* Posts by Uberseehandel

111 posts • joined 21 Jul 2011

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Microsoft’s Revolution Analytics buy pays off, Linux-based R Server launched

Uberseehandel

Yes but R wasn't created in a hot Northern Hemisphere university by a white guy in a lab coat. So the ignorant are going to diss it.

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Uberseehandel

Why Is Everybody So Rude About R?

Well, it was developed by couple of Jokers in Auckland, init?

Data analytics is hot right now, R provides the tools.

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It's amazing the UK Parliament agreed to track 22bn Brits' car trips. Oh right – it didn't

Uberseehandel

Where are the Rights Watchdogs when we need them?

So the database grows to 22 Billion car journeys before anybody wakes up and starts making a fuss - pathetic!

The people who live in Britain generally want to be safe, the, shall we say, Public Safety authorities generally want to catch (and convict) law breakers. Those are entirely different goals.

None of the cameras have much to do with preventing crime, but are often the means by which miscreants are brought to justice.

No wonder Britain has the highest per capita prison population in Europe.

Finally, who has access (officially and unofficially) to this data?

R+C

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Windows for Warships? Not on our new aircraft carriers, says MoD

Uberseehandel

I've given you a thumbs up, but I fear you have a touching faith in UK software developers, not supported by current evidence, well any evidence, really! It will become a government project, it will be run by incompetent but high charging project managers. It will be expected to fail.

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Uberseehandel

Not all versions of XP are called XP

Is XPe (XP for embedded systems) XP?

I think it is, but in MOD-speak?

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CES tech show adds new security checks after fears of violence

Uberseehandel

Doing what the bombers want

How does it go

the bad guys bomb a public space

the heavy handed security folk make attending public events difficult and unpleasant to attend

the events eventually cease

the bad guys do high fives

Any chance we do not go down this path?

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VW's Audi suspends two engineers in air pollution cheatware probe

Uberseehandel

I lived in Munich for over a decade and worked with all the leading auto makers in Germany. I had colleagues with family members within the BMW inner circle, but whilst I had friends at Alpina, I was never at ease with the BMW people I came across, I was always conscious of having to watch what I said, and thought, particularly amongst the M Division engineers.

By contrast, I could not have bean better treated than I was in Stuttgart and Ingolstadt. To be fair, I was impressed by Spartanburg SC, but I had previously been visiting Detroit.

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Uberseehandel

Re: Little Napolean casts a long shadow

Thank you for picking up my typo. I'm sorry you had nothing more to contribute.

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Uberseehandel

Little Napolean casts a long shadow

Some years ago, Porsche had an engineer who was responsible for the factory racing program. He was, and remains a man with sociopathic tendencies. Because he is part of the Piech-Porsche cousinage, he was tolerated, but after the development of the 917 race car, he was encouraged to leave, a dangerous man consumed by ambition and his own sense of importance. He went to Audi where he built the brand and rose to the top and valuable engineers were burned along the way. Men like this have to keep destroying decent people in order to keep the rest of the executive team in line.

Little Napoleon rose to the top of the entire VW group, woe betide anybody who challenged him. He demonstrated that he could demand virtually anything, and get it, all it cost was money and engineers, well VW had plenty of both of those. Anybody dealing with VW and its subsidiaries and the people who were running the show became used to the sudden disappearances of capable pleasant hard working bosses over night. Group executives subsumed themselves to groupthink, if they wished to survive, it was worse than the situation at Neutron Jack Welch's GE.

It didn't matter how stupid or unreasonable the idea was, anybody who disagreed was out. Little Napoleon knew that he was and is a monster, to get his silly Bugatti Veyron project completed, he had to go outside VW and appeal to a mega rich motor racing banker to take over the project, because it was 'interesting', in order to bring it to fruition, doing it 'his way', was burning through more engineers that even VW could afford. In the meantime, people who had dealings with VW would advice their own colleagues and friends not to do business with VW, unless they wished to beaten down to a level that over the years the business was no longer profitable, As German colleagues put it VAG negotiate to the third decimal place.

So there was a culture of fear and decent people, and I include Martin Winterkorn amongst them,, learned not to step out of line, no matter how unrealistic the demands that are made upon them. Even apparently decent people learned to behave like monsters to survive.

