* Posts by Uberseehandel

58 posts • joined 21 Jul 2011

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German army fights underground Nazi war machine hidden in Kiel pensioner's cellar

Uberseehandel

Some folk have elephants in the room, why not a tank in the basement?

I know accuracy is anathema to the subs round here, but the suburb where the villa housing the tank is located is Heikendorf, not, as you have written it, Keikendorf.

The presence of the torpedo is entirely predictable, Heikendorf is the site of the memorial to the U-Boat war dead .Rather chilling, worth checking out - https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/U-Boot-Ehrenmal_M%C3%B6ltenort#/media/File:U-Boot-Ehrenmal_M%C3%B6ltenort_2.jpg

Most Germans love mechanical objects, old tanks are commonplace and torpedos are always popular exhibits in museums, I wonder if this bloke has a Messerschmitt Me 262, as well, that would be something! I always thought Goldfinger was quite Germanic

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Goodbye Vulcan: Blighty's nuclear bomber retires for the last time

Uberseehandel

A "Pocket" Bomber

A lovely aircraft, there was no need for the writer to sprinkle his copy with the adjective "huge". The Vulcan was was nimble, but carried a bomb load slightly less than a Lancaster. As well as being half the physical size of a B-52, it had a maximum takeoff weight some 318,000 lbs less, so huge it most definitely wasn't. As well as being nimble it was comparatively fast with a higher maximum ceiling than a B-52. I doubt it had the range, altitude or outright speed required to be a successful cold war bomber.

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UH OH: Windows 10 will share your Wi-Fi key with your friends' friends

Uberseehandel

MAC filtering is a waste of time

Spoofing MAC details is more than simple to do, so filtering adds little, if anything security wise.

More important, because the tracing of MAC information causes a whole new slew of security problems, there are changes underway to randomise MACs each time one is required. Some kit is already doing this

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Mobe encryption guru Charles Brookson picks up OBE from the Queen

Uberseehandel

Re: Secure from the security services?

The general public might think that the security organs do not need to crack mobile phone encryption as they can listen straight off the switch.

Quite true. However, the network has to be provisioned so that what is required, snoop-wise is put into effect, and this leaves a growing trail that that becomes obvious to a surprisingly large number of people, even the ones who can barely tie their own shoe laces.

Understandably, some security agencies prefer just to listen and decrypt in real time, with or without trojan horse cells and "access" to the various networks own cells. This not only saves an unbelievable amount of admin, but also is much more secure. Some of the people who work in network security are weird enough to be automatic security risks.

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Britain beats back Argies over Falklands online land grab

Uberseehandel

Occupational Therapy For The Mediocre

This report just shows what time wasting organisations ICANN and IANA really are.

Latin America in general and Argentina in particular only bang on about the Falklands when their economies are going down the tubes. So no surprise Venezuela is sticking its pica in, then.

A recent move by the economic disaster that is Argentina is to prevail upon the Chileans to stop sending fresh eggs to the Falklands. Like all incompetent, corrupt economies it wants something for nothing (possibility of oil around the Falklands) and needs to distract its citizens from slow motion train crash that is domestic life.To say nothing of a tendency to assassinate those individuals who disclose what might be termed inconvenient truths.

Who would believe that less than 100 years ago Argentina was one of the most powerful economies in the world, where did it all go wrong? (http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21596582-one-hundred-years-ago-argentina-was-future-what-went-wrong-century-decline)

Incidentally, who is paying for all these waste of space delegates to jet round the world in a rolling beer fest? There are lots better things to do with the money!

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Pint-sized PCIe powerhouse: Intel NUC5i5RYK

Uberseehandel

Re: Gulliver-like

To say nothing of the Yahoos, the Houyhnhnms, the Laputans or several other strange possibilities.

Journalists, faux or otherwise, really should become familiar with the source of their literary allusions, before letting them loose on the rest of us.

Similarly, somebody somewhere should be doing a better job of subbing, rather than concocting awkwardly laboured punning headlines.

