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* Posts by Ian Tunnacliffe

56 posts • joined 13 Jun 2007

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Swedish 'Future minister' doesn't do social media

Ian Tunnacliffe
FAIL

Re: "Please fax any responses [....]"

Ah, no it doesn't.

There are still a gazillion messages an hour flowing around the airline industry whose format was originally designed to be carried on store and forward teletype networks (not telex - that's a circuit switched network) but they are more or less universally carried on IP networks nowadays. Just like everything else.

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Does my mass look big in this? Roly-poly galaxy El Gordo more porky than first feared

Ian Tunnacliffe

Notation

Serious point here amongst the smart arse ones. If you are going to report on stories like this involving very big numbers do you think you could use exponential notation? We've probably all got our minds around the idea that a billion is more usually 10^9 rather than 10^12, but trillions and quadrillions? Much better to avoid ambiguity I would have thought.

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Who’s Who: a Reg quest to find the BEST DOCTOR

Ian Tunnacliffe

Hartnell as Number 2 but Eccleston wins. Hands down. No contest.

I saw all the early series but lost contact during and after University in the late 70s when telly in general played a very small part in my life.

I watched the first episode of the reboot with curiosity but not expecting all that much. He snagged me at

"Lots of planets have a North".

And in the classical star manner he left us wanting more. Lots more.

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Digital radio may replace FM altogether - even though nobody wants it

Ian Tunnacliffe

Re: DAB Bashing

Experience of DAB depends almost entirely on location. I live in the IT workers' paradise of the Thames Valley - on the A4 between Slough and Maidenhead to be precise - and there is just one windowsill in my house where a strategically placed DAB set can (usually) get some sort of signal. I have a semi-built-in system in my kitchen that uses an external aerial to receive DAB reasonably effectively. Apart from that, forget it.

That's point one.

Point 2 is that even if you had decent signal coverage DAB receivers are heavy, bulky and power hungry. If you are away from mains power for more than a couple of hours then your DAB receiver rapidly morphs into a brick. And if you are on mains power, chances are you are online too so can use Internet radio. Failing that, the radio signals from Sky or Freeview telly.

So, where DAB works quite well there are alternatives that work just as well, and where FM is the best solution DAB hardly works at all.

In this case El Reg is perfectly correct to lead the resistance to a compulsory switch. If it gets a bit tedious for your taste, well you don't have to read the articles.

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Baywatch babe Pamela Anderson battles bullfighting

Ian Tunnacliffe

Re: It's pretty effing gruesome.

Obviously you haven't seen a corrida either. The matador is the first into the ring to face the bull when it is undamaged and in peak condition. It is high risk. Matadors do get hurt - badly hurt.

And the bull is not "tortured" for half an hour to an hour. The whole process from start to finish takes about 15 minutes.

Neither of these things will change your mind I know, but at least get your facts right.

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Ian Tunnacliffe

Re: "Only" 8.5% attended a bullfight....

Actually quite a lot of bulls are killed at the fiesta of San Fermin. Including the ones that run through the street goring Americans beforehand.

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Ian Tunnacliffe

You could also put "sport" in quotes because nobody in Spain - pro or anti - considers it a sport. It is not reported in the sports sections of the newspapers nor does it appear on sports TV programs. It is a thing separate in itself. It is a cultural activity, an art form, a test of courage and resolve, a showcase for the skills of breedrs and much else besides. But it is not a sport.

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Ian Tunnacliffe

Re: @OP

To coin a phrase, this is utter bullshit. The torero enters the ring with over half a ton of highly muscled bull in peak condition and only a cape to protect himself (very occasionally herself).

It is true that at a later stage the bull is weakened by the picador's spear before the matador dispatches him with the sword but he remains extremely dangerous. Toreros do get badly injured although it is over 20 years since the last one died in the ring in Spain.

There is no concept of "winning" or "losing" in the corrida. The bull will always be despatched even if the leading torero is rendered incapable of doing so, except in fantastically rare circumstances it may be spared by the President (of the corrida, not the country) to go to stud.

There are serious arguments to be made about whether the bullfighting culture has any place in the 21st century and there is no doubt that the tide is running against it, but let's argue on the basis of actual facts.

