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* Posts by localzuk

546 posts • joined 25 Jul 2011

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Is that a 64-bit ARM Warrior in your pocket? No, it's MIPS64

localzuk
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Pseudo-simultaneous. The hardware scheduler is better at scheduling tasks than end users, so you see a speed up but in effect you're just getting better performance out of similar hardware.

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Windows 7 settles as Windows XP use finally starts to slip … a bit

localzuk
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Re: Why is Win 8 and Win 8.1 seperated?

@Jordan Davenport - surely that same argument applies to Windows XP when Windows XP SP3 was out? Microsoft usually only supports the latest service pack for non-security updates.

Them having switched from SP1 to .1 makes little difference.

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Canadian ISP Shaw falls over with 'routing' sickness

localzuk
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Re: BGP

So, effectively, the BGP issue is caused by the lack of IPv4 addresses? As the larger blocks are reclaimed and chopped up into smaller subnets, and issued?

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No more turning over a USB thing, then turning it over again to plug it in: Reversible socket ready for lift off

localzuk
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USB itself is universal. The bus is the same everywhere. Its just the connector part which has got a little mixed up...

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localzuk
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Re: In Service for 2 Months - Yum...

I have one word for this - what?

Type-C connectors aren't out yet. No-one has implemented them on any hard drives yet, as it has only just been finalised.

Are you referring to the USB 3 Micro-B plug? It entirely different from the USB Type-C connector. Or are you referring to one of the various proprietary USB-like connectors?

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Americans to be guinea pigs in vast chip-and-PIN security experiment

localzuk
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Re: The reason Americans don't like it..

You're looking at chip and pin in isolation. You're not comparing it to previous fraud levels with mag strip/signature cards. It is so easy to defraud someone with a mag strip/sig card that the system is basically an open door to free money.

Whilst flawed, the chip and pin system does actually provide some level of extra security.

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localzuk
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Re: Americans are so funny

You're both wrong about that now. The UK law changed in 2009 which made it legally a responsibility of the bank to prove it was a transaction authorised by the cardholder rather than them simply brushing it off as "can't be done, as only you know the pin".

So, the bank IS still liable by default, and regulators HAVE done something about it.

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localzuk
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Re: Restaurants?

If you're letting someone take your card out of eyesight, then you're basically an idiot in this day and age. Either go with them to the payment machine, or pay with something other than your card.

However, over here they just use mobile chip and pin terminals in most restaurants.

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Twitch rich as Google flicks $1bn hitch switch, claims snitch

localzuk
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Still just speculation

I wish all these media outlets would stop speculating. Every time one of these articles appears, it isn't due to any new evidence, but is a link back to prior speculation! What happened to publishing articles when an actual source can confirm something?

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Pinterest diversity stats: Also pale and male (but not as much as Twitter)

localzuk
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As The Reg seems intent on posting this useless info...

How about The Reg post their own staffing make up stats? Trotting these stats out repeatedly seems somewhat pointless to be honest, but if you're going to keep posting articles about how many women are in XYZ company or industry, you should eat a slice of your own cake and show us your own stats!

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White? Male? You work in tech? Let us guess ... Twitter? We KNEW it!

localzuk
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Re: Odd

I think you've basically just repeated what I said originally. Companies should not be compared to the population as a whole - it is illogical. I use the term "appropriately qualified graduates" simply because the majority of people in the IT industry are graduates. People in the skilled roles/leadership roles are certainly majority graduates. But yes, the term should be "appropriately qualified people" instead, to catch those of us who are edge cases (myself for example - no degree, working hard in the IT industry).

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localzuk
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Re: Odd

I'm slightly confused by your post @Trevor_Pott. Are you saying that the industry as a whole should be made up, demographically, the same as the demographics of "new graduates"? Or are you saying this would be bad (it would) as it would basically tell the existing set of appropriately qualified while males "we don't want you"?

The reason I'm confused, is that I haven't seen anyone saying anything about the industry reflecting "new graduate" statistics here?

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localzuk
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Odd

Its odd how apparently intelligent people seem to obsess over things like this but use completely the wrong statistics and place blames in completely the wrong places.

The stats that need comparing are company make-up vs appropriately qualified graduate populations, not general population make-up. It isn't Twitter's fault if there aren't enough people from whichever ethnicity graduating with applicable degrees. No, that's the government's job to sort out.

This lack of understanding of appropriate statistics seems to exist everywhere too. The media is basically obsessed with it.

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Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales

localzuk
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Re: Clever...

