* Posts by Graham 32

58 posts • joined 9 Jun 2011

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UK digital minister denies legal right to 10Mbps is 'damp squib'

Graham 32

"Not a binary debate, that you are either pro security or pro encryption."

I had to read that several times to see the conflict. I read "pro security" and thought pro information security and therefore pro privacy, which *is* pro encryption. But he meant "pro government controlling everything". Silly me. I obviously need more education about how to live every moment in fear of terrorists and paedophiles.

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Vaizey: Legal right to internet access, sure. But I'm NOT gonna die on the 10Mbps hill

Graham 32

So Luxembourg has 200people/km2 vs the UK's 264people/km2. Those numbers suggest it should be cheaper (per person) for the UK to wire everyone up.

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Google tried to be funny, cocked it up, everyone thought it was a bug

Graham 32

Re: What a useful feature.

In a business email environment an "auto-delete all future responses to this thread" would be very useful. It could nip in the bud all those spam inducing emails that say "well done" or "welcome a new member to the team". Or the very worst email of all "I'm taking a holiday doing what I enjoy and now I expect you to donate to my favourite charidee" and the 97 follow ups of "everyone look at me, I have donated."

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90% of SSL VPNs are ‘hopelessly insecure’, say researchers

Graham 32

Re: Clickbait.

>You would be surprised how much more soothing reading The Register becomes with the aid of a simple Greasemonkey script that just "disappears" any titles with a set of keywords in it (first filter: DevOps)

I've never got round to doing that, but I have been tempted. My first filter would be to delete anything containing "Elon" or "Musk".

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Three: We won't hike prices if you say yes to £10.5bn O2 merger

Graham 32

Re: Consumers Vs Business

@Warm Braw

I agree with the natural monopoly bit in reference to Openreach. The physical network is expensive to build and so a huge barrier to entry for competitors. But services on the network have a much lower entry cost *if* getting access to the network is a level playing field. Hence all the fuss about making Openreach truly separate from BT.

How about O2 and Three can merge only if the network (masts, backhaul etc) is spun off as a separate, truly independent company. None of this "we keep control and make vague promises about 'other meaningful competitors'" crap which will just give us another BT situation the public will spend 30+ years complaining about.

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Oracle blurts Google's Android secrets in court: You made $22bn using Java, punk

Graham 32

Re: Fortunately, the info is very hard to find.

Sadly, it's not a misuse anymore. http://theweek.com/articles/466957/how-wrong-definition-literally-sneaked-into-dictionary

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14 strikes and you’re out. Or not. Emails reveal how Cox lost Safe Harbor

Graham 32

"... in a case bought by music publishers BMG Rights Management and its copyright cop, Rightscorp Inc."

At first I thought this was a typo, but given how the American legal system works, maybe not.

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EE plans to block annoying ads on mobile network

Graham 32

"It would seem that the proposals are aimed at nudging big ad players into better practices."

No, it's about charging big ad players into have their ads shown. They looked at AdBlock Plus's revenue stream and would like some of it.

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It's come to this for IBM: Watson is now a gimmick app on the iPhone

Graham 32

Re: Arggggggg

But if Lego were a supermarket...

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TalkTalk claims 157,000 customers were victims of security breach

Graham 32

Re: Even Jeremy Clarkson could tell them they're wrong

Already discussed here: http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/containing/2685867

Also worth noting that a DD can only give your money to registered recipients: utilities, charities etc. Not much use to the hackers.

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Here's how TalkTalk ducked and dived over THAT gigantic hack

Graham 32

Re: fuck this makes me angry!

@J3D1 Maybe not. Direct Debits allow companies to be reliably paid on time. The alternative is sending bills and waiting for customers to pay up, chasing with follow up demands etc which is less efficient and so more costly.

If there's the occasional fraudulent DD set up that companies/banks/whoever have to refund it may well be cheaper than having a more secure DD system that fewer people use.

Someone will be crunching the numbers, and I expect the current DD system will still be the cheapest.

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'To read this page, please turn off your ad blocker...'

Graham 32

Re: Note to advertisers

I completely agree. It's why I disabled animated GIFs in Firefox years ago.

Now if only there were a search engine that would allow options such as "never show results for Tapatalk-based websites".

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3D printer blueprints for TSA luggage-unlocking master keys leak online

Graham 32

Re: Well, so how about the brilliant idea of...

Of course the FBI think it's a good idea. They want access to all data. This will give them access to all data. They care about your privacy as much as the TSA cares about keeping your luggage secure.

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Wileyfox Swift: Brit startup budget 'droid is the mutt's nuts

Graham 32

"As screens of that resolution go it’s sharp and bright and viewing angles are very strong."

