* Posts by Shoot Them Later

47 posts • joined 10 Jun 2011

Vodafone: For Pete's sake! Apple’s 'soft' SIM's JUST AN EE SIM

Shoot Them Later

Re: Sounds like Vodafone is unhappy

@BristolBachelor, I think you (and many others in this discussion) are missing a fundamental point here. Apple's 'soft' SIM is a physical card with the same form factor as a standard SIM, that is also software updateable for carrier selection. You can remove it and replace it with any SIM from any network and use that instead.

It adds the convenience of not having to acquire a physical card on day 1 with your new device, and as others have noted adds some interesting longer term potential, such as using software to swap between multiple carriers depending on circumstance without needing to juggle SIM cards. Because it is removable, and may be replaced with a bog standard SIM card, the consumer loses nothing here.

Now, if Apple then went a step further and changed the devices so that your only option was to use the soft sim, and baked that into their hardware in the same way they do with RAM in MacBooks now, then I would be the first to complain. And stop buying their devices.

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London slaps down Salesforce's bid to rename Heron Tower

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Coat

Re: The naming rights of an edifice.........

@localzuk - "What if the company wished to change the name to Penis Tower? Would that be acceptable?"

It would certainly be a more accurate description of the general class of building and the reason for building it :)

[Mine's the one with the phallic symbol in the pocket]

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MOST iPhone strokers SPURN iOS 8: iOS 7 'un-updatening' in 5...4...

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Re: 4S killer

I've just inherited my other half's 16Gb 4S as my work phone (in exchange for a nice new 6...). It works just fine with newly upgraded iOS 8. I've used the accessibility settings to turn off the additional motion in the UI - you should try that (http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5595). It compares favourably in speed to my previous work phone, an iPhone 4 running iOS 6.

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Reg bloke zips through an iPHONE 6 queue from ZERO to 60 SECONDS

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Go

Re: Oh, do report back on the experience

Many happy returns to your other half. So you can all join in the fun...

It was a surprisingly painless experience, if you ignore the severe wallet pain involved in buying a possibly ever so slightly overpriced iThing.

They have a special 'reservations' queue, next to the proper one (which is full of people who look suspiciously like they may be planning to sell their purchase on), which moves pretty fast, then they usher you to a Special area like the Special person you are and swiftly extract lots of money from you in the most cheery of manners. No whooping, high fives, fistbumps or whatever the young people do these days, but maybe they reserve those for the morning. Or for people who look in some way cool.

[Only one downvote so far for coming out on el Reg as a day 1 iPhone purchaser? Whatever are things coming to....?]

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Shoot Them Later
Paris Hilton

I'm probably going to get some flak for admitting this in this place, but I have a reservation later today to buy an iPhone in a London Apple store during a 1 hour time slot (it's time to replace the other half's 4S, although she doesn't know this yet). I can't work out if I'm supposed to queue (to actually get in the shop, rather than having to queue just to experience the hype properly). On the first morning of pre-orders, I went to the apple store, chose to reserve for collection instead of delivery (mainly because I wasn't committed to actually buy it that way, as collection is not pay in advance), picked a model and time slot.

I've never done this before (bought an Apple product anywhere near launch day) so I don't know how it works - in a normal shop I'd just saunter in at the start of my slot, say I had a reservation and pay, but in the crazy world of Apple hype it surely can't be that simple.

I note that the reserve for collection option is no longer available so it was obviously a limited number of slots, which makes me hopeful.

Anyone actually done this?

[Paris to reflect my level of cluelessness, although she would obviously not have to queue for one. Or order one herself]

[Oh and don't be fooled by my attempts to appear above the Apple hype. I am obviously a total sucker for it]

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Scottish independence: Will it really TEAR the HEART from IT firms?

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Facepalm

Re: Sod the IT arguments

@Ross K - I think I understand about democracy a bit better than you in that case. Like it or not, the UK is one sovereign nation. Like it or not, no part of the UK - or any other country - has a right to secession without agreement from the state. The Scottish referendum is legal and valid *only* with assent from the UK government. I believe that the *UK* electorate should have had a say in that process; the common way this is done is by national parties putting it in their manifestos for the general election. That never happened - and there was no good reason for it not to, other than Cameron thinking that he could get away with a quick win and have it all done and dusted.

So yes, so much for democracy (see I can use bold text too) - my chance to have a say on the future make up of this country has been taken away by the current set of chancers in Westminster (ironically).

@A Twig - I'm not sure if you are aware of this, but there is a big difference between a sovereign nation assembled by treaty and an overseas territory (or in the case of India, the Raj). Oh and surprise surprise - self determination for India was in Labour's 1945 general election manifesto. Democracy, see?

