* Posts by localzuk

663 posts • joined 25 Jul 2011

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NO ONE is making money from YouTube, even Google – report

localzuk
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Re: @localzuk - Give them a bit of time

Top broadcasters have thousands of subscribers on Twitch. Smaller ones can have dozens or hundreds. I voluntarily sub to 4 channels each month, as they provide hours of entertainment so why shouldn't they get some reward for it?

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localzuk
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Give them a bit of time

Youtube has had tremendous growth over the last few years. That growth costs a fortune in equipment and bandwidth. But growth can't go on forever.

So, with them introducing things like subscription services and the like, I can see it becoming profitable very soon.

I'm quite surprised that they haven't created a system like Twitch TV's subscriptions - ie. people can voluntarily pay a monthly sub, part of which goes to Twitch and part goes to the broadcaster. Offer silly perks, like special emotes and access to "sub only" pages and people do pay up. The content still remains free, but there's a nice steady stream of income.

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'Utterly unusable' MS Word dumped by SciFi author Charles Stross

localzuk
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Re: Content and Style

@benched42 - really? Got Word 2013 open here and Word 97-2003 .doc is a save option? And our old office 97-2003 documents all work fine still...

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localzuk
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Re: Content and Style

Oh no, 680 MB. How terrible. It'll never fit on my 4TB hard disk.

Sorry for the sarcasm, but in the modern world of computing, 680MB is not something to worry about. I install productivity software here, specific to education, that hits about 15GB in total. Yes, its huge for what it does, but our users want/need it, therefore we install it and live with that.

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Microsoft: You want on-prem wares, UK.gov? We'll make you pay

localzuk
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£1200 pa per laptop?!

I'd love to see a breakdown of those costs to be honest! Costs here are closer to £250 per laptop per year, and we're a full Microsoft house.

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'Lenovo, Superfish put smut on my system' – class-action lawsuit

localzuk
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I don't actually get that attitude to be honest. Mac OS has many of its own problems which can and will slow you down.

My workflow simply has very little interaction with TIFKAM, and it is still possible to install a third party start menu if you *really* need it. Maybe its down to my never actively looking for and clicking icons - I always just press the Windows key and start typing the name of what I want - same as I did in Windows 7.

To me though, faster IO drives a real increase in productivity due to reduced processing times for various tasks that swap to disk etc...

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localzuk
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Windows 8/8.1, quite simply, is much faster than Windows 7. Disk IO is a good chunk quicker on its own.

So, as much as Windows 8's TIFKAM interface is infuriating, the core of the OS is pretty good.

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Debian on track to prove binaries' origins

localzuk
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Re: What a complete joke

If you really want to check things like that, you have to check it yourself. The old adage "you can lead a horse to water, but you can't force it to drink" comes to mind.

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Microsoft to store deleted Exchange Online mails FOREVER

localzuk
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Re: Yeah, no.

What part of "unless you set up a policy to bin them" is causing you trouble?

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localzuk
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Re: Some employers in the states have document retention policies

Not sure you understand the system. You can restore emails in Office 365 at the click of a few buttons. The system is already there, and people use it daily. All Microsoft have done is change from 90 days to infinite for the ability to go and find and restore those emails.

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Inside GOV.UK: 'CHAOS' and 'NIGHTMARE' as trendy Cabinet Office wrecked govt websites

localzuk
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I don't understand the plan

Why did it require everyone to move to one monolithic system?

Why instead didn't it simply involve a new "style" framework being created, dictating page layouts, language choices, design ideals etc... which other departments then would've had to implement around their existing content?

Doing it the way they did might work for a small business which merges with another small business, but doing it with a government, with hundreds of different departments and functions, with global reach, stakeholders in every sector of the population both internal to the country and external? That, quite frankly, is ridiculous.

I simply can't see what the advantage ever would've been?

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Elon Musk's Tesla set to unveil home storage battery

localzuk
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Re: Surely you aren't serious?

