT are kept to the letter of the law (providing POTS) then they cannot honour the spirit (providing connectivity) and vice versa.

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Killer ChAraCter HOSES almost all versions of Reader, Windows

Ken Hagan
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Re: C

"But your argument essentially boils down to security through trust, rather than security through engineering."

Actually it didn't. He was quite clear that you can avoid the problem by avoiding the functions that don't take a maximum length. (Truncation brings other problems, but they are more subtle and much less likely to lead to a stack-trashing exploit.) Avoiding a relatively small set of library functions is an engineering problem. The Microsoft compiler will happily flag any and all uses of the offending set and you can write your makefiles so that such code does not build.

Curiously enough, Microsoft's own secure-coding processes, introduced with much fanfare around the time of XPsp2, do exactly that, which makes it all the more mysterious that this kernel code managed to get through the safety net. What's the betting that the handling of Adobe Type 1 fonts gets a special exemption from modern coding standards on the grounds that it seems to work, no-one has touched it for a decade and no-one wants to?

Also, what's the betting that MS now delete the offending code from Win10 and roll out a "security hotfix" for all supported releases (That may or may not include Server 2003.) that simply disables Type 1 support from all supported versions of Windows, forever?

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Ken Hagan
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Re: Ah. Adobe. Again.

The amazing thing is, MS have completely re-written all of Windows from the ground up at least twice since this bug came in and they've managed to inadvertently re-introduce the flaw on each occasion.

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So what are you doing about your legacy MS 16-bit applications?

Ken Hagan
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Re: @Ken Hagan

@Paul: It's a licensing issue to the extent that MS still offer 32-bit editions of client Windows but not of server Windows.

Apropos the wider point of the original article, unless you are running Microsoft's own applications (which may enforce gratuitous licence restrictions), what's the downside of running client editions of Windows for all your "server" tasks anyway?

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Ken Hagan
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Re: Stopping old software.

I'd be amazed if dot-NET outlives Win32. All of Microsoft's most lucrative apps are Win32-based. .NET is already on the way out (with MS open-sourcing chunks).

If MS abandon Win32, the evidence (of WINE's own compatiblilty list) is that WINE probably isn't up to it and that's the best alternative I'm aware of. On the other hand, VMs are your friend. Those old versions of Windows don't stop working just because MS pull the plug. You simply need to keep them away from the internet.

Regarding the original article, if you are still dependent on pieces of Win16 code, 7+ years after MS gave notice that some future version of Windows wouldn't run it, you can't say you weren't warned. On the other hand, those apps can probably run on a client edition of Windows (where Win16 is still OK) rather than a server edition. (How the Linux-tards must chuckle at this random act of licensing.)

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What is this river nonsense? Give .amazon to Bezos, says US Congress

Ken Hagan
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Re: Technically correct. The best kind of correct.

"I wonder how the congressmen would be pleased with a company named ‘US Congress’..."

Perhaps someone in China will set one up. I'm the sure the local authorities won't have any qualms about adding it to *their* DNS servers.

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Ken Hagan
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Re: If we need .$river domains,...

"It's not like those domains are going to be recognized by every DNS anyway."

Perhaps the best way to fight this nonsense is for everyone who operates a DNS server to reject TLD queries that have more than three characters in them. (It doesn't matter what the root nameservers are supporting, since it's a configuration error for pleb users to ask them anyway.) Reduce the value of vanity TLDs to zero and they'll go away.

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UK.gov loses crucial battle in home-taping war with musicians

Ken Hagan
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With any luck...

...the judge who reviews this will decide that "fair remuneration" in this case is "nothing". That would presumably put the issue to bed.

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The world .sucks at a minute past midnight on Sunday

Ken Hagan
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Re: Does anyone even use these additional add ons?

I've seen or two URLs in *.info. That's counting over a period of several years. I can't recall any others. For all I know, someone could have blocked all TLDs with more than three characters. No-one would notice. No-one would care.

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Ken Hagan
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I seem to recall from a previous article on the subject that ICANN have special protection in this domain, so "No, it isn't available.".

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JavaScript creator Eich's latest project: KILL JAVASCRIPT

Ken Hagan
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Re: Source?

Source, in the same way that I can already use a disassembler to produce "the source code" for Windows 10.

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Chrome, Debian Linux, and the secret binary blob download riddle

Ken Hagan
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Funnily enough, I'm not experiencing anger over this, but not because I'm a fan. Chrome, to me, is the browser that is the unexpected payload in so many installers for unrelated products. I'm not in the least bit surprised that it now appears to contain its own unexpected payload. I'm just surprised that other people are surprised.

Chrome is malware. What else is new?

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Foxconn's going to 'exploit' Indian labour? SCORE! Bye, poverty

Ken Hagan
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Re: Call centres

If the computers (or at least, their interfaces) weren't designed by idiots then you wouldn't need all those call centres. (In the current market, you wouldn't need your marketing department either.)

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How to hijack MILLIONS of Samsung mobes with man-in-the-middle diddle

Ken Hagan
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Re: frame the issue

"Except they probably won't update the 4 or 5. They'll just declare those EOL an their users SOL unless they change over to the 6."