This is an unpleasantly conducted debate. As I noted already, it seems impossible for a non-Scot to express opinion on this subject without flak/downvotes. I don't think I am the only one who is unhappy to have been denied a say in this process. I do believe that Scotland should be given the option of independence (even though I think it would be better for all if they stayed), but I also do believe quite strongly that the UK as a whole should not have been denied the right to participate in that decision. I am rather tied to the quaint idea that major constitutional change is something we should get to vote on. [Edited to add, yes of course the UK is a representative democracy, so there are always cases where the government legitimately makes decisions without consulting the electorate directly - however, major constitutional change should take the electorate's views a little more seriously than happened here]

The way the whole thing has been conducted has been a shambles. The only party who has done the right thing (to a degree) is the SNP who have done what they said they would and pushed for a referendum. I don't like the SNP at all, but at least they do what it says on the tin.

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Shoot Them Later

Re: Sod the IT arguments

@Marketing Hack - agreed; Westminster does not like consciously giving up power, although they are somehow carelessly coming very close to giving up the whole of Scotland.

@Jagged - it's a good point. The farce that is elected Police and Crime Commissioners does admittedly come to mind when discussing regional assemblies and the potential for wasting a lot of money on something nobody cares about. However, I think we do need to address the issue that all home nations except England have devolved powers (and may have even more soon), while also bearing in mind that not all parts of England feel well represented by Westminster either. And I'm saying this as someone pretty much as Southern England/London as they come. I'm not sure I have an easy answer to that, but what I do believe is that the make-it-up-as-you-go-along planning constitutional gambles going on at the moment are not in anyone's interests.

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Shoot Them Later

Re: Sod the IT arguments

@Pen-y-gors - I couldn't give a monkeys whether the SNP had a commitment to painting Scotland blue in their manifesto. The decision on whether to hold a legitimate referendum has always been one to take at the UK level. The UK government took that choice, but did not have a democratic mandate from the UK people to do so, as it was in no national party's manifesto at the last general election. I would much rather have had a say in the future of my country.

I'm expecting further downvotes for this posting too, as it seems to be a well established fact that the English are not permitted to hold a view on the future of the union for some reason.

Btw, the username Pen-y-gors suggests that you might be Welsh. If I were Welsh I would be wanting the Scots to vote No just as much, as I would not want to be stuck in an even-more-Tory remainder-UK after the Scots jumped ship.

[My personal preference is for a much more federal UK with matching proper powers for both the home nations and English regions; if that comes out of this referendum then at least that would be something]

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Megaphone

Re: Sod the IT arguments

You know, as a Briton who would rather like the UK to continue as is, I am really starting to regret casting my vote in the last UK General Election for a party that included an independence referendum for Scotland in its manifesto. What was I thinking?

Hold on... NONE OF THE PARTIES HAD THIS IN THEIR MANIFESTO. So much for democracy.

(New Labour has had many many faults, but at least give them the credit for including Devolution in their 1997 manifesto)

And don't get me started on letting Salmond choose the wording of the question, as well as the generally inept way the No campaign has gone about it.

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Apple's SNEAKY plan: COPY ANDROID. Hello iPhone 6, Watch

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Re: Regulations, regulations, regulations...

@Michael Thibault - Presumably because they wanted it to be a surprise. FCC approval means submitting detailed documents. I understand that some can be restricted on commercial confidentiality grounds, but it raises risk of leaks and exposure. Similarly bulk manufacturing nowadays seemingly guarantees supply chain leaks - hence we will wait to 2015.

While the announcement of the watch was hardly unexpected, I think its appearance and functionality was kept well under wraps.

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Applelutely fappulous: Fashionistas bow down before the JESUS PHONE

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Coat

@SuccessCase - "Let's say, for arguments sake, James Bond is cool. He is at the centre of a social effect for that reason. He has a number of people in his circle and they all agree he is cool. Some follow him about, some, may even be cool themselves and don't follow him about."

I don't know much about cool, but what I do know is that if James Bond has a bunch of fans who follow him about, he will need to get a new job.

[Mine's the one with a Walther PPK in the pocket and "I am a secret spy" written on the back in Comic Sans bold]

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Microsoft eggheads publish JavaScript crypto code for devs

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Boffin

I think that Jamie Zawinski can get away with doing his blog in b1ff if he so chooses, and he will still have more credibility than the average Reg commentard when it comes to complaining about ECMA stupidity.

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DOCX disaster recovery: How I rescued my wife from XM-HELL

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Re: Which Office product is at fault?