Battery storage for homes is a great idea. Where I live, we use very little electricity, making a monthly bill about £25. With a battery like this, and a move to economy 7 or installing some solar panels, we could drop that bill down to £10 or less.

Imagine it this way - every house in the country has a home battery capable of storing enough power for a day's usage - blips in the power grid would be less of a worry. Load balancing and capacity on the grid would be simpler and the cost of power in general could drop.

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Proposed US law could deal knockout blow to FBI in overseas cloud privacy ding-dongs

localzuk
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Re: I had no clue..

The EU hasn't been silent. They are currently engaged in a thorough analysis of the problem, and whether the US SafeHarbor agreement is worth the paper its written on.

The main issue is that the EU bureaucracy works so incredibly slowly.

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Over 50? Out of work? Watch out because IT is about to EAT ITSELF

localzuk
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Will always be a job for IT people

As new systems come into existence, those systems will need managing, configuring, debugging, etc...

Automation is all well and good, but it won't be perfect. No technology is perfect - it was invented by humans, and we certainly aren't perfect. So, those "non-perfect" times will require people with knowledge and experience to fix the stuff.

That said, just like any other industry, the number of people needed may well change over time. Where it'd take a team of 10 to manage a company's IT before, it might only take 5 in the future. That's progress for you. Lots of people lost jobs from the farming industry when tractors appeared...

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ANOTHER US court smacks down EFF's NSA wiretap sueball – but won't say why

localzuk
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Re: Question

That kinda renders pointless having something as inviolable as the Constitution. What's the point in it if a bunch of judges, who are appointed by politicians, get to overrule it?

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localzuk
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Question

I thought the US constitution was the highest law in the land? Does it not "trump" other laws?

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French plod can BAN access to any website – NO court order needed

localzuk
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Re: Re. Surpise, surprise

What? How does this have any relation to the article here?

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localzuk
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Re: Not so bad really

Who gave those random employees the right to make decisions about what content could be seen by the population of France? Were they elected? Is there a sensible way to appeal such a block? Is there a process to ensure the sites being blocked are only those which are illegal? Lots of problems with it.

Saying "not so bad" is kinda dumb.

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Microsoft explains Windows as a SERVICE – but one version remains a distant dream

localzuk
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Re: One teensy question

We already pay yearly for Windows, Office, SQL Server and SCCM here, under the OVS-ES education subscription scheme.

So, "Windows as a Service" is pretty much what I've got already, and have had for a decade.

Only difference that I can see is that the upgrade stages (ie. going from one version to another) will be less a major headache to do the deployment!

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localzuk
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Re: One teensy question

Proper management of updates by you as a user is important. Updates don't get deployed to my work network until I've tested them. There's no mechanism for them to be deployed by end users either, so the idea of a machine randomly updating seems a little odd - as it just sounds like a lack of management to me.

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'Tech' City hasn't got proper broadband and it's like BT doesn't CARE

localzuk
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The whole point - encourage new businesses

Thing is, the whole point of providing cheap, fast internet is to allow small businesses to start up and grow. I know in some areas you can get 100Mbps symmetric leased lines for, what, £4k pa, but those costs are very variable. Where I am, those prices jump up to £12.7k pa, and 12 months ago they would've been £19k pa.

Saying to a startup "pay ££££" is not exactly encouraging them is it? Saying "move to somewhere cheaper" is also not very encouraging - they might be based where the talent is. They might be based where their partners are etc...

No, what they actually need is access to cheap, fast, internet connectivity. Subsidies may be necessary to kick-start the availability in the area, but the outcome will be greater tax income for the government and improvements in the local and national economies.

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German 700MHz auction signals start of Euro spectrum flogoffs

localzuk
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Re: Now I have to explain to my bosses...

Fair enough. 24Mhz of frequency is a fair old chunk to need for wireless mics!

It does mean that your equipment will be about 10 or so years old by the time the changes happen in the UK then. Not a bad lifetime for wireless gear to be honest! I wish our Sennheiser mics would last that long.

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localzuk
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Re: Now I have to explain to my bosses...