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Techno-thriller author and gaming franchise Tom Clancy dies at 66

Ian Tunnacliffe

I "discovered" Tom Clancy about 15 years ago. I started with Red October, which was terrific and read through chronologically as far as Executive Orders. At which point I gave up, as a once-brilliant writer of stories founded in cold-war realities morphed into a one-dimensional right-wing polemicist with an increasingly shaky grasp of reality. Stuck for something to read on a long flight I later bought Red Rabbit and was astonished at how far his work had fallen. The trademark detail and accuracy of Red October was replaced by wild-eyed, mouth frothing neo fascist ranting.

Obviously most of the recent output that bore his name was concocted by a team of anonymous hacks at the publishing company. Good business for them I suppose.

I will try to remember him for the first three or four books. They were good.

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Ian Tunnacliffe

Re: Clancy and Dolby

Could it be something to do with that ever present merit cigarette?

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Blighty's great digital radio switchover targets missed AGAIN

Ian Tunnacliffe

Re: If...

Well, I must live within about five miles of you and DAB is only reliably available with a roof mounted aerial . There is one windowsill where I can sometimes get DAB depending on the weather and no doubt the phase of the moon.

I get very cross when the Beeb uses my licence money to advertise this useless system.

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Shopping list for Tesco: Eggs, milk, bread, tablets (the £60 7in Android kind)

Ian Tunnacliffe

Re: Tesco Value Tablet

Dunno about that. I bought a Tesco Value webcam for my mum's PC earlier this year. £5.97 if I recall correctly.

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Fitbit Flex wristband: What to wear out when wearing yourself out

Ian Tunnacliffe

Re: food calories

With you on most of this, but I wouldn't get too hung up on the calorie versus joule thing. They both measure the same quantity and there is a constant relation between them. I calorie = 4.184 joules. Incidentally the unit that is commonly referred to as the "calorie" is actually a kilocalorie - or 1000 times the energy required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water from 14.5 to 15.5 degrees Celsius.

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RIP Harry Harrison: Stainless Steel Rat scurries no more

Ian Tunnacliffe
Pint

Celebrate the life and mourn the death

HH was one of the greats. Read the first few chapters of The Stainless Steel Rat and tell me that we are not heading rapidly towards the society described - though without the space travel of course.

I have also long appreciated his description of how robbing banks is actually a deeply philanthropic activity.

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Study fingers humans for ocean heat rise

Ian Tunnacliffe
FAIL

Re: memory

I was a Physics undergraduate at a decent university in the 1970s. I have no personal recollection at all of any "New Ice-Age" stories. I have no doubt that they existed because I have seen the evidence, but they certainly did not dominate the debate about human effects on climate and environment. The Club of Rome published "Limits to Growth" in 1972 and that was probably the most influential text of the period. It certainly didn't produce any kind of cooling.

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Mozilla releases Firefox 10, adds developer tools

Ian Tunnacliffe

Switched to Chrome

Tried Chrome on the Mac a year or so ago and wasn't impressed. About a month ago I got so annoyed with Firefox grinding my computer to a halt that I gave Chrome another go. It's improved in the interim as FF has gone backwards. I imagine I'll stay with Chrome until it starts to annoy me and the whole cycle starts again.

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So, what's the best sci-fi film never made?

Ian Tunnacliffe

Stainless Steel Rat

Just agreeing with posters above. Would make a brilliant movie. Not perhaps the greatest novel of ideas ever, but a brilliant basis for a film.

Also agree that much as I would pay money to watch a film of any of the Culture novels I find it hard to imagine any director being able to do them justice.

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Virgin America heads to the cloud with Google

Ian Tunnacliffe

In a word, no.

This agreement covers normal office automation functions. If a Virgin employee includes any of those data in an email then they will be held in the cloud. But Virgin's customer service systems (reservations, web booking, check-in etc) are completely separate. As it happens they use the aiRes system from Indian software house ibs, hosted in a specialist airline industry data centre.

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Spanish fascist decries Franco Eurovision slur

Ian Tunnacliffe

You in Paracuellos?

If so the cross is dedicated to Francoists murdered by Republicans.

No question in my mind, the Republicans were on the whole the good guys and the Falange definitely the bad guys - but there were definitely atrocities on both sides.

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DAB lobby launches radio scrappage scheme

Ian Tunnacliffe

Pointless pointless pointless

See heading.

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IT failure downs Stansted systems

Ian Tunnacliffe
Stop

SBO

No, I am sure nobody in the entire history of the airline industry ever thought that high availability systems might be a good idea. It's a good job there are people like you around to point us in the right direction.