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For fax's sake: Medic chaos as e-Referrals system goes offline

Uberseehandel

Re: re: The health record system was designed to "leak"

Well, as far as the"individuals module" was concerned (that wasn't its actual name), one of the tables was set up to store VAT numbers, passport numbers, individual tax numbers, National Insurance numbers, and a host of other information used by the PNC and useful when setting up mammoth data matching projects, and it was all structured in a way that would be very convenient for outside access. This made me feel very uneasy,

All the data models and project documents were in the public domain. I applied for an account and received access by return. They were seeking to record information that I, as a long term non-resident, was unaware even existed.

When setting up a National Master Patient Index in another country, it became apparent that in order to maintain the integrity of Public Health, and Public Health information, all data had to remain confidential, even when illegal immigrants and overstayers were being treated. I think we ended up agreeing that exceptions would be made in the event of people presenting with gunshot wounds, otherwise all requests for information from outside the medical sphere would be stonewalled. Without this we never would have kept on top of some nasty TB problems. In Britain today, both TB and AIDS/HIV are concerns in some recent immigrant groups, if these people do not trust the health service, these issues will become significant problems.

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Uberseehandel

Entirely Predictable Outcome

Some years ago I considered releasing an application for use by clinicians in Britain. I have developed a number of health systems in the past, both at the national level and at the (large) hospital level. But none of this prior experience was in Britain.

Having ascertained that there was both need and demand for the application, it was still prudent to check what was going wrong with Information Systems in the NHS, before spending any real money.

In a nutshell what I found was that several key projects were in process, but the working parties were predominantly staffed by all the doctors, nurses, surgeons, pharmacists, librarians, administrators, midwives, academics (you get the idea, this list could fill several pages), who were so terminally useless that their involvement in an IS project would have no impact on current healthcare operations.

The respective project managers were of the passive process variety, going through the motions and not differentiating between those notions which were batsh1t eatingly stupid, complex and off the wall. and the needed sensible, useful and simple applications that could be augmented in the future. At no stage were the participants shepherded back to the real world.

So a an application to handle prescriptions became a medical order system (sensible), and then somehow metamorphosed into a knowledge based best practices behemoth, which would never, ever work, for very obvious reasons. When it came to prescribing drugs, the processes described were more involved than those involved in getting approval for the drugs in the first place. But somehow there was no alert system considered to pick up on potential prescription drug interactions.........

All the other systems I examined were equalling discouraging. The health record system was designed to "leak", and appeared to have been sketched out by a group with a background in .public safety and a taste for data matching.

I actually attended a "summit" that was discussing health systems in the NHS, and was horrified when in a general session, the response to my tongue in cheek remark "a billion pounds isn't what it used to be", was a great deal of sage head nodding from all on the platform.

As I contemplated the differences between what was, and continues to occur in Britain with what I had experienced elsewhere, I decided not to continue the project. Had it been developed, it would also have handled the current failing referrals project.

I know I am not alone in fleeing abroad when presented with the need to see a doctor for anything more serious than a signature on a piece of paper.

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Furious Flems fling privacy rule book at Facebook

Uberseehandel

Please Cut Out The Cutesie Headlines

"Furious Flems" - what about all the non-Flemish, possibly equally furious residents of Belgium (they are called Walloons)?

The endless pursuit of punning and double-entre laden headlines grows wearisome very very quickly. Apart from anything else, it is infantile.

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Scientists love MacBooks (true) – but what about you?

Uberseehandel

A mistaken idea of what happens in Space Fight Centres

Its hardly surprising that conference rooms at flight centres are full of Macs. These rooms are full of PR folk and journalists. Macs meet their requirements perfectly.

In the real world most of us use Mac OS X, Windows and several varieties of Linux/Unix. There is a very important 3D design tool called SolidWorks, surprisingly it doesn't fully work on a Mac. Most of the grown-up database design tools are Windows based. Anything requiring a specialised card is usually win/'nix based.

Macs develop at their own pace. Try setting up a 5K iMac with a second matching 5k screen. Doing the same with a Win workstation is NOT a problem.

Of course academia is full of Macs - that's where so much of social media originated. Macs are great for students.

Most of the time we don't do anything much more sophisticated than writing correspondence, managing lists, goofing off and wasting our real lives (aka social media). Today's tablets are well suited to this. So my scientific friends who actually work in research labs can be seen with macs and iPads whilst their experiments are run by 'nix devices, designers are wedded to their win machines (for 3D modelling and rendering). Whilst when I work at my original research topic, I'm still Windows based, I'd prefer it if I could use a Mac, but even using parallels or bootcamp, it isn't a satisfactory solution.

