* Posts by collinsl

27 posts • joined 29 Jun 2011

BBC Trust: 'LA LA LA I'M NOT LISTENING' to this DMI mega-tech FAIL

collinsl

Sports PAs at it again?

"By late 2011 Sports production staff in their shiny new Salford offices were buying off-the-shelf systems"

So the sports PAs were being ridiculed in the 1970s/80s by internal staff for being dim, but now they appear to be ahead of the curve. What changed?

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Antarctic ice shelf melt 'lowest EVER recorded, global warming is NOT eroding it'

collinsl

Re: Lewis isn't evil

I notice that in your post you state that "the only people allowed to have opinions are"

I find it extremely disturbing that you find it so easy to trample on the rights of the individual to express an opinion. I am not saying you have to assign any weight to the opinion, but to deny someone the right to speak (which is essentially what you are doing) is very disturbing and smacks of some of the worst dictatorships in the world.

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collinsl

Re: Point 3

I'm offensive and I find the "Pommie" remark British!

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Unlocking CryptoLocker: How infosec bods hunt the fiends behind it

collinsl

Re: Russia or Eastern Europe?

Unless of course the team is in some other country and is just obfuscating themselves to be in Russia/Eastern Europe?

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Mandela memorial. Yup, let's SNAP A SELFIE, say grinning Obama, Cameron

collinsl

Does no-one remember the "working funeral" concept from Yes Prime Minister? The whole point of a funeral of a famous world leader is for other world leaders to gather and conduct governmental business outside the media spotlight. So I'm sure that's what Obama was attempting with Thorning-Schmidt.

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How UK air traffic control system was caught asleep on the job

collinsl

Re: The system that crashed ..

That aricle is from when the centre was being built 10 years ago, and the system envisaged there was implemented successfully some years ago.

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collinsl

Re: Odd.

As someone who used to work for NATS I can't say very much, but what I can say is that we provide the infrastructure and radar services for the millitary air controllers these days, so they had the same problems we did.

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British support for fracking largely unmoved by knowledge of downsides

collinsl

Re: Green fatigue

what tortoises? Last time I looked, it was four elephants standing on the back of a turtle.

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collinsl

Re: Green fatigue

If you have unequivocal and unimpeachable evidence to support this, we would all love to see it.

But, until then, let's keep trying to find evidence both ways, in a fair and reasonable manner, mmmkay?

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collinsl

Re: In Answer to your questions

re point 6: it's weekly now - new rules. Sorry!

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Tech titans team up to complain about US government spy requests

collinsl

"It's a contradiction in terms, you can be open or you can have government"

Now who was it that said that?

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Reports: NSA has compromised most internet encryption

collinsl
FAIL

Ironic Much?

To the bottom-right of this article is an ad for...

GCHQ recruitment.

Ironic much?

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'Catastrophic failure' of 3D-printed gun in Oz Police test

collinsl
FAIL

Plastic guns are all very well, better if they fragment on shooting, but where is the actual threat?

They can't be used on aeroplanes etc as it would be hard/impossible to smuggle ammunition, and without ammunition they are just lumps of plastic with a nail in.

And you can buy a proper, multi-round gun on the black market for £50-100 rather than spending £2000 in polymer (or whatever) so why bother at all?

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Attention, CIOs: Stop outsourcing or YOU will never retire

collinsl

As a starting graduate I feel that £26k is a decent starting wage, considering the difficulties that I would have in getting a starting job in the USA, as I don't have the requisite experience for a visa. I also think that £26k is not correct. I am currently job hunting before I finish uni this year, and most of the positions I am looking at as a junior network/systems administrator are more like £22k average.

And I can confirm that the university course I have been on has taught me very little. I now know a bit about C, have learned and forgotten a bit about Java (useless flawed lump that it is), a fair bit about the very basics of networking, and a bit about configuring routers and switches using the CLI. I have not been taught, however, anything at all about almost any system or network administration task that you could mention, like how to properly make a backup plan or what backplane speed is, or how to configure a VoIP phone, or how PoE works, or how to configure any server other than apache or IIS (or the very basics of this is how you follow the Active Directory wizard). I have essentially spent about £13,000 (in tuition fees alone) paying a university to give me somewhere warm to be bored, not to mention the cost of feeding myself or having somewhere to live.

