* Posts by PyLETS

583 posts • joined 11 Jul 2011

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Random ideas sought to improve cryptography

PyLETS

Einstein's dice

>Going out on an existential limb, it could be that true randomness is impossible because there's an >innate order to the universe that can't be broken....

You're in good company. For Albert Einstein's famous statement: "God does not play dice with the universe" to be true, randomness where we think we've found this, would be an emergent as opposed to an intrinsic property of the universe.

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It's Wikipedia mythbuster time: 8 of the best on your 15th birthday

PyLETS
Devil

@Bc1609: search revenue has to be much more than ads

"Of course, Google don't make money directly off that search either, because I have ad-block installed"

That would only follow if Google's only source of revenue from search engine use was advertising. I'd guess they make much more money now for sales referrals (when you search prior to following a link to buy something and the seller gives a referral commission) and selling the (presumably fig-leaf minimally anonymised) personal data about you to their many and various customers. It's why the advertising that does get through is getting much more creepy than it used to be, and why you're increasingly being cold called by creeps who know far more about you than is good for your personal sanity and security. Knowing as much as they do about who is searching for what seems a much more marketable asset these days than the ability to present ad images.

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IBM introduces fleecing-you-as-a-service for retailers

PyLETS

Be afraid. Be very afraid - and disclose as little as possible

The ultimate triumph of big data as used for dynamic pricing will be when the price of a flight to a conference at which you are a keynote speaker, and on which your professional reputation depends, is the value of your professional reputation if there is only 1 carrier who can get you there on time. That's because every bit of your personal data has been sold to the operators of the dynamic pricing computer as needed to know that the airline has you over a barrel.

Of course this will have to be stopped before that kind of event can happen through data protection law improvements and regulatory restrictions against price gouging, but it will be a political struggle to stop the current tide going in this direction even if it doesn't make it to that endpoint. We're seeing an equally anti-social kind of price gouging in effect already in the gas and electricity markets in relation to how customers too vulnerable or busy to switch are being screwed.

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Stephen Hawking reckons he's cracked the black hole paradox

PyLETS
Boffin

Re: information conservation

The preferred time direction is an inevitable consequence of the 2nd law of thermodynamics. Entropy increases with time. Mix a couple of buckets of hot and cold water to get warm water and there is no way of reversing the change without input of energy from outside the system resulting in a greater increase of entropy elsewhere. Information probably isn't conserved for similar reasons.

If we don't know the quantum physics behind this well-known thermodynamic process, then we don't know that reductionism applies here either (i.e. in the sense that all physical process are seen as "no more than" quantum physics). Like determinism, reductionism seems to be a belief without very good evidence. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle should have led us to question the general validity of determinism in any case, and the general concept of reductionism promises to have been refuted by recent mathematically-based research showing electron gaps (e.g. as required to make semiconductors work) to be provably unpredictable based on quantum physics .

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Linux Foundation assembles gang to build a better Blockchain

PyLETS
Devil

Re: The Problem With the B-b-b-l-l-l-o-o-o-c-c-c-k-k-k-c-c-c-h-h-h-a-a-a-i-i-i-n-n-n...

While the original Bitcoin may have problems forking itself to make any protocol improvements, theoretically new clients don't need to validate the entirety of all large historical old blocks in order to validate the entire chain. I can't see any reason why an improved protocol can't validate large old blocks through signed hashes - much smaller than the blocks themselves. All the new client has to do on installation is decide to trust principals within the network well known to the software developer which have already signed much smaller hashes of large old blocks and placed these signatures on record. Anyone who wants to download a copy of a large old block can then verify that the block matches the signed hash, and can download the public keys to verify the signatures on these blocks.

That said, I can see much worse resourcing problems than the occupation of hard disks and large network downloads, with the use of any technology which allocates resources to beneficiaries on the basis of who can consume the most electricity - even if this will inevitably result in more efficient hashing design conducted at large scale.