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HMRC ditches Microsoft for Google, sends data offshore

Uberseehandel

Re: Goodbye UK IT skills

Its not just IT skills that are vanishing. All engineering and science qualifications are in decline. For example, the NHS is unsustainable without foreign clinical staff (doctors and nurses), which holds back the countries where these immigrant staff come from..

It is no coincidence that there are very few scientific or numerate members of the House of Commons. The skills needed to make a modern economy function are notable absent at the heart of government.

An economy that is based on manufacturing is more dynamic than one based on services, which have very little downstream benefit, often using imported furniture and foreign IT equipment in existing rented premises. Angela Merkel, observing Britain, once remarked "it will be interesting to see if you can run an economy based on cutting each other's hair." I fear the answer may be along all too soon.

Offshoring the tax department ought yo be a matter of public shame. There are Pacific island republics that manage to avoid doing this..

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Airbus confirms software brought down A400M transport plane

Uberseehandel

Impossible Testing Scenario

I have worked on many multi national projects. To cater for customers who want to interface with equipment in their own language, which might be Mandarin Chinese, Sanskrit, Standard Arabic, Bulgarian or what ever, software tends to be hugely parameter driven, to an unsafe extent. Also, to allow for minor differences in customer requirements, parameters are adjusted,

This gets unmanageable really quickly, for example, just 20 Yes/No options have over a million different combinations.

One application I know of has over 24,000 lines of parameters, most with multiple values. This is inherently unsafe, there are not enough hours in the foreseeable future to test all the possible combinations, prior to release of the product.

I have seen people involved in major acquisitions demand "modifications", which, inter alia, complicate the parameter file(s), merely to justify their own role as part of the acquisition team.

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Wheely, wheely mad: Petrolheads fume over buggy Formula One app

Uberseehandel

Re: Techno-wannabees

You miss the point - it took GKN and Audi to make the energy recovery system work - Williams gave up on it. Now it is being deployed to Audi passenger cars, and there are other competing technologies in the LMP1-Hybrid class.

I think your prejudices are showing

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Uberseehandel

Re: Anyone completed the F1 Drivers survey here...

Well I found it a pretty dire effort. Every single question was multiple choice. The answers were all pre-selected. There were no open questions.

For example where was I able to say that they should revert to V-10 Normally aspirated engines, with mechanically driven valve gear (not pneumatic) offering 800+hp. With absolutely no energy recovery. These would be fast, noisy and exciting, and would take some driving, especially if wings were banned.

Whoever put it together stitched up the drivers majorly.I wonder who actually selected the format and the questions? Apart from Rosberg, I don't think many of the drivers are up for that sort of thing.

At the sporting/quality end of the car industry it is well known that focus groups come up with dreadful ideas, so I doubt that Mercedes had anything to do with it, unless they want to bury it.

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Uberseehandel

Techno-wannabees

Contrary to popular opinion, F1 is not a technology hothouse, the performance of the app is on a par with that of the cars, and some of the drivers.

The technology transfer from the LMP1-Hybrid class at Le Mans is much more relevant and less chaotic, and the racing is knife edge.

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Feds: Bloke 'HACKED PLANE controls' – from his PASSENGER seat

Uberseehandel

Re: I would wager

Maybe the articles are written by people who haven't a clue. After all, nobody has questioned the claim that the aircraft was made to go "sideways". its patent nonsense.

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Uberseehandel

Get Real

Fly sideways.........." says who?

Short of an aircraft with vectoring thrust, or a rotary, I can't think of a way to make a plane fly "sideways", The closest I know of is a sideslip, which requires bank (ailerons) and top rudder, ie all crossed up. Bank so that one wing is "down" and apply the rudder to the opposite side, so starboard wing down and rudder sticking out to port.

Increasing the thrust of one engine or decreasing the thrust of another will make the aircraft turn towards the side with the least thrust.

in order to discredit all those who are opposed to a free charter for government snooping and mandatory encryption backdoors, certain agencies will plumb any depths to create FUD amongst the general populace, Nobody who knows about flying or flight systems believes what has been said, or is alleged to have been said. But faced with some influential, knowledgeable and hostile congressmen, the Feds (for want of a better term) are crying wolf. As far as the "perp" is concerned, the term naive springs to mind, or is it dork?

