* Posts by wolfetone

557 posts • joined 6 Aug 2011

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UK now part of another Euro data-spaff scheme

wolfetone
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Re: @wolftone

@AC

So the UK government have stopped you going on a booze run to France without a passport then.

Makes sense.

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wolfetone
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Re: Hmmm 42 years after joining the Common Market

"we still haven't got freedom of movement within Europe (one of the selling points)"

As someone who has been part of the EU for 27 years, and travelled as far as Hungary by car from Birmingham, are you sure about this? The only time my passport was required was leaving Dover and then on the way back in Dunkirk. Going from France, Germany, Luxemborg (cheapest place to buy Jagermiester), Austria, France, Belgium and Holland, I didn't at any point need to produce my passport.

To me, that's freedom of movement. But if it's a bit more complex than that I'd like to find out.

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RADIOACTIVE WWII aircraft carrier FOUND OFF CALIFORNIA

wolfetone
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Re: Radioactive?

"I often perform the Philadelphia experiment in my kitchen. Favourite is between two digestives."

Have you come across the cheesecake variant? Many a mind will be blown with that experiment.

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wolfetone
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Black Helicopters

Radioactive?

I bet you this was the real ship they used for the Philadelphia Experiment.

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Miscreants rummage in lawyers' silky drawers at will, despite warnings

wolfetone
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Re: Surprising

+1 from me.

My girlfriend is a solicitor, and she doesn't give a crap that she uses the same password for everything, uses her iPhone for everything (like mobile banking), and writes down her security details in a notebook.

And she then accuses me of hiding stuff from her when I don't giver her the pin to my phone or give her the password to use my laptop. I have nothing to declare other than my paranoia regarding security.

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WORLD+DOG line up to SLAM Google after anti-trust case unveiled

wolfetone
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Re: I must be missing something

It comes down to how those websites are shown I think.

Through various different updates that Google do the rankings of the left handed underpants websites change, and then the websites are playing catch up because a website may be affected by the update. So the underpants website that was 3rd could be demoted to 13th place overnight because of the change Google did. I'm sure you can understand the impact of this change on the business from lost custom.

The problem then is that website owners don't know how Google updates will view their website, so websites losing position on the search results are scrabbling around to try and fix it. However, the quick way to fix it, really, is to pay for adverts on Google which will bump you up to the top of the page. This costs money, and depending on the keywords you're targeting will dictate how much you pay per word per click.

The ultimate issue is that Google is not a search engine company. It's an advertising company, and it relies on the clicks of these adverts not the organic search results for income. They make it bloody hard to get on to the first page, so desperately companies purchase advertising space at the top of the page.

This, obviously, doesn't take in to consideration Google's other operations, which wouldn't help Google's cause.

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What's Meg Whitman fussing over: The fate of HP ... or the font on a DISRUPTIVE new logo?

wolfetone
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I bet Meg Whitman did that herself in Paint.

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Finally, Mozilla looks at moving away from 'insecure' HTTP. Maybe

wolfetone
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Re: I'm not looking for downvotes here (though likely incomming anyways)

Well, it all depends.

It's quite possible that governments are saying "use HTTPS for encryption as it's more secure", when they know full well how to circumvent it. It's like the old 1980's "Protect and Survive" thing (or more recently the guide they sent out to homes in the UK after September 11th). Protect your family by sticking a wooden door against a wall in your house and hide under it when the nuclear bombs go off. This will protect you.

It wouldn't. But at least the advice, and if you had to take the action, would make you feel safe. Same goes for this. HTTPS may make you feel secure, but it won't.

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This open-source personal crypto-key vault wants two things: To make the web safer ... and your donations

wolfetone
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Re: More anonymity for criminals and terrorists

Are you going to ban cash as well, seeing as that allows the underworld to conduct their dirty deeds?

And I wouldn't use the Anonymous Coward thing, we all know you're the head honcho of Europol.

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Rand Paul puts Hillary Clinton's hard drive on sale

wolfetone
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RE: "The real scandal? Who in their right mind used an IDE drive in 2009?"