Fine, Charlie Clark, I understand your reasoning for eschewing DOM - and let's face it, we've all built XML documents from strings from time to time. But that's not really my point - the case here is where a document has been written to disk that is not even well formed, let alone valid. Are people (and I'm looking at you, anonymous downvoters) really saying that it's too hard to check that the XML document that you've built is well formed at least before writing it? Really? This doesn't require DOM to do - there are faster ways to check that a document is valid and/or well formed.

Maybe I'm somehow unusual in this, but I would far prefer my office software to warn me that there was a problem (and give me the opportunity to cut and paste my work to a fresh document, or make a backup of the existing file) than to silently write an invalid file to disk.

I still maintain - and it shocks me that this seems to be somehow a controversial view - that there is no real excuse for a piece of released end user software writing XML files that are not even well formed.

Full disclosure: despite from time to time being obliged to interact with Lotus Symphony - which I have always found to be an unpleasant and unrewarding experience - I am by no means a hater of LibreOffice. I am also no lover of Microsoft (particularly Word for Mac 2011 with its fun habit of crashing when I try and paste formatted text).

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Shoot Them Later

Re: Which Office product is at fault?

There is no real excuse for writing malformed XML to disk, bug or not. The only exception I'll give is an error in the actual writing process (such as unexpected truncation). There are plenty of good XML libraries out there which will (should) not screw up as described if used properly. It really is not hard at all to check that an XML document is both valid and well formed before writing it to disk, passing it off to the next hapless program or whatever it is you are doing with it.

It's this sort of basic laziness - failure to sanity check your inputs/outputs even when it's trivial to do so - that is an endless source of annoying and avoidable bugs. I'm not just singling out LibreOffice - I work for a company that writes an awful lot of software, and much more time than I would like is spent dealing with this sort of issue. (I can understand why it happens though - if sanity checking and general attention to detail doesn't win you many prizes in the feature-based development cycles, why bother...)

I'm not trying to defend MS either, or their formats - but whatever you say about them, an XML doc is an XML doc.

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Shoot Them Later
Windows

Re: Which Office product is at fault?

LibreOffice is horribly at fault here, and it's inexcusable if the problem is as described. I mean, how does it construct its XML - string concatenation or something?? Any half decent programmer uses a DOM object of some sort to manipulate XML documents - these will not let you add an opening tag and 'forget' to close it; adding an element should be an atomic operation.

Aside from all that, what's to stop LibreOffice *parsing* the document before saving it, just to be sure. Maybe, I don't know, using some kind of published schema?

No excuse. Everything has bugs now and then, but committing unparseable XML to disk should not be one of them.

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NeoPost: This is how you DON'T do PIN security

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Re: Why?

I'm absolutely with you Ledswinger, bar one detail... The basket case that you describe is now Royal Mail. The Post Office is the branch network, the bit that Gideon and Vince didn't flog off at well below market value to their banker mates.

You can tell what level priority 'Mail' has now for the Post Office by the fact that it appears at item 5 on the tabbed list on their home page, sandwiched between 'Broadband' and 'Driving'.

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Time-rich Brit boffin demos DIY crazytech WOLVERINE talons

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Boffin

According to his website, he's originally a plumber by trade, rather than a common or garden boffin. I reckon I'd let him do the plumbing at my house, but I'd check the taps *very* carefully before turning them on. Just in case.

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GM reveals how much you'll pay to turn your car into a rolling 4G LTE Wi-Fi hotspot

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Coat

Seeing the USA in their Chevrolet?

How about Seeing the USA with Chevy? [youtube link, not all that SFW with the volume up]

Although I think that one's actually a Ford.

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Symantec: Antivirus is 'DEAD' – no longer 'a moneymaker'

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"- Those who refuse run anything by Microsoft. Macs and various Linux distros make this choice very, very easy now."

Sadly not entirely true. I am sitting writing this on our corporate Red Hat Linux platform which has... Symantec Antivirus bogging it down. What with the mandatory LUKS on the whole disk (and not just selected volumes containing data/swap) it makes for a mighty slow Linux environment.

So I'm sure Symantec still make plenty of money shipping their crap to very large companies that simply must run AV on *everything*, regardless of whether it is effective or necessary.

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BT Tower to be replaced by 3D printed BT Tower

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Boffin

Crowd source it

What they need to do is distribute the 3D printer files for a 30cm replica of the tower to the millions(?) of 3D printer-equipped people out there. They can then hold up their mini versions at just the right distance from their eyes that they appear the same size as the original in the distance. We can then demolish the original and replace it with something truly emblematic of modern Britain, such as a pound shop. True, only people with a mini tower to hand will be able to see it, but we could create some kind of app to allow sharing with people in your area (thus, Silicon Roundabout would get to make a truly useful contribution).