At least in the UK, I'm pretty sure you can't declare EOL for a device that you are still selling.

But, no, I don't expect them to update anything until a court rules (generally, I'm not picking on Samsung here) that a mobile phone *has* to get security updates for at least 5 years after it is finally withdrawn from sale because it isn't fit for purpose unless you can safely connect it to the network.

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Microsoft picks up shotgun, walks 'Modern apps' behind the shed

Ken Hagan
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Re: Windows 8 interface

"Why would you ever have to "use someone else's PC". "

Because you both work for the same company and they've asked you to help?

Because they are your paying customer and they've asked you to help?

Because they are family and they've asked you for help?

My day job is writing software and yet I still find myself in these situations at least once a week. I'm a big fan of people who don't customise their Windows PC to the point where you wonder whether they've started using an obscure Linux distro. I'm also in the habit of wiping and restoring test machines every few days and I always test on a bog-standard installation of Windows because that's the only assumption I can make about how my customers' machines will be set up.

The "personal" part of personal computing is slightly evil.

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Ken Hagan
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Re: Never enough..

"beta testers, how many million of us does MS have? but still it takes years for something obviously ill considered to be changed."

Perhaps they are harking back to the original meaning of beta test -- the software is pretty much in its final state but we need to find the rest of the bugs. It's far too late by then to be thinking about architectural changes. You will see bug fixes and you will probably see cosmetic changes, like moving buttons around or trying out a few new colour schemes. Hmm, actually, that does pretty much describe the last six months of the Windows Insider Fast Track.

The real question is just how they went so badly wrong in the meetings that decided on the original architecture. I mean, how did *any* group of people who have used computers before reckon that is was acceptable to have hidden UI, or for half the necessary controls to be in one "control panel" and the other half to be in another, or (as already mentioned above) to use the same UI on a 4-inch touchscreen as on a multi-monitor mouse-and-keyboard setup?

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Don't panic. Stupid smart meters are still 50 YEARS away

Ken Hagan
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The more serious issue

Putting aside for one moment the question of whether smart meters are a good idea, we actually have a more serious problem. We have a government which, according to the best available estimates (and those have been quite consistent over a number of years now) is pissing billions up against the wall with not the slightest prospect of receiving benefits in the long term.

And this is legal.

A local authority wasting money in this way would have its councillors barred from holding public office and trying hard to explain to the beak why they should be allowed to just walk away. A national government doing the same thing is apparently just something we have to roll our eyes over.

And we wonder why the country is short of cash. Well, with my free-market hat on, let me explain; if you don't weed out the dross, you are effectively penalising those who aren't dross. We have crap politicians and crap government because we have no mechanism in place to filter it out and anyone who is any good going into politics just gets snuffed out by the twats.

Perhaps if we could get "spoiled ballot paper" scoring over 50% of the vote in constituencies where no-one of any calibre was standing, we might finally get some attention on this issue. Until then, we're fucked.

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Vintage Ask toolbar is malware – and we'll kill Jeeves, says Microsoft

Ken Hagan
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Re: strange...

"I think Java has now switched to trying to default your home page to yahoo."

Given that the Java run-time has no legitimate interest in your homepage and it is vanishingly unlikely that you will think "Oh, that's a good idea. I've been meaning to pick a better homepage for a while, but this is just the thing.", can we not conclude that this is just trying to trick you into doing something you wouldn't otherwise have done.

So it (this installer) is malware. So why don't any of the AV packages quarantine it on sight? What's the point of an AV package if it doesn't detect one of the most widespread pieces of malware there is?

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Ken Hagan
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Java next?

Logically, if Ask is malware then a willing delivery mechanism is malware too.

Or does it depend on how many lawyers the "malware" merchant can afford? Or is this just a publicity stunt?

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NSA slapdown prompts Privacy Int'l to file new lawsuit against GCHQ

Ken Hagan
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Re: Talking thru their arses

To a first approximation, the number of actual terrorists is about six orders of magnitude lower than the number of "everybody". Your scanning needs to be more than 99.999% accurate to avoid even as few as ten times as many false positives as hits. Only the real bad guys are actually trying to hide, but many of the false positives will use encryption on a daily basis for legitimate purposes. It beggars belief that you really think there is a snowballs chance in hell of catching bad guys by screening everyone, but even if you are determined to believe that you can eliminate false positives entirely, perhaps we can remind you that various *actual* terrorists in recent years were already on the radar of the intelligence services and yet still managed to slip the net.

tldr; You are utterly and tragically innumerate.

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Voyager 2 'stopped' last week, and not just for maintenance

Ken Hagan
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"In our own history that's what happened to just about every civilization when a much more technologically advanced one showed up."

But as our own Tim Worstall has recently pointed out (or was it in his book, I can't remember), extra-terrestrial civilisations will not reckon our resources are particularly valuable and nor will they want slaves who are considerably harder to keep running and less capable than the robots ones they already have. Our value to them will probably be purely the entertainment of watching us.

Then there's the fact that unless we grow out of our yobbish ways, we probably won't last long enough to be that advanced, and so we can probably infer a similar constraint on our would-be overlords. That is, their very existence suggests that they are more mature than we are (or were).