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UK rail comms are safer than mobes – for now – say infosec bods

Uberseehandel

Not Invented Here Syndrome

This is planned to be a Europe wide system. Hopefully Network Rail will be working with the likes of SNCF and DB to test it and ensure it is safe and functional. At least DB has a reputation for testing signalling and control systems before they install them, unlike some organisations.

Hopefully the train system will sort out all the pitfalls before autonomous cars make their debut on the roads in significant numbers.

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Ex-Autonomy chief Mike Lynch's Darktrace bags £12.6m from investors

Uberseehandel

Is this outfit for real?

I had a poke around their website and discovered such oddities as a portrait of a presbyterian minister who died over 250 years ago (Thomas Bayes).

I find the explanation of what they do somewhat sophomoric and if it is accurate, no smarter than what was going on back in the 1970s. I also find it trades rather hard on the reputations of a handful of universities, Even so i would have thought a picture of Queens' Bridge more relevant than a hackneyed photograph of King's College Chapel and Clare

RBE has been around for 15 years now and something similar has been in use discretely since the 80s, on a need to know basis.

The combination of the brouhaha around Autonomy and HP together with aging woodcuts of deceased clerics isn't a great inducement. I am sure they are all lovely,people, but I don't really know if they are selling anything new.

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BT inks deal with Williams F1 for go-faster cloudy goodness

Uberseehandel

I can't see Patrick Head keeping his temper.

On the other hand, because Williams is British and based in Britain, their expectations can't be very high.

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BT fixes home hub drop-out glitch ONE YEAR after denying flaw existed

Uberseehandel

Re: Wow BT is getting faster at responding to user problems

@Bunbury

Dropping down from 72 to 42 (ish) is caused by BT deliberately capping my throughput, despite having paid for 72Mb/sec.

There is no coincidence about the speed increasing when a fresh install is done at the cabinet, it happens consistently,

I have a gigabit connection between my router and my computer. Nothing changes between 72 Mb/sec and 42 Mb/sec.

If I go into the router I see that the rated line speed is 72 Mb/sec.

It doesn't matter whether i am on the computer at 5 in the morning or any time, the performance cap and iPlayer download speeds are capped.

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Uberseehandel

Re: Wow BT is getting faster at responding to user problems

Bronak Kozicki

pointed out that "regular" FTTC is capped by BT at 40Mbps, you might want to fork for "premium"

Well, thanks, I am paying the premium for 80Mb/sec, with no volume cap.

I cannot get over all these people who think BT is behaving reasonably, like overselling is reasonable!

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Uberseehandel

Somebody suggested that I check out Zen - well I can't find any line speeds they are prepared to quote and they display a cute message along the lines of "Crumbs! - we don't recognise your phone number" - I also supplied my postcode, which is specific to the building.

Is this level of uselessness normal these days, on any technology related issue?

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Uberseehandel

One of the people who has responded to what I posted has pasted a load of self0-excusing boilerplate from a BT website, trying to suggest that my poor service is for the benefit of everybody else. i am speechless. Its as if i went to Mini and paid for a new John Cooper Works Mini and got given a bog standard diesel, because its better for all the other people on the road. That is also unspeakable nonsense.

BT is bad, it knows its bad, it treats customers as mugs. I can't downgrade my service to an Infinity 1 contract because that is capped and I exceed the cap each month.

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Uberseehandel

Re: Wow BT is getting faster at responding to user problems

So why do I sometimes get 72Mb/sec plus? What happens is, new user added to cabinet, speed increases for a few hours.

Actually the contract is so generalised that any action against BT would probably be best taken under the terms of the Sale Of Goods Act (or whatever its successor is in England now).

Its hard to envisage a network of any sort whereby one is not sharing bandwidth with other users, when it comes to the internet....

Fundamentally, its a question of honesty.

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Uberseehandel

Wow BT is getting faster at responding to user problems

Now they have that problem fixed, please can they get on with fixing my Infinity 2 service.

Infinity 2 is "up to 80 Mb/sec". At this distance i am located from the cabinet, I get better than 72 Mb/sec, which is fine.