To add to this hideous culture, governments and scientists must take some responsibility as the notion of diesel passenger cars supported by dishonest definitions of what was harmful in diesel exhaust residues was allowed to dominate a large section of the climate change debate. As cities around the world are now learning, diesel passenger cars are a bad idea and governments need to discourage, not favour them.

Volkswagen needs to change.but it does not need to be destroyed. Lets just stop making small diesel engines. Oddly, about 12/13 years ago I was at a VW Group shindig during the Le Mans 24 Hour race and mentioned to my charming hosts that betting the shop on diesel was a really bad idea, the first reaction of all those i spoke to was to whip round to make sure that nobody was listening and then to refute my statement in slightly dismissive terms.

Given the culture developed by Little Napoleon, I was reminded of the fable of the Emperor's New Clothes.

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NZ Uni EMC broke considered ditching EMC before SNAFU

Uberseehandel

Re: 15% growth

It really depends what they are doing their research in, some faculties data requirements will expand slowly, others much faster.

It is just the HDS kit that is expanding at 15% per year, we do not know about the growth in demand for other kit.

Growth demand is highly manipulatable in an academic environment ;-)

Depending on how it is done, I suspect genome research can be amongst the more demanding fields data storage wise. Johns Hopkins' labours to map the human genome might as well have been in another world.

Also, years ago when there were punitive import duties and taxes on computer equipment, NZ developed the knack of getting a quart out of a pint pot, computing-wise. Folk used to come down from the States to see how hard tiny boxes were made to work. I'm sure everybody at Otago still chuckles at SCREAM.

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HPE to open private London drinking club

Uberseehandel

The Garage

Surely the most appropriate name for an HP drink shack?

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TalkTalk hired BAE Systems' infosec bods before THAT hack

Uberseehandel

Systems Designed To Fail

Most telcos/ISPs use existing commercial software which can be mix and matched to create the processes required for the organisation to function.

The commercial developers of these systems come under pressure to completely decouple the software from the back end database, where information is stored.

Many organisations have, or plan to have contracts in place with a database vendor.

The software creators want their application software to work with as many databases as possible, at the minimal cost.

To achieve this all the niceties built into the database are rignored, so no encryption, no stored procedures, no integrity. Anything to make the implementation of their application software over any backend exactly the same.

So if a hacker gets to these DBs, the world is their oyster. Putting some kind of security in place ahead of the application that accesses the data is of no effect.

Having looked closely at the designs of several supposedly confidential systems in development in Britain, I have seen that repeatedly provision has been made for data matching/access from "trusted" sources.

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PM wheels out snoop overseer minutes before latest snoops' charter bid lands

Uberseehandel

Re: Only A Fool OR A Fraud Would Take Job

I am most intrigued that 4 people have chosen to give the above post above a thumbs down

What bit don't they like, or which bit do they relate to? Or are they all into homeopathic remedies?

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Uberseehandel

Only A Fool OR A Fraud Would Take Job

and the betting is......... an old fool.

If I need the services of a doctor or lawyer or engineer or accountant, I go to somebody with appropriate qualifications.

A patent attorney studies both engineering and law. Apparently an Interception of Communications Commissioner is only required to be a lawyer and pensionable.

If asked could anybody be certain that they could explain what metadata is (in a meaningful and relevant context) to this anomalous and creaking bauble of the legal establishment?

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Hi, um, hello, US tech giants. Mind, um, mind adding backdoors to that crypto? – UK govt

Uberseehandel

Which Delusional World Are People Living In?

Like anybody in the US gives a sh1t about what Britain wants or thinks or passes laws about.

Neither US business nor government have anytime for Britain or its establishment.

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TalkTalk CEO admits security fail, says hacker emailed ransom demand

Uberseehandel

Re: Dido Harding...

bad taste, cheap clothes, posh name.

what is wrong with this picture?

sell the Talk talk customer base, sell the company, fire the D1D0

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Chaos at TalkTalk: Data was 'secure', not all encrypted, we took site down, were DDoSed

Uberseehandel

sh1t service

sh1t security

is there a pattern?

did0

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Internet daddy Vint Cerf blasts FCC's plan to ban Wi-Fi router code mods

Uberseehandel

Re: On Balance Mucking Around In The 5GHz Bands May Not Be A Good Idea

Airborne radars used to be c-band and are mostly now s-band, according to the FCC and ETSI.

