* Posts by Boothy

563 posts • joined 17 Jun 2011

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Tesla books over $8bn in overnight sales claims Elon Musk

Boothy
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Re: I read a lot...

When I think of this, I had a flash of the old JFK speech.

To paraphrase...

We choose to <do stuff> in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard; because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one we intend to win.

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India orders 770 million LED light bulbs, prices drop 83 per cent

Boothy
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Quote: "Meanwhile all the supermarkets and DIY centres in Britain continue to charge £10 (949.93 INR)."

I suggest you try a different store!

Even B&Q, which tends to be the most expensive of the DIY stores, sells LED bulbs starting at £2 each, the £10 ones are either specialist units, or multi-packs.

And there are far cheaper stores out there.

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Boothy
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Re: Who's paying the piper?

Quote: "So, LED street lights really ought to come with a cover so that they only illuminate down."

The LEDs that were fitted on the road outside my place (about 3 years ago), are like an array of spot lights, (GU10 like) all pointing downwards, splaying out towards the edge. So no light at all going upwards (other than reflected light of course).

They are also lower than the older sodium fittings, so are at about the same hight as the bottom of the 1st floor windows sills (the older lights were around the height of the top of the 1st floor windows), which means little of the LED light hits the bedroom windows.

So overall, much better visibility outside, whilst at the same time, reducing both internal and external light pollution.

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Microsoft to add a touch of Chrome to Edge

Boothy
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Re: I wish they'd develop

I've never really got the point of a browser plug in for PDF docs.

Yes please, open the document in a small constrained window with poor controls, and minimal functionality, rather than opening in the proper application I installed for this very purpose (Foxit in my case)!

In Chrome, I usually disable the PDF Viewer under chrome://plugins/

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Data-thirsty mobile owners burn through 5GB a month

Boothy
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Re: Poor Web Development

Ah, abuse of the height and width image attributes, I know it well.

i.e. It should not be used to scale your images, it's only there to pre-allocate the space needed to display the image on the page, so the browser doesn't need to keep re-sizing during load!

I remember being asked in the early 00s to check why a web page was taking ages to load over dial up. The remit to the developer was to create a page of thumbnails, that linked to some screen shots (about 20 of them).

Turned out all the developer had done was to upload the raw image files, then used the height and width attributes to create thumbnail sized images, rather than creating real thumbnails. So locally the page loaded okay, but over dial up this was painfully slow.

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Brit teen bags $250,000 in first World Drone Prix

Boothy
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Re: says:

Vertical drops

Swinging pendulums.

Stompers.

Port holes of an ever decreasing size

...

...

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Boothy
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Live streaming in VR

This looks way more interesting for live streaming in VR/3D than things like football or tennis etc. At least for me!

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Swedish publishers plan summer ‘Block Party’ to thwart ad blockers

Boothy
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Re: 'The End of Free'

Interesting listen. Thanks for the heads up.

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Hey Windows 10, weren't you supposed to help PC sales?

Boothy
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Re: Improve PC Specs

Quote: "Still running an i5-2500k at home and it does everything I need. Since this came out Intel have gone from 32nm to 14nm but the actual speed has gone up 200mhz, no increase in cores etc either.

Yup, this ^^^

My last major Desktop PC update (triggers broom style) was in early 2013.

New MB, CPU and Memory, everything else (HDD, GFX, case etc) was a carry over.

At the time I fitted an i7 3770K, stock speed is 3.5 GHz.

About a year later I fitted a liquid cooler (Corsair Hydro H60), and the CPU has hummed along at ~4.3GHz since, without issue.

The latest Skylake 6700k (14nm), has a stock speed of 4.0 GHz.

So 500Hz more than a stock 3770K, but 300Hz less than mine is currently running at. So I'd have to OC the 6700k to even match my current 3 year old system*

So an update just isn't really worth it.

* Yes I'm aware there are other benefits to the newer CPUs, but it's just not worth the time, effort or money to upgrade from the 3770K currently, and it's rare the CPU is ever the bottleneck.

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Boothy
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Re: My next machine will be a desktop.

@PC

I can confirm that Mint looks quite good in 3440 x 1440 :-D

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Microsoft's done a terrible job with its Windows 10 nagware

Boothy
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Re: I've had a rather productive weekend.

I've also had a productive weekend with Mint, building a dual-boot Win 7/Mint system.

I did try Debian at first (as I was already familiar with it), but hit a few hurdles (Grub issues, then X Windows crashing on boot etc.). So tried Mint instead.