Why did you buy 700Mhz mics 2 years ago? The industry has been going on about it since at least 2010.

Also, Sennheiser will usually change the frequency bands for you for a fee.

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NASA: Give us JUST 0.5% of the federal budget and we'll take you to MARS and EUROPA

localzuk
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Re: Ted Cruz

@Big John - ah, so you ask for evidence and when it is presented (along with how to get more), you're not happy due to it coming from left leaning sites. What evidence would be good for you?

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US DoJ okays IEEE's patent troll BAN-HAMMER

localzuk
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The trolls want to have their cake and eat it too

If they want their patented technology to become part of an IEEE standard then they, of course, will have to comply with IEEE rules. If they don't want to comply with those rules, then they are free to not include their technology in the standard.

Why should they be able to be a part of a standard and still act like dicks to anyone who then has the audacity to want to use the standard?

Those companies are free to try and create their own competing standard, and free to manufacture their own equipment that uses it. But then, that wouldn't work with their trolling business model would it? They don't actually want to do any work with their patents.

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Sorry, admins: Microsoft says NO new Windows Server until 2016

localzuk
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Re: Windows? As a *server*???

Really? In 2015, you are shocked that Windows Server is popular? When you run a Windows network, the most efficient way of managing them is via, shock horror, a Windows Server.

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Secret Service on alert after drone CRASHES into White House

localzuk
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Time to develop tiny anti-air missiles

A micro-iron dome is needed I think. Combine it with radar sensitive enough to pick out birds from the air, and a deep learning network for target analysis and you might be able to stop drones. Either that or just get some farmers with shotguns on the lawn.

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localzuk
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Re: How much C4

As you can program drones to fly paths, so they don't need someone remotely controlling them, jamming would potentially be useless.

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'Linus Torvalds is UNFIT for the WORKPLACE!' And you've given the world what, exactly?

localzuk
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Funny

People complain about Linus and his personality, but seem to forget how successful he is and his management has been. As far as I can tell, the Linux kernel hasn't been forked by upset contributors to a different project, and gained the same level of use as the original... Why? The whole point of open source is that if you don't like something, you're free to grab the code and do it your way instead.

The reason is simple - he might be rude, but he gets the job done.

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Free Windows 10 could mean the END for Microsoft and the PC biz

localzuk
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Odd article

Consumers don't generally buy PCs because a new OS is out. They buy a new computer because they want or need one.

It isn't like the introduction of a new technology (eg. when iPads appeared). It isn't an additional device.

Businesses have a fixed rollout time usually, so new OS vs old OS isn't a discussion that's made for existing kit usually. They usually just replace PCs at the end of their planned lives, and prior to that the new OS is tested etc... The problem they have faced though, is compatibility - existing programs ceasing to work in the new version, so that caused them to hold back on the entire project.

If Windows 10 can run everything that Windows 7 and Windows 8/8.1 can, then there is less of a hurdle to overcome to encourage an upgrade.

We won't be upgrading to Windows 10 in our school until the next replacement cycle anyway, as there's simply no need to disturb our stable network!

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CIA exonerates CIA of all wrongdoing in Senate hacking probe

localzuk
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Re: Policy

Indeed. If I went around doing this sort of thing here, I'd be up in front of a disciplinary panel pretty darn quick and out the door shortly afterwards.

I technically, have access to the entire organisation's documents and work etc... But if I go accessing them, I'd be abusing my position of trust.

That's what the CIA did here - they abused a position of trust.

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Kiss your Glass goodbye: Google mothballs techno-specs (for now)

localzuk
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Somewhat odd analysis, considering Google Apps being used by millions of people worldwide, with its various different apps. Google Maps is pretty popular too...

Are Google somehow alone in their acquisitions methodology for development? Apple have bought 62 companies since 1988. Microsoft have bought 169 companies since 1987.

Sure, Google buy a lot of companies - 174 since 2001, but does the number actually matter? Just look at the products that come from them for each company - a lot of the "big" releases of the last decade were started by little companies, bought up by big corporations and then polished and marketed by them.