Ofcom, ETSI and US sources discuss the current c-band interference issue.

What you appear to be missing is the fact that there is a comparatively large number of channels in the 5GHz band for WiFi usage, not all of which are usable in all countries. Further the max TX volumes differ from country to country. Some of these channels are only usable if they are equipped with DFS/TPC/CAC and they are active. In the event that weather radar is active, then the available channels and maximum TX volumes along with the current active channel will be changed, automatically.

End users could override this channel sharing arrangement with third party firmware. Interfering with active radar systems will result in chaos. If people really need their internet connection, whilst their router or AP is causing radar interference they have other options, planes relying on airports to warn them of the presence of wind shear do not.

I know that most home wifi hackers do not care about abiding by the regulations for spectrum sharing, because they tell the world this is the case. I can tell you that getting caught out by windshear is a very thought provoking experience.

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Uberseehandel

On Balance Mucking Around In The 5GHz Bands May Not Be A Good Idea

Reluctantly, I have had to spend a surprising amount of time getting to grips with the problems of spectrum sharing in as much as it applies to that part of it used by 802.11ac specification devices.

The problem is that right in the middle of the frequencies earmarked for WiFi, weather radar operates. This doesn't sound like a big deal, at first sight. But weather radars are immensely powerful, mostly range limited by the curve of the earth.and they are not only used for weather forecasting (thunderclouds particularly), but also used at airports to pick up windshear. Windshear might not sound particularly ominous, but in reality its pretty scary for pilots and their passengers. The effect of windshear is to reduce the lift generated by the flow of air over the wings and to reduce the airspeed, eventually to the point where the aircraft will stall. In the past this has caused some very serious air accidents.

There is a network of weather radars across large areas of the world, unless they have been upgraded to s-band units, they are prone to interference by domestic wifi routers and access points..And shipping uses c-band radar, not only ships, but harbours, shore installations and shipping control regimes, such as the Straits of Dover (which is a mass of c-band radar).

In order to make spectrum sharing work, without adversely affecting safety, three (yes 3 not 2) techniques have been specified to make sure that wifi does not cause any problems with the operation of radars. Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS), Transmit Power Control (TPC) and the less well known and documented Channel Availability Checking (CAC).. These pretty well do what is written on the label. CAC, involves listening on a channel to check it is vacant before using it.

Unfortunately, every part of the world has slightly different rules, even the European Spectrum Management Organisation (ETSI), allows different countries to adjust the rules somewhat as they require. There are considerable variations in broadcast signal strength.

Generally speaking, part of the setup of a wifi router or access point involves specifying the device's location. This enables the onboard firmware to select the appropriate parameters for the device to operate within. There is even talk of providing devices with GPS receivers so the location is set automatically.

If end users can load third party firmware, all these safeguards can be overcome, Locations, frequencies and transmission volumes can be altered at will. Which could well become a major issue as far as safety is concerned.

Governments are not too keen on differentiating between minimal risk and risk, let alone major risk, consequently they tend to err on the safe side; they really are in a no-win situation.

I know some manufacturers are taking this very seriously, but the people who make 3rd party firmware, are thy going to be able to prevent users from creating problems?

Weighing the options, I personally don't mind steps being taken to stop users operating their equipment when it is out of specification., and I know that many have done so in the past. Currently I'm hoping that the introduction of 802.11ad will be brought forward - real soon now.

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PGP Zimmermann: 'You want privacy? Well privacy costs MONEY'

Uberseehandel

Mr Zimmerman

Its is easy to understand the British tolerance for widespread surveillance - they are not nice, they like beating up on people - they lock them up in prisons in disproportionate numbers - they do not rehabilitate them - the Prime Minister feels physically sick at the thought of prisoners voting (what happened to bringing offenders back into society and making them responsible), they know that CCTV does not prevent crime, just makes conviction easier.