Mint installed without issue, even recognising my GTX 980 Ti, and giving me options of which drivers to install. Propitiatory ones from nVidia themselves, or an Open Source version, all in a nice little Driver window, listing pros and cons of the different options. Mint recommending the nVidia propitiatory ones, which is what I used, and installation was just a matter of a couple of clicks.

The only issue I had was my audio, which is a Creative SB card feeding some 5.1 speakers. but I was already aware of Creative's lack of Linux support, so expected this anyway. (Mint recognises the card, knows it's a Creative sound card, but no sound comes out).

But my monitor has built in speakers (not normally used), and Mint automatically configured the nVidia audio driver in the GTX 980 Ti, which let me select Displayport as my audio output, so the system still has audio, just stereo at the moment, rather than 5.1 (for now).

As a quick gaming test, I installed Steam (direct from the web site), and then installed a couple of test games, which worked without issue. (About 40% of my 178 items in my Steam library showed up as Linux compatible).

I'll keep Win 7 for now, but hopefully over time the need for Windows will diminish, I've also set up a Win 7 64bit VM within Mint itself, which seems to work fine so far.

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You say I mustn’t write down my password? Let me make a note of that

Boothy
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Re: Auto generated passwords

"Honey, the free coaster delivery is here"

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Microsoft adds 'non-security updates' to security patches

Boothy
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So another one to add to the black list

Windows 10 Blacklist:

  • KB2952664- Compatibility update for upgrading Windows 7
  • KB2977759 - Compatibility checker.
  • KB3022345 - Update for customer experience and diagnostic telemetry
  • KB3035583 - Get Windows 10 app
  • KB3068708 - Update for customer experience and diagnostic telemetry
  • KB3075249 - Update that adds telemetry points to consent.exe in Win 8.1 and 7
  • KB3080149 - Update for customer experience and diagnostic telemetry
  • KB3083710 - Changes to group policy related to Win 10 update
  • KB3112343 - "This update enables support for additional upgrade scenarios from Windows 7 to Windows 10"

And now...

  • KB3146449 - IE11 Update to add Windows 10 ads.

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Boothy
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Re: It didn't happen to me

@AustinTX

If your using Win 7, why do you have a Win 8/8.1 KB listed?

KB2976978 is the Win 8/8.1 'Compatibility update', KB2977759 is the Win 7 version.

I've also got KB3083710 and KB3112343 on my blacklist, but otherwise have essentially the same list as yourself (I'm also on Win 7).

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Nest: It's no longer all about you. Now it can recognize your kids, too

Boothy
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Re: Already doing this

Quote "...and start predicting them, but then if that's the case a timer would surely suffice?"

As far as I know, it's not just things like getting home at a particular time.

It's tied to your phones GPS, it so starts to recognise if you hangout somewhere most days (e.g. the office), and what route you normally take home, and how long that typically takes. So if you head home early one day, it's knows to turn on the heat sooner, or if you are still stuck in the office, or traffic, it delays turning the heating on till it knows your on route again.

It also works out how quickly it takes to get the house up to temperature, from it's current (unheated) temperature, so in deep winter, it would turn the heating on sooner, but as the ambient temperature goes up, so takes less effort to get up to full temperature, it reduces the heating time.

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Boothy
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Quote: "How does it tie the people in the room with their account anyway, do you have to walk around the house waving your smartphone or smartwatch?"

I was wondering that too, once home (much to by gf's annoyance sometimes) my phone gets put down somewhere, typically the kitchen or the bedroom, and doesn't get touched again until I need to use it.

Unless the system has sensors in each room, it's not going to be much use to me.

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Google-backed British startup ‘stole our code’, says US marketing firm

Boothy
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Site tries to 'induce' me to stay.

1. Copy Domain.

2. Add domain to host file.

3. Search for domain in chrome, and when it pops up in the results, click the 'block domain' option (provided by the 'Personal Blocklist (by Google)' add-on)

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Samsung is now shipping a 15TB whopper of an SSD. Farewell, spinning rust

Boothy
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Quote "elsewhere on the internets the figure of 5K (in USD) popped up"

So quick calc, that's about 24p (UK) per GB, which is quite good actually (Using £3,553.57 for the calc). Although that likely doesn't take into account VAT in the UK.

Even at 1-to-1 US to GB (which is typical with tech prices here!) at £5,000, it's still around 33p per GB.

For comparison, current retail SSDs (consumer SATA) are around the 17-25p per GB (from places like CCL/ebuyer etc).

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Beep, beep – it's our 2016 buzzword detector. We see you, 'complexity'

Boothy
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Re: You What?

