* Posts by Uberseehandel

77 posts • joined 21 Jul 2011

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BT Sport website AND app go TITSUP – footie fans weep

Uberseehandel

BT Still Living Up To Customer Expectations

In my experience, in Europe, the Americas, Australia and New Zealand, and latterly the UK, BT has the worst attitude towards customer service and over promising whilst under delivering. Sorry BT, I'd rather have DT, and you even make Telefonica look good.

There cannot be another telco where the engineering bosses have such high and totally unjustified opinions of themselves. To be honest, their soi-disant expertise is a joke is most countries.

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UK.gov: Are we talking about Big Data enough? Should we plug it more?

Uberseehandel

Re: Never mind Betteridge's Law, you cynical mob

Also isn't Big Data, just the marketing speak for Data warehouse. Like "The Cloud" is for visualization.

Big Data can mean whatever anybody wants it to mean, but I tend to regard it as involving a schemaless architecture and fanbois. Stick it in the cloud, and the fanbois have difficulty walking, sharding leaves them dribbling. But don't ask about transactions, or integrity, that isn't what the modern world is about.

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Uberseehandel

Forget Big Data

On the premise that infants need to learn to crawl before they can try walking, let alone running. It would make sense for .GOV to stick to trying its hand at walking for the foreseeable future.

When .GOV has some of its own talent who are capable of designing systems, and some successful implementations under their collective belts, then perhaps they might attempt something a bit more ambitious.

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The Wilson Doctrine isn't legally binding, MPs CAN be spied on, says QC

Uberseehandel

Re: QCs don't make the law, or decide what is legal

How many ways can there be to write "You are now part of the US Navy officially as well as de facto?

Actually, you could not be more wrong - do you even know the contents of the letter or are you dancing to somebody else's agenda?

For those who are unaware of the purpose of the letter, it is to be opened in the event that the UK has been wiped out in a nuclear attack. The captain (and another officer) is instructed whether to launch on the aggressor, not to launch on the aggressor, or to make his, or her, own mind up. The general consensus is that the letter leaves it up to the captain. Captains, after they have retired, have pretty uniformally indicated that they would not fire their missiles. Presumably they would opt to join the Australian or New Zealand navies on the other side of the world, as they have the range.

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Uberseehandel

QCs don't make the law, or decide what is legal

Fancy lawyers often forget that they don't make the law. Judges (through their delivered opinions in Common Law cases), and parliamentarians (by passing bills through parliament) make the law. (As I didn't study any law in England, there might be some practical differences, but that was the theory in a legal system based on English law).

A Prime Minister can instruct the Civil Service and the security organs NOT to rifle through parliamentarian's emails, texts etc. I imagine an incoming Prime Minister will reissue Wilson's instruction to the organs, just as he, or she, rewrites the letter to the Trident armed submarines.

I can see this being the basis for an entire episode of Yes, Prime Minister, or even House of Cards.

Incidentally, in my experience, in a friendly nation far away, the intelligence service and the comms boyos are allowed to spy on parliamentarians , but they can only tell the PM. It all went into a particular filing cabinet, which the PM would dip into when needing cheering up.

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Dumb MongoDB admins spew 600 TERABYTES of unauthenticated data

Uberseehandel

Re: Firewall ?

if you configure MongoDB, properly, as set out in the documentation for the configuration file (parameters), it is possible to explicitly control access to the database, without difficulty.

However, DB access is almost always better controlled (when operating at scale), by using an intermediate tier that the front end connects to, and the intermediate connects to the DB using persistent connections and, in Relational-speak, stored procedures. This type of architecture allows for all sorts of arcane security, authorisation and audit features, transparent non-stop operations and huge per second transaction rates

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Uberseehandel

Re: But

I laughed out loud at that. Sadly, its all too true.

Every web designer I come across seems particularly clueless when it comes to databases, as do their bosses. Almost all the time NoSQL = No data architecture (or consistency). = another generation hairless statisticians. (Note to web designers - the ORM does nor obviate the need for Data analysis and design - if you don't understand that, read Joe Celko)

Even today's CIO types rarely understand the need for proper Data Analysis and Design.