The police lie, the journalists are dishonest, the politicians are shonky.

What does shock me, however is the loss of spine or backbone. The Parisians fixed the wheel clamping problem - they filled the locks with superglue. - clamping disappeared. The Dutch blew up Speed cameras. - the British just take it

As long as somebody else is getting "beaten up on", the British are happy.

So, Mr Zimmerman, don't be surprised by the British

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Surface Book: Microsoft to turn unsuccessful tab into unsuccessful laptop

Uberseehandel

Register Sub-Editor Deactivated

Just joshing!

You see how irritating it is

Please give it up

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Porsche-gate: Android Auto isn't slurping tons of engine data, claims Google – but questions remain

Uberseehandel

OBD2 Connector

Apparently these connectors are designed for infrequent use, as in when they are serviced and tested. Frequent connection/disconnection is likely to fatigue failure.

Anybody who finds the OBD2 information interesting as they drive down the road needs to get a life, beyond its novelty value, it ain't that useful unless you are sufficiently trained to understand what is being displayed. I think it is Nissan which has displays of "interesting" data available, once the novelty value has worn off, they are rarely looked at.

As far as Porsche choosing to go with Apple, well Porsche is part of VAG. VAG always needs alternative suppliers and they are traded off against each other.

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Herbie goes to a hackathon: Mueller promises cheatware fix

Uberseehandel

In the long run spinning off the VW brand is not a good idea

VW AG (VAG) has always prided itself, present circumstances aside, on the involvement of senior management in engineering. One commonly hears comments along the lines of "Daimler is run by people who used to be engineers, VW is run by people who are engineers".

If the senior managers become detached from the underlying brands they become far too involved in non car related matters, to the long term detriment of the group and its customers as a whole.

The best that can come out of this scandal is that passenger diesel cars are forgotten about as fast as possible, or the scientists and government policy makers who colluded to redefine what pollution is are consigned to oblivion and a more accurate measure of pollution is used, if such a thing is possible.

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'We can handle politicos, OUR ISSUE IS JUDGES', shout GCHQ docs

Uberseehandel

Check the Slides

Somebody somewhere is having a laugh

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Cambridge University Hospitals rated 'inadequate' due to £200m IT fail

Uberseehandel

Chaotic NHS IT Projects

From time to time i have reviewed major NHS projects (it isn't difficult).

Two factors stand out alarmingly

Almost all those involved in drawing up project requirements appear to have been selected because they can be spared by their employer without being missed

Also, almost all the project/program managers appear to be from the detached school of project management. They studiously avoid any involvement that is anything beyond the processes required to report what has been decided. The standard line of defence is "the project requirements reflect what the project members desire".

No NHS IT projects will be successful until there is full and ongoing involvement from the busiest, most senior and influential clinical staff.

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Take two mobes into the shower? I didn't before, but I do now

Uberseehandel

Triumph of the MNOs

When the GSM standard was first developed, handsets designed to be ISDN devices. The MNOs realised that if this functionality was widely adopted, cunning users would use it to minimise roaming costs, so they formed a cartel and effectively pushed dual-sim phones out of view.

At the time this was all going down, monthly roaming costs in Europe, years ago, for somebody working outside their home country were more that the cost of new premium smartphone with a maxed out spec.

There have been several attempts since to make something like a dual sim phone work, but they were dire. I haven't tried dual SIM phones for years, its simpler just to have several phones

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Software update borked radar, delayed hundreds of flights, says US FAA

Uberseehandel

I can see that there might be a lot of money to be made out of supplying ATC developers with nightmare busiest day scenarios in digital form for the test factories/labs, so overload situations can become part of standard testing.

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Why do driverless car makers have this insatiable need for speed?

Uberseehandel

Why the german manufacturers rushed to buy Nokia maps

Europe needs a European end-to-end system, the satellites, the software, the data, etc Long run thinking suggests that US, Russian or Chinese reliant systems, cannot be relied upon in the future. We have seen, in the past, the US turn off their sats, shooting themselves in the foot in the process.This could be the salvation of TomTom at some stage, as well.