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GCHQ creates Github repo, offers graph database code

PyLETS

Many eyeballs better than one.

Even GCHQ combined with the NSA don't have enough engineers to peer review stuff they've made in house to make it better as fast as they want. There's a good chance other players interested in analysis of large graphs may want to add features which scratch their itch. Years ago this cost arguably would have concerned making it slightly easier to guess how GCHQ process graph data and that kind of argument would have restricted disclosure. Nowadays GCHQ's interest in relationships mappable as graph data is hardly a well-kept secret. Tor and SELinux have similar histories of being government funded security related projects for which development overheads could productively be shared.

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Court: Swedish ISPs can't be forced to block Sweden's Pirate Bay

PyLETS

Sensible decision

It's a bit like saying the people who build and mend roads aren't responsible for blocking sales of dodgy goods off the backs of white vans.

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Big Bang left us with a perfect random number generator

PyLETS

God doesn't play dice with the universe

If Albert Einstein was wrong on this quote, maybe the universe is a truly random number generator. If he was right, maybe the universe can be used as a pseudo random generator e.g. in the manner the article describes. I read an article in New Scientist a few years ago which claimed it to be inherently unprovable as to whether randomness is an emergent property of fundamentally deterministic physical processes (as in a very good pseudo-random generator whose algorithm is sufficiently obscure and whose cycles are sufficiently long as to be undetectable as such) or an inherent property of various physical processes. Current scientific opinion seems to regard Heisenberg's principle as suggesting the universe to be genuinely random, but I very much doubt there's any proof either way.

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CloudFlare drinks the DNSSEC kool-aid, offers it on universal basis

PyLETS
Big Brother

Re: All I want to know

It doesn't offer any protection against the proposed snoopers charter directly. However, once sufficiently widely adopted, it enables developing more widely used cryptography (e.g. for email contents and addresses) based on a better chain of trust than the current CA system. Under the CA COT, any one bad CA out of several hundred can compromise any domain. Under the DNSSEC COT, those in a position to compromise your chain of trust is likely to be exposed (by signing collectable and provably false statements about any lower-level key they compromise), and held to account in connection with this proof resulting in massive reputation damage. Another advantage of the DNSSEC COT is you can choose whichever top level domain or registrar you do trust to verify your identity and keys, by establishing your identity within their namespace.

Obviously anyone concerned about this should manage their own private keys themselves - the DNSSEC or CA COT are concerned about how other parties verify the identity associated with these keys. Those without the technical capacity to do so are likely to pick a trusted provider to do this for them.

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Condi Rice, ICANN, and millions paid to lobby the US govt for total internet control

PyLETS

@Charles 9: Wresting power back

"Fair enough. Now tell us how we can wrest the power back from them? What cards can the community still play?"

Setup and use an alternate DNS root zone. It wouldn't be that hard to do technically in collaboration between the existing top level domain authoritative nameserver operators. There would be 2 harder problems:

1. Get those configuring DNS resolvers to point to it in preference to the ICANN root.

2. Decide who manages it and how.

Once enough people are using DNSSEC, a revolutionary consensus would also need include operating system vendors to patch operating systems to accept the new root zone signing key.

There would also be quite a financial stream available for such from the domain registrars, who would clearly have to be part of any revolutionary consensus if they are not to have to pay cuts from domain fees to 2 root zone operators during a protracted competition between 2 root providers.

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Renegade NSA, GCHQ spies help fix Tor vulns, claims project boss

PyLETS

M\kes sense

If parts of GCHQ and the NSA need to use Tor to carry out their own investigations, which seems likely, they have the same kind of motivation to fix it as the US Navy had to fund its development in the first place. Doesn't mean other parts of GCHQ or the NSA can't have operations compromised by this development, but who expects the left and right hands in any secretive organisation to know what each other are doing anyway ? It's not as if everyone in GCHQ will know about any particular zero day vulnerabilities involved in any particular investigation, as knowledge will have to be restricted on a "need to know" basis in any such environment. Don't forget it was the NSA who developed SELinux - and open sourced their patch which provided this.