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BBC, Facebook steer users to vuln-afflicted Unity Web Player plugin

Ken Hagan
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Going the extra mile, but in the wrong direction

So they reckon http://x:[email protected]/ is the same site as http://x:[email protected]/ ?

That means they aren't just naively comparing the two strings for equality. If they'd been *that* simple-minded, they'd have been safe. Tragically, however, someone knew that they had to parse the URL into components and compare only the domain. They just didn't know the syntax for a domain.

It reminds me of all those people who "knew" the extra rule about leap years and centuries, and consequently wrote extra code to get 2000 wrong.

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ISIS command post obliterated after 'moron' jihadi snaps a selfie, says US Air Force

Ken Hagan
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post-strike images?

There wasn't anything in the background of the original image, so it could just have been a camp with a few tents off to one side. What, then, would be convincing supporting evidence?

If I post a picture of some empty desert, are you going to start believing that I've wiped ISIS off the map?

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Ken Hagan
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Re: Why do we tell them this?

I'm reminded of a similar story from a few years ago where Israel boasted that they'd managed to target someone using his mobile phone. It seemed a little silly to give the game away, but perhaps the real intention was to make the enemy nervous about using mobile phones.

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What's broken in this week's build of Windows 10? Installing it, for one

Ken Hagan
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Re: , including new icons and

It's a beta build, superseding one the previous week and it will probably be superseded itself this coming week. We are only getting it so that MS can avoid a major catastrophe at the end of next month when it is a load of real users (rather than volunteer testers) getting their real systems (not test systems) hosed along with the real data (rather than nothing important at all) lost.

My personal experience is that this build is one of the 50% or so that haven't borked the update, but I'm sure MS will gather useful data about the systems being hosed this time around just as I'm sure they gathered useful data about my systems when they didn't work.

If the posters on El Reg can't grok the notion of a beta test program exhibiting a few bugs then it is time to collectively slit our throats and let the cockroaches have a go.

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ICANN speak clearly now .gay has gone – Council of Europe

Ken Hagan
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Re: Hot cake domains

How about not.gay or maybe.gay? The possibilities are endless, for extortion at least.

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Windows 8.1 market share grows, Windows 7 slips, Windows 10 lurks

Ken Hagan
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Re: Not just a service pack

"The difference between 8 and 8.1 does not exist, it's simply an update to software using the same license."

Indeed, which is why MS are dropping 8.0 into the "out of support" bin this coming January alongside XP. Apropos the wider question of "Is it a service pack or a new OS?", I think the easy way to decide is to ask yourself "Do I have to pay for it?".

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Hubble spots Pluto's moons are a chaotic mess of tumbling rock

Ken Hagan
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Re: What the hell happens when it hatches?

Urghhh!!! Sorry, but please accept a downvote for reminding me of that episode.

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Fanbois designing Windows 10 – where's it going to end?

Ken Hagan
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Re: maths?

GCSE Maths won't help you with that. For starters, you should be thinking about the separate GCSE in statistics that far fewer people actually take. Even with that under your belt, remember that Feynman described science as the history of us learning how not to fool ourselves (or something like that) and Ben Goldacre has carved out a second career blogging about how even the best medical researchers still have to work hard to get genuine results out of their experiments.

On the other hand, asking the crowd to design a user interface was never likely to be any more successful than asking them to design an aeroplane. A UI is a machine to translate user intent into software commands. If you get it wrong, it is "bad", not "ugly". UI design should be left to engineers who have actually read up on the research in this area (of which there is plenty).

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Ken Hagan
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Re: A novel idea?

"Or is too much choice deemed even worse than enforced choice for the poor guys who have to use the product?"

It may not be too serious for this particular decision, but as a general rule you increase the size of everyone's test matrix each time you introduce such an option. Also, only one of the options can be the default, which in many cases means that only one of them gets properly tested. On the other hand, if you do end up with a fair distribution of usage, everyone in a support role who prepares "howto" guides has to write defensively, covering all common cases.

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It's FREE WINDOWS 10 time: 29 July is D-Day, yells Microsoft

Ken Hagan
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Re: 29 July?

You missed out the fact that the Control Panel (and Spartan/Edge) doesn't work if you are logged in as Administrator. I'm guessing I've just got the wrong kind of leaves, er, administrative account, but I'm only guessing because Windows won't say why it has a problem with this when all previous versions managed fine.

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Ken Hagan
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Re: @Paul Shirley

"Historically, Microsoft have never "deactivated" a license key once you've used it to upgrade."

It's hard to see how they could. You have to be able to restore Windows after wiping the system and your restoration media will be for the previous version. Unless MS want a really big legal scrap from everyone who gets a rootkit in the next few years, you'd have to be able to restore that previous version. If MS then allow you to upgrade again to Win10, even after the first year has elapsed, then that's their decision. My guess is that they will, because that's less painful for them than supporting Win7+8 for the next few years.

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The time on Microsoft Azure will be: Different by a second, everywhere

Ken Hagan
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Re: A typical engineering problem

Ah, the ancient Chinese engineer's curse: "May you work on interesting problems.".

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