Comment inspired by the picture accompanying the article, which clearly shows how it would look in practice.

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BlackBerry sucker-punches TV star Ryan Seacrest in patent brawl

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I hate to say it

BlackBerry have a point - the keyboard looks uncannily like the one on my old, abandoned, work BlackBerry Bold, down to the use of opposed curved ridges on each half of the keyboard. Whether this is a legitimately patentable design, I am no patent lawyer (thankfully) but I've seen lots more flimsy patents.

If one of BB's strengths is its keyboard, then perhaps they should be selling this sort of thing themselves already and let people use a genuine BB keyboard without having to put up with the rest of the BB. If only they had the spare cash to simply buy Typo.

Have to say though that the iPhone 5(s) form factor doesn't really lend itself to this type of add on - looks impossibly tall with it on.

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MH370 airliner MYSTERY: The El Reg Pub/Dinner-party Guide

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Re: "The satellite would thus know to keep one of its receiving assemblies aligned..."

Having spent far too much time following the ever-expanding thread on PPRuNe, I found this a good summary. Some issues with it (like the purported alignment of receiving assemblies) but better than most media.

From my perspective, the big unanswered question about INMARSAT is what about the other pings? The distance from the satellite calculated from the final ping is being discussed, but what about the preceding ones. These would give us an indication if whether the plane was moving, and what approximate direction. You could use this information to infer whether the plane was likely to be in the southern or northern corridors for example, and it would certainly be useful to know if it had stopped moving with respect to the satellite. However, this information has not been given - and frustratingly journalists have not asked for it in the press conferences. It's entirely possible that only the last ping was retained by the system, but it would be good to know that.

I would also be interested in what level if detail the system recorded ping send/receive times. +/- 1 ms implies a particular level of accuracy, if this is greater or less then accuracy is changed, possibly significantly. I've not seen this reported anywhere.

With the conspiracy hat on, I find it amazing that no journalist in the press conferences has pressed for a cargo manifest. The only concrete statement made by the authorities is that "nothing hazardous" was on board. A very valuable cargo has not been ruled out. If there was nothing valuable on board, why not explicitly and unambiguously rule this out?

The standard of both questions and answers at the press conferences is terrible. Take the ACARS being allegedly switched off before the last voice transmission. Crucial point but turns out it was misleading; accurate version is that last ACARS transmission was *sent* before last voice contact. Actual ACARS disabling time may have been later. Bad communication of facts, and an equally bad failure to seek clarification from the journos present.

The whole thing is a masterclass in how not to run an investigation and handle the associate public relations. Unless of course [tin foil hat!] it is all an act of pretend incompetence :)

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Windows hits the skids, Mac OS X on the rise

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Gimp

Re: @Matt "sorry, I dropped FreeBSD when ZFS was forced on us"

Strange - I have several FreeBSD systems running 8/9 and none of them has an unwanted ZFS filesystem. Sure they *support* ZFS, but there's a world of difference there. I'm sure anyone who really hates ZFS could build a custom kernel and omit the ZFS module.

I'm all for complaining about unwanted changes to software/operating systems, but to whinge about something entirely optional seems a bit OTT to me. Reminds me of the grumbling that occurred when the SMP support was first mooted (IIRC)

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SCRAP the TELLY TAX? Ancient BBC Time Lords mull Beeb's future

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Re: BBC should adopt an airlines business model

Well that's fine if you want to do what airlines have been doing lately - namely racing to the bottom.

The BBC have already been moving in that direction - take the sale of BBC Outside Broadcast to SIS in 2008. Was supposed to save money, but of course it didn't. SIS Live are now getting out of the OB game because the BBC didn't renew their contract (because SIS Live turned out to be both expensive and inferior to the old in-house operation). Now lots of ex-BBC OB staff - techies, not managers - are likely to be out of a job, the BBC has no high quality in-house OB like it used to and no money has been saved.

And how does BBC R&D fit in with the airline model? Obviously, it doesn't.

I'm sorry, but I want my BBC to be like a proper airline that serves free meals and will give you that extra bottle of wine with your chicken/beef with a cheery smile, and not like Ryanair. If that's not stretching your analogy too far.

I completely agree that swathes of overpaid middle management and overpaid "talent" are a problem, I just don't think that outsourcing everything is a solution.