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Russian Tor network-wrecking effort takes bizarre turn

PyLETS

things are probably not what they seem

Maybe they are trying to convince Tor users in Russia that they haven't got a clue how to trace them. Well, they would, wouldn't they ?

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Email addresses in DNS records? We'll make a hash of it, says IETF

PyLETS

Advantage of DNSSEC

"Your data is only as safe as your CA's security." Under the current CA system, it's much worse than that, given that hacking the weakest CA in the target's OS or browser can result in issuance of a bad certificate capable of compromising any domain, regardless of whether or not the domain owner obtained a certificate from the hacked CA.

At least under DNSSEC, your security can be as good as that of your choice of TLD and registrar, and a compromise of the .com registrar doesn't compromise anything in .bank or .uk .

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Hurrah! Windfarms produce whopping ONE PER CENT of EU energy

PyLETS

Black start options

Rotating fossil fuel generators tend to need electricity to generate a magnetic field to generate electricity. Hydro is often designated for this purpose in grid black start planning.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_start

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ROBOT SEEDS to be scattered into upper atmosphere of JUPITER: NASA scheme

PyLETS
Alien

Just the start

Demonstrating the viability of such survivable "seeds" based on bouyancy and wind energy harvesting comes first. Then the 2nd generation needs the capacity to make more in their own likeness, with the 3rd generation able to communicate more intelligently, mutate and evolve. If so what's to stop the 4th generation launching space war on their creators ?

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London man arrested over $40 MILLION HFT flash crash allegations

PyLETS

choice of company name

His offence seems to be being a small guy doing what the larger guys whose HFT algorithms make the rules are doing and bragging about it. His choice of name for his offshore company seems to give the game away a bit too much for their liking: "Nav Sarao Milking Markets Limited."

See also: http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/04/british-futures-trader-arrested-as-primary-2010-flash-crash-suspect/

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Big changes proposed to DNS overseer ICANN

PyLETS

Would the ITU be any worse ?

I don't see problems with international level telephony codes managed by the ITU being sold off to the highest bidder. I guess we'd have a different set of problems in relation to bureaucracy and slowness of process, but I don't see the fact that member states of the ITU are not all shining democracies to be it's main problem. Slowness of process, to the extent this achieves political consensus, would probably be a relatively good thing in connection with the ICANN TLD sell off which shouldn't be occurring at all.

There would be an initial issue of technical competence, probably best solved by passing the managment of ICANN as it stands over to an ITU process to be defined.

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Torvalds' temptress comes of age: Xfce 4.12 hits the streets

PyLETS

split between Xubuntu and Lubuntu

The LXDE Lubuntu desktop runs extremely well on low RAM hardware such as my old netbook. I tend to prefer Xubuntu on better provisioned desktops. Haven't looked at Gnome or KDE for a few years since their developers seemed to lose the plot, though that may have changed since. The great thing about having choice in this environment is that all the Gnome/KDE whatever oriented applications seem to install and run fine on all the desktop manager options, so changing desktop managers doesn't require you to change your applications.

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Nuclear waste spill: How a pro-organic push sparked $240m blunder

PyLETS
Mushroom

Found in a piggery near me

Rumour has it that the escaping nuclear waste got mixed up with some genetically modified maize which was reused in commercial pig feed, and the pigkeeper is now breeding a new strain of mutant pigs which are sprouting wings and getting ready for take off. On somewhat better authority, Jeremy Clarkson is considering reducing his carbon footprint.

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Microsoft takes lid off .Net Common Language Runtime sauce

PyLETS

Re: Why?