A good summary there. A lot of it can be further summarised down to "the stock market doesn't want long term returns, they want returns right now". Its the ultimate in short-termism.

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Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network

localzuk
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Re: Not wanting to defend plod, but

@AndrewDu - and all you'd need is a witness called who explains how IP addresses work, how wireless networks and shared or public networks work and you've now got reasonable doubt that you are matched up to that IP address.

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localzuk
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Re: Not wanting to defend plod, but

The page you link to is for "commercial entities" not private individuals. A private individual can offer their home connection to whoever they darn well want without having to log anything. They might be breaching their terms and conditions of use with their ISP but it isn't a criminal matter.

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NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14

localzuk
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Re: Oh the irony...

Not sure what you're talking about regarding subscriptions to get VS? You can buy a standalone license of VS2013 on Amazon for £536/£450 Upg. I've not seen any requirement to have an MSDN subscription for the coming V14 either?

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Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises

localzuk
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Yeah, IBM have definitely lost their way. They certainly didn't do $100bn in sales last year... *rolls eyes*

IBM is still synonymous with the enterprise, wherever you go.

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Mozilla and Facebook snip a further five per cent from all JPEGs

localzuk
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Re: Open sauciness

I wouldn't discount any minor gains for Facebook. A while ago they stated that they serve 600,000 images per second. That's 51.8bn images per day. If they manage to shave even half a kb off each, they save 24TB of bandwidth costs per day.

Basically, minor saving scale massively.

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UK.gov warned: Small biz bods 'blunted' by broadband bumbling

localzuk
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Semi-rural areas have issues too

Towns like the one I live in have no end of internet issues. Average speed here is less than 7Mbps in the "good" areas. Outside those areas the speeds drop like rocks.

For our school, we have to go via our LEA for our connection for a leased line. We couldn't afford a true leased line ourselves - BT would want £31k for a 100Mbit line.

The problem isn't that there's a lack of customers here, its that we're a relatively isolated town - our nearest proper town is about 25 miles away, so we are always at least 5 years behind everywhere else. It is significantly affecting the development of our town, to the extent of businesses giving poor connectivity as a reason for moving out or refusing to move in.

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New leaked 'Windows 8 screenshot': The Start Menu strikes back

localzuk
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Grouped shortcuts? You can do that with, you know, the desktop. Internet favourites? You can do that with the desktop, or in your web browser. Live tiles? You've got me there. I've never used any, as I've not found a single one that aids my computer usage.

When my PC is idling, I have my email client open and it gives me a notification sound when email arrives. It even does this when it is locked.

Weather, headlines and photos are just toys. Want those things? Get them on your personal phone.

Just seems odd that you're arranging your productivity around non-productivity related things.

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localzuk
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Re: Every other edition...

The typing of program names is one of the things that vastly improved Windows 7. Windows 8 just continued that one.

It was something that I even installed additional software to be able to do in XP, as having to do everything via the mouse is massively inefficient.

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Tech industry IGNORES customers: 'It's a supplier-driven world'

localzuk
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Very true

An awful lot of ICT is supplier driven - due to the inability of those making the purchasing decisions to get local expertise to check what is being bought. Many such decision makers actively ignore their local advice in fact, and get drawn in by the smooth patter of the sales people.

Its particularly prevalent in the printing industry, and in the education world. Many headteachers get themselves in a pickle due to their lack of knowledge.

Danwood have traditionally been one of those companies to avoid, mainly due to their "Evergreen" contract, which has screwed over quite a number of schools in its time. Hopefully, this new boss will scrap it, or at least actually get their sales staff to sell it properly and clearly!

Until I hear of positive changes, I'll continue to avoid them.

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German government orders local CIA station chief to pack his bags

localzuk
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Re: NSA....National Security Administration is ASN....American Stasi Network.....

Whut? The NSA was "set up" in 1952. So, unless Dubya had amazing abilities at the age of 6, I doubt he'd've been creating many spy agencies...

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10Gbps over crumbling COPPER: Boffins cram bits down telco wire

localzuk
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Re: why not take it all the way in.

@JeffyPoooh - not really. Most high density urban areas have conduits in place to large buildings.

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localzuk
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Re: Dumb concept - stop being lazy and just run the fiber to the home

You seem to think that everywhere is like where you live. It isn't. Not to mention, you're comparing the costs of replacing the "last mile" copper with fibre, compared with running new copper. The problem with that is the copper already exists, so the cost of running the fibre is being balanced against a zero cost for upgrade of the copper...

