* Posts by Fat Northerner

56 posts • joined 4 Jul 2011

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Five Eyes nations must purge terrorists from the web, says Theresa May

Fat Northerner

Re: Five Eyes nations must purge terrorists from the web, says Theresa May

I'll believe it when they stop blacklisting their own loyal citizens, for simply pointing out the obvious, because it endangers to careers of connected families with arts degrees who went to the right schools.

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Deutsche Bank to axe 'excessively complex' IT, slash 9,000 jobs

Fat Northerner

Colin Computer Scientist comes crawling from Uni.

With pathological need to reinvent the wheel in his favourite language.

Simply refuses to use anything Microsoft. It must be a framework on a blog, completely unsupported and with no fixed code base, but has lots of programming by side effect. Doesn't do half the things C# does, but it's not Microsoft because Bill is the devil.

Treats the whole organisation as a place which is there to fund his "creativity"

Repeat until bankrupt.

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Blighty's GCHQ stashes away 50+ billion records a day on people. Just let that sink in

Fat Northerner

Re: #include <std/quotes/spiderman>

If you want to control the government Daggerchild, you have to get them to do what you want. The same is true for facilitating the protection of our women folk.

And you can't just tell them to do it, because they won't. Politicians have close protection, houses in Primrose hill, and total response of the police. They just don't give a f*ck about you for more than one day every five years.

So if you want your womenfolk protected, from nutters which you know have unique abilities, then seed the idea with the intelligence services as to how they'll be caught, and act in that fashion against MPs. They will then fund the security service's ability to detect you, and by extension, the nutters.

When they look closely into you, they'll see you're just some capricious average joe, and aside from listening to your daughter masturbate through bugs built into plug sockets, tracking your every movement, and following you on holidays abroad, there'll not be any really intrusive privacy concerns.

The only real downside is you'll lose security clearance, but who wants it with so many Common Purpose chippy shouldered fourth wave feminist b1tches with humanities degrees working in the public sector.

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Did GCHQ illegally spy on you? Now you can find out – from this page

Fat Northerner

Re: Have you thought about resurrecting your project?

They have

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Fat Northerner

Re: My spook experience (mid 1980s)

They did.

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Fat Northerner

Re: The answer is Yes.

Ah. Brilliant, the non-existentialism argument.

"Everything exists at least conceptually, because if you can think of something which doesn't, you've made it so by imagining it."

(That's how thick middle class kids get onto Oxbridge philosophy courses.)

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Fat Northerner

Re: Fuck's sake.

" but if you weren't on a list before you signed up, you sure are now"

You were anyway. There's no if.

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Fat Northerner

Re: Are GCHQ spying on me...?

And always have been.

It's not the spying that bothers me. It's the 800K in lost earnings through being more valuable to someone unable to get a job, than employed.

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Fat Northerner

Re: Very old joke...

This isn't a joke.

This is how a major world crisis was averted.

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Hey, folks. Meet the economics 'genius' behind Jeremy Corbyn

Fat Northerner

Re: Next time, do some research first

The BoE are full of retards.

If you asked me in my job to solve a problem, and I couldn't, then I'd be sacked.

There are too many people from excellent universities, with high grades in subjects which attract thick people, getting into power.

I'd give every one in the Treasury, the BoE and the FCA, the request to solve it or be sacked.

This would then yield results.

Too many innumerate posh middle class management types.

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Fat Northerner

Re: It's OK

We've spent far more working on the M6, M1 etc since it was built, than it cost to make.

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Fat Northerner

Re: It's OK

Quite. The world is full of retards, who read books on solutions for a different time, and lack the brains to work their own out. We call them economists.

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Fat Northerner

The UK hasn't had Margaret Thatcher Mk 2 at all.

Margaret Thatcher fixed the problems the country had by applying intelligence to solve the problems.

The four stupid retards took her solution, and kept on applying it, because they simply lacked the brains to know what to do next.

This is like all the economists in world, thinking, "Duh, Keynes did X, and Friedman did Y. That gives us two possible solutions." The problem isn't that Keynes' solution and Friedman's solutions didn't work, because they did, at the time. The problem is that no economist since has come up with anything new, because they're all thick as pig shit.

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Fat Northerner

Re: You don't need a 150 IQ to have a custom icon as Anonymous Coward

Do you get one for free when you pass180?

It's quite funny. Because the Tories halt spending, and inheritance bails them out, after the labour party wastes money on people who'll never pay it back, and labels it investment.

The collective G of all the economists in government, except C's (who is obviously really bright, and nothing like all the other economists,) is less than the night shift in Google's cleaning department.

Economics is a subject middle class semi numerate kids take, because their parents know it's clean and overpaid.

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GDS denim brigade flees GOV.UK after Web2.0rhea MESSIAH Bracken departs

Fat Northerner

Re: Hundreds of people who've never delivered anything.