I can see real world use cases for MongoDB type architectures, but if it matters, it calls for one of the RDBMS heavyweights.

In passing, I'll add that CIOs would make life easier if they didn't hire Oracle DBAs to run non Oracle DBMS, that only ever ends in tears.

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Brit school software biz unchains lawyers after crappy security exposed

Uberseehandel

many "hackers" are ratbags, but.....

letting loose the dogs of war (aka Lawyers) because you got found out hard coding keys....

Sadly, it is no more than most of us expect .....

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Neil Young yanks music from streaming services: 'Worst audio in history'

Uberseehandel

Why should somebody be sneared at because they care about quality? I know that in an age where so many people sees merit-free celebrity, quality is "not required on voyage", but what happens when there is nobody left who cares about quality?

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Nokia Networks is going to make zer Vaterland's trains run on time

Uberseehandel

Make the trains run on time????

So how exactly is this going to "make the trains run on time"?

There is a separate control system for the train and driver.

Once off the ICE netwerk, trains can be reassuringly slow, delayed and late

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Apple to end telco iPhone sales monopoly in Britland

Uberseehandel

Re: "... the Dickensian Cookian empire."

In place of Dickensian, I'd substitute Kafkaesque.

Dickensian implies something quite different to what goes on at Apple, remember Dickens wrote what he did because he was campaigning for social reform.To this end he also used adroit humour, irony and bathos. The Apple of Jobs and later Cook is a much meaner spirited place.

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Uberseehandel

Please cut out the unfunny funnies

What is Britland?

It sounds like part of the Poundland empire!

Britain is quite weird and funny enough without a lame attempt to make the place sound like an adjoint of somewhere else. It adds nothing to the story

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The modest father of SMS, who had much to be modest about

Uberseehandel

Re: Its a miracle that the MNOs allowed SMS to be available to subscribers

I take your point about 3 Mobile, and some others, however, when dealing with people in a European country it is only polite to be able to ask them to call one on a local number. I don't like asking the laundry in downtown Bratislava to make international phone calls to tell me my shirts are ready for pickup, or the taxi is waiting downstairs.

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Uberseehandel

Re: "Pizza had nothing to do with SMS"

"And, to emphasise this, El Reg has a picture of someone, with a phone, eating pizza."

That is somebody's idea of a joke, unfortunately. All Vulture subs should spend an internship at Private Eye to learn something about the art of the well executed feeble jike

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Uberseehandel

Its a miracle that the MNOs allowed SMS to be available to subscribers

At various times of my life I have been somewhat involved with the issue of mobile phone roaming and can state that SMS was dismissed as not important long after all users understood how useful it is/was.

True to form, the MNOs, including Telefonica/O2, similarly dismissed the notion of subscriber demand for mobile data.

When working with the folk in Carrier Services at the various MNOs, the roaming team has to negotiate not only roaming agreements with other operators but also wholesale capacity deals, which don't sound very exciting but provide significant revenue and profit for many operators, and the lion's share for a significant few.

In order to negotiate these deals, which often roll over from year to year, it is important to understand where there is growing demand in the market and to make sure one is covered against customer demand outstripping one's negotiated usage levels, which results in having to buy expensive additional capacity on the "spot" market, to borrow an analogy from the energy suppliers.

Virtually all the MNOs I have come across around the world, with the notable exception of NTT-Docomo, have lacked a technical understanding of the future of their industry. Amongst the legacies of the state owned telephone companies to the new mobile phone industry has been has been extreme short sighted conservatism and a deserved reputation for stodginess, which makes hiring quality graduate new entrants extremely difficult.

BT was amongst the stodgiest of the PTTs and its staff acquired a certain reputation for choosing to under deliver capabilities, in both the fixed and mobile telephony spheres. The BT version of ISDN was a subset of what most of the rest of the world used, for example.

The defective BT version of ISDN infected thinking about GSM, which has been mostly designed by various people and organisations found in Europe. From the outset GSM handsets were supposed to have ISDN BRI capability (2 B channels and 1 D channel). With BT's dismissive attitude to ISDN, the MNOs, new to GSM seized on the reservations of some of the prime movers behind GSM and given a plausible sounding argument about how dual voice lines would allow users to evade the excessive roaming charges that were then common.