If you've got a highly dense urban population, running FTTP is relatively cost effective, but reduce that density and suddenly the costs are high enough that the company would never make their investment back. Ever. This is why the UK government is investing in rolling out high speed internet to rural areas itself. Its why the cable companies that exist now are not the ones that ran the cables in the first place - they have all just been bought out over time as each little company failed.

So, I'd counter that your "tiny fraction" is actually a "majority percentage" of the cost.

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localzuk
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Re: why not take it all the way in.

Its nowhere near that simple. The company needs permits to do any form of digging. They have to work with all the householders to gain access to do the install. They have to deal with any bylaws, or protected buildings. If they're using existing conduit, they need to ensure it has space etc...

Its isn't so simple. Not to mention the disruption to the streets being dug up.

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Airbus to send 1,200 TFlops of HPC goodness down the runway

localzuk
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Re: PUE of 1.25??

Why? Google claim to have a PUE of 1.12 in their data centers last time I checked. Facebook is at 1.08...

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Would it be BAD if the Amazon rainforest was all FARMS? Well it WAS, once

localzuk
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They can't actually make that claim at all, without simultaneous studies of the rest of the planet's land. Were there more forests elsewhere, for example?

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Virgin Media goes titsup AGAIN. The cause? Yet MORE DNS strife

localzuk
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Tin foil hat time

Interesting that BT have a similar issue a short while ago also... Maybe a new government back door being installed that broke things?

Or, without the tin foil hat, more likely incompetence.

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Royal Navy parks 470 double-decker buses on Queen Elizabeth

localzuk
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Re: I name this ship White Elephant..... @localzuk

Amazingly, the Royal Navy have other ships for anti-sub operations... For example, the Astute class subs. My point was more one of why is it a problem that the Type 45 surface vessel has a purpose specific to how it is actually going to be used when other ships and boats can do those things already...

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localzuk
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Re: I name this ship White Elephant.....

Yes, because we as a country have needed lots of anti-submarine and surface combat ships recently haven't we... Oh wait, no, nearly all of our wars in the last 20 years have been about air power.

So, why would we invest in anti-sub and surface combat destroyers?

And why wouldn't we invest in more air based weaponry?

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Lindsay Lohan sues Grand Theft Auto V makers for 'using her image'

localzuk
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Which is a bigger brand? Lohan or GTA?

GTA generates billions of pounds of income, Lohan? Not so much...

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Dotcom crypto keys not for the FBI: NZ High Court

localzuk
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Re: So just how long will it take

Doesn't matter if they've been leaked or not, the court has ruled they're not allowed them, therefore anything they get using illegally obtained keys would be inadmissible in court, same as if evidence were obtained as a result of an illegal search.

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localzuk
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Re: Getting desperate?

Thing is, you usually have evidence before you go in guns blazing... You're not supposed to spend 2 years fishing around hoping to find something.

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Sorry, chaps! We didn't mean to steamroller legit No-IP users – Microsoft

localzuk
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If you had a list of companies selling drugs, and you approached the company first you mean? Sure. If they had the list, bypassed the company and went to a judge to get this year's books confiscated before they're distributed so you can drop them in a big vat of black ink before distributing them, then no...

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localzuk
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According to No-IP, Microsoft didn't even contact them about the problem first... So, it looks remarkably like Microsoft simply took it upon themselves to do whatever they wanted, and found a random judge that would side with them to do it.

If I were No-IP, I'd be pursuing it through the courts, as Microsoft seem to have failed to do any pre-injunction legwork to try and remedy the issue, which is usually required in order to get such an injunction. Not to mention, does a Judge have the right to hand over the assets from one company to another without that company having any legal representation or redress?

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PayPal says sorry: Fat fingers froze fundraiser for anti-spy ProtonMail

localzuk
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Re: Mmmh, its definitely a cock-up when it becomes world-wide news ....

@Ole Juul - there's a lot more to having Paypal as a payment option than just paying using a PayPal account. A merchant can handle the card data themselves, or get Paypal to handle it. You can have Paypal use their merchant accounts (ie. the default way of doing things) or you can have them use your own merchant account.

So, it isn't just a case of "put your PayPal login in the box" for all PayPal merchants.

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localzuk
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Re: still waiting ....

Getting a solicitor (or lawyer if you're in the USA) to write to them usually gets them moving...