In fact if the facts are accurately reported and both internet and airport check-in were down then it is likely to be a failure in the back-end passenger services system of one specific airline. In general these are airline-specific rather than utilities provided by airports (although there are exceptions). These back end systems have typically four nines availability or better although there are variations between the mainframe systems used by traditional airlines and the .NET based Newskies used by Ryanair and others. Life gets more complicated when check-in is being managed by a ground handler rather than the airline itself although that isn't likely to be the case here as a ground handler's system failing would not have affected web check-in.

It is also extremely unlikely that anyone at the airport would have been in a position to "reboot" the system even if they had wanted to as check-in systems usually live in vendors' data centres that are often not even in the same country.

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Survey outs Britain as nation of tech twits

Ian Tunnacliffe

Stupid Stupid Stupid

This "survey" shows nothing useful at all. If you confront people with a multiple choice list and they either don't know or don't care about the answer, they will select one of the choices maybe at random. So if you neither know nor care who Tim B-L is then you just pick one of the alternatives - which may well be "Head of MI5". If you allowed a "don't know" alternative AND people took the survey seriously, I doubt if you would get so many silly headlines. But then the PR company wouldn't achieve its objectives and the thing wouldn't be done.

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FCC approves radio mast 'shot clock' rule

Ian Tunnacliffe

Irony?

@AC 1747. That was meant to be ironic, right? Sorry to ask but there are nut jobs out there who really believe that stuff. Wouldn't expect to find them in these parts though.

@Bazza. With you most of the way but if you think that we don't get charged for receiving calls you should see my Vodafone bill when I get back from a trip across the Channel. And Paris is a lot closer to London than Seattle is to Miami. The US phone system developed its charging systems differently to ours and has had free local calls for decades. Since they use local area codes for cell phones too that pushed them in the direction of charging for inbound calls. Not better or worse than what we have. Just different.

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Apple preempts Win 7 with fresh iMacs, Macbooks

Ian Tunnacliffe

@Anonymous Coward

"It seems you are the one who does not know much about the tax system: VAT does not stand for "Value" Added Tax - how does that make any sense?"

And here's me sitting down and filling in my Value Added Tax Return that HM Customs and Excise have kindly sent me. Do you suppose I should write to them and tell them they have it wrong?

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Ian Tunnacliffe

@Grease Monkey

" "Because they are in business in order to make money."

On what evidence do you base this? I can see none. "

Stock price, quarterly earnings reports?

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Ian Tunnacliffe
FAIL

@Anonymous Coward

Not got such a good grasp of the tax system have we? All the VAT further up the supply chain is reclaimable such that the net tax take is that paid by the final consumer. Each business pays tax only on the value it has added. That's why it's called Value Added Tax. Geddit?

The reason it has more impact is that in general VAT rates are higher in Europe than are sales tax rates in the US. Oh, and the fact that prices in the US are invariably quoted net of tax while in Europe they are usually quoted VAT inclusive, especially for products and services offered to the consumer rather than B2B.

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Ian Tunnacliffe

@Dale Richards

"To be fair to Windows, these issues haven't been a problem since the bad old days of Windows 9x/Me."

Well, my last Windows machine was XP and it still had both issues. Not as badly as 98/ME to be sure but I definitely couldn't leave it running for more than 48 hours or so without having to reboot or it would slowly grind to a halt.

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Ian Tunnacliffe
Happy

All Good Fun

I sometimes think that El Reg would vanish in a puff off smoke if it were not for these periodic Mac vs Windows spats, with the penguins cheering on from the sides.

I use a Mac. My wife, my son, my daughter and my business partner all use Macs. I am very happy to be using a Mac. I am happy that I don't need to worry overmuch about malware (not completely complacent but the odds are in my favour). I am happy that a crashing app doesn't bring the O/S tumbling down with it. I am happy that my machine doesn't need to be rebooted on a regular basis to recover its resources. I am happy that I can afford to think of these things rather than looking for the absolute cheapest computing I could find.

If I were a hardcore gamer I would probably have stayed with Windows, but I'm not. In the event that I ever need to run an app that is Windows-only I have Parallels although I have never actually installed it because I have not yet hit that need.