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'No, I CAN'T write code myself,' admits woman in charge of teaching our kids to code

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Facepalm

Re: Idiocracy

You can tell it's ridiculous simply from the fact that the 'director' of this initiative has the temerity to go on Newsnight to tell Paxman that "you can create a web site in an hour", but has not personally invested that hour to try it herself [and shame on Paxo for not picking her up on this].

It's bad enough that an obvious inexperienced political crony gets appointed to this sort of position, but I would have been prepared to cut her an awful lot more slack if she'd come on and said "I'm a non-technical person with no experience of coding, but I tried some of this stuff and I learned something - and I am enthusiastic about helping other people go through the same learning journey" [or something along those lines].

The problem isn't really just having people with no domain experience in charge of projects, it's also with having people in charge who won't eat their own dog food. But that's the political class for you.

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California high school hackers expelled for grade tampering, test thievery

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Re: Cheating and education

The printed record idea is good and can be made to work without much work too. Print all the marks densely on paper along with a calculated checksum. At a later stage, simply recalculate the checksum based on the current stored results and compare with the original. If it does not match, then you can start comparing results, but otherwise ignore. The checksum can be a represented as a bar code or QR code, so you don't even need to type/compare it longhand.

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Apple’s Mac turns 30: How Steve Jobs’ baby took its first steps

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Windows

Re: Floppy Eject

My first encounter with a Mac - back in the 90's some time - also featured an embarrassing failure to understand how to eject a floppy. When I finally asked someone, I found the idea of dragging the floppy icon to the trash to eject it ridiculous and just plain wrong. In fact lots of things about Macs seemed stupid to me (single button mouse anyone?)

But here's the thing - every computer has flaws, and if I was crazy enough to permanently reject a whole line because of one or two flaws I would by writing this with a biro[*] rather than typing it on my fine MacBook Air.

* - well obviously I wouldn't, because I wouldn't have read this article on the interwebs because I would have given up on the whole web browser concept when Netscape Communicator came out

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Oh those crazy Frenchies! Parisian cabbies smash up Uber-booked rival ride

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Megaphone

AC @09:52 - you're going too easy on them

Parisian taxi drivers are the distillation of everything that is wrong with Paris.

My personal pet hate is that drivers ordered to a hotel turn up with 'travelling time' already on the clock. I've had a taxi turn up at a CDG airport hotel with €12 on the clock already. Of course you know full well that they just sit round the corner with the meter running waiting for call outs.

It's why I always where humanly possible take the Metro, or walk. Sure the metro is not exactly the most pleasant experience, but it beats the hell out of taking a taxi.

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HALF of all Bitcoin-investing Winklevoss twins predict $400bn market for the currency

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Re: Josh Zerlan

I think there's probably quite a lot of competition for the title of "The most untrustworthy person to have ever walked the path of bitcoin", and I'm not sure Mr Zerlan qualifies.

I assume that you are one of those who is very unhappy that they have not yet delivered an ASIC-based miner that you have ordered. You may be further exercised by perceived queue jumping for orders of other products. None of this makes Butterfly Labs a scam company.

I myself have a (now outdated already ) 5GH/s BFL unit. BFL were quite upfront about the uncertain and extended nature of the waiting time when they took my money, and I was quite happy with that deal. To be honest I'm pleasantly surprised that I actually have the thing already. Mind you, I never bought it expecting to make money with it; I just thought it would be a cool thing to own and fiddle around with. I'm hoping (if the bitcoin price remains at a similar level) to make back my purchase and running costs for it and earn a little pin money on top. Maybe someone with more mercenary reasons for wanting to get hold of their miner as soon as possible may be less sanguine about it.

ASIC-based mining has been an explosion. It's an arms race, and even the arms manufacturers like BFL are having trouble keep up it seems. Those already with their powerful ASIC miners (and I'm not counting my puny one here) are laughing, while those still waiting are losing out and likely to be unhappy. This does not justify calling BFL a scam company.

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Analogue radio will CONTINUE in Blighty as Minister of Fun dodges D-Day death sentence

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Windows

I had the pleasure of listening on the nice FM radio in my kitchen to the prize tool Quentin Howard (behind both DAB in general and I believe Radio Birdsong in particular) being interviewed on You and Yours by Winifred Robinson. It was a predictable display of obfuscation, misdirection and blinkered bloody-mindedness.

The shirty response when Ms Robinson suggested that many people thought DAB was the wrong technology was impressive. Here's a little bit of the response:

"I hear you Winifred now going on [...] you should remember [...] I think you're being rude to half your listeners [...] it's lovely to pick up on these little gems saying oh it's the wrong technology [...] it's Daily Mail type headlines and I think you should be thinking better than that".

- defensive? Check!