However, almost all the time it is artificially throttled back to little more than 42 Mb/sec. Allegedly this is to ensure that all users whose service is routed through the same cabinet that my line is connected to get "the best possible service". This is complete tosh and nonsense. I am paying for a high speed service, BT are deliberately giving me a lower speed service. On the very rare occasions when I do receive a 72Mb/sec connection, I have checked the line quality, and it is fine, so it isn't a quality issue. Fixing another customer's connection problems by trashing my service is wrong, however you look at it. Nine times out of ten, when the connection works at the specified speed for a few hours, a technician has worked at the cabinet earlier in the day.

I have written to BT's various customer service channels, explaining what is wrong and explain that I have carried out a statistical analysis of the upload and download throughput speeds achieved and that I can demonstrate that the line speed is being artificially regulated, and that if they won't cease from this practice, I would like to speak to an engineer. To date, all communication is ignored.

BT is still handing out shoddy service and not even acknowledging correspondence about problems, although they are quick enough to send me an invitation to complete a questionnaire about how great BT service is.

In order not to make life complicated for BT, I have decided to wait until my line speed issue is resolved before trying to discover who is artificially restricting download speeds from the BBC iPlayer site.

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Jaguar F-Type: A beautiful British thoroughbred

Uberseehandel

Its No E-Type

Lovely car as it is, it isn't a Series 1 E-Type. The sublime beauty and menace of the latter still has the ability to stun onlookers into silence. I wonder if the F-Type will be so greatly admired 54 years after its release?

Not all is lost, an eccentric company called Eagle fortunately creates modern E-Types with uptodate running gear and drivetrains, unfortunately, at a price.

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Give ALL the EU access to Netflix, says Vince Cable

Uberseehandel
Holmes

the simple answer obviously hasn't occurred to this politician

Uncle Vince needs to have a chat with some of the IT gnomes at his day job, so he can feed his Breaking Bad habit anywhere in the world

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Ski MOUNT DOOM or take top coffee to the beach? Your choice

Uberseehandel

It always amazes me when folk from abroad rock up in a new job in a country they have never lived in before and start talking about "work/life balance".

Too many immigrant workers have a poorly hidden sense of superiority and entitlement. And you don't just find these people in IT. Seven day a week 14 hours a day projects are just as common in NZ as they are in Silicon Valley. All too often British immigrants (aka Poms) confuse being at work with working. Presentism is rife amongst Pom immigrants.

Sadly, the technical education of Poms is often a poor fit to their qualifications.The rash of new British universities appears not to have been entirely successful, if education was the aim.

Immigrants who buy imported food products are selling themselve short and costing themselves money. NZ is one of the world's great primary producers. NZ brands may be unfamiliar, but in most cases they are superior to their UK equivalent. Learn to buy meat from the butchers' shop at one of the big meatworks, great prices and you are cutting out the middlemen.

Would be immigrants should consider bringing a quality (German) car with them, organised properly, this can be finacially rewarding in due course. Immigrants with partners who have useful skills, such as clinical or teaching qualifications seem to integrate more quickly than ones who don't. Poms will know they are making progress on the integration front when they are referred to as a Brit rather than a Pom, its a big step up.

Whilst Poms might not like hearing about the All Blacks, they are relevant. The ABs have a terrific work rate and awesome technical skills, which is why they are the world's most successful team. Their example is taken to heart by all New Zealanders, which sets quite a standard for new arrivals.

Incidently, there is a difference between trekking and tramping. Kiwis find trekking rather a gentle acttivity.

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Crap broadband holds back HALF of rural small biz types

Uberseehandel

BT's Broadband service is so bad, I'm nominating them for a Comedy Award

Their technicians are barely trained and the engineer's have, shall we say, unusual design goals

I never believed it possible, they make me want to live in South Korea!

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If BT gets EE, it will trigger EU treasure hunt for fixed lines

Uberseehandel

Some of us have seen BT come up against DT in the past. Experience leads one to believe that Deutsche Telekom will have out-planned BT, well that is the polite term for it.