"Leverage" and especially "Leveraging" [sic]

Makes my skin crawl. <shudder>

What's wrong with "use" and "utilise"?

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Turkish hacker pleads guilty to $55m maniac global ATM heist

Boothy
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Re: In the place of guns and masks, this cybercrime organisation used laptops and the internet.

Quote: "this cybercrime organisation used laptops and the internet,"

I'm curious to know what the other cybercrime organisations are using, if it's not laptops and the internet? As they seem to be implying this is unusual behaviour for cyber criminals!

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Boothy
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Re: Spellchecking budget cut again?

Also why is 'Tips and corrections' missing on the mobile Reg page?

(And no option to add icons on the mobile forums either?)

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$17 smartwatch sends something to random Chinese IP address

Boothy
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Mushroom

Re: I think I'll buy one

If it sends back GPS data, how about spoofing the location to make it look like you are heading for China?

If you can figure out the unique watch ID (assuming they have one), then you could spoof all the watches, and make it look like all the watch owners are heading for China.

If you could physically locate the phone home IP, then you could have everyone heading there :-)

Icon, well you never know...

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Zynga CEO resigns – again – after terrible results

Boothy
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10 new titles!

Quote: "we are now poised to launch 10 new titles this year.

This smacks of pile it high, sell it cheap.

It also means that teams and people will likely be being spread around too thin, unable to spend enough time on a specific game, before they need to move onto the next, affecting things like quality, productivity etc.

They'd be better of focusing on just 2 tiles.

Where practical, create two internal teams, one per game, and set up some friendly rivalry between them. Maybe offer a bonus based on how popular the game is 1 month after launch.

Competition, especially with a carrot (bonus etc), rather than a stick (your sacked if you loose), drives people.

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Hardcoded god-mode code found in RSA 2016 badge-scanning app

Boothy
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I'd have thought at this conference in particular, that the developer should have expected someone to try to crack the app.

They should have written it better, and then perhaps left some sort of Easter egg in there for people to find.

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Spanish cops discover illegally parked flying car

Boothy
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Re: Rag Week?

Reminds me of the time some of my rugby playing mates popped into the local supermarket to pick something up, and when they got back to the cars, someone in a mini [1] had double park in front of one of their cars, blocking them in.

[1] This was the 80's, so a proper mini, i.e. it was actually a small car, rather than the bulbous large things they brand mini's now.

They were in a rush, so rather than waiting, they simply picked up the car and carried it out of the way.

After driving their car out of the space, and being the nice guys they are, they duly picked up the mini again and put it into the space that they had just vacated.

Okay, they weren't that nice, they did put the car in sideways!

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More and more Brits are using ad-blockers, says survey

Boothy
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Re: Why the fuss just about Ad blocking?

Some sites also seem to break if the tracking is disabled!

I've had things like missing buttons, or pages that just won't load unless you disable ghostery and reload!.

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Google robo-car backs into bendy-bus in California

Boothy
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Re: Bus vs. meat bag

Google have apparently already updated the software so that this type of accident won't happen again.

Google cars now assume buses are driven by asshats, who will always just barge through, irrespective of the car being in the middle of a manoeuvre.

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Microsoft releases Windows 10 preview for Raspberry Pi 3

Boothy
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Joke

Re: I wouldn't worry

If you're using the standard Microsoft OS progress bar for that counter, shouldn't it be more like...

10,9,8,7,6,9,27,78388725518,5,4,3,2,1,0,1,3,2,9,8..........

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Raspberry Pi 3 to sport Wi-Fi, Bluetooth LE – first photos emerge

Boothy
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It's ARMv8

According to http://raspi.tv/ the CPU is a ARM Cortex A53 CPU

A look on ARMs own site (linked from the above page) and...

The ARM ARMv8-A Cortex-A53 processor offers a balance between performance and power-efficiency and is capable of seamlessly supporting 32-bit and 64-bit code.

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Google human-like robot brushes off beating by puny human – this is how Skynet starts

Boothy
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Re: #Error 2035

Working in Chrome too.

Although you do have to wonder why the Reg are still using Flash, rather than a HTML 5 based player?!

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Reminder: How to get a grip on your files, data that Windows 10 phones home to Microsoft

Boothy
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Re: naive question

MS telemetry bypasses the hosts file. If you want to block, it needs to be at the firewall or router level.

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Boothy
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Re: "Change your network settings to metered and the power source to battery."

It only works on Wi-Fi or mobile data as well.