Can someone explain why wide viewing angles are important on handheld devices? I would expect a narrow viewing angle would improve battery life as less light needs to be emitted. Also I'd prefer it if the person next sat next to me in the pub/train/bus couldn't read my screen.

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Gloves on as Googler deposits foul zero-day on Kaspersky lawn

Graham 32
Headmaster

Is it cold...

... or did you mean the gloves are OFF?

Gloves on = fighting fair

Gloves off = fighting dirty

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So unfair! Teachers know what’s happening on students' fondleslabs

Graham 32

Re: "Just a thought"

Maybe, maybe not.

A few years ago I was in a meeting with a visiting US colleague. She was surprised how many people were listening to what she was saying. In the US it was so common for everyone in meetings to sit typing away on their laptops that some offices had started "full attention meetings", ie laptops banned.

While it sounds like hell, the idea was that after a while it encourages people to think more about whether the meeting is needed and do all the attendees need to be there. Well, that was the idea....

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Sysadmins: Your great power brings the chance to RUIN security

Graham 32

"Receptionists should for instance be given a copy of Kevin Mitnick's The Art of Deception for easy consumption of social engineering training, French says."

Yeah, cos the receptionist is going to read a 304 page book on something they don't care about.

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Robots.txt tells hackers the places you don't want them to look

Graham 32

Re: Yes.

> Using it for security is like leaving your front door open and a note on the table saying "please don't nick anything in the bedroom".

I used to work for a company that insisted all confidential information be stored in locked cabinets with a label on the cabinet saying "Contains confidential information."

It was probably meant as a reminder for staff to lock the cabinet but obviously helped any would-be industrial spy.

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That DRM support in Firefox you never asked for? It's here

Graham 32

Re: out of the frying pan...

"Windows Vista and later''

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David Cameron's Passport number emailed to footy-head

Graham 32

Re: defaults

"Autocomplete is great for regular casual situations. I'm just wondering why people handling sensitive information have it turned on"

Without autocomplete you have to not make a typo every time you type an email address. I reckon autocomplete prevents emails going to the wrong recipient more often than not having it. And when you do screw up it goes to someone you already have a relationship with and therefore may cooperate, as seems to be the case here.

However, if your emails are spreading gossip you probably wish it did go to a complete stranger rather than the wrong friend/colleague.

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No password or PIN, but I have a fake ID. Sure, take the domain

Graham 32

Re: Not just Go-Daddy

That sounds ok to me. The contact details the registrar already had on record were used to confirm the request was valid. The security flaw, if there is one here, is that your company's receptionist lies and so do you. But that's a security hole with your company, not with your registrar.

If that phone number isn't good enough for identification purposes it shouldn't have given it to the registrar in the first place. It's the same as when I phone my bank - I don't verify I'm speaking to a trusted person by any means other than dialling the right number.

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Death becomes it: Grim Fandango Remastered

Graham 32

It's worth pointing out the game has a brightness setting. It seems all those screenshots were taken with it as dark as possible. Turn it up a bit and you get to see the beautiful art deco scenery.

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Synology and the NAS-ty malware-flingers: What can be learned

Graham 32

If Synology are reading the article they'll only care about this bit: "I like Synology's products and I intend to keep on using them."

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Average chump in 'bank' phone scam is STUNG for £10,000 - study

Graham 32

Re: What I don't understand

I don't know of any devices that can do this for landlines but on a mobile there's loads of apps for it. I use Call Blocker on Android and have it configured to bump anyone not in my contacts straight to voicemail. If it's important they'll leave a message.

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Wireless traffic-info networks could save BEEELIONS per year

Graham 32

The tracking technology is already on its way. By 2015 all new cars must be fitted with gps and mobile phone tech... for safety purposes of course.

http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/bulletin/eu-signs-off-ecall-all-cars-to-contain-gps-tech-by-2015/21857

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Twitter locks down logins by adding two-factor authentication

Graham 32

Great for individuals. What about companies?

Can you have multiple user IDs access a single Twitter account yet? Or are they still peddling the idea that companies run their Twitter account from one PC, with one user not sharing the password with anyone? I'm sure that works cos employees never quit or go rogue *cough* HMV *cough*.

Ref: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-22351987

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A backdoor into Skype for the Feds? You're joking...

Graham 32

And then...

Of course the next law that will have to be introduced is the one making it illegal to use any communication system that doesn't have a back door. "Oh, you were using that fancy foreign encryption system no back doors. I sentence you to 10 years!"

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Dell's PC-on-a-stick landing in July: report

Graham 32

Re: Ophelia?

I read the Scottish play for GCSE, so I know it's not that. IIRC, Ophelia is Jamie Lee Curtis' character in Trading Places, and she says something like "yeah yeah, I know, it's Hamlet's girlfriend name".