Me. And what m8?

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Daddy Dyson keeps it in the family and hoovers up son’s energy biz

wolfetone
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Missed point

Could James Dyson be King then as he owns more land than the Queen?

Imagine the ceremony. Him there on the throne, crown on head and the ball and sceptre in either hand. Then the Archbishop asking him to lift his legs up while he vacuum’s the rug with the Royal Dyson DC69 (or whatever model - it's up to them).

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Google Maps Doesn't Like Tottenham

wolfetone
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Re: Google Maps Doesn't Like Tottenham

Wait till you type in "Gobshites" in to Google Maps*

*Best not done if you're a Liverpool fan

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ALIENS ARE COMING: Chief NASA boffin in shock warning

wolfetone
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Obviously NASA hasn't heard of Roswell and Area 51.

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Bigotry posted by your Facebook account? Use this, Mister UKIP MP wannabe: 'I was hacked'

wolfetone
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Asian Friends

Doesn't translate to Muslim friends.

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Go, daddy, go: GoDaddy shares rocket 30% in value at IPO

wolfetone
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Re: Internet Bubble 2.0

I wouldn't say it's the grey dogs being ignored. It's common sense, how can a company be worth so much money when it doesn't turn a profit. Amazon is a prime example of it. It's worth billions but has never in it's history turned a profit. Twitter is the same.

Greed is the ultimate driver in all of this. Software has two main costs, the time of the developers and the equipment to run it. Compared to a lot of other industry's the overheads are more simple and aren't that expensive really. So all of these VC's (scum of the Earth in all honesty) invest in a company they aren't doing it because it's a good product. They do it because they know it can be overvalued and they'll walk away with 10 times what they invested.

The losers in this will be the developers, the people who have jobs in this. The CEO's, the VC's, can just walk away shrug their shoulders. They don't care. But the ordinary Joe supporting a family will be out on their arse, trying to get a job in an industry that will be tanking until all the dead wood is killed off.

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wolfetone
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Internet Bubble 2.0

We're in it.

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Power, internet access knackered in London after exploding kit burps fire into capital's streets

wolfetone
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Probably interviewed the cleaner again:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWAvHnfJsOQ

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wolfetone
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I'm not sure if this is true or if this is a very late April Fool's joke...

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It's the FALKLANDS SYNDROME! Fukushima MELTDOWN to cause '10,000 Chernobyls' in South Atlantic

wolfetone
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Reg, shame on you!

The Reg has only told half the story.

The Fukishima core is about to burn through the crust. But what they won't tell you is that the Earth is actually hollow. So it will free fall in to the Falklands, smashing it out of the crust and in to the air.

Gravity will then take over, pulling the Falklands in to the core, merging the core so the Falklands then becomes the nuclear core, and be thrown back through the crust and smash in to Japan. Again, the force of the impact will merge Japan with the Falklands.

While all this happens, the UK will not be able to mobilize their Navy or the Army to prevent this from happening, as really it's a theft of the Falklands. But no one before, or will, be able to stop a country the size of the Falklands from slipping in and out of the Earths crust and across the other side of the world.

But this isn't an accident. This has been planned all along by..... Argentina.

Argentina are a majority sleeping shareholder of TEPCO, the people who run Fukushima. It's true, David Icke has the information on his website.

I'm ashamed of you Reg, only telling half a story.

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Encryption is the REAL threat – Head Europlod

wolfetone
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Re: This is the stuff of Blake's 7 'Federation'....

You've never told Siri that you love her, have you?

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wolfetone
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He's been misquoted

What he actually meant to say was:

"Ordinary people shouldn't have the capability to encrypt their communications."

Europlod? Again, a typo here. You mean: Europlonker.

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Belgium to the rescue as UK consumers freeze after BST blunder

wolfetone
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Nest owners

Have you not heard of a quilt?

I have, it's lovely and warm under it and works regardless of clocks going forward or back.

