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* Posts by localzuk

605 posts • joined 25 Jul 2011

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Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix

localzuk
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Re: Makes sense

@Uffish - no. When you go to the cinema, you are paying to watch a single showing of a film. You aren't buying a copy of the movie.

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localzuk
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The key is fair compensation

The key in the EU ruling is about fair compensation. The UK has simply determined that zero compensation is fair, and I agree with them. The music industry is doing nothing to earn any compensation, so why should they be compensated?

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localzuk
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Re: Makes sense

So, taxation on devices that have the potential to be used for copying is not charging twice? I've not ripped a CD in over 6 years. I have, however, burnt dozens of CDs of data, my own videos and photos etc... I've used mobile devices to play legally paid for music via Spotify, and to play for legally purchased downloaded music.

How would my paying tax on those items *not* be my paying twice? That's the scheme other countries have used, and it amounts to an unfair tax in my mind.

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Gov.UK annual IT spend edges down... to £4.3 BEEELLION

localzuk
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Breakdown of costs

It'd be great to see a breakdown of costs for this spending. Is it mostly going on external contractors? Staffing? Bespoke software? Maintaining legacy systems?

Its a heck of a lot of money going on IT, yet we see a constant stream of articles about their mess ups.

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BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?

localzuk
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Re: Waaay too close to home.

Ah yes, Ricoh drivers. Want to print in colour from Publisher (which is a nightmare on its own)? All those settings you carefully chose, pah, ignored. Here's your single black and white A4 print.

At one point we had to print to PDF and then print that to get it to print anything in colour!

Its a bit more reliable with the PS drivers, but even now it still randomly ignores things.

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Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins

localzuk
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Re: ALL YOUR XP BELONG US?

@LDS - that doesn't seem right... Why would a patch for Windows client OS's be issued then?

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UK urged to stop bigging up startups, feed 'growing' firms

localzuk
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Re: More to the point...

1. Not really. We're part of the EU in the UK. The EU is a larger market, being 500 million people (plus the population of Switzerland and Norway etc...)

2. Again, business locations in the EU are all over the place. OK, the UK alone doesn't add up but hey, we're part of the EU.

3. The interstate is falling apart (to the extent that a recent report put it at $3.6tn to actually repair it all. Not to mention, the rail system in the USA is shockingly bad.

4. What? Not sure what your point is...

Also, American beer is pretty much awful, unless you hunt down micro-breweries!

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localzuk
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Re: More to the point...

I dunno, I'd be more interested in how many scale up compared to how many get bought up by the existing giant corps like Microsoft, Google, Apple and HP.

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FCC: Gonna need y'all to cough up $1.5bn to put broadband in schools

localzuk
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Re: Only the #@#$%!! FCC

Might have been this line, where you accuse teachers of being lazy... "Perhaps so everybody in the class can watch Youtube tutorials and the teachers can relax and go home early?"

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localzuk
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Re: Only the #@#$%!! FCC

I dunno, why not find out, rather than being indignant and basically attacking teachers for making use of the internet as a teaching tool?

Internet access was recognised as an invaluable tool for education over a decade ago in the UK. Most schools have at least 100MB connectivity over here (obviously, if they're a school with 20 kids like some around here, that will not be the case, or if they're a school with 1500 kids). We saturate our line here.

There are so many resources available for schools now, its ridiculous to start going around blithely arm waving and shouting "why?" without actually looking into it.

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localzuk
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Re: It's a crisis?

You do realise that multimedia educational sites exist now? We can have 90 kids all using a site, rich in video content and interactive activities, each chomping away at the 100MB fibre we have here. It gets to the stage were 100MB isn't enough, and we only have 550 kids in the school!

The advent of "cloud" services has allowed schools to have much more access to complicated services, without the need to implement more server infrastructure in house for each application too.

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Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table

localzuk
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Re: This is bad

Don't worry, Amazon has an alternative...