Because the different product and technology divisions within Microsoft don't want to be bound together into an ultimate gamble where either all have to succeed together, or none will succeed at all. It's the same reason Microsoft want to sell Office on platforms they don't control. If they can get their technology working as well on Linux and Apple platforms this increases the market for services and support, even if they sell fewer licenses on Windows. If the .Net platform is sold based on support as opposed to product licensing they have no reason not to do this.

.Net also competes against Oracle Java, CPython and the GNU toolchain also, but it can't compete as well if it's limited to Windows platforms given these competitors are not so limited. Python runs on .Net (IronPython) and Java (Jython) platforms for the same kind of reason.

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Renewable energy 'simply WON'T WORK': Top Google engineers

PyLETS

Re: Naive -> "What’s needed are zero-carbon energy sources..."

The main problem with wind energy is storage, due to wind variability. Putting big reservoirs on the top of hills is expensive and unsightly. One option being looked at is storing excess wind energy in the gas grid, using C02 captured from residual fossil fuel plant in the medium term, and I guess from biofuel in the longer term. Again, all of this is feasible given acceptance of higher energy costs, but not a perfect totally "carbon free" solution during several decades of transition.

The alternative is much higher energy costs externalised into costs of sea level rise, more frequent storms and flooding etc.

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EVERYTHING needs crypto says Internet Architecture Board

PyLETS

DNSSEC ?

Well, it provides for the possibility of a somewhat better PKI than the broken one we use for HTTPS, where any of over 500 CAs can forge a certificate for any domain on the net. DNSSEC would not be a perfect PKI by any means, and there's no particular reason to trust ICANN as the holder of the keys to this kingdom either. But signatories of bogus NS records pointed to at managed zones can at least be held accountable. Such a bogus signed NS record for any next level down is observable and recordable, and once recorded and publicised, such would provide signed proof of bad intentions and actions wherever in the DNSSEC hierarchy registrar reputation needs to be protected.

DNSSEC also provides a fairly obvious place for certificated public key storage. For example, if you want to develop a networked application called foo, storing the public key for example.com at _foo.example.com seems fairly obvious. And given domain registrants already got the hassle of having to renew domains every year or 2, now's good time to move our business to DNSSEC domain friendly registrars in preference to those which are not. This could also save the cost of those stupid, expensive and near useless CA HTTPS certificates.

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Pentagon hacker McKinnon reinvents himself as SEO guru

PyLETS
Black Helicopters

He was a very naughty boy

And I'm very glad he's now able to use his skills to make an honest living. Should have been given a hundred hours community service by the local magistrate and the chance to get on with life much, much sooner. Instead he spent what should have been the best years of his life awaiting extradition and is still confined to the UK until the US legal system and politicians stop behaving like drooling idiots.

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LibreSSL crypto library leaps from OpenBSD to Linux, OS X, more

PyLETS

conflicting objectives

That's probably why the code got into a mess. Having a good testsuite will certainly help in refactoring. Problems this library has to deal with include doing integer arithmetic securely on 4096 bit numbers and larger and at high performance on different CPUs. And you can't afford to leave any clues in memory which might be reallocated to a different process afterwards. So you've got all this non-standard stuff done in many different ways, and need to avoid integer overflow and stack and heap smashing bugs as well, none of which you can develop automated tests for until you know about them.

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Revealed: SECRET DNA TEST SCANDAL at UN IP agency

PyLETS
Pirate

foxes and the management of hen houses

Talking of conflicts of interest, can any beneficiary of strong IP protection be trusted to present an unbiased view ? Surely the conflict of interest present in the behaviour of WIPO is dwarfed by the conflict of interest inherent in the simple existence of this organisation.

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Euro banks warned off Bitcoin as Canada regulates it

PyLETS

"disappear forever. Will it happen with bitcoin ??"

Unless the cypto protocols are broken and the system branches wildly without consensus about which branch is "authentic", I expect Bitcoins might be traded in 100 years, just as Penny Blacks are after they ceased to be carried by anyone's need to have letters delivered, amongst a historically inclined and nerdy trainspotterish sect. They probably won't generate many press articles though once they stop carrying some other historical baggage with them such as payment for blackmail demands, other than in the cryptocurrency equivalents of stamp-collector's magazines.