- hostile? Check!

- patronising? Check!

My favourite line (on why FM should be switched off): "and this is from an Industry perspective not a listener perspective - we'll get to that in a minute, I guess". Nice to see he has his priorities straight. He never did get to the "listener perspective" by the way, which probably says all that needs to be said about DAB and its apologists.

Make no mistake, I like digital radio, and I listen regularly online. I even have a DAB radio somewhere. I just think that DAB is bad technology being forced on us by vested interests, and that it is in the best interests of the *listeners* to keep FM transmission as an option for the forseeable.

The You And Yours edition is available online here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03lnzxm. I thought it was good radio.

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Don't PANIC, but these SMARTWATCH-stuffed boxes are going NOWHERE

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Re: Stop. Watch.

Garmin are addressing GPS lock time with their next gen of products like the Forerunner 620 (I have one on pre-order and I never preorder technology normally). In this case, they use pre-caching of satellite details over wifi. I'd point anyone interested in DC Rainmaker's in-depth review.

I haven't been a wristwatch wearer for over a decade - I just don't feel the need to have one and prefer to avoid having something on my wrist most of the time. However, I am a big fan of using my Forerunner 610 for activity recording. It's more convenient than using a phone and the dedicated hardware is (in my experience) still more accurate than phone GPS.

I agree that the niche that products like Garmin's Forerunner are in is the one compelling case for smart wristwatches. I think Garmin and similar manufacturers are in a better position to compete in it by adding more smartphone integration to their already effective specialised GPS products than the likes of Samsung are by approaching from the other direction. I'll admit that many people still will not be able to justify spending a lot of money on a dedicated GPS watch, but for the still-substantial market of those who are, the dedicated devices are still a better proposition.

Those who do not want to shell out on a dedicated device still have the free alternative open to them of taking their phone with them and using an app and I suspect many will do so rather than get a watch just for that (although come to think about it, I'm not sure how phondleslab users go about taking those with them when they run etc. - maybe they have to use a rucksack rather than armband).

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Oh My GOD! Have the TORIES ERASED THE INTERNET?*

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Windows

The article reads a bit too much like a hatchet job on the CW author, which is a shame as it gets in the way of the story.

The issue here is that there seems to have been a pretty cynical and hypocritical attempt to hide information, with a dash of incompetence thrown in (because the attempt is not going to be successful as there are other copies out there). If El Reg is not interested in cynical, hypocritical, incompetent moves in the technological sphere made by our political masters, then I don't know what it is interested in.

The whole thing has a whiff of Grant Shapps about it, and we all know how malodorous that can be. It's a story of interest not because they have redesigned their web site but because they have also tried to make the material disappear from archive sites. While I'm sure that Labour and various journalistic organisations have copies of all the speeches, it's just become harder for Joe Public to look up what the Tories said about something when they were trying to get elected last time around.

It is also a valid point that the record of things on the Internet is fragile. I personally wasn't aware that a robots.txt would retrospectively remove content from archive.org - that's one of the more interesting things I've found out from this.

If Labour have done the same thing, then shame on them too.

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Chinese shoppers spend £100 MEEEELLION online in SIX minutes

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So while much of the rest of the world commemorates Armistice Day on 11th November, Alibaba chose it as a great opportunity for a splurge of consumerism. Not casting any moral judgment - after all China wasn't exactly a major perpetrator of world wars in the last century - but it's a stark contrast. Maybe peak sales are at 11 o'clock too.

10:58. I'll shut up now.

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Have you reinstalled Windows yet? No, I just want to PRINT THIS DAMN PAGE

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obOfficeSpace

I know this particular article is a software whinge, but we should never miss an opportunity to link to the Office Space printer scene: http://vimeo.com/60821380.

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Apple Store workers' inner journey revealed

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Gimp

@AC 13:02

Don't get a job in an Apple Store then. It's not for me either (I don't think I could bring myself to whoop and cheer for any product, except maybe a pocket sized nuclear fusion device that also cured cancer), but we're all different. Apple employees seem to have more enjoyment in their work than many in retail, so good for them. Have you worked in retail? I have, and it can really suck. So don't criticise people for having no self respect when they are doing a perfectly reasonable job and by all appearances having fun hamming it up. I'll bet you that 9 out of 10 Apple Store employees think the whooping is all a little OTT but still genuinely enjoy these launch days.

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Police constable 1337 stunned by Lego lookalike

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Re: PCSO

Not sure I really get all the hate for PCSOs. I mean, I don't see people laying into (say) classroom teaching assistants, and they are a similar thing conceptually - they don't do the same job as their fully qualified counterparts but they fulfill a role all the same. On the other hand, I've not had so much dealings with PCSOs and maybe they are terrible (but if so this would surely be a case for better training and/or job definition?)