As a result the MNOs have been lagging the market ever since the inception of GSM. I cannot recall meeting a single MNO staffer who saw any demand for either SMS or data services. I've given up waiting for a GSM handset that is really capable.

Working abroad SMS was a godsend, it was far cheaper to use this service than to use voice on our mobiles. Some folk had monthly roaming bills of over GBP 900. I avoided this problem by using SMS and buying a local pre-paid SIM and forwarding my deskphone to the new prepaid handset.. To make a call, I just picked up the phone in whoever's office I was in (nobody minded these were phone companies). As a tip to anybody doing this today, I'd say store all your phone numbers with the full international dialing prefix (+44 for Britain), and make sure that the contacts are stored in the handset, not on the SIM. That way when you cross from, one country to another, you simply swap SIMs and advice those who need to call you of your new number by SMS.

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NHS trust's crack IT squad claims its first digital upgrade hits

Uberseehandel

Nothing Useful Yet

Sounds like par fort the NHS

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Ex-Goldman Sachs programmer's code theft conviction overturned AGAIN

Uberseehandel

Re: Ummm

You say

"Vance needs to understand what the law is."

Vance knows exactly what the law is. What the law is is irrelevant. Vance wants a conviction and he uses his courtroom skills to get the jury, who do not know the law, to agree on a verdict of guilty.

That is the way the legal system works

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Uberseehandel

Cyrus Vance Jr - son of (deceased) somebody who was somebody

Nice to read an item that hasn't been "enhanced" by the subs.

The DA in question is the well connected son of a former US Secretary of State.

It is quite possible that young Cyrus has never operated a computing device, given his age and background.

I haven't read Flash Boys (I plan on remedying that), but if much of the code is based on Open Source, material then that could open up a whole new can of worms, with GS in the firing line for potential GPL-type violations.

Some time ago, I was invited to attend a meeting at GS and after some stuffing around I was asked to consider spending more time there in the future. At that point a salesman type suit asked me if I could explain my understanding of the difference between bonds and equities (he can't have been listening to the earlier conversation), I was somewhat taken aback (it was like asking a surgeon if he knew the difference between the heart and the lungs, or a chef, for that matter), so I explained how certain investment banking practices, when used in "creative" ways removed all the apparent risk mitigation factors that attract investors to bonds in the first place, and left them as exposed as equity investors. Fortunately, I had decided earlier in the meeting that I did not wish to spend more time with these guys.

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Florida cops cuff open-carry, balls-out pirate packing 'operational' flintlocks

Uberseehandel

Neither Funny nor Accurate

Almost certainly percussion cap, not old black powder pistols are flintlocks, by any means.

Just give us the story, if the alternative is a grossly laboured piece lacking in either humour.or reportage.

And why is THIS old non-relevant story being given space, anyway? It ranks right up there with chavs chucking fire crackers around.......

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German army fights underground Nazi war machine hidden in Kiel pensioner's cellar

Uberseehandel

Some folk have elephants in the room, why not a tank in the basement?

I know accuracy is anathema to the subs round here, but the suburb where the villa housing the tank is located is Heikendorf, not, as you have written it, Keikendorf.

The presence of the torpedo is entirely predictable, Heikendorf is the site of the memorial to the U-Boat war dead .Rather chilling, worth checking out - https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/U-Boot-Ehrenmal_M%C3%B6ltenort#/media/File:U-Boot-Ehrenmal_M%C3%B6ltenort_2.jpg

Most Germans love mechanical objects, old tanks are commonplace and torpedos are always popular exhibits in museums, I wonder if this bloke has a Messerschmitt Me 262, as well, that would be something! I always thought Goldfinger was quite Germanic

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Goodbye Vulcan: Blighty's nuclear bomber retires for the last time

Uberseehandel

A "Pocket" Bomber

A lovely aircraft, there was no need for the writer to sprinkle his copy with the adjective "huge". The Vulcan was was nimble, but carried a bomb load slightly less than a Lancaster. As well as being half the physical size of a B-52, it had a maximum takeoff weight some 318,000 lbs less, so huge it most definitely wasn't. As well as being nimble it was comparatively fast with a higher maximum ceiling than a B-52. I doubt it had the range, altitude or outright speed required to be a successful cold war bomber.