Also, based on experience, It is hard to envisage BT being able to manage Fixed/Mobile convergence. BT has a well deserved reputation for corner cutting, and there are some significant issues to be resolved. Once upon a time, BT owned 40% of Germany's fourth mobile network, which included a small, but significant fixed network. because it seemed 'simpler and less capital intensive', they handed management of their Data Centre to a subsidiary of DT, effectively placing their own future in the hands of their principal competitor.

Through all this incompetence shone the arrogance of many BT staff who were not only off-hand with anybody who wasn't a BT staffer but were alarmingly unreliable in the information they communicated.

I can't see any reason why this takeover should benefit the people who will be using telecoms in all its various forms,

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White hats do an NSA, figure out LIVE PHONE TRACKING via protocol vuln

Uberseehandel

Cracking encryption in real time becomes trivial when the 16 most significant bits of the encryption key are set to zero, as they are for most networks in central and eastern Europe.

Taking over the cells is equally trivial.

All this sloppy procedure saves the federal authorities the bother of arranging matters formally, as the laws, in the various jurisdictions, require.

Is it any wonder that undesirables jump on board?

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This week it rained in San Francisco and the power immediately blew out. Your tech utopia

Uberseehandel

Education Abroad

Whoever suggested that food in Germany is bad has never been there. Eating out in Germany can be as healthy or as unhealthy as you wish. This has been the case for a long time. Napoleon always had great difficulty getting his French troops out of Germany when he needed to do some campaigning, the food being one of the things that kept them there.

During my years in Germany, I grew to greatly admire the quality of Germany's technical universities. Any English speaking student will greatly benefit from attending such an establishment, at many, most of the teaching is in English. I greatly admire the close cooperation between universities and industry, students graduate with very valuable address books.

However, American friends who have educated their children in good (state) secondary schools in Europe before sending them back to the States for University report that European high school graduates are more advanced academically than their US educated peers, but that it levels out by the time post graduate work kicks in

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'Tech giants who encrypt comms are unwittingly aiding terrorists', claims ex-Home Sec Blunkett

Uberseehandel

Re: Genocide?

Actually what ISIL is doing to the Kurds in general and the Yazidis in particular is genocide

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Uberseehandel

Dog House Rules

I always thought his dog wrote all his speeches.

I was very impressed by the dog.

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BT: Consumers and cost cutting save the day

Uberseehandel

Bunbury

thats OK

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Uberseehandel

Re: Poor Customer Service - Lousy Performance

Bunbury

You are doing the equivalent of teaching your Grandmother to suck eggs. Of course I make sure I carry out the speed tests properly, I do know what I am doing - asking to talk to a BT engineer who is MIEEE or equivalently qualified, ought to have flagged that fact up to you.

There is a problem at the exchange, or between the exchange and the local cabinet or in the cabinet itself. There is a strong correlation between visits by an engineer/installer (the installers are not engineers) and my experiencing 70Mb/s plus download speeds. Which may last for up to a day at a time.

What appears to be happening is that working on the local cabinet resets the error control systems, and my connection operates at over 70 Mb/s. Usually within the next 24 hours, the maximum download speed is reset to around 45 Mb/s, no change to upload speeds. Statistical analysis indcates that the download speeds are artificially regulated and are not capacity limited (up to about 75Mb/s as far as I can measure), the SD value for the much slower uploads, is much greater than the SD for the capped downloads. This is what I have been able to deduce from my analysis.

My emails are being ignored, I would just like BT to do a decent job, but Based on dealing with BT engineers in projects around the world, I am not surprised.

Please don't ladle out corporate twaddle, it is not helpful, I have measured decent throughput at what are generally regarded as busy times and downloaded at over 2.5MB/sec from BBC iPlayer.

I am paying for a premium service, it is not unreasonable to expect the equipment involved in delivering that serive to be properly installed, maintained and adjusted

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Uberseehandel

Poor Customer Service - Lousy Performance

I have subscribed to the the best service available in my area, its called Infinity 2. That is 80 Mbits down and 20 Mbits up, unlimited usage.

For the first couple of months, I measured line speeds several times a day, and recorded them. Better than 80% of the time my maximum download speed was 40-45 Mbits/sec, but from time to time, I did achieve over 70 Mbit/sec. I carried out a statistical analysis on my measurements and it was quite clear that my download speed was being clipped by BT, the standard deviation in my download speeds was disproportionately less than the standard deviation in upload speeds.

