* Posts by localzuk

702 posts • joined 25 Jul 2011

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BT's taxpayer-funded broadband monopoly may lock out rivals, says independent report

localzuk
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Conduits and infrastructure into one business

Business sales into another

Consumer sales into another

R&D into another

Seems like a reasonable way to split it up.

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It's the end of life as we know it for Windows Server 2003

localzuk
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Re: "Unlike Windows XP Server 2003 won’t cling around, zombie-like, at high numbers for years."

Yup. I know of some businesses still running Server 2000. Hell, until a couple of years ago, I know of a couple of schools that were using Windows 98 SE as their "server"!!

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Roku 3: Probably the best streaming player on the market ... for now, at least

localzuk
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Re: Can it be rooted?

Yup, and your average consumer wants to do that? No, they don't. They want a box they buy in PC World, that they plug in to their TV and they point a remote at.

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localzuk
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It is an internet streaming device. Internet being the key word here. It isn't a local content streaming device - where's the money making opportunities for Roku to add that as a feature?

Anyway, Plex isn't very complex - install, add videos, add channel to Roku, done.

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World of the strange: There will be NINE KINDS of Windows 10

localzuk
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Re: How about the following?

Or, you could accept that the writing has been on the wall for 16 bit applications and MSDOS(!?) for over a decade, and accept that it might be time to rewrite things to work in the 21st century.

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localzuk
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Re: As a Service?

Most home users consider their OS to be a service anyway, really. And in reality, consumers treat their devices as services also. They buy them, use them for a period of a couple of years and then replace with a new one.

So, practically, there won't be that much of a difference to most consumers that I've come across. Many have already happily made the move over to Office 365 subscriptions from full Office boxed editions.

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localzuk
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Not seeing an issue

Home, Pro, Enterprise, Education, Mobile, Mobile Enterprise, Enterprise Embedded, Mobile Enterprise Embedded, IoT.

There's not going to be much confusion because of that - they're all fairly well targetted.

Home users are going to buy devices with Home and Mobile.

Business users are going to buy Pro, Enterprise, or Mobile Enterprise.

Schools will use Education and Mobile Enterprise.

Embedded will use one of the 3 embedded/IoT version.

Seems simple enough!

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Backwaters in rural England getting non-BT gigabit broadband

localzuk
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Re: Excellent!

My hope too. Still waiting for anything above 5Mbps where I am in Somerset!

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Cheers Ireland! That sorts our Safe Harbour issues out – Dropbox

localzuk
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Don't think it changes anything

If Dropbox are still transferring data outside of the EU, then they are still going to be relying on SafeHarbor regardless of where the account is managed.

The only way it makes any difference is if Dropbox change the way their system works and they specify that data doesn't leave the EU.

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Money-for-mods-gate: Valve gives masterclass in how to lose gamers and alienate people

localzuk
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Re: Meh

What's wrong with something running in the background? *confused*

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Barclays, Halifax and Tesco still being gnawed by POODLE

localzuk
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Re: Who's doing the IT for these banks?

IT in big business has long been the department that gets a beating every time there's any kind of financial strife. Profits dipped? Sack some IT. Regulations increased? Sack some IT. CEO has a headache? Sack some IT.

IT is seen purely as a cost centre by many bean-counters, rather than a driver of the business. It doesn't have any sales people, therefore it can't be making any money.

So, IT ends up outsourced to the cheapest bidder or the teams face reorganisation so that the knowledgeable people are made redundant (as they cost too much) and young, inexperienced, people.

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Console makers game the EU Commission to avoid energy-use law

localzuk
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Re: They are computers

Developers have not got lazy. They have to do a heck of a lot more with the equipment now than they used to, and support devices from all over the place. Gone are the days of producing text based games using VESA drivers etc...

The amount of work that's needed to produce the giant games of today is phenomenal. To say the developers are lazy is to ignore the needs of a game that will sell well.

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localzuk
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They are computers

Capping the power usage of a computer is a stupid idea, and I'm a hippy green loving environmentalist.

The only thing that happens if you cap power usage of such a device is the functionality will not be as good. Ok, yes, CPUs and GPUs are regularly being released with new capabilities at lower energy ratings, but these things take time to be developed and to reach the market. The legislative machine moves even slower than that though. They've been negotiating this agreement for 6 years! In that time, there have been, what, 3 generations of Intel CPUs?