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Half of youngsters would swap PRIVACY for... cheaper insurance

Graham 32

Re: The UK has that

I know a lot of insurance policies used to do that, but I thought it stopped because insurers found lots of people insuring one car car (which the insurer deemed "low risk") but spending most of their time in a different car (considered "high risk").

Also, why is it that when buying a tax disc they need to check that the car is insured? I'm not aware of an option to say "I promise the only people driving this car will be insured on other vehicles."

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Ubuntu 13.04: No privacy controls as promised, but hey - photo search!

Graham 32

Re: Rush, rush, rush

But someone else may see it as "the features we promised you, that you're waiting for, and are ready to ship are going to be delayed for 3 months because something else you don't care about isn't ready yet."

Some companies declare what they're going to ship and wait until it's ready. Some companies say when they're going to ship and ship the things that are ready at that time. Two systems, both good, both bad, it just depends which features you're waiting for.

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Windows 8 has put the world's PC market to sleep - IDC

Graham 32

But this is actually happening. Not to the main driving controls, but to all the others. Some manufacturers have started putting touch screens into cars, which makes it difficult to change something like the radio/heater without taking your eye off the road because you can't just feel the button/dial like you used to.

Hopefully car buyers will reject this and good old fashioned buttons and dials will stay - or the various laws in the world about operating phones/satnavs on the move will expand to cover stupid car touch-screens too.

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Who wants a smart meter to track'n'tax your car? Hello, Israel

Graham 32

Re: We already have a system that you pay more the more you drive...

"At the moment all drivers are heavily subsidised by those that don't own a car" I cry bullshit on that one.

Doesn't seem true - politician's always say fuel duty is going up because of the environment or congestion, never because the motorist simply isn't paying their way.

And after 5 seconds with Google I found this, http://cars.aol.co.uk/2011/12/16/angry-response-over-disproportionate-road-tax-spending/ which says in 2010 VED and fuel duty raised £33bn but total road spending was £9.4bn.

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IBM socialises Notes mail to stop your yammering

Graham 32

Re: Ouroboros

"If you're still using 10 year old software" then you probably work for the sort of enormous corporation that upgrades software as infrequently as possible... exactly the sort of company that uses Notes.

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Ubuntu? Fedora? Mint? Debian? We'll find you the right Linux to swallow

Graham 32

Re: Another example of why Linux fails to gain market share

Totally agree. Linux too often feels like the kit-car of the OS world. Sure you can make it be exactly what you want, but it takes so much time and effort barely anyone can be bothered.

The app stores of Android and iPhone (does Win8 have one too?) are showing it's all about the user experience of getting apps installed and working so people can get on with real-world tasks. Linux needs an equivalent but developers can't even agree between .deb or .rpm! Perhaps Steam can sort it out - at least they have a financial incentive to make it work.

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BSkyB to flick switch on network-level smut-'n'-violence filters

Graham 32

Re: Parental controls: Computer level -> ??? -> DPI

Firstly it's probably a third-party solution, so tying yourself to one router would limit which ISPs you could implement it.

Secondly ISPs who supply a router tend to respond to all connection problems with "we'll send you a new router" which then resets all the user's settings. That's the point, but it would also reset the porn filter. If it's anything more sophisticated than filter=on/off then these "important" settings need to be configured again by the parent who isn't tech-savvy and probably found it difficult first time round.

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WTF is... NFC

Graham 32

Re: "Apple folk can already use AirPlay to stream pictures and video to their Apple TV boxes."

I couldn't believe he used that as the first example of an interesting use of NFC. I touch my TV a few times a year (dusting, plugging in some gadget), the rest of the time it's controlled from the comfort of my sofa. Now he wants me to stand up, walk across the room, touch my phone to the TV, then go sit back down. How 1980s! And only the tap is NFC cos the rest of the work is going to need some other technology. Solution looking for a problem.

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Firefox support extended to older Android mobiles

Graham 32

Re: Good heavens, is Firefox still around?

"There are a few big improvements coming down the line, incremental garbage collection is one. (ever have Firefox pause briefly or become unresponsive for a short period? That's the garbage collector)"

Translation for users: "We're finally going to fix that really annoying bug where FF hangs for a few seconds."

Oh and well done on adding Flash support on Android, just as Flash stopped being available. [slowclap]

Without sarcasm now: The latest FF on Android is actually quite nice to use, a huge leap over the previous one, but it needs to stop being some beta toy for the devs and be grown up about supporting users. (eg dropping tablet support for several months really made me feel second class. Meanwhile I started using Chrome, and still do)

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Google snags patent on price discrimination

Graham 32

repurchase the particular item of electronic content

I suspect this is limited to things like online film rentals because the patent only covers "repurchase the particular item of electronic content." ie you renew the film before, perhaps gave it a good review, so you're likely to rent it again.