But I don't feel the need to slag off those who stick with Microsoft. They can definitely buy cheaper hardware. They can play more games and there is no doubt a greater quantity of applications available for the platform. And so long as Windows remains the dominant O/S in the market the bad guys will probably continue their concentration on low-hanging fruit rather than trying to raise their game and come after me.

On the whole, life is good.

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Ian Tunnacliffe

@Sean Timarco Baggaley

You may well be right in much of what you say but you must be very young or extremely old if you think the current £/$ rate is poor. It's well over the average for the last 25 years. Now if Apple were based in the Eurozone...........

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Ryanair faces ban on luggage charge auto-opt-in

Ian Tunnacliffe

Grow Up People

Every time El Reg runs a Ryanair story we get comment threads like this.

The whole airline industry has more capacity than the economy can sensibly support at economic prices. The reasons for this are many and complex but it's a fact.

As a result airlines are unable to charge fares that enable them to make a return on capital invested while operating a "normal" service. The rational response to this would be for airlines to merge or go out of business but in practice that hardly ever happens and the industry continues with over-capacity.

So in one way or another airlines try to make so-called "ancillary revenue" to try to bridge the black hole in their finances. Ryanair is the best in the world at the ancillary revenue caper. Something like 25% of its revenues are ancillaries (That's from memory. If I were wider awake I woudl look it up.) Other airlines look at Ryanair as a leader in this respect but they don't have the sheer brass neck to take things quite as far.

In the end Ryanair is just doing more of what almost all airlines are doing less successfully. It is the most profitable airline in the world so it's hard to argue from a shareholder point of view that what it does is wrong. From the consumer point of view there is always the option of not flying with them.

In my personal experience Ryanair's on-time performance is better than Easyjet but where possible I avoid flying either of them. It's usually possible to fly with a more "traditional" airline for a little more money. Then it's a simple economic decision. Is the extra discomfort and annoyance with the ten or twenty quid I could save? For me the answer is usually no, but I fully understand why others may come to a different conclusion.

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First Samsung Android phone out next week

Ian Tunnacliffe

Me too

If this carries on we are going to have to start lobbying for legal changes. I am with Vodafone on a contract. I can't have an iPhone, and now I hear I can't have a Samsung Android. That should be grounds for walking away with no penalties.

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Apple rides fanbois to popularity crown (again)

Ian Tunnacliffe

Fair Points

@Dave

If you have tried it and don't get on with it then fair enough. I am perplexed by how that would have happened but you and I are different people and so I must accept that it has.

@Vincent

Yes, there are some apps that are only available for Windows. Games in particular. However my experience in the corporate world is that 99% of users need no more than an office suite and a browser plus access to the corporate back-end apps - to do serious work. If you are in the 1% then you may have to grit your teeth and run Windows. Good luck to you,

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Ian Tunnacliffe

And on and on and on and on....

Naturally this debate will go on as long as there are computers and people who want to argue about them. But here are a few observations from a happy Mac user.

1. Macs are not perfect, especially the hardware. My last Macbook Pro was definitely a Friday afternoon model. I had endless problems with its sleep function and eventually the screen just died on me.

2. BUT when I took it in to an Apple Store they took it off my hands and fixed it for free, even though it was out of warranty.

3 BUT I was buying a new Macbook Pro at the time so they probably had an incentive to be nice to me.

4. OSX is so far superior to anything from Microsoft that the debate is hardly worth having any more. Any Windows die-hards out there who disagree, please just use it for a month. Interesting thing is that most Mac users have long-term experience of using Windows every day. Not sure the same is true in reverse.

5. I agree that using a Mac is far more likely to be a personal choice than using Windows and so people have more invested in the choice.

6. I know that Mac's market share is small - around 7% I believe. I suspect (but cannot prove) that if corporate IT departments allowed users a free choice the Mac's share would increase enormously. There is no reason that this could not happen. The extra cost of supporting two platforms would be offset by the reduced costs of security management and user bafflement. Possibly by more than 100%, but that's just a guess. Since my small company decided to go Mac two years ago we have had only one compatibility issue with our Windows-centric clients. And we spend a lot of time in their offices working on their networks.

7. The one issue is with the way Powerpoint handles images - oh and that's Microsoft software that's incompatible between the two platform versions.

8. And the price premium - for similarly specced machines - really is quite modest, in the laptop space at least. Maybe you can get a Windows desktop machine for nuxpence - I did once (from a major Japanese manufaturer). It exploded - quite literally. Now that was extreme but you get my point?