Architecture is for middle class kids who like the building trade but couldn't make anything if their lives depended on it , to keep the money in house. Builders think they're wan×ers.

Economics is for middle class kids who like sums, but can't count, to keep the money in house. Mathematicians think they're wan×ers.

Politicians is for middle class kids who want to manage, but can't do anything, to keep the money in house. Company owners think they're wan×ers.

Programme management is for middle class kids who want to sound more important.

It's the nature of the useless to want to be hands off, and well paid for it.

Software architecture is no different. The ones who can are obstructed by the ones who can't at every turn.

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Online armour: Duncan Campbell's tech chief on anonymity 101

Fat Northerner

Completely pointless.

All of these, (ok, most of them,) will one day be cracked.

And they won't be announcing it, so unless you can guess, you've had it.

There's a law of natural selection which says the prey and the predator continually evolve to outdo the other. This is all this is.

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This box beams cafes' Wi-Fi over 4kms so you can surf in obscurity

Fat Northerner

Re: My first thought was.

My first was... Given access to the world's communications, by someone using the same frequency as mobile phone masts, simply listen to them via them.

Pointless.

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Fat Northerner

I don't see why anyone is bothering to try...

GCHQ, and NSA, you know, the organisations which employ people (who also have children and loved ones,) both exist to find out what is being said to whom, by whom.

So as soon as you start playing clever buggers, you stand out like a sore thumb, and they have billion dollar budgets.

It's just a complete waste of time. They'll still find out what you're saying, but they'll spend more of your tax doing it.

We have no privacy, but so what? There are many, many people who've been under total observation by both these organisations, because they're... well strange, for over a decade, and they're still free to give their strange opinions, crack jokes about killing politicians, slag off their council or the BBC, or their wife, school etc. None of these people are political prisoners.

Trying to hide communications from the mainstream just costs the taxpayer's money.

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Global spy system ECHELON confirmed at last – by leaked Snowden files

Fat Northerner

Re: ECHELON and 9/11

As was said before, on a BBC documentary... They were listening to their calls, they just didn't know they were already in the US.

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Fat Northerner

Re: Meh.

I agree completely.

My government can know everything about me, (and it does.)

It's what it does with the information that's important.

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Fat Northerner

Re: Nice article...

The science had been invented to allow them to establish it would happen.

There's been documentary after documentary which has clarified this.

I think the most pertinent one contains a line, I paraphrase, "We knew everything about these guys, names, dob, history, allegiances etc. What we didn't know was that they were on the US soil at the time."

The people that protect us, (and despite me never having worked for any of them, I still believe that they are there for that, despite having the view of several miscarriages of justice which were necessary for the bigger picture,) had in the previous two years asked if they could test new developments in mathematics, because they were finding it very difficult to identify IT aware nutters using conventional means.

The US senate refused permission in 1999. This was on the BBC. The US Senate was full of the same kinds of people who populate most parliaments, e.g. non scientific, ego centricists, but they did do their job of protecting civil liberties.

It was an inevitable consequence of an IT aware Al Queda, that sooner or later the senate's refusal to allow exclusion based geo-locint, would result in a catastrophe, and the whole Big Data science has been a state sponsored attempt to harness the world's brains to find nutters, in my opinion.

I will go to my grave, hopefully a long time from now, still supporting these people, despite terrible miscarriages of justice, because the cost benefit analysis shows we are better off with them, especially if they have to justify themselves.

There have been dozens of documentaries which reference the Senate's refusal to allow geo-loc analysis on nutters, largely because had they done it, they'd have found them.

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Fat Northerner

Re: Where are the OBEs?

As far as I'm concerned the government uses the honours system to keep people quiet. It's bribery imo.

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Fat Northerner

Re: @moiety

Your grandchildren will find out under the 100 year rule. Hahaha :-)

Joking aside, I'm a person who believes science rarely goes backwards, and I also believe, because I have a very lopsided brain I'm of the view that people who don't understand something think its impossible, because they just can't conceive it.

They usually don't take too kindly to being told that there's someone cleverer than them either. It comes in two forms, resentment, and attempts at job protection.

As you can see, I can't string two sentences together.

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Fat Northerner

Re: Dumb and Dumber Still Do as Stupid Does

"Is the Wilson Doctrine being adhered to by the police and security services and still expected to be by executive Parliamentary systems administrations?"

Hahahahaha!

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Fat Northerner

Unlucky for Terrorists.

I personally couldn't be bothered in the slightest, about plug sockets that are listening devices, phones that are tracking devices/bugs/ etc... or even enormous databases that hold all kinds of data on everyone and allow all kinds of experimental algorithmic mining to find out what everyone's motivations, hopes, wishes, and fetishes are.