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UH OH: Windows 10 will share your Wi-Fi key with your friends' friends

Uberseehandel

MAC filtering is a waste of time

Spoofing MAC details is more than simple to do, so filtering adds little, if anything security wise.

More important, because the tracing of MAC information causes a whole new slew of security problems, there are changes underway to randomise MACs each time one is required. Some kit is already doing this

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Mobe encryption guru Charles Brookson picks up OBE from the Queen

Uberseehandel

Re: Secure from the security services?

The general public might think that the security organs do not need to crack mobile phone encryption as they can listen straight off the switch.

Quite true. However, the network has to be provisioned so that what is required, snoop-wise is put into effect, and this leaves a growing trail that that becomes obvious to a surprisingly large number of people, even the ones who can barely tie their own shoe laces.

Understandably, some security agencies prefer just to listen and decrypt in real time, with or without trojan horse cells and "access" to the various networks own cells. This not only saves an unbelievable amount of admin, but also is much more secure. Some of the people who work in network security are weird enough to be automatic security risks.

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Britain beats back Argies over Falklands online land grab

Uberseehandel

Occupational Therapy For The Mediocre

This report just shows what time wasting organisations ICANN and IANA really are.

Latin America in general and Argentina in particular only bang on about the Falklands when their economies are going down the tubes. So no surprise Venezuela is sticking its pica in, then.

A recent move by the economic disaster that is Argentina is to prevail upon the Chileans to stop sending fresh eggs to the Falklands. Like all incompetent, corrupt economies it wants something for nothing (possibility of oil around the Falklands) and needs to distract its citizens from slow motion train crash that is domestic life.To say nothing of a tendency to assassinate those individuals who disclose what might be termed inconvenient truths.

Who would believe that less than 100 years ago Argentina was one of the most powerful economies in the world, where did it all go wrong? (http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21596582-one-hundred-years-ago-argentina-was-future-what-went-wrong-century-decline)

Incidentally, who is paying for all these waste of space delegates to jet round the world in a rolling beer fest? There are lots better things to do with the money!

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Pint-sized PCIe powerhouse: Intel NUC5i5RYK

Uberseehandel

Re: Gulliver-like

To say nothing of the Yahoos, the Houyhnhnms, the Laputans or several other strange possibilities.

Journalists, faux or otherwise, really should become familiar with the source of their literary allusions, before letting them loose on the rest of us.

Similarly, somebody somewhere should be doing a better job of subbing, rather than concocting awkwardly laboured punning headlines.

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For fax's sake: Medic chaos as e-Referrals system goes offline

Uberseehandel

Re: re: The health record system was designed to "leak"

Well, as far as the"individuals module" was concerned (that wasn't its actual name), one of the tables was set up to store VAT numbers, passport numbers, individual tax numbers, National Insurance numbers, and a host of other information used by the PNC and useful when setting up mammoth data matching projects, and it was all structured in a way that would be very convenient for outside access. This made me feel very uneasy,

All the data models and project documents were in the public domain. I applied for an account and received access by return. They were seeking to record information that I, as a long term non-resident, was unaware even existed.

When setting up a National Master Patient Index in another country, it became apparent that in order to maintain the integrity of Public Health, and Public Health information, all data had to remain confidential, even when illegal immigrants and overstayers were being treated. I think we ended up agreeing that exceptions would be made in the event of people presenting with gunshot wounds, otherwise all requests for information from outside the medical sphere would be stonewalled. Without this we never would have kept on top of some nasty TB problems. In Britain today, both TB and AIDS/HIV are concerns in some recent immigrant groups, if these people do not trust the health service, these issues will become significant problems.

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Uberseehandel

Entirely Predictable Outcome

Some years ago I considered releasing an application for use by clinicians in Britain. I have developed a number of health systems in the past, both at the national level and at the (large) hospital level. But none of this prior experience was in Britain.

