* Posts by Flatpackhamster

560 posts • joined 14 Jun 2011

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'Second Earth' exoplanet found right under our noses – just four light years away

Flatpackhamster
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Re: Orion and/or Daedalus?

Got to be a good one for Kickstarter.

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Windows 10 pain: Reg man has 75 per cent upgrade failure rate

Flatpackhamster
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There seems to be neither rhyme nor reason to upgrade failures.

I had three clients with identical Lenovo Yoga flabtobs. One did the upgrade without a hitch. The other had a bit of a hissy fit but got there with some touchscreen driver updates. The third destroyed itself, creating an unbootable version of Win10 and deleting the backed-up copy of Win8 and the recovery partition.

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'Leave EU means...' WHAT?! Britons ask Google after results declared

Flatpackhamster
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Re: So how long before ...

It does. But if I buy a thing now for £1 and sell it for £2 next week, the fact that next week the next one will cost me £1.10 to buy doesn't mean that selling price of the first one I bought will rise.

The selling price of the first thing I bought is not affected buy the buying price of the second.

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: So how long before ...

@AndrueC - The fuel in the pumps now, that you are buying now, has taken between 4 and 12 weeks from its purchase time to reach those pumps. The movement of the pound NOW won't affect pump prices for weeks.

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: So how long before ...

The fuel price rise is gouging, plain and simple. No way does the exchange rate feed through that fast to the pump.

Further, the price of oil slumped today:

http://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Oil-Tumbles-As-Britain-Votes-Out.html

So why should fuel at the pump rise?

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Microsoft cancels Remain speech after death of Labour MP

Flatpackhamster
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Re: State of disappointment? @ Flatpackhamster

Did you try talking to anyone face to face about the referendum? Did they shout at you? Did they scream? Did they hurl abuse? No, they didn't. But that's how the media has played the whole campaign for both sides.

But if you want to believe I'm some secret paid-up shill for Leave, that's your decision.

Don't forget that if you're voting to Remain, your voting time runs from 10pm on Thursday until 10pm on Friday.

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: State of disappointment? @ Flatpackhamster

It's all media spin and crap. I have been out on the streets with the Leave campaign. I've done leafleting, a scrap of canvassing and I'm out on Thursday reminding Leavers to get the vote out. And I have talked to hundreds of people in all lines of work. Millionaires to bin men, housewives, teachers, farmers, every walk of life.

Everyone I have met has been courteous. To a man and woman they have been interested in the debate. They have wanted more information to make better informed decisions. I got my hair cut and everyone in the salon was talking about the referendum. In a hairdressers where the average level of conversation is about holidays there were stylists and clients talking about the CAP and the economy. I haven't had a single aggressive or unpleasant encounter when I've met people face to face. They have been passionate, oh yes, deeply passionate about things

It has reaffirmed my faith in the Demos. And it has made me all the more committed to Leave because people CAN make decisions for themselves without politicians and they WANT to do it.

All the shit in the media is just that. We are better than this, I've seen it and it makes me want to see it again and again. Even if the UK votes to Remain (and I sincerely hope it doesn't) the experience on the ground has been fantastic.

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: State of disappointment?

If we do vote to Leave I will be mostly drinking the bitter tears of the vile Remain campaign, whose campaigning slogan has been "We are all geniuses, and people who are better and richer than you think this, so fucking vote the way we tell you, you vile plebs."

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Brexit: More cash for mobile operators or consumers? Pick one

Flatpackhamster
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Re: UK legislation

Thank goodness you have the wise, benevolent, all-knowing EU politicians to protect you from the self-serving, arrogant, out-of-touch British politicians who might otherwise sully this fine country with their policies.

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On her microphone's secret service: How spies, anyone can grab crypto keys from the air

Flatpackhamster
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Re: Clever stuff

It's a handy repository for a small steak.

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Google is the EU Remain campaign's secret weapon

Flatpackhamster
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'Fair'

So your top results are:

1 - Pro Remain

2 - Mostly impartial but partly remain

3 - Remain

4 - Impartial

And that's - 'fair'.

Well 3 weeks ago googling 'EU Referendum' stuck the eureferendum.com site at the absolute top of the page - so something's happened.

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UK eyes frikkin' Laser Directed Energy Weapon

Flatpackhamster
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Re: You read my mind

It's spelled Ponce, but it's pronounced Poncy.

Which makes it all just fine.

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Queen's Speech: Ministers, release the spaceplanes!*

Flatpackhamster
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Re: Skylon

Feeling let down is part of the joy of being governed by lackwits. After a while you realise that you're always going to feel a combination of bafflement, disgusting and loathing towards them and the only true interest comes in finding out exactly how let down you feel.