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localzuk
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Re: misleading title?

Indeed. The BBC is presenting it in an "its dead Jim" manner also. I don't really read it as that though.

Google's X labs are for pure out of the box thinking. Google Glass is no longer a "new" idea and is mature enough that it can happily be its own department - that doesn't seem like being axed to me. If it were being axed, surely they would've reduced staffing or moved the head to something else instead?

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Nvidia flops out TERAFLOP X1 for self-aware cars

localzuk
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Re: Self drive

Go read some NTSB reports. You'll see pretty quickly that pilots don't get the blame for everything. You seem dead set on saying that a pilot is legally responsible for all and every crash and fault that affects fly by wire planes. That is what is nonsense, and you know it.

How about this site, which lays it out quite clearly about legal liability - http://injury.findlaw.com/torts-and-personal-injuries/aviation-accidents-overview.html (that being a US site).

Or look at some crashes. China Airlines Flight 611 - crash was due to failure of maintenance (therefore, the pilot isn't responsible). American Airlines Flight 96 - faulty design (therefore, the pilot and the maintenance team aren't responsible). In neither case was the pilot legally responsible.

Those same concepts apply to *all* systems on-board a plane.

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localzuk
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Re: Self drive

You just yourself said that the 787 doesn't have a direct link between the peddles and the flight control surface. That means that when you press something, or use a pedal, or use any of the flight controls, those actions are being translated into the movements that the plane actually performs - via computer. It isn't a little bloke in there going "oh, he wants to go right, lets move the rudder" and then pumping hydraulic fuel into the system... Its a computer. It might be many different individual computers, with redundancies, but they're still computers.

If the wires that fly your plane break - meaning the systems that run those hydraulics are not working, that means YOU as a pilot are not legally responsible. There is absolutely nothing you can do. You can't go climbing on the wing to jump on the ailerons. Imagine it this way - you're flying along happily and your wings fall off. Is that the pilot's fault? No!

You can do your damned best to control the plane, of course, but if the plane crashes and it all ends up in court, the fault won't be "the pilot didn't do the impossible! He didn't fly the unflyable plane!". The blame will be placed, legally, on the engineers (ie. the company) or the manufacturer.

I did not mention "autopilot" at all.

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localzuk
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Re: Self drive

Not all the time, no. If the on-board computer simply dies, severing all fly by wire controls, the pilot is pretty much useless. Its not like there are hydrolics from the pedals in a Dreamliner cockpit to the rudder or ailerons.

If the pilot does something wrong then they are held responsible. If the plane's systems do something wrong, it is either the fault of the manufacturer, or the ground crew who were maintaining it.

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localzuk
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Re: Self drive

Its a question that we already have answered. If you have your car repaired by, say, a mechanic and he fails to tighten the lug nuts and a wheel later flies off - the mechanic is responsible.

If a person doesn't have their car regularly maintained and it a bit falls off on the road, it is that person's responsibility.

If a car develops a fault with its ECU and locks the throttle on, causing a crash, it is the manufacturer's responsibility.

There's a pile of case law that already exists on it. An automated car isn't so much removed from the "fly by wire" type vehicles we already have.

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localzuk
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Re: Great , even more technology for its own sake

The tens of thousands of deaths on the roads of the world due to human error would seem to show that you aren't really on the right side of the, err, road here.

Automation of cars will reduce road deaths. I trust a well trained computer more than a human who might be tired, inebriated, distracted etc...

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localzuk
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Re: Sensors and transponders better than cameras?

@Marketing Hack - That's kinda the point of a learning computer - over time it will learn more and more things that it will recognise.

I don't know what that weird object on the road is until I'm either standing over top of it or have picked it up and looked at it. A computer is no different.

The human eye is notoriously easy to trick.

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Elite:Dangerous goes TITSUP

localzuk
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Re: I'm not a programmer.

Ah, so you are dictating how the game should be created too then? There's many of us who love that it is a realistic implementation of the universe. Are our views not important too, or do you get to dictate the entire game - limiting it down to what the old Elite was. In fact, why bother with a new game, everything was done in the original, let's just use that...