If your using a LAN connection, e.g. Ethernet to a desktop etc. Then the 'metered connection' option is missing :-/

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Google goes over the top with RCS

Boothy
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Where is the users carrot?

Unless I'm reading it wrong, I don't see any mention of what benefit this offers the end users?

It's a standard that only seems to run on one platform (Android).

It will cost users money to use, i.e. the same model as SMS/MMS, so needs funding somehow.

It doesn't seem to provide any tangible benefit over current SMS, which works everywhere on all phones, universally.

It seems to be worse than existing messaging apps. as it removes a layer of privacy.

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LG’s modular G5 stunner shuns the Lego aesthetic

Boothy
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Standard, standard, standard

Quote: "an alliance of vendors who can agree to standardise on an expansion slot"

This * ∞

Without an agreed standard, by at least a good chunk of the major players, it's not going to last long.

It also needs to be free to use, preferable an fully open standard, that then gets adopted as an ISO standard, that any phone or peripheral producer can use.

Although personally, I don't think this should be classed as a modular phone, it's a phone with an expansion port.

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Sir Clive Sinclair in tech tin-rattle triumph

Boothy
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Found it, it was a Multiface

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiface

Mine was the Multiface One, as it had the Kempston joystick port on the side.

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Boothy
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Forgotten what it was called now, but I had a snapshot type device that dumped the Spectrum memory to the Sinclair microdrive.

As this could work at any point in time, it meant you could also save your game progress, as you just hit a button, and it froze the system. You could then dump the memory state to the microdrive at that point in time, mid game, and reload again later.

Hmm, it's going to bug me what the thing was called now!! Anyone any ideas?

It was a small box, plugged into the rear expansion, and had a single red button on the top. Hit that and the speccy froze, and you got an on-screen menu that let you peek and poke memory, save/load to/from the microdrive, and various other bits.

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Boothy
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Mushroom

Re: What Games though?

"Hall of the Mountain King" : Over and over and over and over again.

Icon --> As that was my head after a few hours on Manic Miner!

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Boothy
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I was 13 when the Spectrum 48k came out.

I was a bit of an electronics tinker back then.

At 14, I worked out what frequencies were used on the tapes, and built an in-line multi frequency band pass filter to try and remove background noise between the tape player and recorder.

Took a while to sort it out, but once done, made perfect 'backup' copies of games :-)

Happy days, although Manic Miner background music still haunts me to this day!

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Brits unveil 'revolutionary' hydrogen-powered car

Boothy
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Hybrids are a stop gap, and should vanish as tech improves.

But I suspect most everyday cars, e.g. under 30 miles a day, nip to the shops, local office etc. will be electric. That way most car users can simply charge at home, and never need to visit a refuelling station/garage.

I see hydrogen being used for high mileage users, (sales reps, HGVs, intercity buses etc), and those that need to be driving for most of the day, such as local public transport etc.

Eventually though, I think private ownership will diminish, and you'll just use an Uber style app to call a car appropriate to your specific journey.

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Google to snatch control of Android updates from mobe makers – analyst

Boothy
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Re: Definitely a good idea

I always thought Hangouts was a bit odd, not one friend ever used it, and I thought it was horrible as an SMS client.

So on my Nexus 5, it's disable.

But that still doesn't stop it from using over 23MB of space, and crashing in the background occasionally. (How can a disabled app still crash!!).

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Boothy
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Re: Mixed feelings

Out of curiosity, what do people use root for these days? i.e. Why do people feel the need to root your phones?

Genuine question, not trolling.

I've been a user of Android since the original HTC Hero, which I rooted at the time, and did the same to several phones after that point.

But I haven't bothered rooting for a while now, as all the things I'd used root for previously, are possible now in a non rooted device.

For example, firewalls and granular app permissions, work without root these days.

So what other things do people feel they need to do on their phones, that requires root access?

For reference, I use Nexus devices these days, so don't have to deal with the cruft installed by the various manufacturers. So this likely also plays into the no root needed for me.

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Samsung now pushing Marshmallows into the Galaxy S6, Edge

Boothy
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Re: Get your act together

This could be fixed if they could mandate that all OS related updates be managed centrally, regardless of manufacturer or carrier.

The manufacturers/carrier could still do their customising, to help differentiate their products, but this aught to be as extensions to the OS (e.g. drivers, custom controls for non standard buttons etc) and via standard app installs.

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Boothy
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Unhappy

Re: And tablets?

Think yourself lucky, I've had an LG G Pad 8.3, for about a year, (was a freeby give-away when I bought an LG TV).