Having ascertained that there was both need and demand for the application, it was still prudent to check what was going wrong with Information Systems in the NHS, before spending any real money.

In a nutshell what I found was that several key projects were in process, but the working parties were predominantly staffed by all the doctors, nurses, surgeons, pharmacists, librarians, administrators, midwives, academics (you get the idea, this list could fill several pages), who were so terminally useless that their involvement in an IS project would have no impact on current healthcare operations.

The respective project managers were of the passive process variety, going through the motions and not differentiating between those notions which were batsh1t eatingly stupid, complex and off the wall. and the needed sensible, useful and simple applications that could be augmented in the future. At no stage were the participants shepherded back to the real world.

So a an application to handle prescriptions became a medical order system (sensible), and then somehow metamorphosed into a knowledge based best practices behemoth, which would never, ever work, for very obvious reasons. When it came to prescribing drugs, the processes described were more involved than those involved in getting approval for the drugs in the first place. But somehow there was no alert system considered to pick up on potential prescription drug interactions.........

All the other systems I examined were equalling discouraging. The health record system was designed to "leak", and appeared to have been sketched out by a group with a background in .public safety and a taste for data matching.

I actually attended a "summit" that was discussing health systems in the NHS, and was horrified when in a general session, the response to my tongue in cheek remark "a billion pounds isn't what it used to be", was a great deal of sage head nodding from all on the platform.

As I contemplated the differences between what was, and continues to occur in Britain with what I had experienced elsewhere, I decided not to continue the project. Had it been developed, it would also have handled the current failing referrals project.

I know I am not alone in fleeing abroad when presented with the need to see a doctor for anything more serious than a signature on a piece of paper.

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Furious Flems fling privacy rule book at Facebook

Uberseehandel

Please Cut Out The Cutesie Headlines

"Furious Flems" - what about all the non-Flemish, possibly equally furious residents of Belgium (they are called Walloons)?

The endless pursuit of punning and double-entre laden headlines grows wearisome very very quickly. Apart from anything else, it is infantile.

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Scientists love MacBooks (true) – but what about you?

Uberseehandel

A mistaken idea of what happens in Space Fight Centres

Its hardly surprising that conference rooms at flight centres are full of Macs. These rooms are full of PR folk and journalists. Macs meet their requirements perfectly.

In the real world most of us use Mac OS X, Windows and several varieties of Linux/Unix. There is a very important 3D design tool called SolidWorks, surprisingly it doesn't fully work on a Mac. Most of the grown-up database design tools are Windows based. Anything requiring a specialised card is usually win/'nix based.

Macs develop at their own pace. Try setting up a 5K iMac with a second matching 5k screen. Doing the same with a Win workstation is NOT a problem.

Of course academia is full of Macs - that's where so much of social media originated. Macs are great for students.

Most of the time we don't do anything much more sophisticated than writing correspondence, managing lists, goofing off and wasting our real lives (aka social media). Today's tablets are well suited to this. So my scientific friends who actually work in research labs can be seen with macs and iPads whilst their experiments are run by 'nix devices, designers are wedded to their win machines (for 3D modelling and rendering). Whilst when I work at my original research topic, I'm still Windows based, I'd prefer it if I could use a Mac, but even using parallels or bootcamp, it isn't a satisfactory solution.

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HMRC ditches Microsoft for Google, sends data offshore

Uberseehandel

Re: Goodbye UK IT skills

Its not just IT skills that are vanishing. All engineering and science qualifications are in decline. For example, the NHS is unsustainable without foreign clinical staff (doctors and nurses), which holds back the countries where these immigrant staff come from..

It is no coincidence that there are very few scientific or numerate members of the House of Commons. The skills needed to make a modern economy function are notable absent at the heart of government.

An economy that is based on manufacturing is more dynamic than one based on services, which have very little downstream benefit, often using imported furniture and foreign IT equipment in existing rented premises. Angela Merkel, observing Britain, once remarked "it will be interesting to see if you can run an economy based on cutting each other's hair." I fear the answer may be along all too soon.