I'd even help them come up with the maths if I could.

What does bother me is the entire concept of what they are able to then do, to people who only want best for their country, because they may have politically different, or critical views, simply because it advances their career or personal interests, with no visibility or compensation for loss.

It is simply wrong. Not least when you see how well off, people who've basically committed child rape and murder by other people, and they've been protected too.

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Fat Northerner

Re: @moiety

" There are too many people and too few terrorists, so if your false positive rate is anywhere near the realm of the possible you will have far too many leads to follow (a "99.99% accurate" test would give you 3,000 leads in the UK alone - it would take something like 30,000 field operatives --- and probably another 10,000 support staff --- to keep an eye on them 24x7)."

I heard that on a train in 1998, by some guy who thought he was clever. It was no more true then, than it is now.

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We tried using Windows 10 for real work and ... oh, the horror

Fat Northerner

Can anyone tell me...

Can you at install time, make it look and feel, and act exactly the same as windows 7?

I don't want stupid boxes.

I explicitly want cloud connectivity disabled at install.

I don't want to give my email address to use it.

I'm not interested in apps.

etc.

Other people will know better than me. Should I get it? (No MS shills please.)

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Microsoft picks up shotgun, walks 'Modern apps' behind the shed

Fat Northerner

I personally love nothing more...

Than having to remember 90% of what I'm working on, while I focus on the one thing that Microsoft thinks I'm most involved in, at any given moment.

There's nothing so useful in fending off Alzheimer's as having to remember a map in detail for instance, while I'm trying to explain a route to someone.

Thank god Microsoft know what's best for me. I don't need windows. Great race, the Romans.

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Microsoft: Profit DECIMATED because you people aren't buying PCs

Fat Northerner

Re: Be patient, it's coming!

>UEFI secureboot = better security

Is this what's stopping me from slotting an SSD in?

>Windows 10 - its great, try out the tech preview

Don't want it.

>Windows App store - Easier access to applications

Don't want it. I want to own the software.

>Forced cloud - Umm no, there is nothing forced on the user whatsoever

How do you disable all cloud, for all time, for all applications at install?

>Subscriptions - an option in addition to the traditional perpetual rights, use whatever suits you

I don't rent anything.

>nice try but you are clearly talking out your backside

Say what you like. I'm not upgrading.

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Fat Northerner

Everything they've done since the Ribbon was terrible.

The Ribbon, Windows 8, Tiles, Clouding everything, Homegroups, Libraries.

I hate it all.

It is the story of life though isn't it.

1. Company becomes uber success, and government then demands they employ care in the community types.

2. They then outnumber the techies who build it, and by weight of numbers demand a say.

The same has happened in government.

The health service doctors are managed by secretaries.

People with IQs of 160 and degrees in engineering build Hawker Harriers which are given away by people who have IQs of 90 and degrees in History.

Lions led by donkeys.

The mistake was to allow predominantly female and metrosexual sales staff direct product development.

I won't buy windows 10 either. I don't want my data on someone else's server, and I want to buy a product, not rent it. You rent anything that flies, floats or f**ks. Everything else, you buy.

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In three hours, Microsoft gave the Windows-verse everything it needed

Fat Northerner

The answer is obvious.

The world is populated by "UI Experts" who've never written a line of code in their life, they are "Experts" in "Experience"

I wouldn't trust any of these people to toast bread.

So, can we have a button, top right, which switches between "Their seamless experience" and the old fashioned Windows interface, which simply worked, with an added Up button in explorer, the return to a search which radically just searched files when you wanted to, and didn't wander off searching things just in case you wanted to, and then only searched things it thinks you might be interested in, or marketeers have paid for you to see first.

Completely radical, I recognise, but with the removal of the dozens of background processes, letting Microsoft approve and be aware of everything you do, Windows would absolutely fly.

I don't want whole screens of information blocking everything I do, because I can't minimize it or shrink it without removing it. I don't want a window, just because it's playing music, to look like the turner prize. I just want text menus, buttons that look like buttons and so on.

I don't want an Icon which is what they think save as is, today, and a different icon in the next version of the product. I don't want big flat tiles. If I want to know the news, I'll look at it. If I want my wife to see my porn, I'll show her it, and so I don't want them putting pictures on folder icons showing publically what's in folders that I'm not looking at. I don't want libraries. I want to know exactly where I've put something. I don't want aero peeks. I want all the rubbish chopped off and every CPU cycle going towards improving the performance.

Google is no better. They used to have links to websites along the top. News, shopping etc. Now they're "Apps" and you have to click a link to "Show the Apps" and then wander around looking for it in the morass of coloured pictures.

Jesus.

Why can't Microsoft get it into their thick skull. I don't want their latest style experiment. A computer is a tool for working.