Of course this is all predicated on continuing interest in the "my CPU/GPU/Hashing farm is bigger than yours" electricity-wasting competition continuing.

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PyLETS

Re: A matter of scale

If you're interested in non-state currencies which have been proven to have operated at scale with a stable value standard for decades (since the 1930ies) have a look at Wirbank in Switzerland. If you are a Swiss SME with a good trading reputation, then you'll be able to get the cheapest mortgage finance in the world using this community currency, which is very widely used and accepted by and between Swiss SMEs. It's just like a LETS, in relation to how the accounting is done, except it's done as a professional and not as a voluntary operation, and credit control is done managerially rather than by providers of goods and services within the currency.

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PyLETS

State currencies not the only game in town

I'm a member of a LETS group which has operated for 21 years. Money earned that long ago is still spendable at par with conventional UK sterling at our trading events. You don't have to waste electricity to do double entry accounting within a closed group. And if you dislike conventional currencies as value standards, do the same kind of accounting using hours or minimum wage hours as your value standard at the cost of making it marginally more difficult for account-holders doing tax returns.

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PyLETS
Mushroom

Re: I'm not surprised

Bitcoin doesn't circumvent any legitimate businesses. The idea that it reduces money transfer fees can only operate for those willing to enter into risks (which carry costs of their own) much greater than those undergone by those using conventional markets. An argument could be made comparing Bitcoins against gambling tokens issued and redeemed at casino cages, but I don't think any casinos consider their business models to be threatened by Bitcoin.

It's a bubble speculation which has proved of some ongoing value to some cyber-criminals, drug dealers, botnet operators and digital blackmailers. The exchange value of a Bitcoin is predicated on a similar basis to the value of rare postage stamps, but is much less stable. These are man-made artefacts in deliberately limited editions of interest to collectors of such, and of no intrinsic interest to anyone else, unless your computer delivers you a notice telling you one is required as a fee to a blackmailer to recover the encryption key from a server operated by criminals or your data will be deleted.

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Bill Gates asks telcoms standards boffins to define future of money

PyLETS

Has to be multicurrency to be useful

Because many things can be currencies in different contexts. E.G. air miles, my supermarket's points, the balance I have with my local LETS, prepaid credits I have with Oyster or on my PAYG phone. And if physical cash is insecure, having to manage many physical kinds of cash in my wallet is worse. Pushing the idea that the whole world transacts using a single currency suits those interested in preventing competition so the usual suspects can get their rake offs.

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Running Cisco's VoIP manager? Four words you don't want to hear: 'Backdoor SSH root key'

PyLETS

Re: Hang on a minute…

SSH can be setup either to use a shared secret password, or to use public/private keypairs, where only the public key would have needed embedding, and clearly the latter approach is safer if slightly harder to setup. I've installed it using both approaches. Cisco had wanted to leave a way in for themselves and/or their spook friends without it becoming so easily exploitable and had thought a bit more carefully about this, they wouldn't have used the shared secret password approach.

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Anti-snoop Android 'Blackphone' sees the light of day

PyLETS

NSA behind this ?

You can't achieve security without trust at some level. That's looking at it from the point of view of risk management which is possible, and not full risk elimination which isn't possible.

You can make whatever conclusions you like of the fact Phil Zimmerman is their CEO. He was the author of PGP and faced a grand jury trial many years ago which was eventually thrown out, based on the allegation his authorship and release of PGP contravened export regulations which classified crypto software as equivalent to munitions at the time. You can form whatever opinion you like of Phil's motivations in doing this, and of his ability effectively to select and manage whichever professional engineers he has chosen to collaborate with him on this.