Offshoring the tax department ought yo be a matter of public shame. There are Pacific island republics that manage to avoid doing this..

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Airbus confirms software brought down A400M transport plane

Uberseehandel

Impossible Testing Scenario

I have worked on many multi national projects. To cater for customers who want to interface with equipment in their own language, which might be Mandarin Chinese, Sanskrit, Standard Arabic, Bulgarian or what ever, software tends to be hugely parameter driven, to an unsafe extent. Also, to allow for minor differences in customer requirements, parameters are adjusted,

This gets unmanageable really quickly, for example, just 20 Yes/No options have over a million different combinations.

One application I know of has over 24,000 lines of parameters, most with multiple values. This is inherently unsafe, there are not enough hours in the foreseeable future to test all the possible combinations, prior to release of the product.

I have seen people involved in major acquisitions demand "modifications", which, inter alia, complicate the parameter file(s), merely to justify their own role as part of the acquisition team.

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Wheely, wheely mad: Petrolheads fume over buggy Formula One app

Uberseehandel

Re: Techno-wannabees

You miss the point - it took GKN and Audi to make the energy recovery system work - Williams gave up on it. Now it is being deployed to Audi passenger cars, and there are other competing technologies in the LMP1-Hybrid class.

I think your prejudices are showing

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Uberseehandel

Re: Anyone completed the F1 Drivers survey here...

Well I found it a pretty dire effort. Every single question was multiple choice. The answers were all pre-selected. There were no open questions.

For example where was I able to say that they should revert to V-10 Normally aspirated engines, with mechanically driven valve gear (not pneumatic) offering 800+hp. With absolutely no energy recovery. These would be fast, noisy and exciting, and would take some driving, especially if wings were banned.

Whoever put it together stitched up the drivers majorly.I wonder who actually selected the format and the questions? Apart from Rosberg, I don't think many of the drivers are up for that sort of thing.

At the sporting/quality end of the car industry it is well known that focus groups come up with dreadful ideas, so I doubt that Mercedes had anything to do with it, unless they want to bury it.

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Uberseehandel

Techno-wannabees

Contrary to popular opinion, F1 is not a technology hothouse, the performance of the app is on a par with that of the cars, and some of the drivers.

The technology transfer from the LMP1-Hybrid class at Le Mans is much more relevant and less chaotic, and the racing is knife edge.

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Feds: Bloke 'HACKED PLANE controls' – from his PASSENGER seat

Uberseehandel

Re: I would wager

Maybe the articles are written by people who haven't a clue. After all, nobody has questioned the claim that the aircraft was made to go "sideways". its patent nonsense.

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Uberseehandel

Get Real

Fly sideways.........." says who?

Short of an aircraft with vectoring thrust, or a rotary, I can't think of a way to make a plane fly "sideways", The closest I know of is a sideslip, which requires bank (ailerons) and top rudder, ie all crossed up. Bank so that one wing is "down" and apply the rudder to the opposite side, so starboard wing down and rudder sticking out to port.

Increasing the thrust of one engine or decreasing the thrust of another will make the aircraft turn towards the side with the least thrust.

in order to discredit all those who are opposed to a free charter for government snooping and mandatory encryption backdoors, certain agencies will plumb any depths to create FUD amongst the general populace, Nobody who knows about flying or flight systems believes what has been said, or is alleged to have been said. But faced with some influential, knowledgeable and hostile congressmen, the Feds (for want of a better term) are crying wolf. As far as the "perp" is concerned, the term naive springs to mind, or is it dork?

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UK rail comms are safer than mobes – for now – say infosec bods

Uberseehandel

Not Invented Here Syndrome

This is planned to be a Europe wide system. Hopefully Network Rail will be working with the likes of SNCF and DB to test it and ensure it is safe and functional. At least DB has a reputation for testing signalling and control systems before they install them, unlike some organisations.

Hopefully the train system will sort out all the pitfalls before autonomous cars make their debut on the roads in significant numbers.

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Ex-Autonomy chief Mike Lynch's Darktrace bags £12.6m from investors

Uberseehandel

Is this outfit for real?