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EFF sues NSA over snoops 'hoarding' zero-day security bugs

localzuk
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Re: Im all for bashing the NSA

No. The NSA are charged with protecting the USA. That includes the government IT infrastructure. So, they are supposed to do all they can to do that - which means they should not be finding and hiding zero day exploits but should be telling the software manufacturers so they can be repaired, which would then mean US govt IT systems would be patched and secure.

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Microsoft, Google et al form club to push 25/50 Gbps Ethernet

localzuk
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Re: Why?

You should shop around a bit more if you pay £500 for a 10Gbit NIC. An Intel dual port 10GbE card costs £320 inc VAT. Shop around a bit and you could probably get it for less.

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Patch looks like Microsoft FAIL, quacks like FAIL, is actually quite good

localzuk
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Re: Vista?

It only gets security updates now. It left mainstream support on April 10th 2012!

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Adobe Creative Cloud 2014: Progress and pain in the usual places

localzuk
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Re: I need to get this to my client right away.

The link you just posted @PassiveSmoking contradicts your statement that "EVERYBODY'S copy of software" stops working. Only people who were not logged in, or those who updated during the outage, were denied access. Those of us who were logged in during the time were not denied anything. It carried on working just fine for me.

You're extrapolating one piece of downtime and declaring it reason not to use the software. Microsoft have regular license checking on Windows, complete with grace period when it fails, yet people no longer complain about that. Gmail has had downtime, yet people still use that - and many pay for it in businesses too.

Do those people who are so anti-subscription run their own mail servers, and use Linux too?

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localzuk
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Re: I need to get this to my client right away.

There are *always* factors outside of your control which can prevent your being able to work. Thing is, if you're in a business environment using CC software, there's no reason you would be locked out of your software. Once you've logged in, there is a grace period of "up to one month + 99 days" for individual licenses, or "up to 2 months + 99 days" for team licenses bought through resellers. If you're using it so rarely that you don't use it within that period, then you are not really someone who screams "spend £600 a year" on software...

As I said, FUD. Fear, uncertainty and doubt, based on perceptions that make little sense.

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localzuk
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Re: I need to get this to my client right away.

That is pretty much FUD.

I have been a subscriber to Adobe CC for almost a year now, and have never been denied access to the installed programs because of server downtime or new updates. Sure, this is theoretically possible, but so are many other things that don't happen all the time.

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Microsoft challenges US gov over attempts to search overseas data

localzuk
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Re: Why Not

"Ah, but here we touch the rather insiduous part of US law, and the surrounding politics. First off, US law doesn't care one iota that it gets you in trouble abroad. As far as US law is concerned, the rest of the planet doesn't exit so making you do something that is a crime abroad is not their problem (Gitmo is a good example of "not on our soil" excuses, but I'm drifting off topic)."

Not completely true. The USA is a signatory to a long list of international treaties, which mean they have to respect the laws of other countries/areas, else those areas will themselves ignore the laws of the USA. International relations are a balancing act, and the USA knows this.

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localzuk
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Re: Why Not

But the remote data centres aren't directly owned by Microsoft USA, they're owned and operated by a subsidiary, which is registered in the country where it exists usually. So, the USA has no direct oversight over that company. In fact, the local laws may specifically disallow such interference by the USA.

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REVEALED: GCHQ's BEYOND TOP SECRET Middle Eastern INTERNET SPY BASE

localzuk
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Re: Loyal Commenter

Forgot to mention, if you are referring to Section 5, it doesn't apply either, as it wasn't disclosed initially by a British Citizen or in the UK - it was disclosed by Snowden outside the UK, and the Reg is simply re-publishing what has already been disclosed.

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localzuk
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Re: Loyal Commenter

Slight issue - the OSA only applies to "persons who, as the case may be, are or have been crown servants, government contractors, or members of the security and intelligence services".

So, unless The Reg works for the government, OSA doesn't apply...

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US citizens want stricter CO2 regulations by two to one – Yale poll

localzuk
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Re: Yale Poll=Tainted Goods

@Big John - You just linked to a project page for a climate change communication project. Of course it has information about climate change and CO2 - they go hand in hand, and the evidence thus far has been providing evidence that supports the conclusion that climate change is happening. The consensus, no matter what the media manages to dig up, when you look at peer reviewed research, is pretty clear also.

So, the questions are based on the research that has been undertaken. Which makes sense.

You seem to be under the impression that bias means presenting an equal amount of coverage to both sides of this argument. If we apply that same thinking, when the media does a report about the space station, they would also have to provide coverage of some lunatic who doesn't believe that it exists...

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