It's still stuck on 4.4, despite 5.1 coming out on it in other regions in the middle of last year! :-/

How much effort is needed to create a new regional version?

I'm in UK also.

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Shopping for PCs? This is what you'll be offered in 2016

Boothy
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Indeed, 4GB is pitiful these days.

I've little running on my (work) laptop atm, and it's still used >5GB of RAM.

4GB single stick is around £15, a full 8GB kit (2 x 4GB) is about £31, and that's from a main online retailer.

Yet buy an 8GB laptop, and you'll add £50+ onto the price!.

You're better of checking to see if the 4GB laptop has a free slot, and just buy and fit the extra stick yourself.

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Why does the VR industry think 2016 is its year? It's the hardware, stupid

Boothy
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Re: "we've come a hell of a long way"

These are just the initial costs, early adopter pricing. Which is the norm for emerging technologies.

For comparison, early tablets, like the Galaxy tab were over $700 dollars back in 2010. A far more capable current device is under $300, even sub $100 budget devices are more capable now, than the $700 devices were back in 2010.

The market for VR will be smaller than the tablet market, I just chose it as a fairly recent 'new tech'. So I suspect prices will not drop as far, or as fast, as they did for tablets, but it will happen.

2016 will be for early adopters, those that already have $600+ GFX cards fitted in desktop gaming rigs, or have $1,500+ gaming laptops (You can get a GTX 980 in a laptop/notebook form factor).

By 2017 we'll have v2 retail kit out, and perhaps even some more VR produces, so more competition. The market will have matured as well, so more VR content, and the costs will come down.

Plus of course by next year, you'll have 2nd hand first gen gear available on ebay etc. Just like you can buy the DK2 gear now.

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Boothy
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Re: "we've come a hell of a long way"

From what I've read, Braben had a hands on with an early Oculus, and basically went "Wow, this is the future of gaming".

He then went back to the Frontier studio and got the developers to redesigned the in game UI to be fully immersive and VR friendly. So ever since early Alpha, the Elite game has had a focused on VR.

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Boothy
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Re: Dirt cheap, but good enough

Quote: <em"The main obstacle right now seems to be making it easy (and cheap) to create the content. Cost of a rig and hardware capable of managing the post processing in a reasonable time are obstacles which will stop all but the most determined from becoming content producers for now."</em>

Isn't that dependant on the content that's being created?

If your talking about games producers, which is where I'd suspect most of the content is going to come from, at least initially, then those people will likely already have all the equipment needed for creation anyway, and might only need a software update to their chosen 3D engine. (They might need to by a headset to test though). All major game engines now have VR support, even the free Unity engine, which lots of people now seem to be using (even a recent AAA PC game used it), has included VR support for some time at no cost.

Producing VR videos/movies/TV, or VR scanning of real world locations etc, that's going to need investment, but I can't see this side of things taking off for a while yet, until VR at home becomes more common.

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Boothy
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Re: "we've come a hell of a long way"

Why pick Gears Of War?

It's a 3rd person game, and personally I don't think 3rd person is all that suitable for VR immersion, at least not without some major change to how the games are produced/shot etc.

I've always thought 3rd person games are less immersive anyway, as to me it just looks like your controlling something on screen, rather than actually being there in the action like you are (or at least seem to be) in a 1st person game.

VR will be best suited to driving/flying type games, where you are in the cockpit/drivers seat, or standard 1st person games.

Although you could still be right on the need for a bucket, at least for FPS games (driving/pilot games don't really have this issue, even with the current dev kits).

Hopefully the retail versions of at least the high end devices (Oculus and the HTC/Valve Vive) should resolved most of this for the FPS type games (where it shows up the worse). Although I can't see the Gear VR being able to cope with FPS games all that well, although it will probably do driving/flying/movies etc without issue.

For reference, I've played Elite Dangerous on a DK2 for several hours without any issues.

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Building automation systems are so bad IBM hacked one for free

Boothy
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1) Enforce passwords rules out if the box, including an expiry period.

2) Don't have any default passwords in the system. Forcing the installer to set a new password on first login.

3) Next time the building/system manager/admin logs in, it's likely to be after the password expiry date, so force another password change.

4) Implement a hardware only recovery option, in case the password is lost/forgotten, that requires someone to be physically on site. (i.e. a jumper inside the device).

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The Mad Men's monster is losing the botnet fight: Fewer humans are seeing web ads

Boothy
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Re: And I still don't understand

No doubt it's the same people who respond to junk emails, and so still make it worth to miscreants to send those out :-/

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