I know the stuff I have learned is good grounding and may be useful, but most of the topics I have found out about through internet research have not been taught at university and likely won't be until years from now.

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Boeing outlines fix for 787 batteries

collinsl

Insulation is necessary to prevent the batteries freezing at -53 degrees C (or colder) whilst in flight.

The electrical tape is there to attempt to prevent thermal runaway by insulating each cell against the others (obviously this didn't work).

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collinsl

Re: I put my money on...

As the incidents happened on the ground it would appear that overdrawing is the problem, not overcharging. A plane's batteries are recharged in-flight by power from the engines. On the ground the batteries are used to power cockpit equipment whilst the plane's engines are not running. Normally on the ground the APU (Auxiliary power unit) is running to provide in-cabin lighting, seat power, AVOD (Audio Visual On Demand) equipment & galley power (etc) and power to the cockpit equipment. Starting the APU draws power from the batteries, much like a car engine. Bleed air from the APU is used to start the main engines as hot air is needed.

In the case of the 787 Boeing, in their infinite wisdom, appear to have thought something like this: "Wow, we have this really cool new battery technology that gives us more power for longer. We use the APU for power on the ground but this uses expensive jet fuel. Why not transfer some of the load from the APU to the batteries whilst on the ground? This is SO COOL!" This is a good idea, but they appear to have the current requirements too close to the endurance limit of the batteries.

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Kirk to beam up chat with ISS astronaut on Thursday

collinsl

Why William f*@&£%g Shatner?

Why must they choose one of the nastiest people on earth to host this event? Shatner is nasty to people because he can. Why not get Sir Patrick Stewart to do it instead?

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Bring out your dead: Reg readers reveal filthy, filthy PCs...

collinsl

Maybe someone who thought that computer should actually work rather than overheating every three minutes...

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Home Sec: Let us have Snoop Charter or PEOPLE WILL DIE

collinsl

Fix regular policing first!

Theresa May is busy destroying the police service by cutting office numbers, and increasing paperwork. The police are stretched beyond breaking point and morale is at rock bottom and now she wants to give them something else to work at. With that resources?

I say fix regular policing first by giving back the 30% cut from the budget and then add another 10% on that, and then worry about passing new legislation increasing the work of the police!

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UK air traffic controller lands 6,000-seater VDI on flashy Violin arrays

collinsl

Re: No problems will be incurred by air traffic control

The reference to 6000 people was only used by the Register. There are far fewer people in the organisation however a smaller system would have been too small.

There are about 3000 support staff, of which 85% or so are engineers or engineering managers. The rest are Project Planners, HR, Legal, Finance etc. There are about 400 ATCOs on duty at any one time, with three watches throughout the day & night.

These figures are from my memory and may not be completely accurate.

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collinsl
Alert

No problems will be incurred by air traffic control

As someone who has recently left NATS I would like to clarify that the new desktop infrastructure is for the engineering and planning side of the business, not the air traffic control side. The air traffic controllers use custom systems developed within NATS whilst controlling. This project is merely a desktop refresh for the "office workers" within the business.

Let me stress again, this is totally safe and will have no flight impact at all, otherwise the information would not have been released.

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Gaping 'open data' loophole could leave your privates on display

collinsl
Joke

Sounds familiar...

...That's where I remember this from! Something very similar to this was in Yes Minister!

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Restaurant takes the piss, recycles it as fertiliser

collinsl

Re: But, as the BOFH would

I agree, if I were to attend this venue I would want at least money off my food as I am providing a donation to the company to keep their fertiliser costs down. This should lead to cheaper food. This is the only reason I would be willing to surrender my I.P. rights to the company, and without this I wouldn't donate.

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Boffins demo time-warp cloaking device

collinsl
Alien

I was under the impression that the Federation (IE us) was banned from owning cloaking technology?

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Yahoo! seeds Hadoop startup on open source dream

collinsl

Where! Are! All! The! Exclamation! Points! In! A! Title! About! Yahoo!?

Where! Are! All! The! Exclamation! Points! In! A! Title! About! Yahoo!?

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