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Brexit campaign group fined £50k for sending half a million spam texts

Flatpackhamster
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It does weaken it.

The two examples quoted above were pollution laws (including the habitats directive) and 'rights' at work. Why should those be dictated by the EU? Is the voter not capable of choosing what kind of country they want to live in and what kind of pollution laws they want? By taking the decision away from people and handing it to the EU you strip the people of their democratic right to choose the kind of country they live in.

I wouldn't want to live under a Corbyn government but if that's how people vote then so be it and I don't want any government being told 'You can't do that because the EU says not'. What's the point in voting?

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: Do what the Bankers tell you

That isn't the only reason.

Plenty of people have done well out of the EU. The rich, the well educated, the economically mobile, academics - all of them have done well. But plenty of people haven't done well. If you don't have lots of skills and a good education and you aren't mobile because you've got three kids at school and you aren't bright then the EU is bad for you. More people coming to the UK means more children in schools and that makes it harder to get your kids in to a good school.

If you're rich that doesn't matter. You can move house. If you're poor, you're stuck and your kids may end up at Stab Comprehensive.

What about training? These days companies don't need to bother training their staff. They've had 15 years of just hiring the next batch of highly educated eastern European migrants, and they've been able to cancel their training budgets altogether. Job progression and training for the people who need it the most are gone - thanks to the EU's freedom of movement. Who does that punish? Not the rich or highly skilled or well educated, but the people at the bottom of the pile.

A system is worth nothing if it doesn't consider the needs of the people at the bottom as well as at the top. The EU doesn't do that. It was designed by the rich and successful, for the rich and successful. That alone is a reason to leave it. If we leave it the whole horrible edifice will come crashing down and perhaps we can rebuild an EU based upon real co-operation rather than centralised, top-down bureaucracy.

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Flatpackhamster
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So your argument for remaining in the EU is that it weakens the democratic process to push through policies you personally approve of. That sounds much like the arguments I've heard from a number of pro-EU people who still laughably describe themselves as democrats.

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Romania suffers Eurovision premature ejection

Flatpackhamster
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Re: I wonder

It wasn't so bad when we were allowed to treat it with the contempt it deserved. Now, though, we're expected to 'celebrate' it and be engaged. Urgh.

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Larry Ellison's Brit consortium in 'advanced talks' to buy Aston Villa

Flatpackhamster
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Re: Do we know if...

He never misses a game watching The Aston Villa play, does old Cameron. Sitting on the sofa on a Tuesday evening, or cheering from the bleachers.

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Windows 10 Mobile races to summer with useful facelift

Flatpackhamster
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Re: Yes, we get it. MSFT BAAAD!

Dear ole Andrew has been amongst the most fair and balanced reviewers of Windows that I have seen, finding generous things to say about most O/S updates. If he pastes W10mobile here, there's probably a good reason.

I blocked the Win10 upgrade for my Win8 mobile. I rely too much on the device's day-to-day operation to allow Microsoft to bugger around with it on a daily basis.

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Prof Hawking to mail postage-stamp space craft to Alpha Centauri using frickin' lasers

Flatpackhamster
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Lasers on earth?

Surely they should be mounted on the moon, around the edge and in the centre of a huge circular crater.

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Britain is sending a huge nuclear waste shipment to America. Why?

Flatpackhamster
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Well thank goodness we now get shitty filler articles bought in from Duh Conversation instead of well-informed ones by people whose politics the editors of the Register happen to have a problem with.

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Brits rattle tin for 'revolutionary' hydrogen-powered car

Flatpackhamster
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Re: Give it up, I'm not buying fuel any more

So you take taxpayer's money for the subsidised electric car and then charge it with solar panels subsidised by the taxpayer. And you think hydrogen is an evil scam by big business to fleece the little guy.

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Flatpackhamster
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Where's the boot?

Where do you put your stuff? Even two people need to carry things. Briefcases. Laptop bags.

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Sick to death of mighty rocket launches? Avoid these dates

Flatpackhamster
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Oh to live in such a time.

A time where space flight is as common and normal to people as getting on a jet on holiday. I'd commit a bad murder to live in such a time.

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Electronic Superhighway 2016-1966 – a retro: Texts, ar*se and ASCII rolls

Flatpackhamster
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Yes.

I hear that argument a lot from people who can't draw or paint or sculpt.

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Plucky cable billionaires defeat menace of small-town broadband

Flatpackhamster
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Re: Hooray for the free market!