Apart from anything else we have seen the US screw up the billing model for mobile telephony, one of the links in an automated motoring future, and very often, the nav system in a US based car is a nice person in a call centre telling one where to go over the inbuilt phone. (I think they are chosen for being nice). For a short time a very senior GM-honcho was my sister-out-law, she could not understand why Europeans laughed at the GM view of telematics.

Definately Europe is taking the long view

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More UK broadband for bumpkins, but have-nots still ain’t happy

Uberseehandel

Villages should learn how to roll their own WISPs. Depending on how is done, anywhere from 20Mbps to 80Mbps is entirely possible. To help offset the cost, once installed and bedded in residents could drop the BT connection and simply use a Sipgate/VoIP service, much cheaper.

I have used a WISP, I found it remarkably reliable, only when the National Grid started laying temporary wooden "roading" to rewire pylons was there any problem as they blocked the line of sight with 40' x 20' wooden sections being hoisted into position. That doesn't happen every day.

And yes, I was able to watch streamed HD TV

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Misconfigured Big Data apps are leaking data like sieves

Uberseehandel

Few of the MongoDBs I've come across have been secured properly

MongoDB is embedded in a number of applications. The users of these applications are incapable of reading manuals, so even when they are directed to instructions for securing the DB, they do nothing.

The people who write the software that controls the equipment that the users bought don't know anything about databases, they tend to be electrical and electronics engineers, who regard software as a necessary evil. They are also so insular, I'm not sure they really appreciate the need for security.

I regularly sort out MongoDB security (its not difficult), upgrade it from 32 to 64-bit (equipment engineers don't do this), and link it to Pentaho for reporting purposes. I must have explained how to do this upwards of 100 people, despite being "professionals", not one of them has been capable doing the same. From their point of view they just want kit that works. Sometimes I think that free Open Source software is the most expensive you can buy.

I enjoy this view of MongoDB - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2F-DItXtZs

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Germans in ‘brains off, just follow orders' hospital data centre gaff

Uberseehandel

The True Echt Of The Sweaty Armpit

When I first went to Germany, I had a big office with a floor to ceiling view of the Alps, which was fine, but very soon, as the weather improved, like most of the other folk with offices facing south, I had to organise portable air-con units. Which worked,up until the point where there were so many of them in the building that the fuse boxes were all tripping and the electricity bill was soaring. Fortunately, I got wind of the forthcoming ban on self-installed AC units and managed to swap my nice Alpine viewed sunny office for larger but less plush one on the north side of the building. Unfortunately, nearly all the meeting rooms were on the sunny side. After a time a few of us used to hand round deodorant sprays before meeting began, being Germany they had to be the kind that does not harm the environment.

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Cause of Parliamentary downtime on Microsoft Office 364½ revealed

Uberseehandel

A private cloud hosting environment for Office 365 is entirely possible - that is an Exchange server on a private virtual server.Who looks after the machines the servers runs on is a separate matter. An organisation like ATOS can run the servers, but they are still private to parliament.

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Uberseehandel

You can host Exchange 365 on a private box (real or virtual or cloudy)

You need to get out and about more

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AIDS? Ebola? Nah – ELECTRO SMOG is our 'biggest problem', says Noel Edmonds

Uberseehandel
Devil

I'm impressed

Not many people in television are as bright as that!

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BT Sport website AND app go TITSUP – footie fans weep

Uberseehandel

BT Still Living Up To Customer Expectations

In my experience, in Europe, the Americas, Australia and New Zealand, and latterly the UK, BT has the worst attitude towards customer service and over promising whilst under delivering. Sorry BT, I'd rather have DT, and you even make Telefonica look good.

There cannot be another telco where the engineering bosses have such high and totally unjustified opinions of themselves. To be honest, their soi-disant expertise is a joke is most countries.

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UK.gov: Are we talking about Big Data enough? Should we plug it more?

Uberseehandel

Re: Never mind Betteridge's Law, you cynical mob

Also isn't Big Data, just the marketing speak for Data warehouse. Like "The Cloud" is for visualization.

Big Data can mean whatever anybody wants it to mean, but I tend to regard it as involving a schemaless architecture and fanbois. Stick it in the cloud, and the fanbois have difficulty walking, sharding leaves them dribbling. But don't ask about transactions, or integrity, that isn't what the modern world is about.