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Women crap at parking: Official

Fat Northerner

It thought it was almost universal.

Men have 50% more accidents than women, but drive 2.25 times the distance on average.

Before the European union feminists changed the law to get men's pensions, Insurers always used to go by women having 50% more accidents per million miles.

Men used to cost more to insure when young, because their typical accident was a 100mph motorway shunt or losing it on a bend, or taking off on a humpback bridge in the dark and landing in a house.

And while I've not had any of those for 15 years, women's accidents were misjudging corners, distances etc, and scratching paintwork.

And while 80% of them involved male drivers, being hit by a woman would still make me in that statistic even though I wasn't to blame.

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I, for one, welcome our robotic communist jobless future

Fat Northerner

Forget retirement.

There'll be world war three in under 10 years.

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First rigid airship since the Hindenburg cleared for outdoor flight trials

Fat Northerner

Re: COSH - new idea???

"Didn't know it was a new-ish idea"

It wasn't a new idea, I solved this in about 1976, around the time of the drop in aluminium canisters into floors safes, when I thought that filling the safe with mercury would bring them to the top.

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Elon Musk to release open source Hyperloop plans in August

Fat Northerner

As it looks like everyone else's alresdy said. Should read the comments before posting, not just the story.

Apologies.

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Fat Northerner

Sounds like a vacuum tube plug.

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Ex-CIA techie Edward Snowden: I am the NSA PRISM deepthroat

Fat Northerner

Re: Six degrees of Kevin Bacon ...

That is logical. Do you think perhaps piping it to dev \ null would be useful? What are your views?

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Fat Northerner

Re: War on Terror or war on us?

You won't get an answer.

Thankfully, neither of us are hypocrites.

I support the oppression of foreigners to get oil, and have no problem therefore criticising the government if they don't secure it.

I do however stand side by side with your stated intent to not hold it against the government, when your children and or mother dies for the lack of fuel for an ambulance. Your stance has principles I could only wish for.

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Microsoft SQL Server 14 man: 'Nothing stops a Hekaton transaction'

Fat Northerner

Re: Been asking for it for years for store and forward concepts.

The other thing is that I've started turning up at places where they want to squeeze more performance out of a box, and aside from one or two massive write only audit tables, the whole of the rest of the DB would fit, indexes and all, into ram with tons to spare.

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Fat Northerner

Re: Been asking for it for years for store and forward concepts.

My idea was a system, where each node models say, "A low paid shop assistant," and the "transaction log" is merely a "Stock Added", "Stock sold list", "Schema change" thus providing a very long feed and audit trail.

Before each move, the node asks the central server, or on of it's neighbours, if there are any more transactions, and applies them before it does anything.

Thus, if you want more machines, you simply add another one, and set latest transaction to zero. It then rapidly builds the store representation from nothing, after which it announces it is ready to serve.

Of course, the cloud bypasses lots of the problems it was intended to solve, but only if you trust it.

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Fat Northerner

Been asking for it for years for store and forward concepts.

After I wrote an ecommerce website, my first venture in, I came up with the concept of millions of nodes using an identical code base, with a shared transaction log. I've been waiting for this solution for ever.

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Windows 8.1 Start button SPOTTED in the wild

Fat Northerner

click start get metro.

But the whole point was to boot to windows and completely remove metro.

Why doesn't Microsoft sack all these useless currants?

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Windows 8 'sales' barely half as good as Microsoft claims

Fat Northerner

Re: Splayd

I thought it was the viners splade.

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Google Glass will SELF-DESTRUCT if flogged on eBay

Fat Northerner

Re: What gives ANY company the right...

How can they know who they're spying on if they are sold outside their control?

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Visual Studio 2012 Update 2 delivers modest improvements

Fat Northerner

Re: Slick!

Can you tell what is a button yet?

I have been holding off because it reminds me of metro.

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Windows is the OS of the cloud, says Microsoft

Fat Northerner

Re: Microsoft in full desperate mode trying to mimic Apple and failing completely at it...

I too thought Metro was awful, until I tried it out for a few days. After you get used to it, and use it the way it was intended, and get the work arounds in**, then you realise that under it all, Windows 8 is screaming fast.

** (Just before anyone at MS thinks I'm complimenting Metro, I'm not. I'm actually complementing it. My work arounds for Metro is to completely remove all the buttons, except for the desktop one, (so I can get back there when I end up on the Metro page by accident,) then write a small winform app, which I've called "Start". It opens a menu page with stuff in I've described in an XML document, and shells them.)

Win 8 really is fast, it's just that Metro promotes the usability of a deaf blind quadroplegic. Try coordinating work between two metro apps at the same time. I'll bet the number of people who could do it, is less than the count of Mother Theresa's lesbian lovers.

Microsoft. What are you doing? Wake up!

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