Well it clearly isn't a free market, is it? A free market has low barriers to entry and this is anything but.

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Knackered Euro server turns Panasonic smart TVs into dumb TVs

Flatpackhamster
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WELL

I bought a Panasonic wifi chip for my Panasonic plasma TV and it never worked so I sent it back and got another one and that didn't work so I sent it back and...the third one didn't work either, so I tested it in a chum's TV and it didn't work there.

And the 'smart' features in my TV don't work. And some of them which did work stopped working (eg Youtube, iPlayer) after they were decreed obsolete

And the 'smart' features of my set top box / blu ray player barely ever work properly, and they're slow and buggy, and it doesn't stream media very well.

So I won't be buying any more Panasonic gear and it looks like I'm not the only one!

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Official: Toshiba pulls out of European consumer PC market

Flatpackhamster
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Re: Have a Satellite Pro B40-A

There was a reliability survey carried out a few years ago (2012) I think based upon the number of warranty repairs for all the different makes of laptops. Toshiba and Asus came top as the most reliable machines (ie fewest warranty repairs in 2nd and 3rd year of laptop life). Apple came about fifth.

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: Ah, well

@David Lawton

I thought the Magsafe power connector had been discontinued on Macbooks? Or is it still on some of them?

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Cameron co-opts UK mobile industry for EU Remain campaign

Flatpackhamster
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Re: Politics

Oooh, you won't be able to do that if you vote to Leave. It'll be a wasteland I tell you, no TV for anyone if you vote to leave the EU. TVs never operated before the EU and they won't operate if you leave, so vote to remain because the EU loves you.

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NASA's Orion: 100,000 parts riding 8 million pounds of thrust

Flatpackhamster
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Re: 3 Screens?

But only the green one is connected.

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Mobile: DevOps for IT shops. Minus the upheaval

Flatpackhamster
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Re: My measured response...

After reading the article I'm no wiser about what devops is.

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Get out of mi casa, Picasa: Google photo site to join Wave, Code, Reader in silicon hell

Flatpackhamster
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Re: Good replacement for the app?

Irfanview is a photo viewer, but not a manager.

@Jon37 - The article fails to make it clear, but according to the Picasa web site, the desktop application will still exist, it's just there won't be any more updates for it. So your mum (and my dad amongst others) will be fine.

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Remember Netbooks? Windows 10 makes them good again!

Flatpackhamster
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Re: But.... where are the netbooks?

They've been replaced by devices like the Linx 1010 - 10" touchscreen tablet running Win10, and with an attachable keyboard.

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Can't upgrade, won't upgrade: Windows Mobile's user problem

Flatpackhamster
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Re: As I've said before

I agree. I had a Lumia 720 for 2 years, which sadly died a hideous death which was its own fault. It kept loading Cortana up so I had to beat it with an axe.

I bought a 640XL for £160 which has a cracking camera and a lovely clear screen and since I showed it what I'd done to the 720 it's been as quiet as a mouse.

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Apple’s retail chief: ‘Touching customers’ key to retail success

Flatpackhamster
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Re: How about touching a REAL UK Keyboard?

Just use the shortcuts on the keypad .... oh, sorry.

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Five reasons why the Google tax deal is imploding

Flatpackhamster
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Re: Osborne's future

He's just as bloody useless and nasty as Gordon Brown, which is hardly surprising when you consider he's been using Gordon Brown's taxing and spending spreadsheets since 2010.

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BT dismisses MPs' calls to snap off Openreach as 'wrong-headed'

Flatpackhamster
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Re: Publicly owned business

As a counter to that suggestion, let me point you to the success story that is the railways under national ownership.

The railways were actually nationalised three times. During WW1, the government took over all the railways and worked them in to the ground and failed to maintain them. Then at the end of WW1, when they were knackered, the government handed them back to the rail companies. Then it hiked wages for workers. Then it fixed ticket prices.

As a result of that section of brilliant actions lines closed and the companies were merged in to the 'Big Four' rail companies. They pretty much got back on their feet and started doing well again by the time WW2 came around, when the government did exactly the same thing - taking them over, running them in to the ground and failing to maintain them properly.

Finally, of course, it nationalised them after the war. It then chose to keep operating steam services when diesel was the way forward. Then it closed down two thirds of the rail network, stripping out the inter-city lines and designing a train network focused entirely on the needs of the capital. British Rail was a byword for incompetence and poor quality. They were still closing down rail lines right up to privatisation. Near where I lived they closed down a line and a set of stations by altering the timetable to ensure there weren't any connecting services, and then saying there 'wasn't any demand'.