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Business plans, good ideas, and 8 other myths about startups – by Indiegogo's CEO

localzuk
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Depends

Nearly all of these depend on the business type. I mean, I have an idea for a company, but in order to do it I would need to quit my job and have money to live off for a year to get things started. That means I'd need money for living costs, equipment, business supplies etc... At a conservative estimate, that's at least £30k (considering the cost of living down here anyway. I suppose it could drop if I moved up north, but then I'd not be near my support network). To me, that's a huge amount of money!

Business plan - pretty sure that to find that sort of money, people will want to see a pretty detailed business plan.

Brand/PR - this depends on the market. If the market is full of competitors which have swish marketing then turning up in a jalopy and having a HTML3 website isn't going to help you.

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Microsoft to offer special Surface 3 for schools

localzuk
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Funny really, you're commenting that teachers don't know what's needed in the workplace whilst yourself not knowing what being a teacher is like.

Or to sum it up more accurately - what a pile of nonsense.

Tablets are not useless, they have some great uses in education. The problem comes when someone buys into the sales drone's bullshit and buys them before actually having a need. Tablets are great in music and SEN. They're great as a "companion" device - so, for use alongside traditional materials and methods. No need for planners, calculators, printing periodic tables, handing out homework, booking an ICT suite to allow your class to do some research on a topic, etc... The question is value for money - all those things can be done without tablets, but do tablets do it better, cheaper and more conveniently? I'd say that with recent cheaper X86 based tablets coming out that they absolutely do.

ICT as a subject has been a joke for over a decade. When I took it, it didn't tax me as a student a single time. That's why the government and industry are trying to reform it into something useful - which takes time.

Teachers have a difficult job, and people like you don't make it any easier.

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localzuk
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Software storage space and Windows Updates etc...

Not sure 32GB is going to be enough when you consider the size of some Windows applications. Ok, fine, the tablets aren't going to be running Solidworks, but Smart Notebook? Serif suite? It all adds up. Our standard image comes to well in excess of 30GB on top of Windows at our school.

I just don't think this is a particularly sensible size. Especially when you consider how cheap flash memory is to manufacturers. But then, the size of storage in devices is a big point of contention - why are upgrades in SSD size from OEMs and the like so much more than the actual cost to them to make it?

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GDS monopoly leaves UK.gov at risk of IT cock-ups, warns report

localzuk
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Re: Government technocrats

You are both right and wrong. There is a mindset difference but at the same time, we do actually need to be seeing modern technologies in use in government. People don't engage with systems that are clunky and complex.

Websites need to be smooth and easy to use. Javascript is good for that. You're doing pretty much the exact same thing as the newbies in the jobs - you're discounting the new technologies as unnecessary when old technologies could do it but failing to take into consideration the real-world use cases and requirements of the systems.

If you look around the world at the large data crunching websites, you almost certainly won't find much COBOL in use anywhere! Facebook handles a billion users and it certainly doesn't use Unix and z/OS.

The technologies needed for a project should be chosen to fulfil the requirements of the project, simple as that.

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localzuk
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It should not be one or the other

To try and bespoke build all digital systems via GDS is absurd - just as buying them all would be.

Each case should be looked at individually, is a bespoke system necessary? Or is there an off the shelf product that can do the job for less cost?

Open source should be a necessity, regardless of the system, so that the government doesn't get locked in to any supplier contracts and to allow for rapid changes to be made should they be needed.

The complaints made by Copeland in this article scream "we have to outsource everything!" to me though.

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'Leaked' EU digi wish list: Junkets for Eurocrats, sops to copyright and telcos

localzuk
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Geo-Blocking?

Would a simple solution be that any online service that you wish to geo-block must also be offered in all regions of the EU? So, companies can still charge their differential pricing but they can't stop any EU citizen from viewing it, so long as they are offering it as a service in one country?

Eg. Sky Now online service is available in the UK and not the rest of the EU (I don't actually know if this is the case but for this example let's say it is). With my idea, they must also offer the service to all other countries in the EU. They could charge £10pm in the UK, €20pm in France, €25pm in Germany or whatever.