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Uberseehandel

Forget Big Data

On the premise that infants need to learn to crawl before they can try walking, let alone running. It would make sense for .GOV to stick to trying its hand at walking for the foreseeable future.

When .GOV has some of its own talent who are capable of designing systems, and some successful implementations under their collective belts, then perhaps they might attempt something a bit more ambitious.

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The Wilson Doctrine isn't legally binding, MPs CAN be spied on, says QC

Uberseehandel

Re: QCs don't make the law, or decide what is legal

How many ways can there be to write "You are now part of the US Navy officially as well as de facto?

Actually, you could not be more wrong - do you even know the contents of the letter or are you dancing to somebody else's agenda?

For those who are unaware of the purpose of the letter, it is to be opened in the event that the UK has been wiped out in a nuclear attack. The captain (and another officer) is instructed whether to launch on the aggressor, not to launch on the aggressor, or to make his, or her, own mind up. The general consensus is that the letter leaves it up to the captain. Captains, after they have retired, have pretty uniformally indicated that they would not fire their missiles. Presumably they would opt to join the Australian or New Zealand navies on the other side of the world, as they have the range.

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Uberseehandel

QCs don't make the law, or decide what is legal

Fancy lawyers often forget that they don't make the law. Judges (through their delivered opinions in Common Law cases), and parliamentarians (by passing bills through parliament) make the law. (As I didn't study any law in England, there might be some practical differences, but that was the theory in a legal system based on English law).

A Prime Minister can instruct the Civil Service and the security organs NOT to rifle through parliamentarian's emails, texts etc. I imagine an incoming Prime Minister will reissue Wilson's instruction to the organs, just as he, or she, rewrites the letter to the Trident armed submarines.

I can see this being the basis for an entire episode of Yes, Prime Minister, or even House of Cards.

Incidentally, in my experience, in a friendly nation far away, the intelligence service and the comms boyos are allowed to spy on parliamentarians , but they can only tell the PM. It all went into a particular filing cabinet, which the PM would dip into when needing cheering up.

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Dumb MongoDB admins spew 600 TERABYTES of unauthenticated data

Uberseehandel

Re: Firewall ?

if you configure MongoDB, properly, as set out in the documentation for the configuration file (parameters), it is possible to explicitly control access to the database, without difficulty.

However, DB access is almost always better controlled (when operating at scale), by using an intermediate tier that the front end connects to, and the intermediate connects to the DB using persistent connections and, in Relational-speak, stored procedures. This type of architecture allows for all sorts of arcane security, authorisation and audit features, transparent non-stop operations and huge per second transaction rates

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Uberseehandel

Re: But

I laughed out loud at that. Sadly, its all too true.

Every web designer I come across seems particularly clueless when it comes to databases, as do their bosses. Almost all the time NoSQL = No data architecture (or consistency). = another generation hairless statisticians. (Note to web designers - the ORM does nor obviate the need for Data analysis and design - if you don't understand that, read Joe Celko)

Even today's CIO types rarely understand the need for proper Data Analysis and Design.

I can see real world use cases for MongoDB type architectures, but if it matters, it calls for one of the RDBMS heavyweights.

In passing, I'll add that CIOs would make life easier if they didn't hire Oracle DBAs to run non Oracle DBMS, that only ever ends in tears.

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Brit school software biz unchains lawyers after crappy security exposed

Uberseehandel

many "hackers" are ratbags, but.....

letting loose the dogs of war (aka Lawyers) because you got found out hard coding keys....

Sadly, it is no more than most of us expect .....

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Neil Young yanks music from streaming services: 'Worst audio in history'

Uberseehandel

Why should somebody be sneared at because they care about quality? I know that in an age where so many people sees merit-free celebrity, quality is "not required on voyage", but what happens when there is nobody left who cares about quality?

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Nokia Networks is going to make zer Vaterland's trains run on time

Uberseehandel

Make the trains run on time????

So how exactly is this going to "make the trains run on time"?

There is a separate control system for the train and driver.

Once off the ICE netwerk, trains can be reassuringly slow, delayed and late

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Apple to end telco iPhone sales monopoly in Britland

Uberseehandel

Re: "... the Dickensian Cookian empire."