This is the nature of nationalised public services. They are uniformly awful. The socialist ideal is fine but when it hits the buffers of reality it all falls apart. Like every socialist ideal.

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Four Boys' Own style World War Two heroes to fire your imagination

Flatpackhamster
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Mosquito on carrier

There was a Sea Mosquito (post war IIRC), but I wouldn't fancy landing something that big on a fleet carrier, let alone an escort carrier.

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The last time Earth was this hot hippos lived in Britain (that’s 130,000 years ago)

Flatpackhamster
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Re: And it's not complicated either

https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/antarctic-sea-ice-reaches-new-record-maximum

Antarctic sea ice reaches new record maximum, the highest area since 1979.

Perhaps it takes a long time for that much else to melt, but it should at least be melting.

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: And it's not complicated either

It was a hypothetical.

If the temperature is the same now as it was 130,000 years ago, why aren't the sea levels 6 metres higher now? Why are the sea levels for two time periods of supposed identical temperature so wildly different? 6 metres isn't peanuts.

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: So let me get this right.

Oh, honestly. It feels as though you're deliberately missing the point. Maybe I should have phrased it differently to make sure it was clear.

Where are the grape growing regions of Germany? Take a quick look online and you'll find out they are in the WARMEST parts of Germany. They are not in Kiel or Lubeck, but in the south-west of Germany around Stuttgart and Baden-Baden.

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: So let me get this right.

@Mephistro - yes, grow them just like that. Germany and Scotland are not on the same latitude, not by a considerable margin.

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: And it's not complicated either

That's not what we're being told. We're being warned of very rapid sea level change.

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: And it's not complicated either

Well if I increase CO2 in the atmosphere by 10%, how much will the temperature rise by? Exactly?

The article is bizarre. It's claiming that it's hot enough NOW for hippos to live and breed in the wild in Britain as they did 130,000 years ago. That's the clear inference. Hippos live in a subtropical climate now. Now when I look out of my window and see the frost on my car the first word that leaps to mind is not 'subtropical'.

There's the statement that sea levels were 6 metres higher 130,000 years at the same temperature. So are the authors saying there is NO link between temperature and sea level? Because they do seem to be with that statement. And that flies in the face of all the OTHER claims they've made about rising temperatures = melting ice caps = rising sea levels.

If the temperature is the same now as it was 130,000 years ago, why aren't the sea levels 6 metres higher now?

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: So let me get this right.

Can you point me to any examples of this? I'd like to see what they're finding out.

It would also be interesting to see what's coming out of Chinese research too, since that experienced warmer temperatures aswell during the MWP. Obviously that's just regional rather than global. But there do seem to be a lot of regions affected by it - N America, E Africa, China, Europe. I wonder what point it counts as global.

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: So let me get this right.

Just to add - some of the information is already out there. Why don't the researchers take a look at pollen analysis for archaeological sites across Europe and the ME for the last 2,000 years? Big job, I know - but this would give you a long trend indicative of temperature fluctuation. It would also, of course, show vegetation changes caused by humans. However, if your vegetation switches from birch forest to rye growing, you can be pretty certain that the people living there weren't able to grow wheat because it was too wet or cold.

And if - IF - it is as warm now in Greenland as it was 130,000 years ago, plant a crop of what the Vikings were growing and see how you get on.

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Flatpackhamster
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Re: Bring on the warming!!!

You can grow olives in Kent in a good year. My dad grows figs every year.

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Flatpackhamster
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So let me get this right.

The Mediaeval Warm Period wasn't warmer at all. So the fact that the Vikings were able to chop lumber in Greenland in the 10th and 11th century and grow crops in Greenland is not true. And the Roman period wasn't warmer either. So the vineyards at Hadrian's Wall didn't exist either.

And the reason none of those things really happened is that Michael Mann ran a computer simulation of some data that had some results that didn't fit his agenda.

Now I will admit that my expertise isn't in running computer simulations of data. My original background is archaeology. Roman archaeology in fact. So what I'd like to do is extend a challenge to the authors of this article. Grow a successful crop of vines on Hadrian's Wall. You can use modern vines, and modern viticulture techniques.

And yes, I know, local =/= global. I just think a little actual practical testing of real world situations which can be confirmed by archaeological investigation would be more beneficial than yet another set of computer simulations.

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Waving Microsoft's Windows 10 stick won't help Intel's Gen 6 core

Flatpackhamster
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3 years? Wow.

Someone's got some cash to splurge. It certainly isn't small businesses.

My small businesses are typically doing 7-8 years, with a drive or RAM upgrade after 3-4 years (replacing with SSD and doubling RAM typically).

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