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Robot Overlords: Tween babysitting fodder with no in-jokes for the adults

wolfetone
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"They also never bothered to figure out what caused the shock to work, they assumed a "dodgy" part."

Sounds like it was based on the UK car industry from the 1970's.

"There's a dent on this wing"

"Does it have four wheels and move?"

"Yes."

"Then who cares."

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wolfetone
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How did they manage to go from fixing a PlayStaiton to shocking themselves with a car battery?

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Microsoft and Oracle are 'not your trusted friends', public sector bods

wolfetone
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Re: So, give them the boot - use open source.

I would love it, LOVE IT, if they did.

However, in my office I run Linux while the rest of the (large) office run Windows, and the experience I have with LibreOffice opening/saving Office 2007+ documents isn't brilliant, but would be fixed if everyone saved it in ODF!!!!!!

We can but dream and live in hope.

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NASA: We're gonna rip up an ASTEROID and make it ORBIT the MOON

wolfetone
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I would love to know what the Russian plan would be. You know it'd involve a Soyuz, a pencil, and it'd work for a lot less money.

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Document Foundation pledges Office 365 and Google Docs challenger

wolfetone
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Can they fix the compatibility with the Office 2007+ versions of .docx, .xlsx, etc first? I think the wider internet would appreciate that more first than a self hosted/paid for hosted version of LibreOffice.

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Make up your mind: Microsoft puts a bullet in Internet Explorer after all

wolfetone
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Re: Not going to be just the NHS.

"Working for a higher education institution that will remain nameless, we've been forced to keep IE pegged at 8 and java at 6 (for which we have to pay for extended support) because a shit-ton of our admin software won't work with anything newer.

That would be bad enough were this "legacy" software, but it was purchased in 2012, by which time both of these products were clearly already end of life. Bad choices have been made all round."

Give me an email and I will rebuild your stuff in HTML5 and Silverlight :)

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wolfetone
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That isn't Microsoft's fault - is the fault of both Labour and Conservative governments who think it's a brilliant idea to throw billions at a company to solve all the IT problems the NHS has. The fault of the use of ActiveX controls and it's reliance on legacy systems is down to these IT contractors who know that, whether they deliver the product they said they would, they'll get the millions they said it'd cost, plus the blank cheques they'll have signed when the projects over run. Sadly that problem won't fix itself until someone who knows their Apples from their PC's is put in charge and is firm with these companies and they are held to account.

I'm with you though in your sentiment. It's a f**king joke the NHS's IT system is what it is. But on the brightside, the NHS won't have to upgrade to Windows 10 for many many years due to the current compatibility issues.

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Ford: Our latest car gizmo will CHOKE OFF your FUEL if you're speeding

wolfetone
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I can see the market in second hand cars that don't include all this crap to boom within the next few years. I, for one, won't buy a car that will stop me doing what I want to do.

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AT&T, Verizon and telco pals file lawsuit to KILL net neutrality FOREVER

wolfetone
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In the words of Chris Rock from Lethal Weapon 4

"If you hire Johnny Cochran, I'll kill you"

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Dear departed Internet Explorer, how I will miss you ... NOT

wolfetone
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Re: IE Not So Bad, Safari? Chrome? Worse.

"WinME? Stable?

You are trolling, right?"

Must have been my computer but I found Windows ME to be alright. Was fairly reliable - until you went to eject a USB device and then BANG...... BSOD.

Windows 98 on the other hand, worst Windows I've ever used. It took me 3 1/2 hours to install once. That wasn't fun.

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wolfetone
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IE Not So Bad, Safari? Chrome? Worse.

When I first got in to web development IE7 had just been released, and I used to shout blue murder when transparent PNG's, styling issues would occur in IE6. The only way to fix them was to have a separate stylesheet for IE6, and IE7 would render the page nicely enough without too much of a difference between that and Firefox.

Fast forward to today, we have IE10 and IE11. They have come on by such leaps and bounds that I can design and code something inside Firefox and know it will just work in those versions of IE, even IE9.