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BOFH: An UNHOLY MATCH forged amid the sweet smell of bullsh*t

localzuk
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A lot of organisations ignore their own staff's expertise for whatever reasons (many simply think they're just trying to get budget increases I guess), so getting an external "consultant" to say exactly what you've said previously is a good way of hammering home your message, even if it does end up costing you a chunk of cash.

Sadly.

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UK PM Cameron says Internet must not 'be an ungoverned space'

localzuk
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Re: Government regulation usually ends up with overreach

Any and all "censorship" related law. Laws to control child pornography online ended up being extended to include copyright infringement, which then get extended to include extreme material etc...

Unless you mean it should be "always"...

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localzuk
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Government regulation usually ends up with overreach

Whilst blocking extremist material (whatever that is) might make for good headlines for people who don't think things through, in reality such a policy has been shown repeatedly to lead to massive overreach by governments. Who decides what is "extremist"? Will the definition only include people who want to bomb somewhere? Or will it be a fuzzy definition that can be used as a blunt tool to control any dissent?

How would such a system be implemented also? Transparently, or entirely in secret? I figure it should be transparent - that way people don't think you're hiding things away.

And then, behind all that, why is the focus on end results, rather than prevention? Surely we should be putting our effort into preventing radicalisation and the like?

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The last PC replacement cycle is about to start turning

localzuk
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Re: Fascinatingly myopic

Thing is, with a thin client, you're still effectively running a PC - you've just moved the processing power to a cabinet in a room elsewhere. The productivity and working practices for end users are still the same.

Many banks already do operate VDI infrastructure, or data-centre based workstations for users. I still consider them as PCs though. The work paradigm is still the same. The only difference is geographic location of the processor.

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localzuk
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Re: Businesses don't work like that

@Charles 9 - You are still effectively running a PC, you've just moved it to a server instead.

My question is this - why? The cost of introducing a VDI solution which has enough grunt to handle the work of a proper desktop (eg. if you need a graphics card to do stuff) is pretty high.

It'd take a proper cost benefit analysis to decide if such a setup would actually gain you anything.

It certainly wouldn't here. A VDI solution powerful enough to do the job of our PCs would cost us roughly 2 times the price of simply continuing to use full fat clients.

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localzuk
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Fascinatingly myopic

Articles like this seem to like presenting a tunnel vision view of the world. The author's little niche works well with a phone and a pile of video clips (I hate presentations that are all videos btw, you get very little actual content out of them), so why shouldn't everyone else's?

I hate to break it to you, but your local bank won't be doing all its work on tablets any time soon. They might augment certain roles with them, but the bulk will still be a traditional PC or similar. The local call center? That'll continue to use something PC-like for a while yet. All those businesses *creating* stuff, will continue to use some form of PC to do that design and engineering work.

There's actually only a very small group of people who could make the move to *just* a phone and tablet. These people being mostly consumers of info, and people who give presentations for a living. As much as I'd love to be able to do my job using a 5" screen, I suspect that my employer would have to hire 3 more people to do the job as well, whilst I'm busy jabbing away at the screen and getting annoyed with auto-correct. Even this post would've taken 5 times as long to enter on a phone or tablet.

Once again, the death of the PC is predicted and once again I think the author is living in cloud cookoo land.

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Reg mobile man: National roaming plan? Oh UK.gov, you've GOT to be joking

localzuk
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History disagrees

If what you say is true, surely there shouldn't be any not-spots, as the telcos would be busy rolling out more coverage to compete in these "borderline" areas? But they haven't. In this area of 20,000 people, there are are large areas of the town which don't have coverage from a number of providers. Leave the town, even by a half mile, and you struggle to get any signal at all. The telcos certainly aren't all competing to roll out masts down here...

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Million Mask March: Anonymous' London Guy Fawkes protest a damp squib

localzuk
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Re: Great journalism...

Or do I actually know a number of the people who were there (who, amazingly, all have at least 1 job, some more, have families and who are worries about what the government is doing to the country), and therefore have actual evidence, not just an impression based on prejudices and hyperbole.

So, yeah, make assumptions. Really helps.

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localzuk
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Great journalism...