In place of Dickensian, I'd substitute Kafkaesque.

Dickensian implies something quite different to what goes on at Apple, remember Dickens wrote what he did because he was campaigning for social reform.To this end he also used adroit humour, irony and bathos. The Apple of Jobs and later Cook is a much meaner spirited place.

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Uberseehandel

Please cut out the unfunny funnies

What is Britland?

It sounds like part of the Poundland empire!

Britain is quite weird and funny enough without a lame attempt to make the place sound like an adjoint of somewhere else. It adds nothing to the story

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The modest father of SMS, who had much to be modest about

Uberseehandel

Re: Its a miracle that the MNOs allowed SMS to be available to subscribers

I take your point about 3 Mobile, and some others, however, when dealing with people in a European country it is only polite to be able to ask them to call one on a local number. I don't like asking the laundry in downtown Bratislava to make international phone calls to tell me my shirts are ready for pickup, or the taxi is waiting downstairs.

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Uberseehandel

Re: "Pizza had nothing to do with SMS"

"And, to emphasise this, El Reg has a picture of someone, with a phone, eating pizza."

That is somebody's idea of a joke, unfortunately. All Vulture subs should spend an internship at Private Eye to learn something about the art of the well executed feeble jike

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Uberseehandel

Its a miracle that the MNOs allowed SMS to be available to subscribers

At various times of my life I have been somewhat involved with the issue of mobile phone roaming and can state that SMS was dismissed as not important long after all users understood how useful it is/was.

True to form, the MNOs, including Telefonica/O2, similarly dismissed the notion of subscriber demand for mobile data.

When working with the folk in Carrier Services at the various MNOs, the roaming team has to negotiate not only roaming agreements with other operators but also wholesale capacity deals, which don't sound very exciting but provide significant revenue and profit for many operators, and the lion's share for a significant few.

In order to negotiate these deals, which often roll over from year to year, it is important to understand where there is growing demand in the market and to make sure one is covered against customer demand outstripping one's negotiated usage levels, which results in having to buy expensive additional capacity on the "spot" market, to borrow an analogy from the energy suppliers.

Virtually all the MNOs I have come across around the world, with the notable exception of NTT-Docomo, have lacked a technical understanding of the future of their industry. Amongst the legacies of the state owned telephone companies to the new mobile phone industry has been has been extreme short sighted conservatism and a deserved reputation for stodginess, which makes hiring quality graduate new entrants extremely difficult.

BT was amongst the stodgiest of the PTTs and its staff acquired a certain reputation for choosing to under deliver capabilities, in both the fixed and mobile telephony spheres. The BT version of ISDN was a subset of what most of the rest of the world used, for example.

The defective BT version of ISDN infected thinking about GSM, which has been mostly designed by various people and organisations found in Europe. From the outset GSM handsets were supposed to have ISDN BRI capability (2 B channels and 1 D channel). With BT's dismissive attitude to ISDN, the MNOs, new to GSM seized on the reservations of some of the prime movers behind GSM and given a plausible sounding argument about how dual voice lines would allow users to evade the excessive roaming charges that were then common.

As a result the MNOs have been lagging the market ever since the inception of GSM. I cannot recall meeting a single MNO staffer who saw any demand for either SMS or data services. I've given up waiting for a GSM handset that is really capable.

Working abroad SMS was a godsend, it was far cheaper to use this service than to use voice on our mobiles. Some folk had monthly roaming bills of over GBP 900. I avoided this problem by using SMS and buying a local pre-paid SIM and forwarding my deskphone to the new prepaid handset.. To make a call, I just picked up the phone in whoever's office I was in (nobody minded these were phone companies). As a tip to anybody doing this today, I'd say store all your phone numbers with the full international dialing prefix (+44 for Britain), and make sure that the contacts are stored in the handset, not on the SIM. That way when you cross from, one country to another, you simply swap SIMs and advice those who need to call you of your new number by SMS.

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NHS trust's crack IT squad claims its first digital upgrade hits

Uberseehandel

Nothing Useful Yet

Sounds like par fort the NHS

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