However, you can't say the same with Safari and Chrome. Chrome is the worst offender, a lot of the time styling needs to be amended to suit Chrome but is fine on everything else. Further to this, in an update to Chrome it broke part of a clients website that used a slideshow built with Javascript. Works perfectly on every other browser - just not Chrome. And Safari, well it's as slow as pig shite to be quite honest.

IE, as crap as it was, isn't as crap now as it was then. Chrome has overtaken it, and if you were to ask any normal thinking web developer about the browsers they have the most issue with, IE9 and up will not be at the top of the list. Chrome and Safari will be.

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Google adds evil-code scanning to Play Store

wolfetone
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Re: Apple's process isn't fully automated

@ SuccessCase

The whole circumstance wasn't fantastic, and had to be done that way. The Android version was tested within an inch of it's life, so it was reasonable (for me anyway) to assume it would be fine on iOS as the same framework was used.

And the email thing had to happen as theres a specific condition in the app that would generate the email, it's actually the core function of the app.

But it's easy enough to insinuate that I'm relying on Apple to test my code before it's public - which isn't true. What I stated was that they don't test the apps at all. In my case the app was primarily a web app, so most of the heavy work was done by the server. But from my experience with this, I doubt Apple have any way to make sure the app is what I say it is and not some elaborate ruse to steal user information. And that is why it's concerning.

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wolfetone
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Re: Apple's process isn't fully automated

I don't know what Apple do, but they do not test the apps that are submitted to the App Store.

I built an app for a client that ran on Android and iOS, and I used Appcelerator to achieve this. It worked perfectly on Android, and it was alright on the simulator for iOS (I don't have an iPhone). It wasn't until I submitted the app, and it was accepted and published on the App Store, that my girlfriend tried it out and she found an app breaking bug. The whole thing crashed.

Further to this, in the submission, I gave them details on how to test the app and what they could expect. Using the app generates an email which is sent to both the user and the client - no emails were generated. Not because it didn't work, but because the app simply wasn't used.

So it's fine to try and pass off Apple's App Store as the standard bearer, but to me it's absolutely no better than Android in the way they review apps.

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.Free domains at Amazon while Google says bye to .family

wolfetone
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Re: Hmm anyone wanna start a kickstarter for .wtf and .getmeofftheplanetnow?

Which could link to an advert campaign:

I'll take you to the horse.dentist

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wolfetone
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Re: Hmm anyone wanna start a kickstarter for .wtf and .getmeofftheplanetnow?

I have to agree. Some TLD's you can see a sense in, things like .scot, .london even. But a lot of the TLD's we have now is just utterly stupid. Who, unless you're either Findus or Tesco, would want .horse?

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Zuck: Get your FULLY EXPOSED BUTTOCKS off my Facebook

wolfetone
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How dare Facebook take away my right to bare arse, down with this sort of thing!

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BBC: We'll give FREE subpar-Raspberry-Pis to a million Brit schoolkids

wolfetone
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Everything up to the giving away of the "Microbit" is brilliant. The idea of giving away that bit of hardware out for free is bloody stupid.

They are giving away a stripped down "Raspberry Pi-like" device. Stripped down, Raspberry Pi-like, why??? The Raspberry Pi is well documented, well supported, already in schools, and cheap. It's also not stripped down, the possibilities are practically endless.

The BBC should have bought a stockpile of Pi's and gave them out, and tailored their documentation for the device. That's all they needed to do. But no, someone at the BBC decided "We're not spending enough money on this, lets release our own hardware too!". But you know why would it be any different? They haven't had to work for their money, they just use the threat of court to get money from people who want to watch a bit of TV in the evenings.

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Can't pay $349 for an Apple Watch? Get a Chinese knockoff for less than $50

wolfetone
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Re: Not really a knockoff....

Well Apple will have a job to claim they invented the smart watch:

http://archive.linuxgizmos.com/ibm-citizen-watch-develop-linux-based-watchpad/

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wolfetone
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Bet you the battery's are removable on these...