Most happy with Lego choosing 1337 for the copper's number. I can imagine that one sailing straight over some manager's head, which is what makes it worthwhile in my view

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Hollywood: How do we secure high-def 4K content? Easy. Just BRAND the pirates

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Facepalm

I just want to pay for content

I actually quite like the idea of watermarks, if done right. And to me that means NO DRM. Just let me download a watermarked MKV or similar file with no DRM attached, for a fair fee. You know, just like I can now, but legally. I'll take good care of it; it certainly won't end up on bittorrent or wherever from me, but if it did, the studios could identify me as the transgressor and deny me any future content.

If they had half a brain cell between them, they might see that watermarked content is a good way of allowing them to sell digital movies to all those people who don't want to put up with all that DRM crap - without compromising revenue.

I have never bought a DRM-encumbered music track of any sort, but since Amazon started selling MP3s I have bought quite a few of them and have not illegally downloaded a single one either. The same would apply to movies etc., if they would let me buy them.

But this is an old argument, much restated by many and much ignored :(

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Blighty's great digital radio switchover targets missed AGAIN

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Dead Horse

I very frequently stream radio over the Internet, either from a mobile device or desktop, but I will always choose an FM radio where it's an available option. Better sound quality, reliable, no delay (which just annoys me), reliable, works properly in my car, RELIABLE.

I think it is also a spurious justification to turn off FM when 50% of all radio listening is via digital means. If somehow DAB alone managed to scrape together 50% of the listening hours then that would be reasonable (if quite surprising this side of hell freezing over), but to use the rise of Internet streaming in order to justify the turning off of the most popular broadcast radio medium is just wrong.

The government should look to DAB+ as a minimum for the future, and only turn off FM when it comprises only a minority of direct broadcast radio listening. Oh, and broadcasters should avoid nasty little tricks like deliberately making popular content only available on DAB or broadcasting the first episode of something on FM and making the rest of the series digital only (as Radio 4 did with their production of Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere).

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Oracle sued over $33,000 bill for SaaS: STRIPPERS as a SERVICE

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"Try not to make blanket statements. I'm in the UK and I have an Amex Corporate Card linked to my own bank account as that is what my employer insisted on. Suffice to say I avoid using it where practically possible."

My employer (who I suspect might be the same as yours) has been trying to make me sign up for a corporate Amex for years, linked to my own bank account. I refuse to take one on the grounds that if I am to put expenses on a card that I am responsible for paying the bill on, then I will do so on a card of my own choosing. If they really want me to use a corporate card, then they will have to provide it, on their own account.

So far this has resulted mostly in having to repeatedly copy and paste "I do not have a corporate card" into the inevitable exceptions alerts raised by the expenses system. This is no more annoying than using the expenses app in the first place, as it is a crappy piece of client-side Java so I have to fire up a VM to run it in.

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New use for old iPhones: Watch your house get robbed in REAL-TIME

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Holmes

Re: CCTV warning notices

There's a lot of rubbish talked about where you can point your CCTV cameras, much of it coming from the police. The only legal obstacle to pointing a CCTV camera that is located on your private property wherever the hell you like is the human right to privacy of your neighbours in their homes. People in public places do not have such a right to privacy, so you can freely point your camera at whatever street or alleyway by your house that you like. You are not prevented from doing so by DPA or whatever other bit of legislation someone wants to spuriously drag up.

More ambiguously, your cameras can also be placed in such a way that they can see your neighbours property, if the reasonable purpose of them is to detect crime (for example if crims are coming in via your neighbours garden, or if your camera that is pointed at your boundary also takes in some of the neighbouring garden). Your neighbours can of course complain that this is a breach of their right to privacy and could take legal measures, so if you want to avoid conflict talk to them first and get agreement on the placement and direction of any cameras. Talking can also be applied as a general strategy for avoiding neighbourly conflict and is highly recommended in all sorts of situations :)

See these pages for more information (while bearing in mind that they are written by someone wanting to sell CCTV systems...):

http://www.homecctvdirect.co.uk/home-cctv-uk-law.html

http://www.homecctvdirect.co.uk/home-cctv-law.html

Things might change though: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/10109384/CCTV-new-controls-on-private-security-cameras-to-stop-homeowners-snooping-on-neighbours.html

Regarding the actual topic... I am notoriously reluctant to part with old kit, so in this case the idea of putting it to some use sounds good - although I suspect I would quickly tire of it.