But as there is plenty of prior art on personalised pricing I can't see how it's novel to apply it to repurchases or to electronic content. Their algorithm might be novel, but the concept is not.

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Twitter launches vox populi index for US presidential race

Graham 32

Re: ARRRRGGG!

It's more like being in a restaurant where the chef is having a hissy fit and will only produce one type of meal each night. The whole restaurant has to vote on which meal everyone gets. There may be a full menu but most people want "shit sandwich" or "shit soup". You can vote for the lasagne if you like, but it will never win. It's best to vote for the least bad of the shit options.

And going to the sub shop across the street is akin to emigrating.

This is how first-past-the-post works. At least the Americans have recognised this and reduced to a (mostly) two party system.

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What happens when Facebook follows MySpace?

Graham 32

Social networks are for sharing, not for long term storage. They are only interested in storing your old data so that if you are accused of murder/terrorism/whatever and the newspapers want your life story the social network can make a fortune from you. And you'll probably wish at that point they weren't storing it all.

And when Facebook stops being popular can you export all your photos and videos, or will it take a 1000 page loads and 1000 right-click-save-as actions to get 1000 photos back?

The real solution is: local storage. Disks, memory cards, etc. Throw in some added protection from an online backup company where your data is still yours - definitely not some free-to-use social network. That way if your local media is stolen/fails/burns-down-in-a-house-fire you have an off-site backup. Do remember to test both systems occasionally to be sure you actually have something that works (which if you use a certain Korean brand of hard disk will be required about once every 6 months in my experience!)

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Chrome beats IE for a weekend

Graham 32

Re: Weird Stat Counting?

Totally agree. The sudden lurch in Firefox, Opera and Safari stats suggests something big happened, and it's big enough for end users to actually switch browsers. Or maybe StatCounter changed how they count stats.

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Google fined for stalling Street View cars' Wi-Fi slurp probe

Graham 32

Re: Not illegal?

It's not illegal in the same way that it's not illegal for me to overhear a conversation you have with your friends in a pub. If you want to keep it secret you should take sensible precautions to make it so.

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Ice Cream Sandwich gives Android mobes brainfreeze – Sony

Graham 32

Re: I initially had trouble

Wow! That's a multi-hour solution to a problem that causes pain for about a minute each time it happens. In my experience as a TF101 owner, it's about once a week.

On a broader note, as others have pointed out, the Android update model is broken. Imagine Dell having to package up fixes for Windows and you see how stupid it is. I'm not buying any more Android devices until there's a reliable, simple way to get security updates.

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Visa and MasterCard warn of credit card data breach

Graham 32

Re: Victim?

"Despite many requests the bank could not give me any direct example of my account having been inappropriately accessed"

That's probably because it hadn't been accessed. There is a difference between "security threat" and "security breach". And of course they won't give you details about the threat, that would be giving away details of a security hole that they haven't yet patched.

A PITA it happened at all, but it is the correct response.

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TV tax takers reveal Brits telly habits

Graham 32

Re: Jumping to conclusions

And my interpretation of "Size remains a key buying factor" was really "cost remains a key buying factor". Sure I'd love a 60" behemoth to hang on the wall, but I don't watch enough TV to justify the cost.

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Walmart offers $2 digital copies of your DVDs

Graham 32

Re: @AC

"'cause converting means converting and not replacing."

Well in the case of a download I think it does means which version they offer for download. They will have two versions of it available for download, if you have the DVD you can get the SD stream for $2 and the HD stream for $5.

There will be no "converting" in the traditional sense. It's hardly like they'll ask you to upload the DVD!

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Windows 7 squeezed into Android tablets

Graham 32
FAIL

Aah. I thought my Asus Transformer wasn't compatible. I should have read the error in full... "This item cannot be installed in your device's country." I am in the UK. So is this a US-only story then? Should be used to this sort of thing from the reg by now, but I still keep thinking it's a British site. Silly me.

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Graham 32
Thumb Down

Asus Transformer compatible?

I'm at work and don't have my fondle slab to hand, so I thought I'd trigger a remote install to test it out when I get home. But, contrary to the article, the android marketplace says the app is not compatible with my TF101.

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Twitter mobile apps storing address books for 18 months

Graham 32

Re: Double privacy fault

Firstly, I think you are confusing "personal" with "private".

And when you give your details to someone do you have them sign an agreement saying what they can and cannot do with that information? I guess not. It's certainly not private, nor is there any obligation on your friends to keep it private.

If you want to keep your details secret don't tell anyone!

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