Let's blindly call them a left-wing rent-a-mob, without any actual evidence. Let's not interview any of them. Yeah, just reaffirm your own beliefs, not bother with actual reporting.

What did you expect? Riots and burning buildings? If there had been, you'd no doubt be attacking them for it as well, so they can't actually change your view.

Basically, your article should have been on the Daily Mail site. I'd expect more from this site to be honest.

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Not even 60,000 of you want an ethically-sourced smartphone

localzuk
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Who made what now?

Not really seen this anywhere. No advertising. Not in any phone shops or electrical retailing stores. Not in any "ethical" focused stores either.

The market they're aiming at are one, in my experience, that don't spend a lot of time looking for a new phone online...

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RBS faces BIGGEST ever fine for THAT huge IT meltdown – leak

localzuk
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Yay, lets fine the victims...

Any fine paid by a company ends up being recovered via their customers, who in this case are also the victims. So, effectively, the FCA are fining the victims.

When the management of a company are held fiscally and legally responsible for the performance of their company, we'll see real change. Until then, we're just gonna see more of the same.

I'll sum it up like this - only a single banker was prosecuted after the crash. Just the one. And he wasn't even a high level executive.

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Trickle-down economics WORKS: SpaceShipTwo is a PRIME EXAMPLE

localzuk
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Re: Space isn't orbit

Thing is, the technology is also a proving ground for things like truly reusable rocketry - it'll be no use to Virgin Galactic to have to strip their ships down to bare components, replace half and rebuild every time they launch (like the Shuttle did). So, in essence, even though it is sub-orbital, its a technological stepping stone to further advancements.

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Manufacturers SLAM UK.gov: 'High speed broadband' rollout is TOO SLOW

localzuk
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They want it at affordable prices. An example - until BT had started the upgrade process in this area, a 100Mbit BT leased line was close to £30k per year.

So, I don't think businesses particularly want consumer pricing, but they do want affordable pricing. £30k is a heck of a price for internet connectivity, even for relatively large businesses.

The price has dropped down a huge amount now, even for leased lines, but it'll still be well outside the price range of the majority of local businesses. So, until FTTC is full active here, many will be stuck with less than 8Mbps.

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localzuk
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Re: Agree with that!

BT are being paid billions of taxpayers pounds to roll this stuff out. It isn't that much to ask for them to keep an accurate log of what they're doing and when...

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localzuk
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Agree with that!

Communication is the worst part of it all I reckon.

Our area has suddenly been marked as having FTTC. Well, part of it. Well, on the area organisation website anyway (if not ISP sites).

It went from "Under Investigation" for the entire district, to "active" in one massive update, skipping the "installing" stage. When I asked the organisation in question whether BT Openreach installing cabinets everywhere in the town meant it would be coming soon, their response was "we can't say, maybe, the cabinets can appear and it can be ages until they're active" pretty much.

There seem to be 6 month gaps between massive updates too, rather than just updating the site when things are actually activated.

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Branson on Virgin Galactic fatal crash: 'Space is hard – but worth it'

localzuk
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Re: Is it really worth it IN THIS CASE, though?

Its about making space easier. Things like space planes and getting things into LEO with reusable tech, or "easily launched" tech, to reduce the cost of space.

Every big leap of this form is the playground of the rich at first - because they can afford to buy into the early stages. In the future though? Could be very good for us as a species.

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Netflix and other OTT giants use 'net neutrality' rules to clobber EU rivals

localzuk
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Re: Providers pay too

I still disagree Andrew. I'm a customer of my ISP. I'm paying for internet access - that access is for the entire internet, not just the "non-video" bits. The ISPs should be using that money to provide the back end needed to cover it. If they aren't earning enough, they need to charge customers more, not look to charge the content providers, else you end up creating a 2 tier web - one where there's companies paying ISPs for access, and one where companies don't pay and the end users can't access their sites properly. I don't want that internet.

Put it this way - without content providers, ISPs wouldn't have a business. The sole purpose of ISPs is to connect people to content...

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localzuk
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Re: Providers pay too

Let's put it simply.