9. And finally, if in doubt cite your mother. My mum had a Windows machine that she could only ever use to play a bridge game. Anything else, including email, was simply too baffling. A year ago I got her an iMac and now you can't get away from the emailed photographs from her digital camera - and she books her rail tickets online.

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Ian Tunnacliffe

Well Duh...

You build a superior product, you support it better than most and you price it at a small premium to the competition. You'd hope to do well in consumer surveys then wouldn't you?

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Ask.com rehires butler Jeeves

Ian Tunnacliffe

Wodehouse Estate?

Are they planning to pay any royalties to the Wodehouse estate this time round? I seem to remember that they just blatantly ripped off the character without a by your leave.

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Surface surfaces in Europe

Ian Tunnacliffe

Just Played with one

Just played with one in the lobby of an airport hotel in San Francisco. It's a weirdly compelling user experience. Not sure I could ever justify paying ten grand for one though.

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Boffin dubs global warming 'irreversible'

Ian Tunnacliffe

Probably true

James Lovelock is interviewed in the current New Scientist. He simply takes it as read that catastrophic climate change is coming and there is now almost nothing that can be done about it.

That may still be an extreme position but it's not that far from the scientific consensus as exemplified by the IGPCC - which has historically been extremely conservative in its assessments.

Now, I'm a physics graduate so I can understand the basic science (not that the degree is necessary - any intelligent human prepared to put in a bit of effort could do so). If I were able to put a bet on it would be with the scientific consensus and against the deniers, almost regardless of the odds William Hill might quote.

There is an opportunity to ameliorate some of the worst effects if we take it seriously, but we should still be planning for a world in which Bangladesh is under water full-time instead of just when a cyclone strikes.

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Disabling Windows Autorun - there's a right way and a wrong way

Ian Tunnacliffe
Thumb Down

Didn't do it for me

I still have one Windows machine that runs my mail server. Someday I will get around to finding the right mail server software to run on Linux or Mac but in the meantime I still have the one.

So, I tried the "fix" from Microsoft because this has bugged me for years.

Result?

"Windows cannot find the file gpedit.msc. Make sure you have typed the name correctly ...........etc"

There is probably a good reason. It's just that life is too short to go looking for it.

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US teen clocks up 14,528 text messages

Ian Tunnacliffe
Happy

Multiple recipients

I assume that she is sending some of her texts to everyone in her address book - or at least to groups of friends at a time.

I have a teenage daughter

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Leonard Cohen's Hallelujah set for top two spots in Christmas Day charts

Ian Tunnacliffe
IT Angle

What??

Sorry - what is this X-factor thing?

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Software update nobbles Sky+ boxes

Ian Tunnacliffe

Me Too

Sky HD. Acting up as described by others. Power reset fixes it in the short term. No need to mess about pulling out viewing cards.

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Mobile phones will 'cut off' Al Qaeda

Ian Tunnacliffe

Oh Dear Oh Dear

The usual half-informed stuff here....

LH - If you have been getting on aeroplanes without boarding passes then you are more or less unique. They have not gone away. In many cases they look different to the way they used to. Lots of them are printed at home on A4 or Letter paper, complete with bar code. Others are printed from a kiosk using thermal paper. So, you may not have had your old familiar ATB2 mag striped boarding pass for a while - depending in which airline you use - but you most certainly have a boarding pass.

As to the main thrust of the piece, mobile phone boarding passes are not being introduced as a security measure. The airlines have wanted them for a long time because they expect them to increase the use of self check-in, which costs pennies, in place of check in at an airport desk, which costs dollars (substitue pounds, euros, zlotys or dongs at your preference). The security issue is that various authorities, including the TSA, have not been prepared to accept them until they could be at least as secure as printed boarding passes. Which is not all that secure, but as part of a managed process including searches and profiling and all the other "security" measures is deemed to be an acceptable risk.

And, to all the other Chicken Lickens, no airline that I have ever talked to has any intention to go for exclusively mobile phone boarding passes. All the Luddites, children, users of non-standard devices and all the rest will still have the option of old-fashioned paper.