I wonder if that would work?

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Ad-blocking is LEGAL: German court says Ja to browser filters

localzuk
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Re: It's my computer

@FF22 - what have contracts got to do with it? There isn't any contract between a web client and a web server. A contract has to be agreed by both parties before interactions occur. If I go to google.com and receive the HTTP data from them, I can do whatever the heck I want to do with it on my machine, its just data. If I want to, on the fly, swap the background colour I can do. There's no contract or anything stopping me - I didn't agree to one.

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NetApp nails 11PB Oz supercomputer storage deal

localzuk
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Re: 2 million?

Question is, how much of it is real, physical, storage? How much is clever de-duplication or other wizardry etc...

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EU bods Oetti and Ansip: We must digitise EVERYTHING

localzuk
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Re: here we go:

Lots of people do follow stores on Facebook. There's a local café that puts their daily specials on there and they've got a few thousand followers. So, you're arguing against something that already happens.

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localzuk
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Re: Again with the savings...

I dunno, £23 per person is quite a lot of money. £23 is enough to get me to and from work for 2 weeks.

I've bought things from across the EU, and postage has never been that slow. It nearly always is couriered and next day is quite normal.

Recourse if things go wrong - now that's something that needs sorting out. Just knowing who to contact and where would be a good thing.

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localzuk
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Re: here we go:

A green grocer could very easily make use of social media - advertise their daily offers etc...

Newsagents could run a classifieds page on social media, and again show what their business offers.

Farmers - they absolutely could be using big data, for analysing crop yields and the like, to adapt to changes in their land, if they monitored things like ground acidity, weather, pollution etc... Many larger farms already do use such services.

Butchers - just like the grocer really.

So, no they won't all use all those services, but they could all use some of them.

I know of a couple of pet shops who use social media very effectively, for example.

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Labour manifesto: Tech Bacc, not-spot zapping and hi-speed interwebs

localzuk
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@JHC_97 - the world we live in now is not one driven by people with degrees only. It is one driven by ideas and skills. Companies want people who can develop quickly, who can adapt quickly and can keep up with the latest technologies.

Sure, if you're looking for employees to develop stuff for $random_bank, you're going to go for someone with a bunch of initials after their name, its a way of protecting yourself. If you're a start-up, you won't care - so long as they can produce what you want.

Going by paper skills is a poor way of finding staff. I have no paper degree, but I could run circles around a graduate in my field. Why? Experience.

I'd employ a plumber who could do the work - I'd not care if they were qualified or not, so long as they knew what they were doing.

The computing curriculum isn't about qualifying someone to be a coder anyway. It is about giving today's students a grounding in more than just PowerPoint and Excel. Its about getting them to understand the devices that they so easily interact with on a daily basis, to perhaps be able to work their way around a problem by themselves etc...

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Google: Give us cash or we'll poke YouTube ads into your eyeballs

localzuk
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Seems good to me

A nice step in the right direction.

Next up, I want an easy to use monthly subscription option for channels I want to support - like Twitch TV's subscribers. Entirely voluntary, doesn't affect the content in any way, but allows you to easily show support to a channel. The Fan Funding/Tip Jar concept is a nice one, but they need an option for recurring payments, and also need to roll it out further afield than USA/Mexico/Japan/Australia.

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Streaming tears of laughter as Jay-Z (Tidal) waves goodbye to $56m

localzuk
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Re: Streaming? more like Steaming

I use streaming almost exclusively as my source of music. However, I pay for it and I can pre-populate music to mobile devices for travel purposes. There's no need to be using mobile bandwidth for music!

It isn't an age thing - its a "thinking things through" thing.

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localzuk
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Their explanation of lossless on their site...

Is as nonsensical as the rest of the concept. Apparently, parts of music is "left out" to make an MP3 smaller. Weird.

We live in a world where people buy crap headphones because of the name, so people don't particularly care about audio fidelity. The only people who really care about it are those who spend a fortune on their HiFi systems - and they aren't really the sort to buy streaming media. They look for AAD CDs and, quite frankly, vinyl. Not a large enough market, I don't think, to sustain an entire streaming company.