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PyLETS

anonymous phone purchase

If it's PAYG, get a friend or agency to buy and register it for you. Illegal in some countries, but effectively unenforceable.

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Bitcoin was illegal in California? Whoops, governor fixes that 165-year-old money law

PyLETS

Not enforceable

Bit like the law which required London cabbies to have a bale of straw in the boot repealed in the 1960ies, long after anyone was worried about starving cab horses. Ultimately that kind of law would prevent any kind of exchange or contract from being legal unless one side paid legal tender currency to the other.

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London teen charged over Spamhaus mega-DDoS attacks

PyLETS

Pick of jobs

Robert Morris didn't do too badly. But computer crims didn't have to waste 10 years of their life awaiting threatened extradition then. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_worm

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Finding the formula for the travelling salesman problem

PyLETS

Re: Worked on something similar to this.

Me too, in the early eighties. I didn't even know then the name of the problem. Ended up optimising 3 variables, 1. The time on the CNC drilling tool used to drill a stack of PCBs, 2. The machine time on the much more expensive mainframe computer, and 3. the number of days programming effort.

I seem to remember I did it by dividing up the rectangular area into a number of smaller squares with suitable start and end nodes within each square to minimise movement of the drill head between squares, optimised the route within each square and moved between adjacent squares.

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Today's get-rich-quick scheme: Build your own bank

PyLETS

Re: Been there, done that. - well more or less depending how you view it

"The user id doesn't work on your demo app."

Fixed it for now.

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PyLETS

Been there, done that. - well more or less depending how you view it

If the people providing the goods and services being sold decide the credit rating of people doing the buying, within a group of people who trade with each other and keep score , you don't entirely need the BofE issued stuff, you can create, circulate and destruct some of your own as part of the process. I've even coded a webapp to keep score , it's all just double entry accounting.

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'CAPTAIN CYBORG': The wild-eyed prof behind 'machines have become human' claims

PyLETS
Black Helicopters

the terminator is already very nearly here

If you were a known Al Quada operative organising training in Waziristan with a known face, would you trust the drone overhead not to be making targeting and missile launch decisions itself based upon facial recognition ?

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Egghead dragged over coals for mining Bitcoin on uni supercomputer

PyLETS
Devil

Interesting to know

What proportion of newly mined bitcoins (and increasingly transaction charges) are using stolen CPU capacity (botnets) and unauthorised use of electricity.

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UK govt preps World War 2 energy rationing to keep the lights on

PyLETS

Re: Yup..

"Pity that the most crumpled places in the UK, i.e. those best suited to hydro-storage, are those bits most likely to devolve and claim independence."

Matters from one point of view, but not this one given suitable market incentives. Eire has been considering using their western mountain ranges for pumped storage. Not so much for their own needs, but to sell more reliable renewable electricity to the UK. Same applies to increasing interconnector capacity across the North Sea (as well as the Irish Sea), enabling access to Norweigan hydro and pumped storage on a commercial basis.

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NSA: Inside the FIVE-EYED VAMPIRE SQUID of the INTERNET

PyLETS

Who cares about commercial crypto ?

When this all depends upon previously amateur stuff like OpenSSL where they found gaping holes due to the guy who maintains it having to do something else for a living ? Actually that was the case until last month, when organisations realised they were sufficiently dependent upon it that they started paying to have it maintained. http://opensslfoundation.com/freesupport.html

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Apple: We'll tailor Swift to be a fast new programming language

PyLETS
Coffee/keyboard

Re: complexity and obsequiousness

Block structure based on typographical convention has the interesting effect of encouraging you to use the main roads more because of these minor speed bumps, rather than trying to construct very long journeys using seemingly more familiar and understandable but minor and tangled roads and lanes.

For projects requiring more than a couple of hundred lines of code, you should generally be focussed on the source files, packages, modules, classes and objects concepts relating to the problem and solution, not on how you get to do function, loop and branch control done in order to patch together something that just about works but is neither scalable nor maintainable.