I emailed BT and asked that they look into this and have a qualified engineer contact me (MIEEE or equivalent).

All I have received since is a request to grade them on the effectiveness of their response.

I would switch to a lesser service, in accord with the performance I actually receive, but, Infinity 1 has a monthly download load limit, which I exceed..

In practical terms, the performance is much less than the 40-45 Mbit/sec that speedtest shows. When I download from the BBC iPlayer site, I used to get over 2 Mbyte/sec, now I rarely exceed 750 K byte/sec.

I am not a happy camper.

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Want a customer's call records Mr Plod? No probs

Uberseehandel
FAIL

It appears that Ethics are not taught at either Technology Institutions or Police Colleges. It were ever thus. The police won't change, perhaps the technologists might become a little more aware. When you start supplying information about customers to the authorities in bulk - you know, or ought to know that this might be morally dubious. When you build a system to do this automatically, you KNOW what you are doing is morally dubious.

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Payment security bods: Nice pay-by-bonk (hint: NO ONE uses it) on iPhone 6, Apple

Uberseehandel

Contactless Payments - Not Thought Through

In the UK, the limit for contactless payments is GBP 20. In other words, not a lot.

So the most likely retail outlet that a user would seek to make a contactless payment is the local store, where folk go for papers, milk, small grocery items. Very few local stores use the internet to link their payment terminals to their card payment supplier, most still make a (time consuming) telephone call. I have asked storekeepers why they don't use their internet connection and I am told that the charges are too high, I have been surprised by the amounts quoted.

Pay By Bonk (PBB) is unlikely to have a strong uptake if payment authorisation is slow, or if shopkeepers place a minimum payment amount limitation on transactions.

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Snooptastic US CELL TOWERS pose man-in-the-middle THREAT

Uberseehandel

Re: Purely hypothetically...

Hypothtically an ancient kingdom close to the mountains, fairytale castles and maidens in dirndls, if you have ever admired Our Lady of the Big Feet atop her column, you have visited its capital - there is a creepy crypt close by

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Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE

Uberseehandel

TV manufacturers are shackled by a social phenomenon

For most consumers, its all about the size of the TV, not its quality. Indeed, it may be a truism to say 'the smaller the house, the bigger the television'. Where incomes are low, picture size is much more important than picture quality.

Manufacturers have improved colour and contrast. Resolution is improving slowly. To make the Ultra HD experience truly outstanding both the refresh and frame rates need increasing. We are not seeing much improvement in these areas, so far.

The 'blurring' of moving objects detracts from the viewing experience. Until this is addressed, the increase in take up of 4K (and 8K) television is unlikely to be rapid.

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There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES

Uberseehandel

For years it has been axiomatic that Gresham's Law applies to television as well as the coinage.

There is a great deal of garbage and talent-free content created in both the US and Europe (including the UK). There is also some excellent content still being created, but not as much as formerly.

Over recent years some of the widely broadcast 'Scandinavian Noire' series have been thought provoking and well made.. But this level of programming is, I agree, increasingly rare.

Television is not alone amongst the media in being inundated with egregious content. It has become ever harder to find a quality English language daily newspaper in Britain. In a world where hoi poloi confuse infamy with achievement and self promotion with endeavour, is it surprising that the media in all its facets is overrun with talent free programming.

Good programs are still being made, you just have to look for them. It has been three years since any of my television sets have been attached to external antennae; connecting them to the internet ensures a much wider choice a quality programming.

If all this sounds a bit elitist, it is. Sadly, programmes about dancers who can't dance, singers who can't sing, and fornicating tattooed and bejazzled sociopaths is what we get in a culture driven by entitlement.

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NHS tears out its Oracle Spine in favour of open source

Uberseehandel

Lots of American and even a Russian company, but not any British software developers mentioned ( I'm not counting implementation consultancies).

Furthermore, non of what is mentioned has anything to do with Health.

Coming up with fairly arbitrary database and infrastructure products excludes the use of many of the available products, that are known to be effective, without huge rewriting and adapting.