I go and slap a server into a data-centre. I pay that data-centre for the power usage and net connection, which they pay for via various peering arrangements with companies like Level3.

A customer of mine wants to connect to my server, so they sign up to an ISP and pay for the data they use, and that ISP then pays to peer with companies like Level3. My customer can then access my server.

What Netflix is saying - we already pay to peer with people like Level3, so why should we pay the ISP of the customer accessing us? No-one else does!

They even go one step further and provide free caching hardware to stick into peering locations, so data is going the shortest distance possible. Yet people are saying they should still pay even more.

I entirely agree with Netflix on this.

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Computer misuse: Brits could face LIFE IN PRISON for serious hacking offences

localzuk
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Re: Needed

That is the very definition of victim blaming. You're saying that someone who doesn't dress conservatively is basically to blame for being raped. The company that doesn't invest millions in their security systems is asking to be attacked. Your exact words: "If securing your computer isn't a priority for you, then why should jail time for your hacker be a priority for society?"

So if a company doesn't secure its network, a hacker shouldn't be prosecuted. That is shifting the blame for a crime onto the company and off the hacker. You are specifically saying that the crime is only a crime if the victim tried to do something to prevent it!

As you say, in an ideal world, we wouldn't need to do things to protect ourselves - I don't deny that or the reality of the world we live in, but making the punishment for a crime dependant on the victim having done something to prevent it is simply not the same thing.

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localzuk
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Re: Needed

@LucreLout - that's victim blaming at its finest. "Why didn't they secure their computers better?!" "Why didn't they have tougher locks on their doors?" "Why was she wearing a short skirt in public?"

Companies shouldn't have to spend millions of quid on making their systems operate like Fort Knox. The idiots hacking their stuff are the ones who need eliminating.

@Sir Runcible Spoon - Wait, so you're blaming me for not reading back to the original report, and looking at the article instead?

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localzuk
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Re: Needed

So you're arguing that our punishments should all be weak because some others are already weak? Surely the answer is to tighten up the weak sentences rather than stick with poor sentencing across the board?

Here's the report on that number too - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-cost-of-cyber-crime-joint-government-and-industry-report

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localzuk
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Re: Needed

You all seem to be underestimating the damage done to economies by computer crime. Govt figures put the cost to the UK economy at £27bn per year. That's a huge amount of money being lost through crime. That's peoples jobs and livelihoods. That's people's pensions and savings. Are those things only worth a metaphorical slap on the wrist?

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localzuk
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Needed

I do think we do need reform with our computer crime laws. The current 5 year maximum is far too low considering the damage that can be caused by "hacking".

Just need to make sure they get the details right!

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Ada Lovelace Day: Meet the 6 women who gave you the 'computer'

localzuk
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Re: In reply to your response...

What a compelling argument you present... Wait, no, you don't at all.

A phrase that might be relevant to you - confirmation bias.

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localzuk
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Education

When you compare the number of people graduating from university with applicable degrees, you find that the make-up of the industry itself is actually better than the make-up of STEM graduates! When I was at uni, I could count the number of women on my Computing degree on one hand, out of about 300 of us. On top of that, the majority of those women were international students and not from UK schools.

So, what it makes me think is the failing starts far earlier than the industry or university. It starts in school.

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Lies, damn pies and obesity statistics: We're NOT a nation of fatties

localzuk
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So many causes!

Trying to analyse it in a cursory manner is never going to get to the bottom of it.

Things like modern medicines, the types of fats and the types of carbs in foods all have their parts to play. Add in lack of exercise and you've got a nice mix.

Of course some people's bodies will behave differently than others, but it won't account for the large-scale increase in obesity. For example, until I was about 25, I had to eat 3500 calories a day minimum to simply maintain my weight. I wasn't particularly active either. Just very tall compared to the national average.

Now though, if I eat 1 calorie over the daily recommended amount, I can watch extra fat appear on my waistline.

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Google in 'right to be forgotten' snub probe: Ireland tackles moans

localzuk
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Nope. No-one responsible for that. Well, yet anyway. That's gotta go through a few years of discussions before it can end up in committee to decide when a meeting should be held to discuss implementation.