I had a poke around their website and discovered such oddities as a portrait of a presbyterian minister who died over 250 years ago (Thomas Bayes).

I find the explanation of what they do somewhat sophomoric and if it is accurate, no smarter than what was going on back in the 1970s. I also find it trades rather hard on the reputations of a handful of universities, Even so i would have thought a picture of Queens' Bridge more relevant than a hackneyed photograph of King's College Chapel and Clare

RBE has been around for 15 years now and something similar has been in use discretely since the 80s, on a need to know basis.

The combination of the brouhaha around Autonomy and HP together with aging woodcuts of deceased clerics isn't a great inducement. I am sure they are all lovely,people, but I don't really know if they are selling anything new.

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BT inks deal with Williams F1 for go-faster cloudy goodness

Uberseehandel

I can't see Patrick Head keeping his temper.

On the other hand, because Williams is British and based in Britain, their expectations can't be very high.

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BT fixes home hub drop-out glitch ONE YEAR after denying flaw existed

Uberseehandel

Re: Wow BT is getting faster at responding to user problems

@Bunbury

Dropping down from 72 to 42 (ish) is caused by BT deliberately capping my throughput, despite having paid for 72Mb/sec.

There is no coincidence about the speed increasing when a fresh install is done at the cabinet, it happens consistently,

I have a gigabit connection between my router and my computer. Nothing changes between 72 Mb/sec and 42 Mb/sec.

If I go into the router I see that the rated line speed is 72 Mb/sec.

It doesn't matter whether i am on the computer at 5 in the morning or any time, the performance cap and iPlayer download speeds are capped.

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Uberseehandel

Re: Wow BT is getting faster at responding to user problems

Bronak Kozicki

pointed out that "regular" FTTC is capped by BT at 40Mbps, you might want to fork for "premium"

Well, thanks, I am paying the premium for 80Mb/sec, with no volume cap.

I cannot get over all these people who think BT is behaving reasonably, like overselling is reasonable!

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Uberseehandel

Somebody suggested that I check out Zen - well I can't find any line speeds they are prepared to quote and they display a cute message along the lines of "Crumbs! - we don't recognise your phone number" - I also supplied my postcode, which is specific to the building.

Is this level of uselessness normal these days, on any technology related issue?

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Uberseehandel

One of the people who has responded to what I posted has pasted a load of self0-excusing boilerplate from a BT website, trying to suggest that my poor service is for the benefit of everybody else. i am speechless. Its as if i went to Mini and paid for a new John Cooper Works Mini and got given a bog standard diesel, because its better for all the other people on the road. That is also unspeakable nonsense.

BT is bad, it knows its bad, it treats customers as mugs. I can't downgrade my service to an Infinity 1 contract because that is capped and I exceed the cap each month.

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Uberseehandel

Re: Wow BT is getting faster at responding to user problems

So why do I sometimes get 72Mb/sec plus? What happens is, new user added to cabinet, speed increases for a few hours.

Actually the contract is so generalised that any action against BT would probably be best taken under the terms of the Sale Of Goods Act (or whatever its successor is in England now).

Its hard to envisage a network of any sort whereby one is not sharing bandwidth with other users, when it comes to the internet....

Fundamentally, its a question of honesty.

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Uberseehandel

Wow BT is getting faster at responding to user problems

Now they have that problem fixed, please can they get on with fixing my Infinity 2 service.

Infinity 2 is "up to 80 Mb/sec". At this distance i am located from the cabinet, I get better than 72 Mb/sec, which is fine.

However, almost all the time it is artificially throttled back to little more than 42 Mb/sec. Allegedly this is to ensure that all users whose service is routed through the same cabinet that my line is connected to get "the best possible service". This is complete tosh and nonsense. I am paying for a high speed service, BT are deliberately giving me a lower speed service. On the very rare occasions when I do receive a 72Mb/sec connection, I have checked the line quality, and it is fine, so it isn't a quality issue. Fixing another customer's connection problems by trashing my service is wrong, however you look at it. Nine times out of ten, when the connection works at the specified speed for a few hours, a technician has worked at the cabinet earlier in the day.