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Storage glitch sends Curiosity into safe mode

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Coat

Repairability

I'd like the see the iFixit teardown of this thing to see how end-user repairable it is. Let's hope that flash memory's not soldered on.

Also, good luck with getting a Genius Bar reservation at the Olympus Mons Apple Store to do the work - availability is shocking.

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Lenovo proclaims PC victory, re-orgs to take on Apple

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Flame

Re: When I bought my 'mobile' workstation 4 years ago...

I'm sitting here typing this on my work-provided W510.. Oh wait, no I'm not, because it is a hugely disappointing piece of junk that only has a 1600x900 resolution (which is as good as you'll get on a W5*0 unless you pay extra for the "full HD" screen option, which my employer didn't) - so I'll only use it when I really have to. This replaced a T61p that - while physically smaller - supported 1920x1200 and had a much more useful screen ratio. Still, I guess I was lucky - the "base" model comes with a 1366x768 display, which for a 15.7" display in a "mobile workstation" (i.e. big, heavy and expensive) class of notebook is criminal. Looking at the Lenovo site, the current crop of T series is no better. Says a lot about the way Lenovo has gone really.

However, I think the experience of Apple shows that there is still a lot of potential profit in personal computing hardware if you produce a good product and avoid the commoditised end of the market, as long as you do it right. You might say then that IBM's decision to sell Lenovo was a mistake, but on the other hand I'm not sure that IBM was or would be capable of claiming a chunk of the high end high margin market. It remains to be seen if Lenovo as a standalone can do it, but of they do want to they need to produce some better hardware than the W & T series.

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Trust the cloud with my PRECIOUS? You gotta be joking

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Thumb Up

Re: Already had my close call with the cloud

Agree with a lot of the comments on here.

I've recently taken to using another approach to the cloud for backing up my data. I have a Linux micro image running in the Amazon EC2 cloud with a substantial EBS volume attached (interestingly EBS is still cheaper than S3 for Amazon data storage). I rsync my music, photos and incremental dumps from my FreeBSD home server daily. A Synology NAS acts as my main backup/archive/filestore and most of the data on this is either archived to blu ray or replicated to EC2 via the above rsync process. This way I am in control about how my cloudy data is stored/used as I administer the server, and while I am dependent on Amazon continuing to provide the platform, this is a backup data store only.

Finally, I keep copies of portions of this on my laptop and desktop. I use Unison File Synchroniser to keep these in sync. I can't recommend Unison enough for anyone who works on documents from multiple locations and doesn't want to rely on manual copying or services like dropbox. It means that I can easily switch from working on desktop to laptop to go on the road, and also ensure that I have a backup of other key files while I'm at it.

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AARGH! We're ALL DOOMED, bellows UN - right on schedule

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IT Angle

I don't get it

We've recently had two interesting Royal Navy related stories out there -

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/nov/13/submariner-collected-codes-russian-spies

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/defence/9682148/HMS-Astute-nuclear-submarine-beset-by-design-problems-and-construction-failures.html

- and not a peep from El Reg's resident naval affairs expert. Yet the slightest peep of a report, study, paper, article, rumbling, rant or fart about climate change and Lewis is all over it.

If I wanted to read exactly the same thing over and over again, I would head over to the comments on any given Apple-related article. At least it would be on topic ;)

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I have you now! Top 10 Star Wars Xmas presents

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Holmes

@Zett Jukassa

I'm aware of that the parsec is a measure of distance - I was attempting to have a poke at Lucas's own failure to understand this fact. Hence the deliberate confusion of distance and time in my post. I thought it was amusing (albeit slightly corny, hence the icon I chose), but I guess a joke's not funny if you need to explain it :)

I for one don't buy for a second the post hoc explanations about the Kessel Run claim - I think that Lucas just got it wrong.

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Shoot Them Later
Coat

"I played with a mate's Lego Star Wars Millenium Falcon the other week: it's massive and belongs on this list though it is £340+ and takes aeons to construct."

- Surely you mean it takes *parsecs* to construct?

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Reg hack cast adrift as Illuminati Online goes off-line

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Holmes

No guarantees

If you don't own the domain, you will only ever get to use it as long as the owners choose to let you.

The closest you can come is buying your own domain and hoping you will always pay the bills on time, that the rules don't suddenly change on you and people with expensive lawyers don't take an interest (remember baa.com?) Some email addresses are more secure than others (I think I will have my @acm.org address for some time as long as I keep paying my dues). Of course very few people thought of all this back in the day when getting their first account. I certainly didn't.

It's a shame, because not all of us want to be permanently tied to bookface or linkedup as our means of being contactable.

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