That said, if they can really sell the "Jay Z" or whoever, names attached to it (like the crap headphones) then they may get the "idiot market" too...

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Bye bye, booth babes. IT security catwalk RSA nixes sexy outfits

localzuk
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Re: Christ on a fucking BIKE!

@NotArghGeeCee

I'm in total agreement. The comments on here are precisely what's wrong with the IT industry. The people making them are an embarrassment to our industry and, as you say, to our gender.

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Assange™ lawyers demand Swedish prosecution files or no London interview

localzuk
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Not good

I have supported his quest for proper treatment, but this has no basis or need.

Why does he need access to these files before someone comes and talks to him? They wouldn't under our law in the UK either - you get access to the documents at the "you've been charged" stage before court dates.

This isn't a good move and he has lost my support with it.

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Adobe: Flash, pah. Look, we're doing just fine in the cloud, thank you

localzuk
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Re: Paid?

As far as I can tell, there isn't a "free" subscription available at all. So, I would be assuming that they're all paid for subs.

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Timeout, Time Lords: ICANN says there is only one kind of doctor

localzuk
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Re: In the UK Medical Doctors aren't Real Doctors!

You are trying to create a distinction as to what a "real doctor" is. I am trying to point out that your grounds for doing so are flawed - the term Doctor pre-dates its use in the medical profession.

If you wish to diminish the use of the term Doctor for PhDs, then you should more rightly do so for its use in the medical profession, based on its historic use. Before medical doctors were referred to as doctors, they were referred to as physicians. It is MD's who have appropriated the term.

However, both ways of using the term are used consistently world wide. A doctor can be an MD or a PhD. So, the idea that one or the other is a "real" doctor is nonsensical to say the least.

Also, my use of colloquialism wasn't itself colloquial. You seem to be struggling with the English language a bit.

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localzuk
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Re: In the UK Medical Doctors aren't Real Doctors!

@david 12 - you might want to look into the history of the term "Doctor", as it is from the Latin "to teach", in relation to teaching in a university. It had no relation to medicine at all.

The use of "Doctor" for medical professionals is closer to a colloquialism than any other definition, as medical doctors already have possible titles available, per their profession: Physician and Surgeon.

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MPs 'alarmed' by millions of mugshots on Brit cops' databases

localzuk
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Re: They *are* just trying to keep us safe

@Joey M0usepad

You seem to think its about specific laws. It isn't, its about legislative creep. This stuff is in addition to all the other attacks on civil liberties. It all piles up, and suddenly you realise you're living in a police state. Just look through all the laws of the last 10 years and you'll find an alarming number which take away tiny bits of freedom here and there, but overall it adds up to a much larger issue.

Safeguards *could* be put in place, but they very rarely are, and when they are they are so weak or are ignored so as to make them pointless. Just look at the spying stuff. We had a court rule what GCHQ had been doing was illegal, but since people now knew about it, it no longer was. We have laws all over the place with "safeguards" but the safeguards are never as strong as the laws they are there to control. It barely takes any effort to change them.

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localzuk
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Re: Future, what future - They *are* just trying to keep us safe

@Joey M0usepad

Quite simply put - corruption. Sure, those technologies aren't an issue on their own, but when they're used in a blanket way, it doesn't take much effort to screw someone over with them. I've been on the receiving end of police lying about me, and of a concerted political campaign to clamp down on a peaceful protest. It resulted in my having to drop out of university, and my life taking a massively different direction - and that was relatively minor stuff they lied about.

On top of that, our movement saw the government make laws specifically to make what we were doing illegal. That being protesting. Injunctions were issued, new laws brought in. Its now illegal to contact 2 people in a business to complain about their business practices if the first one tells you not to call again - ie. you are harassing a business.

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Crap employers banned from enforcing backdoor crim records checks

localzuk
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Re: And how many people...

I don't know about you, but if a company did that to me I wouldn't want to work for them anyway!!

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HP Services engineer dispatch tool 'broken', say engineers

localzuk
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Indeed. Down here, 3G signal is a luxury. On most of the roads around here, any signal is a luxury!

So, something needs to change in the UK to deal with this sort of system!

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HTC One M9 hands on: Like a smart M8 in a sharp suit

localzuk
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Re: Few changes but...