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Dear Reg readers. I want Metro tiles to replace ALL ICONS in Windows. Is this a good idea?

localzuk
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Tiles

They aren't a new thing, surely. Aren't tiles a continuation of a paradigm created by NeXTSTEP, OpenStep and GNUStep?

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EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers

localzuk
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Refund?

I wonder if that means those of us who needed to use data urgently, and were prompted that we had to buy a top-up in our phone browser, will get a refund for that pack?

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London slaps down Salesforce's bid to rename Heron Tower

localzuk
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Re: The naming rights of an edifice.........

@Dan Paul - you are confused, it seems. Thing is, in the UK, the government/local council have lots of legal rights. They're enacted via these things we call "laws" and "by laws". This means they DO have the right to prevent a building being renamed. Its as simple as that. They also have the right to kick you out of your own building if you don't comply with local laws too (eg. if you persist with, say, using a property as a drug den, or you have loud parties constantly counter to a noise abatement order).

You're confusing "fact" (in this case, aka "law") with "opinion" (in this case, aka "your view that private contracts are not subject to government regulation").

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localzuk
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Re: The naming rights of an edifice.........

Why do politicians have the right to insert themselves in a private contract? Because it isn't a purely private contract is it? Its a public name for a prominent building in a major city. What if the company wished to change the name to Penis Tower? Would that be acceptable?

Whether you like it or not, the local council have control over the buildings in their area.

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Le whoops! Microsoft France boss blows lid off 'Windows 9' event

localzuk
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Re: Only moved to Windows 7 last year here...

The requirements of our organisation made us do it.

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localzuk
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Only moved to Windows 7 last year here...

Highly unlikely we'll end up migrating to something else for at least a couple of years - doing so is a BIG pain to do, ensuring application compatibility, user retraining etc...

So, not sure how many enterprise customers will be willing to move to 9 or whatever it ends up being called.

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Poverty? Pah. That doesn't REALLY exist any more

localzuk
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Semantics

So, it appears the argument is actually just one of semantics. You dislike "poverty" and would rather people use "inequality" because the prior term is more loaded, emotionally.

Me? I don't care what you want to call it - throw as many facts and historical figures around as you want, I can see poverty daily. People who have to choose between heating their house and eating in winter, those who can't afford to dress their kids, those who don't eat so that their kids can eat. Faffing around with definitions isn't helping either.

Masking it by saying charities help (eg. food banks) is not helping. The problem exists.

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Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share

localzuk
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Re: Replacement cycle....

5-6 years seems very low! The monitors attached to my work machine are now, 11 years old and still going strong. The ones in one of our ICT suites are 8 years old, and that model has not had a single failure amongst the 50+ we had of them.

17" hard glass with DVI? That's a tough find, I have to say. You might have some luck speaking to a refurb seller like ICT-Direct. They might find some somewhere!

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localzuk
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Obsession with tablets

Why are the media so obsessed with tablets. Every article about sales of PC related equipment makes the rather giant leap that everyone is shifting to tablets, rather than looking at it with a bit more nuance and realising that a modern PC lasts a lot longer than it used to.

Example: A core 2 duo PC from 6 years ago is still perfectly fine for running Windows 7 or 8 in a business environment. Am LCD monitor from 6 years ago is also perfectly fine too. The LCDs here are mostly on their second generation, some even third generation, of desktop PCs.

In my experience, people aren't buying tablets *instead* of laptops and PCs. They're buying them *as well as* PCs and laptops.

But as always, people won't replace something if it still works in most cases.

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Oracle's Larry Ellison quits as CEO – new bosses are Hurd'n'Catz

localzuk
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Re: stacks of cash, stock certificates, bonds and other items

He could create a new charity of his own. I recommend "Yachts for Tots".

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Massachusetts shoots down car dealers' Tesla-busting sueball

localzuk
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I thought America was all about the free market?

These rules regarding dealerships don't fit well with the whole "American free market" ideal that so many are obsessed with...

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