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Boffins pen 'Guide to better spamming'

PyLETS
Boffin

Re: Fraudulent Source?

"How do you decide that?"

Look up the IP address of the SMTP client sending to your SMTP server, or the last SMTP server in the Received: header chain you trust. If the reverse DNS PTR record indicates it's a dynamic host, reject it. If you're its ISP providing a smarthost for it, rate limit it. If its address is in zen.spamhaus.org reject it. That will get rid of about 95% of spam.

You can then get rid of another 4% or so using more complex measures such as maintaining your own DNSBL, using Spamassassin, ClamAV, SPF, URLBLs.

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Sony on the ropes after revising losses UP to $1.3 BEEELLION

PyLETS

Schizophrenic company

One side used to make fantastic innovative and high quality electronic consumer goods. Which were excellent at copying things. Sounds onto tape. Tape into sound. TV signals into pictures.

The other side tried to make a business out of media and copyright and wanted to stop the other side of the business making it easy to copy content easily or perfectly.

The solution - split Sony into 2 companies where one side isn't trying to sabotage the other.

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Über-secure Blackphone crypto-mobe spills its silicon guts

PyLETS

Re: If that's not a typo...

The level of security audit and testing feasible on hardware and software is proportional to its age.

So if you really want a secure system, you don't want the latest shiny. You do want something that's been around for a while and has been very heavily used by many curious people willing to publish what they have discovered.

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It's spade sellers who REALLY make a killing in a gold rush: It's OVER for graphics card mining

PyLETS
Mushroom

So why should the miner care

If the mining is done on pwned hardware anyway ? The beneficiary doesn't pay for the electricity used to run pwned hardware. It's an externality.

Given the amount of pwned hardware on the planet, it seems economically improbable that anyone paying for their own rigs will be competitive in this murky world against pwned botnet mining.

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Why won't you DIE? IBM's S/360 and its legacy at 50

PyLETS

Cut my programming teeth on S/390 TSO architecture

We were developing CAD/CAM programs in this environment starting in the early eighties, because it's what was available then, based on use of this system for stock control in a large electronics manufacturing environment. We fairly soon moved this Fortran code onto smaller machines, DEC/VAX minicomputers and early Apollo workstations. We even had an early IBM-PC in the development lab, but this was more a curiosity than something we could do much real work on initially. The Unix based Apollo and early Sun workstations were much closer to later PCs once these acquired similar amounts of memory, X-Windows like GUIs and more respectable graphics and storage capabilities, and multi-user operating systems.

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WIMPs wipe each other out in giant radiating spot at galaxy's centre

PyLETS

Re: Interesting, but

If it is closed and curved, and you could see the same object more than once, you wouldn't see exactly the same object, more a much younger and older version of the same object. Chances are you can't see all the way around in time to see anything more than once in that way, because the big bang occurred more recently than would make that possible. It's possible to see the same object through more than one tiny variations in direction, due to gravitational lensing. But it would be a very major cosmological discovery if we started to observe a provably same, distant and early galaxy in more than one very different direction.

What is even more weird is that the further you look in any direction, the closer you get to the same big bang singularity which existed in a much smaller region. That's a bit like the idea of a universe being like an expanding balloon but with an extra dimension - we can look in any direction on the surface of a balloon and you get back to the same point when the much smaller balloon hadn't been inflated.

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USA opposes 'Schengen cloud' Eurocentric routing plan

PyLETS
Big Brother

So who are they speaking for anyway ?

There already is a European data network, and no particular reason for messages not to be most efficiently routed within it, as I'm sure very many are. But that doesn't stop a free citizen or business operating within an EU or Shengen country locating data and servers wherever personal preference, business or legal issues require.

I'm free to locate my server wherever it suits me and commerce offers suitable facilities, and having some crat or politician telling me I can't locate it where I want to reduces the reasons for me to want to locate it closer to home.

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