I have written to BT's various customer service channels, explaining what is wrong and explain that I have carried out a statistical analysis of the upload and download throughput speeds achieved and that I can demonstrate that the line speed is being artificially regulated, and that if they won't cease from this practice, I would like to speak to an engineer. To date, all communication is ignored.

BT is still handing out shoddy service and not even acknowledging correspondence about problems, although they are quick enough to send me an invitation to complete a questionnaire about how great BT service is.

In order not to make life complicated for BT, I have decided to wait until my line speed issue is resolved before trying to discover who is artificially restricting download speeds from the BBC iPlayer site.

3
8

Jaguar F-Type: A beautiful British thoroughbred

Uberseehandel

Its No E-Type

Lovely car as it is, it isn't a Series 1 E-Type. The sublime beauty and menace of the latter still has the ability to stun onlookers into silence. I wonder if the F-Type will be so greatly admired 54 years after its release?

Not all is lost, an eccentric company called Eagle fortunately creates modern E-Types with uptodate running gear and drivetrains, unfortunately, at a price.

5
4

Give ALL the EU access to Netflix, says Vince Cable

Uberseehandel
Holmes

the simple answer obviously hasn't occurred to this politician

Uncle Vince needs to have a chat with some of the IT gnomes at his day job, so he can feed his Breaking Bad habit anywhere in the world

1
0

Ski MOUNT DOOM or take top coffee to the beach? Your choice

Uberseehandel

It always amazes me when folk from abroad rock up in a new job in a country they have never lived in before and start talking about "work/life balance".

Too many immigrant workers have a poorly hidden sense of superiority and entitlement. And you don't just find these people in IT. Seven day a week 14 hours a day projects are just as common in NZ as they are in Silicon Valley. All too often British immigrants (aka Poms) confuse being at work with working. Presentism is rife amongst Pom immigrants.

Sadly, the technical education of Poms is often a poor fit to their qualifications.The rash of new British universities appears not to have been entirely successful, if education was the aim.

Immigrants who buy imported food products are selling themselve short and costing themselves money. NZ is one of the world's great primary producers. NZ brands may be unfamiliar, but in most cases they are superior to their UK equivalent. Learn to buy meat from the butchers' shop at one of the big meatworks, great prices and you are cutting out the middlemen.

Would be immigrants should consider bringing a quality (German) car with them, organised properly, this can be finacially rewarding in due course. Immigrants with partners who have useful skills, such as clinical or teaching qualifications seem to integrate more quickly than ones who don't. Poms will know they are making progress on the integration front when they are referred to as a Brit rather than a Pom, its a big step up.

Whilst Poms might not like hearing about the All Blacks, they are relevant. The ABs have a terrific work rate and awesome technical skills, which is why they are the world's most successful team. Their example is taken to heart by all New Zealanders, which sets quite a standard for new arrivals.

Incidently, there is a difference between trekking and tramping. Kiwis find trekking rather a gentle acttivity.

2
20

Crap broadband holds back HALF of rural small biz types

Uberseehandel

BT's Broadband service is so bad, I'm nominating them for a Comedy Award

Their technicians are barely trained and the engineer's have, shall we say, unusual design goals

I never believed it possible, they make me want to live in South Korea!

5
1

If BT gets EE, it will trigger EU treasure hunt for fixed lines

Uberseehandel

Some of us have seen BT come up against DT in the past. Experience leads one to believe that Deutsche Telekom will have out-planned BT, well that is the polite term for it.

Also, based on experience, It is hard to envisage BT being able to manage Fixed/Mobile convergence. BT has a well deserved reputation for corner cutting, and there are some significant issues to be resolved. Once upon a time, BT owned 40% of Germany's fourth mobile network, which included a small, but significant fixed network. because it seemed 'simpler and less capital intensive', they handed management of their Data Centre to a subsidiary of DT, effectively placing their own future in the hands of their principal competitor.

Through all this incompetence shone the arrogance of many BT staff who were not only off-hand with anybody who wasn't a BT staffer but were alarmingly unreliable in the information they communicated.

I can't see any reason why this takeover should benefit the people who will be using telecoms in all its various forms,

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