Precisely. Its a good looking, sturdy phone. I've had my M7 for 2 years and have dropped it numerous times, onto concrete too, and its only signs of wear are a small scratch on the glass, and a few tiny scratches on the back. Why spend all that time changing everything if what they've got is already pretty darn good?

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localzuk
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Good timing

That'll do me nicely, as my contract is up! Running the M7 at the moment and the M9 seems like a good replacement! :D

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NO ONE is making money from YouTube, even Google – report

localzuk
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Re: @localzuk - Give them a bit of time

Top broadcasters have thousands of subscribers on Twitch. Smaller ones can have dozens or hundreds. I voluntarily sub to 4 channels each month, as they provide hours of entertainment so why shouldn't they get some reward for it?

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localzuk
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Give them a bit of time

Youtube has had tremendous growth over the last few years. That growth costs a fortune in equipment and bandwidth. But growth can't go on forever.

So, with them introducing things like subscription services and the like, I can see it becoming profitable very soon.

I'm quite surprised that they haven't created a system like Twitch TV's subscriptions - ie. people can voluntarily pay a monthly sub, part of which goes to Twitch and part goes to the broadcaster. Offer silly perks, like special emotes and access to "sub only" pages and people do pay up. The content still remains free, but there's a nice steady stream of income.

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'Utterly unusable' MS Word dumped by SciFi author Charles Stross

localzuk
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Re: Content and Style

@benched42 - really? Got Word 2013 open here and Word 97-2003 .doc is a save option? And our old office 97-2003 documents all work fine still...

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localzuk
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Re: Content and Style

Oh no, 680 MB. How terrible. It'll never fit on my 4TB hard disk.

Sorry for the sarcasm, but in the modern world of computing, 680MB is not something to worry about. I install productivity software here, specific to education, that hits about 15GB in total. Yes, its huge for what it does, but our users want/need it, therefore we install it and live with that.

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Microsoft: You want on-prem wares, UK.gov? We'll make you pay

localzuk
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£1200 pa per laptop?!

I'd love to see a breakdown of those costs to be honest! Costs here are closer to £250 per laptop per year, and we're a full Microsoft house.

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'Lenovo, Superfish put smut on my system' – class-action lawsuit

localzuk
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I don't actually get that attitude to be honest. Mac OS has many of its own problems which can and will slow you down.

My workflow simply has very little interaction with TIFKAM, and it is still possible to install a third party start menu if you *really* need it. Maybe its down to my never actively looking for and clicking icons - I always just press the Windows key and start typing the name of what I want - same as I did in Windows 7.

To me though, faster IO drives a real increase in productivity due to reduced processing times for various tasks that swap to disk etc...

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localzuk
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Windows 8/8.1, quite simply, is much faster than Windows 7. Disk IO is a good chunk quicker on its own.

So, as much as Windows 8's TIFKAM interface is infuriating, the core of the OS is pretty good.

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Debian on track to prove binaries' origins

localzuk
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Re: What a complete joke

If you really want to check things like that, you have to check it yourself. The old adage "you can lead a horse to water, but you can't force it to drink" comes to mind.

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Microsoft to store deleted Exchange Online mails FOREVER

localzuk
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Re: Yeah, no.

What part of "unless you set up a policy to bin them" is causing you trouble?

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localzuk
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Re: Some employers in the states have document retention policies

Not sure you understand the system. You can restore emails in Office 365 at the click of a few buttons. The system is already there, and people use it daily. All Microsoft have done is change from 90 days to infinite for the ability to go and find and restore those emails.

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Inside GOV.UK: 'CHAOS' and 'NIGHTMARE' as trendy Cabinet Office wrecked govt websites

localzuk
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I don't understand the plan

Why did it require everyone to move to one monolithic system?

Why instead didn't it simply involve a new "style" framework being created, dictating page layouts, language choices, design ideals etc... which other departments then would've had to implement around their existing content?

Doing it the way they did might work for a small business which merges with another small business, but doing it with a government, with hundreds of different departments and functions, with global reach, stakeholders in every sector of the population both internal to the country and external? That, quite frankly, is ridiculous.

I simply can't see what the advantage ever would've been?

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