Its a new game. It has new things in it - one of those things is the expansive universe, another is the server based architecture to allow continual updates and changes to be made. A sequel is not just a like for like copy with new graphics. This isn't COD.

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localzuk
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Re: I'm not a programmer.

Its quite funny that some of you think its easy to have a database containing 400,000,000,000 star systems and their associated celestial bodies on a home PC. If each system contains 10Kb of data, that's potentially 372.5TB of data. Yeah, SQLite can handle that. Add in market data etc... and your game database is gonna be pretty huge!

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localzuk
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Re: Another One...

Eve and Elite are about as different as chalk and cheese. I don't think I ever saw any proper commentator say the 2 were actually in competition with each other, and indeed many people play both.

One is a flight sim, in space, with dog fighting. Full immersion style. The other is a finance management game really, with some fighting thrown in.

I love both games.

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localzuk
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Only had a single problem myself...

In the 50 hours+ I've played it so far, I've had a single issue - I got stuck in hyper-space for 5 minutes randomly. That's it. Other than that, its worked perfectly.

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Untangling .NET Core: Open source for Windows, Mac, Linux

localzuk
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Re: Dear microsoft guy...

You seem to have forgotten a key thing - Microsoft are a profit making corporation. They have to protect their assets, and that includes their IP. So, they are *never* going to just go and give it away with no wiggle room for them to operate in. It just won't happen, its not capitalistic.

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localzuk
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Re: Dear microsoft guy...

As far as I can tell, they've not removed many frameworks from use... VB6 evolved into VB.Net, and it wasn't really a framework like this. Silverlight, ok, they've kinda depreciated it but they're supporting it until 2020, and considering it is a web technology and the pace at which the web moves, I'd say that's generous!

You mention MySQL and OpenOffice, but as far as I can tell, both are current and developing projects. Sure, development of OpenOffice went through a dip, but that's the thing isn't it? Its open source, so Libre Office appeared to fill any perceived gaps. MySQL as well - problems with it? Forked and now MariaDB.

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'Turn to nuclear power to save planetary ecology from renewable BLIGHT'

localzuk
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Re: What? Have these people learned nothing?

Solar is not cost effective yet in many countries. In the UK, it is heavily subsidised (it has the highest strike price of all the renewable technologies). Introducing it en-mass in the UK would cause yet more rises to electricity bills, which would not be acceptable to many.

No, we need nuclear in our mix. We could have 20% of our energy provided by geothermal, at most, according to the last surveys done, which is great, but we'd have to dig very deep to achieve that. However, for heating, we could very much use geothermal, only problem would be the cost and disruption of installing such a system.

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localzuk
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Cost per MWh to the end user is still cheaper than current wind, far cheaper than solar and tidal, and even cheaper than "clean coal" stations (in their various guises).

The government aren't spending anything on the nuclear plant themselves, they are just insuring the project, and guaranteeing the return for the investors via the strike price. The strike price is up to 50% lower than the strike price agreed with many wind farms.

So, even after all the issues you list about the cause of the expense, it is still not *that* expensive, long term.

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localzuk
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Re: How convenient...

The cost per MWh for Hinkley C, even with the agreed strike price of £92.5 per MWh is still below the price paid for wind power (which is between £95 and £155 per MWh). Its actually cheaper even than modern "carbon capture" coal stations.

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BT to gobble EE for £12.5bn – BTEE phone home

localzuk
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Re: Too big?

Only problem I can see is the back-haul part, but it'd basically be the same situation as OpenReach/Wholesale have with the retail side of BT now.

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What a pity: Rollout of hated UK smart meters delayed again

localzuk
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Re: Security concern?

I wasn't referring only to actual street lights, I was being more general and speaking of all the different random lights we have on our streets. Such as the little lights that highlight street signs, the millions of traffic lights that still use incandescents, the "bollards" that sit on islands etc... There are plenty of places where incandescents are still in use which could be switched out.

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