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Ian Tunnacliffe
Thumb Up

Gate and Check In

Oh and another thing. Gate and Check In Systems are the same system in the vast majority of cases. Where there is a case for better integration is between the airline Departure Control Systems which include check-in boarding, baggage and a bunch of other stuff, and the security screening systems used by TSA, Immigration authorities etc. To some extent this does happen but there are some real issues of technological compatibility (which are largely soluble) and data protection/privacy which on the whole are less tractable, as regular Reg readers will be well aware.

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Oz pub dishes up really crap ice cream

Ian Tunnacliffe

OhMyGod - I've stayed in that hotel!

All I remember about that restaurant was that it was infernally cold - it was July. No poo in the puds to my recollection.

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TSA says 'checkpoint friendly' laptop bags on the way

Ian Tunnacliffe
Unhappy

Won't work

In the years after 9/11 a couple of shoe manufacturers started to make shoes without metal stiffeners expressly for the use of travellers who had to pass through TSA checks. I had a pair of these and they were fine for about 6 months until one day I was told to take them off. When I pointed out that there was no metal in them and that they were specifically designed for the purpose I was told "We're not looking for metal - take them off". So I took them off and walked through the metal detector.

The checks have almost zero practical purpose and They are almost 100% about P/R and image.

Where is the icon for hyper expensive mega stupidity when you need it?

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Amazon.com's US site KO'd!

Ian Tunnacliffe

Still Flakey - and spams too

I just failed to get in to amazon.com with a Http/1.1 Service Unavailable. Seems to be intermittent. BUT also, over the weekend I have been getting spams with subject lines like "Amazon.com have some troubles" and other variations. Some connection surely?

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Virgin taps Boeing for 787 compensation

Ian Tunnacliffe

Timbo

"not many airlines I know announce which planes they will use on specific flights"

Actually, all airlines do precisely this. They publish them in various places but the most widely used is the Official Airlines Guide (OAG). From there the information is disseminated to the Global Distribution Systems that provide the information to travel agencies in both the real world and cyberspace. Some airlines provide even more information to GDSs and each other via direct data feeds but the OAG data is the base line. Even low-cost airlines that do not distribute via the GDSs and travel agents still publish to OAG.

Mind you there is always the possibility of a last minute change due to technical or operational issues that could mean a flight is operated by an aircraft different to the one planned. Even then though the overwhelming probability is that any substitution would be like for like in terms of aircraft type.

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Apple unleashes monster patch batch on Mac faithful

Ian Tunnacliffe
Paris Hilton

Downloaded trouble

Just downloaded the "patches" and applied them. They included a keyboard firmware update.

Previously my Macbook Pro suffered from the well-known "doesn't register the first character keyed into a form box" bug that Apple has been denying for several months. Now when I am working in an Excel spreadsheet, about 50% of the time it only registers the first character typed in a cell. When I click on another cell then go back for a second attempt it's usually OK.

What is going on Steve?

Paris because she had some experience with cells.

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Ian Tunnacliffe
Coat

What's happened to the language?

When I was a working programmer (yes, back in the dark ages kiddies) a patch was something you did at four o'clock in the morning because the system was down. It was keyed in at the console in a hex representation of machine code. Twenty or thirty bytes typically. 100 tops. Then next day you would fix the problem properly, reassemble the segment(s) and load it/them to the system. That's not a patch, it's a new version.

All this talk of "patches" being 100MB or more just bemuses me.

Mines the very very old one with the muffler.

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DAB: A very British failure

Ian Tunnacliffe

Bring on the Satellites

I didn't know that the Beeb sends out its digital streams from Maidenhead. Who says El Reg isn't educational? Thing is, I live in Maidenhead and DAB reception here is appalling (TV reception is pretty poor too. No chance of Freeview without a rooftop aerial). I have a couple of DAB sets. One is connected to an external antenna and works fine. The other is a top of the range Roberts and works on its own antenna, in one or two spots in the house. Sometimes. And it needs to be on mains power unless you own Ever Ready.

So DAB provides a satisfactory service when tied to a fixed location. A bit like streaming IP radio. It does absolutely zero for me when I am moving between rooms, out and about, in the car or in the bathroom. Precisely the times when I most want radio.

I recently rented a car in the States that had satellite radio fitted. It was a revelation as I cruised up I-75 in Georgia listening to the BBC World Service in crystal clear quality. I could have chosen from roughly a gazillion other stations and I did try some of them out.

So my view to add to the debate is that DAB is a dead end. Bring on Satellite radio in Europe.

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