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Apple Watch: Wait a minute! This puny wrist-puter costs 17 GRAND?!

wolfetone
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Re: Bye bye upgradable laptops

"Weren't Apple the ones who soldered in an SSD?"

Yep. I had to buy a Mac about two weeks ago so I could continue developing iOS apps. Up until then I had a 2006 MacBook which I had upgraded the RAM and HD of to be able to run Mountain Lion (10.8). I couldn't get Mavericks to run on it, so I had to bite the bullet and purchase a new system.

I ended up with a MacMini, the mid range one, and I feel absolutely used. I have, willingly, bought a machine that I can upgrade the HD on. That's it. I can't upgrade the RAM, it's soldered on. I can't upgrade the CPU, it's soldered on. And, although I don't believe it, I am stuck with this configuration for the rest of time. I can't give it back to Apple and ask for more RAM. This is what the bloke in the shop told me, but again I doubt this.

During this time I looked at the MacBook Air's, and he told me they were the same. No user serviceable parts, everything soldered.

F**k you Apple.

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Scotland to get National ID system 'by the backdoor', campaigners mull challenge

wolfetone
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Flame

Think of the children

"But we MUST have a national ID system because we need to protect ourselves from terrorists!!!!"

Said nearly every expert on the BBC ever.

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Boffins probe mystery of ANTARCTIC BLOOD GLACIER

wolfetone
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Taylor Glacier

Is this Taylor Swift's colder cousin?

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Chappie: The AI tale that’s about heart, not intelligence

wolfetone
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Re: Short Circuit 2 - balling your eyes out

Shania Twain made sure my sexual development past the age of 11 was handled extremely well :)

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wolfetone
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Short Circuit 2

I was 6 years old, watching Johnny 5 in the middle of my floor, and when he was beaten to a pulp I was balling my eyes out. Fast forward to Christmas just gone when the same film was on, 21 years later, I couldn't stop the tears welling up at the same scene in front of my girlfriend. She was totally bemused as to why I could shed a tear at this film but not even bat an eyelid at other films like "Stepmom".

When I saw Chappie advertised, and in a few trailers, I can't help but compare it to Johnny 5's antics. Hopefully I will get to see this film while at the cinema and I hope it's good. I know it's only like Short Circuit 2, but to my 6 year old self, it's probably going to be my Short Circuit 3.

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Ads watchdog: Er, what does woman in her undies have to do with ‘slim’ phone?

wolfetone
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Re: Cillit Bang...

Surprised there's all this talk of Ronseal and Cillit Bang when the biggest liar here is Lynx.

I bought that stuff hoping, praying, I would get a girlfriend when I was a teenager using the stuff.

I've been diddled again.

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Elementary, my dear penguin: It's the second beta of Freya

wolfetone
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Re: Pompous Twats

Hang the frig on, don't tar us "Gen Y's" with them lot.

I can see why they want the money. They'd like to go full time doing something they love. They'd like to give it more of their time before they even get more people involved. I'm in a similar position, I'm working full time for a job I used to love and working on a project that will get me out of that job. But it takes time, and the only available time I get is for seeing the girlfriend and sleeping. I can tell you burning the candle at every end possible may be physically possible, but your love life and mental health suffer.

That said, as far as I can see from using Elementary (I used Luna for 12 months), there isn't actually enough for me to warrant payment. It's a theme for Ubuntu. Elementary uses Ubuntu's software centre, Geary and Midori are separate projects. From the blog post I read, if I gave them $10 would it filter down to the projects that they use? I highly doubt it.

While Elementary is a lovely OS to use, it's a theme dressed as a distro. I forsee the project folding soon, and Pantheon (the window manager Elementary has) will be made available just like Gnome and KDE.

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Marconi: The West of England's very own Italian wireless pioneer

wolfetone
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Marconi was Irish/Italian.

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May the fourth be with you: Torvalds names next Linux v 4.0

wolfetone
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Finally

I'll be able to get Linux 4.0 NT.

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