The NHS claims unique requirements based largely upon scale, well having looked into some of their requirements, most of their problems actually appear to have arisen from having specifications drawn up by completely clueless individuals i.e. the ones who could be spared from their main job to spent an eternity agonising over prescription systems, for example, that don't even take into account the patient's existing medication, but do try to make the prescription process comply to some overarching medical order best practice knowledge base..........

Have a look at the Riak website, and I quote

"The National Health Service is the publicly funded healthcare system for the United Kingdom. Riak is being used as the IT backbone for this system, to help drive efficiency quality of care improvements. Riak is replacing a legacy system, which allows them to drastically cut costs while improving the performance and reliability of the system."

That was quick! You might even think optimistic.

1
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Bloke raises hand in vid, claims: I sparked Apple dev site hack panic

Uberseehandel

Whistle-blowing security vulnerabilities has to be handled carefully.

Some years ago,I discovered a nasty vulnerability that is present in almost all bank systems. I was developing a new system for my bank client.

Not being suicidal, I made an appointment with the bank's chairman, then I spoke to my lawyer, who arranged an appointment with the bank's principal (only) shareholder, so ended up spending half an hour with a head of state.

I notorised a statement about the weakness and then advised the head of security that there was a flaw in the systems and to drive the point home i would carry out a transaction on a certain date that would be reversed 24 hours later.

Because I had advised my client, my lawyer, my client's shareholder and security head and set out in a notorised statement what the weakness is and how I would demonstrate it, I did not get into trouble, quite the opposite, it kept me in work for many years.

You know, nobody was aware of this vulnerability until i demonstrated the problem,, and many years later it still exists, its simply too convenient. If anybody ever exploits it, its just a cost of doing business.

The lesson is - cover your arse

7
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How do you drive a supercomputer round a Formula 1 track?

Uberseehandel

Recently a well known IT infrastructure supplier got involved with Lotus - there were 40 pallets of kit.

Unless a team has a full size wind tunnel, they are wasting their money, these boogers don't scale.

As far as telemetry is concerned, even a sail boat had 400 measurements per second 20 years ago and it may only be going 10 miles per hour,

0
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Steelie Neelie eyeballs ENCRYPTION PLAN for telco data breaches

Uberseehandel

Re: What?

To use your analogy, if the fox is in the hen-house, he still has to acquire a 'personality' that has rights to execute the appropriate procedure.

It is standard practice to obfuscate personal information when returning the result of wide ranging queries, such as would be required to download bulk information.

0
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Uberseehandel
FAIL

Your knowledge of grown up databases is slight - having what you call 'root' on the database server does NOT give decryption rights, nor should it.

And as far as knowing about FIPS140-2 is - why wouldn't I know? Personally I would implement non-US encryption, that is open-sourced.

Frankly, Mr Ireland, you are shooting from the hip. With a grown up DMBS, you can give a copy of the database to an unauthorised user and they still wouldn't be able to access the encrypted information. And as far as Audit goes, its like CCTV, it discovers that something has happened but it doesn't deter the offender in the first place, any assumption otherwise is fallacious.

0
1
Uberseehandel

Store the data in a database where all personal data is encrypted using FIPS140-2 equivalent standards as a minimum. Then configure the database so that only stored procedures have read (and the others) rights. To read the un-encrypted information, a hacker would have to run an application that called a stored procedure and ensure that the user/application had execution rights for that stored procedure.

This isn't easy to do. As a result, the loss of physical data is not significant and access to the information is complicated by the need to emulate a user with stored procedure execution rights and then know which stored procedure to execute.

There is a further level of Hierarchical Rights Management that is able to measure the appropriateness of the access request and the relative relationship of the user making the request and the subject of the information requested. Whilst this sounds complicated its easier to set up than might be imagined. Where entropic systems are concerned, pseudo hierarchies are just as effective.

0
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A woman in IT is like a dog who speaks: Rare. A woman in IT security?

Uberseehandel

I am not the least bit surprised that few women are drawn to security training.

Several times in my career i have had to support strong competent women who have been viciously and pointlessly attacked by security specialists. In all these instances, the source of the trouble has been a male security specialist who has worn a uniform in a former career.

Whilst the security sector continue to provide a cultural home for superannuated, under educated sociopaths, I can't see this situation changing. And in case you are wondering, I don't have a problem with people in uniform, I just want them to but it behind them when the quit.

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